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nir

Microsoft intercepting Firefox and Chrome installation on Windows 10

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nir

When you try to install the Firefox pr Chrome web browser on a recent Windows 10 version 1809 Insider build, you may notice that the installation gets interrupted by the operating system.

 

The intermediary screen that interrupts the installation states that Edge is installed on the device and that it is safer and faster than the browser that the user was about to install on the device.

 

Options provided are to open Microsoft Edge or install the other browser anyway. There is also an option to disable the warning type in the future but that leads to the Apps listing of the Settings application and no option to do anything about that.

 

While there is certainly a chance that Microsoft is just testing things in preview versions of Windows, it is equally possible that such a setting will land in the next feature update for Windows 10.

 

Companies like Google or Microsoft have used their market position in the past to push their own products. Google pushes Chrome on all of its properties when users use different browsers to connect to them, and Microsoft too displayed notifications on the Windows 10 platform to users who used other browsers that Edge was more secure or power friendly.

 

The intercepting of installers on Windows is a new low, however. A user who initiates the installation of a browser does so on purpose. The prompt that Microsoft displays claims that Edge is safer and faster, and it puts the Open Microsoft Edge button on focus and not the "install anyway" button.

 

It seems likely that such a prompt would result in higher than usual exits from installation if the intercepting prompt lands in stable versions of Windows.

 

There is also a chance that Microsoft would push its own products when users attempt to install other products: think a third-party media player, screenshot tool, image editor, or text editor.

 

While it seems that Microsoft plans to integrate an option to disable these "warnings", it remains to be seen how that will look like. Judging from the current implementation it will be opt-out which means that the intercepting prompts are displayed to all users by default who attempt third-party software installations.

 

I tried to install Chrome Stable and Firefox Stable, and both installations were intercepted by the prompt. Again, this happens only in Windows 10 version 1809 on the Insider channel. Whether the intercepting will land in the soon to be released stable version of Windows 10 version 1809, the October 2018 Update, remains to be seen.

 

Microsoft Edge is not doing so well despite the fact that it is the default web browser on Windows 10. Microsoft stated in 2017 that Edge usage had doubled but third-party usage tracking service still see the browser lag behind Chrome, Firefox and even Internet Explorer in usage share.

 

Microsoft has released Edge for Android and the browser has been well received by Android users.

 

Source

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BimBamSmash

They haven't yet introduced a proper bookmark management system for this "better" browser, have they?

Last time I checked it wouldn't open certain websites properly either.

 

Seriously, MS, maybe spend some of that marketing budget on making the actual product too?

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Karlston

Just Microsoft controlfreaking users' Microsoft's Windows 10 installations.

 

Nothing new here, unless the bastards go one step further and force Edge usage and uninstall any other browser and refuse to install them.

 

Nothing that Microsoft does with Windows 10 and to its users surprises me any more...

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Kalju

If you do not go fool any other way, read ghacks comments and suggestions and it will happen certainly. 😂

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mkc21

disgusting, no one wants to use that crappy browser. M$ shilling only will make people hate it even more

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pc71520
15 hours ago, BimBamSmash said:

They haven't yet introduced a proper bookmark management system for this "better" browser, have they?

That's too difficult for the M$ Retards...:tooth:

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nir

Microsoft Pulls Notification Warning Against Google Chrome Installation

 

This was only an experiment, the company claims

 

Microsoft has removed the warning displayed on Windows 10 preview builds that attempted to block the installation of Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox.

 

Earlier this week, it was discovered that the most recent Windows 10 updates released as part of the Windows Insider program included a notification recommending against the installation of third-party browsers like Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox.

 

Specifically, a warning showed up when users launched the installer of a different browser, with a message telling that Microsoft Edge is already installed and offers safer and faster browser in Windows 10.

 

While the warning could be skipped and the notification came together with a setting to block it from showing up once again, Microsoft has since pulled it completely following public backlash.

 

Warning already pulled

The company says it was all just an experiment conducted as part of the Windows Insider program, but doesn’t specifically mentions whether it wants to bring it to everyone on Windows 10 at some point in the future. However, the company guarantees that users will be allowed to choose what browser to run.

 

“We've tested this functionality with Insiders only - The Windows Insider Program enables Microsoft to test different features, functionality and garner feedback before rolling out broadly. Customers remain in control and can choose the browser of their choice,” a company spokesperson was quoted as saying.

 

While it makes sense for Microsoft to release such experiments in Windows 10 preview builds, some of the changes that it proposed have been at least controversial. One of them would have forced Windows 10 users to open all links from Store apps in Microsoft Edge, regardless of the default browser.

 

Windows 10 October 2018 Update would certainly not feature the highly criticized warning, but expect Microsoft to come up with some other similar ideas in the coming updates for Windows 10.

 

Source

Edited by nir

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nir

Why Microsoft’s Attempt to Stop Chrome, Firefox Installation Can’t Do Any Good

 

Microsoft showing warnings when users install other browsers

 

Microsoft trying to convince users to stick with Edge browser isn’t entirely a new thing, as the company has been struggling to increase its browser userbase ever since it rolled out Windows 10.

 

Sometimes, however, the Redmond-based software giant turns to tactics that can easily be considered way too aggressive against its very own users.

 

In the past, Windows 10 displayed popups right on the desktop to highlight Edge capabilities, while in some rare cases, the default browser was reset when the operating system was updated.

 

Microsoft’s efforts to force users to try out and eventually run Edge as their daily drivers have pretty much failed, according to third-party data.

 

NetMarketShare, which is one of the leading market share data providers on the desktop, shows that Microsoft Edge is being used on a little over 4 percent of PCs, while Google Chrome, which right now is the number one choice in the browser world, has a share of more than 60 percent.

 

The difference is huge, and despite Microsoft struggling to bring more users to Edge, pretty much everything has been unsuccessful.

 

And yet, most recently the world’s number one software company has once again turned to tactics that are likely to do more harm than good.

 

Whenever users attempt to install Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox, a warning shows up to remind that Microsoft Edge is already there on Windows 10. Microsoft interrupting the installation of third-party browsers is certainly a thing that you didn’t expect, and the company says it’s only an experiment. For the time being, at least, the company wants to see how this new approach is received by the user community.

 

Microsoft is only trying out this behavior on Windows insider builds, and at this point, there is no plan to include it in the upcoming October 2018 Update launching next month.

 

However, such an approach can’t do anything good, and even worse, it only fuels the criticism that the software giant receives whenever it tries to promote Edge in a more aggressive manner.

 

First and foremost, interrupting the installation of third-party browsers can only lead to more frustration among users, as this makes the process as a whole take longer. This eventually affects Windows 10, an operating system that was built on the concept of boosting productivity as much as possible.

 

Second, by bringing these warnings in Windows 10 preview builds, Microsoft is going after the wrong audience here. Windows insiders are most often power users who are skilled enough to decide which browser they want to use, and such ads aren’t exactly their cup of tea.

 

A similar idea was criticized from the very beginning earlier this year when Microsoft wanted to make Edge the default browser for links in its Windows 10 apps. Most of the insiders blasted the company for forcing them to stick with a specific browser, and Microsoft eventually dropped the plan, letting users open links in their default browsers.

 

If there’s anything to learn from all of this is that forcing a specific app on users is never a good idea, and most of these decisions eventually backfire in one way or another.

 

For now, Microsoft hasn’t even made this behavior broadly available to insiders, and it’s pretty clear that nobody agrees with it. Fortunately, feedback is still important for the company, so don’t expect this new aggressive push for Microsoft Edge to make it to Windows anytime soon.

 

On the other hand, the company doesn’t seem too willing to give up on its strategy of making Edge a more widely-used browser one way or another, so expect similar ideas to make it to Windows 10 sooner or later.

 

Source

Edited by nir

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BimBamSmash
20 hours ago, nir said:

 

You know, I am thinking maybe on the contrary of what logic states here, this approach might have had some impact. Gains are no doubt small but likely still a positive digit. They seem to be doing this sort of stuff regularly but in short bursts. Easy for us to jump to conclusions about their motivations and sanity but if it truly had undesirable outcomes on their business there's no need for them to keep beating that dead horse over and over.

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LeeSmithG

If Edge was like FireFox and had the funtionality of I.E. like favourites in a long line down side I would use it.

 

However it does not I have it installed but won't use it.

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