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Who lives in a country with universal healthcare?


Universal Healthcare Poll  

68 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you live in a country with universal healthcare coverage for its citizens?

    • I live in a country with universal healthcare coverage for its citizens.
      50
    • I do not live in a country with universal healthcare coverage for its citizens.
      18


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  • 5 months later...
  • 1 month later...

I live in Spain
health is universal
any citizen can go to the doctor or the hospital
free.
some deficiencies due to the economic crisis
but in general it is very good service.
good hospitals and good doctors.
I would not like to live in trumpiland

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  • 4 months later...
On 2/10/2019 at 5:55 AM, eufrasiox said:

I live in Spain
health is universal
any citizen can go to the doctor or the hospital
free.
some deficiencies due to the economic crisis
but in general it is very good service.
good hospitals and good doctors.
I would not like to live in trumpiland

:clap:

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  • 2 months later...

Well, in Brazil, you either pay a healthcare plan, or you're just left to die lmao

I rely on public healthcare and I do not recommend the experience, last week I went to the emergency three times with different things and it was as unpleasant as it sounds. The doctors are nice, they really want to help and do the best they can, but public hospitals don't have the ideal infrastructure to accommodate everyone. It's really sad, and it makes me miserable to think that I don't even have the right to enter some hospitals near my house because my (lack of) money is worth more than my life.

Sorry if it's too political, but some places aren't as happy as others. And it doesn't even have to be a matter of countries, just neighborhoods apart really show the difference.

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  • 3 months later...

We have universal healthcare...

... and I pray for my US friends that in the upcoming primary elections this year, Bernie Sanders with the help of millions of fed-up and unrepresented voters can this time overcome the democratic party's rigging of the election process and the media's collusion (as it has been proven time and again has happened in 2016), to FINALLY give the US universal healthcare as well in the form of *Medicare for ALL*!

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  • 8 months later...
On 1/26/2018 at 3:16 PM, Vdogeek said:

I live in Canada...very good healthcare here :)

 

VDO

How compare prescriptions medicines prices with the one in USA. Some medicines that are not cover by medical insurance plans really have a high cost that many of us can not paid. 
I read some place that many Americans bought their medicines in Canada due to the high prices in USA. Is this true/posible?

Thanks for the feedback.

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6 hours ago, vitorio said:

I read some place that many Americans bought their medicines in Canada due to the high prices in USA. Is this true/posible?

 

Quote

Quinn Nystrom, a leader of T1International's Minnesota chapter, said in May that the price in the U.S. of insulin per vial was $320 US, while in Canada the same medication under a different name was $30.

 

American caravan arrives in Canadian 'birthplace of insulin' for cheaper medicine

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I live in a country with universal healthcare, but I'm on the fence over the benefits of a universal healthcare scheme, perhaps because all I've seen are its dysfunctional sides. Here we have a rapidly ageing population, so the system is overcrowded by pensioner hypochondriacs that spend all their time chasing the next diagnosis in order to try and live to a hundred, if possible. The system cannot handle that, and the existing workforce cannot be taxed high enough to make the system sustainable in the long run. Since healthcare has been free for so long, there's no chance in hell any politician will take that away or even risk overhauling the system. Most people I know avoid the free healthcare system if they can and turn to private clinics. Here it takes months and multiple visits to get a diagnosis – first a GP looks at you, and tells you to do scans/tests, then you go and book the scans/tests (sometimes that too can take months, like for an MRI). Then you get back to him when you're done for another consult. Only then might he refer you to a specialist, and you probably need to wait months to see him, etc. It takes literal months, with delays and arduous waiting rooms to get a diagnosis, and then you still have to get treatment, get admitted to hospital, etc.

 

On top of all that, there is rampant corruption, with the Government here recently legalising bribery, erm, "gifts" as they called them. "Gifting" your doctor anything under 300 euros is now perfectly legal, and if that just happens to bump you to the front of the queue, well that's just coincidence. The system cannot afford to pay doctors what they're actually worth, so institutional corruption is a vain attempt to not have our healthcare professionals move to countries like Germany or Norway. The siphoning effect has another consequence – the best and brightest keep on emigrating, the more unscrupulous stay here and double dip, doing both public and private practice work and forcing people to go to their private enterprises ("Well, this scan takes 6 months here, but come to my private clinic and we'll do it in a week, then we'll book you for a consult the next day"). Outside these folks, the bottom of the medically trained barrel usually ends up being your GP. Of course, there are a lot of terrific people in the system trying their best to help and be kind, but they are a minority, and will never be able to correct the structural issues at play in our situation. Eventually, many of them break and become disheartened and emigrate. So, we do have universal healthcare, with near universal distrust in its capabilities.

 

Hell, if I felt I have anything remotely serious wrong with my health, I'd borrow money and go to a private clinic, which is something people here do regularly. I've been following America's healthcare dilemma, and I'm sceptical about some peoples' faith in their ability to successfully engineer a full-proof, just and fair system. I'm not advocating for the removal of universal healthcare, even in my country. If all you have is the flu or a sprained ankle, it's fine, because it will all be finished through the GP relatively quickly, but if you have a serious condition the system is likely to fail you. There are other factors at play, and I think this Covid crisis has proven that other countries' models are not applicable to the whole US. Simply saying we'll do collective state-sponsored bargaining and raise taxes a bit doesn't answer a myriad of structural questions. I do believe that a huge step in making healthcare more reasonable in America would be getting a handle on drug prices, compared to the US, even my country got that one right.

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On 6/11/2017 at 2:34 PM, jtmulc said:

 

In the United States, the #1 reason people file for bankruptcy is medical bills.  That's including people who have health insurance.

 

 

I did hear that the hospital treatment for Coovirus shoud you survive, can leave you with a bill of $100,000. Whilst I understand the medical proffesion is run as private company ,thats a staggeringly eye wattering  way to run a health care system biased to those who can afford care.

Edited by Arachnoid
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On 2/10/2019 at 5:55 AM, eufrasiox said:


I would not like to live in trumpiland

 

Yes I completely agree.  Obama(S)care is a disaster,  Trump is doing his best to get rid of it.

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4 hours ago, flash48 said:

 

Yes I completely agree.  Obama(S)care is a disaster,  Trump is doing his best to get rid of it.

Was not Obama care introduced to give low income families lower cost or even free care but it is those having to pay more to supliment this that are using scare tactics to remove this from the system?

Is not the issue that the US healthcare system is run by the insurance companies for their own benefit?

Edited by Arachnoid
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