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  1. WindowsAddict

    Microsoft Activation Scripts

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Activation Type Supported Product Activation Period ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Digital License - Windows 10 - Permanent KMS38 - Windows 10 / Server - Until the year 2038 Online KMS - Windows / Server / Office - Maximum for 180 Days, For lifetime Activation, Either create Auto Renewal task via Task Scheduler Or manually run the Activation script whenever activation is required. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- * For more details, use the ReadMe. Read Me Latest Version: 1.0 Release Date: 18-06-2019 Download links Credits Mirror Changelog Mirror Made with Love ❤️ -------------------------------------------------------------------- For any queries, post a comment here, or Mail me at, [email protected] --------------------------------------------------------------------
  2. A Linux kernel developer working with Microsoft has let slip that Linux-based operating systems have a larger presence on Microsoft’s Azure cloud platform than Windows-based ones. The revelation appeared on an Openwall open-source security list in an application for Microsoft developers to join the list, and was apparently part of an evidently credible argument that Microsoft plays an active-enough role in Linux development to merit including the company in security groups. The overwhelming prevalence of Linux on Microsoft’s cloud platform may come as a surprise when viewed in isolation, but it makes complete sense from a business perspective. To start with, it’s simply cheaper to run Linux on Azure, as Microsoft’s own price calculator illustrates as clear as day. In this respect, Microsoft basically forced its own hand in terms of monetizing OS licensing into a consistent revenue stream, since Windows 10 Home is essentially free (if you don’t count the “Windows tax“) and Windows 10 Pro works out to a one-and-done revenue opportunity with many enterprise customers. The fact that Linux conforms closely (enough) to the Unix structure and philosophy also makes Linux instances easier to manage. Because Unix is so prolific, basically any system administrator will instantly be at home in the Linux file system, and the saved time and headaches translate pretty quickly into saved dollars and cents, not to mention fewer complications posed by downtime. Linux’s dominance also fits perfectly in the context of its gradual, deliberate integration into Microsoft’s long-term development and innovation vision. When Microsoft first proclaimed its love for Linux in 2014, many industry professionals, especially in the open-source sphere, were skeptical, but from that point on, Linux has been rolling steadily ahead at Microsoft. Initially, Microsoft’s embrace of Linux manifested as the Windows Subsystem for Linux, a curiosity mostly aimed at developers. Last year, though, the company announced Azure Sphere, a cloud-connected platform for internet of things (IoT) devices which includes Azure Sphere OS, an in-house headless Linux-based operating system. This was a masterstroke for Microsoft — even a stripped-down Windows OS is far too bloated to run on practically any IoT device, but most IoT manufacturers could benefit from a secure, off-the-shelf IoT solution to replace their own ill-conceived attempts. Azure Sphere was designed specifically to fill this void. Taken together, it’s easy to see how the numerous Linux options Microsoft offers on Azure alone — to say nothing of the deeper integration Linux is getting on the Windows 10 desktop — outflanks the comparatively more limited options and higher cost associated with running Windows on Azure. At the rate at which the company finds new and inventive applications for Linux, this trend looks set to continue, and Microsoft seems just fine with that. Updated on July 15, 2019: Revised with additional information from Microsoft regarding Azure Sphere. Source
  3. The launch of AMD's Ryzen 3000 series has been undeniably successful thus far, but early Zen 2 buyers have run up against two curious and vastly different bugs: not being able to play Destiny 2 on Windows 10, and not being able to boot up Linux machines using more recent kernels. Good news for both camps is incoming, as AMD just sent word that a fix is coming within the next few days. An AMD representative just provided this statement via email: "AMD has identified the root cause and implemented a BIOS fix for an issue impacting the ability to run certain Linux distributions and Destiny 2 on Ryzen 3000 processors. We have distributed an updated BIOS to our motherboard partners, and we expect consumers to have access to the new BIOS over the coming days." AMD says it was able to root cause and resolve both issues fairly quickly in its BIOS code with a patch, and the company expects motherboard vendors to distribute the patch (potentially in beta BIOS form) by next week. Earlier this week a growing number of complaints amassed from Windows gamers concerning the inability to launch Activision's Destiny 2 with various Ryzen 3000 CPUs. On the Linux side of the fence, a fairly critical bug emerged that straight up prevented a system from booting with 5.0 or newer Linux kernels. It's nice to have these both addressed and resolved within the first week of launch, and hopefully the motherboard vendors will act quickly to seed this patch to their users. Keep an eye on those BIOS updates! Source
  4. Researchers from the Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection Research Team have issued a warning to confirm that a notorious credential-stealing malware threat is targeting Windows users. What makes this one so dangerous is that it uses an "invisible man" methodology by only running files within the attack chain that are legitimate system tools and so hides in plain sight. The Astaroth Trojan can employ many techniques, including keylogging and clipboard monitoring, to steal login credentials. However, it is the way that it exploits living off the land binaries (LOLbins) that has created a certain level of infamy for the malware. In the case of the threat campaign that the newly published Microsoft report confirms, it was the Windows Management Instrumentation Command-line (WMIC) that was the LOLbin in question. Andrea Lelli, part of the Microsoft Defender ATP Research Team and author of the report, notes that the victim still has to click on a malicious link in an email to initiate the attack chain via a file that runs an obfuscated batch file. This batch file, in turn, runs the legitimate WMIC system tool in such a way that an obfuscated JavaScript file runs automatically. Now, this is where things get necessarily complicated, involving more obfuscated JavaScript code and more legitimate system tools running. The most important in the attack-chain being the Background Intelligent Transfer Service (Bits) admin tool that is used (actually, multiple instances of Bitsadmin are used) to download additional payloads. These kinds of fileless attacks, as they are known, run the malicious payloads "directly in memory or leverage legitimate system tools to run malicious code without having to drop executable files on the disk," Lelli explained. Eli Salem, a security researcher at Cybereason who uncovered another Astaroth attack earlier in the year, told me that these attacks are considered challenging to detect as "the full process of the deployment and execution of the malware" is by way of those Windows LOLBins. "To an average person, this activity can seem like a legitimate Windows activity," Salem says "because it's being executed by Windows processes." However, "using invisible techniques and being actually invisible are two different things," Lelli explained. Because some of the techniques used were so "unusual and anomalous," Microsoft Defender ATP, the commercial version of the Windows Defender Antivirus component that is included free of charge with Windows 10, was able to spot the Astaroth attack. If you are not using Defender ATP, however, then Salem advises Windows users to be extra careful "when opening anonymous or new .lnk and .zip files that came from suspicious mail attachments." I also spoke to Kevin Reed, the CISO of Acronis, this afternoon who says that as fileless malware is a very efficient technique, avoiding detection by many existing anti-malware products, users should choose a solution "that employs advanced malware detection techniques such as memory scanning, stack trace analysis, and system call-based detection as these will expose malware residing in PC memory only." One thing is for sure, and that is I doubt it is the last we will hear of Astaroth and fileless malware. According to a recent WatchGuard threat intelligence report, "fileless threats appeared in both WatchGuard's top 10 malware and top 10 network attack lists. On the malware side, a PowerShell-based code injection attack showed up in the top 10 list for the first time, while the popular fileless backdoor tool, Meterpreter, made its first appearance in the top 10 list of network attacks too." Corey Nachreiner, CTO of WatchGuard Technologies, said at the time that "it's clear that modern cybercriminals are leveraging a bevy of diverse attack methods," and I have yet to see anything to think he's wrong. As Sergeant Phil Esterhaus used to say in every episode of cop drama Hill Street Blues back in the 1980s: "Hey, let's be careful out there." Source
  5. Microsoft Windows Security Updates July 2019 overview Microsoft released security updates and non-security updates for Microsoft Windows (client and server) and other company products on the July 9, 2019 Patch Day. Our overview provides system administrators, organizations, and home users with detailed information on released patches, known issues, and other relevant information. The overview starts with an executive summary; it is followed by the operating system distribution, and the list of security updates for all versions of Windows. The list of known issues, security advisories released by Microsoft, and download information follow. Here is the link to the June 2019 Patch Day in case you missed it. Microsoft Windows Security Updates July 2019 Here is an Excel spreadsheet listing security updates that Microsoft released for its products in July 2019. You can download the archive with a click on the following link: Microsoft Windows Security Updates July 2019 Overview Executive Summary Microsoft released security updates for all client and server versions of the Windows operating system. All versions of Windows are affected by (at least) 1 critical security issue. Security updates were also released for other company products such as Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge, Microsoft Office, Azure DevOps, .NET Framework, Azure, SQL Server, ASP.NET, Visual Studio, and Microsoft Exchange Server The Microsoft Update Catalog lists 212 entries. Operating System Distribution Windows 7: 21 vulnerabilities: 1 rated critical and 20 rated important CVE-2019-1102 | GDI+ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability Windows 8.1: 19 vulnerabilities: 1 rated critical and 18 rated important CVE-2019-1102 | GDI+ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability Windows 10 version 1703: 24 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 23 important CVE-2019-1102 | GDI+ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability Windows 10 version 1709: 36 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 35 important CVE-2019-1102 | GDI+ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability Windows 10 version 1803: 37 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 36 important CVE-2019-1102 | GDI+ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability Windows 10 version 1809: 36 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 35 important CVE-2019-1102 | GDI+ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability Windows 10 version 1903: 36 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 35 important. CVE-2019-1102 | GDI+ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability Windows Server products Windows Server 2008 R2: 21 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 20 important. CVE-2019-1102 | GDI+ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability Windows Server 2012 R2: 22 vulnerabilities: 2 critical and 20 important. CVE-2019-0785 | Windows DHCP Server Remote Code Execution Vulnerability CVE-2019-1102 | GDI+ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability Windows Server 2016: 27 vulnerabilities: 2 critical and 25 important CVE-2019-0785 | Windows DHCP Server Remote Code Execution Vulnerability CVE-2019-1102 | GDI+ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability Windows Server 2019: 40 vulnerabilities: 2 critical and 38 are important. CVE-2019-0785 | Windows DHCP Server Remote Code Execution Vulnerability CVE-2019-1102 | GDI+ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability Other Microsoft Products Internet Explorer 11: 6 vulnerabilities: 6 critical CVE-2019-1001 | Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability CVE-2019-1004 | Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability CVE-2019-1056 | Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability CVE-2019-1059 | Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability CVE-2019-1063 | Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability CVE-2019-1104 | Microsoft Browser Memory Corruption Vulnerability Microsoft Edge: 7 vulnerabilities: 7 critical CVE-2019-1001 | Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability CVE-2019-1062 | Chakra Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability CVE-2019-1092 | Chakra Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability CVE-2019-1103 | Chakra Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability CVE-2019-1104 | Microsoft Browser Memory Corruption Vulnerability CVE-2019-1106 | Chakra Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability CVE-2019-1107 | Chakra Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability Windows Security Updates Windows 7 Service Pack 1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 KB4507449 -- Monthly Rollup Same as KB4507456. KB4507456 -- Security-only Update Security updates to Windows Server, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Shell, Windows Input and Composition, and Windows Kernel. Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2 KB4507448 -- Monthly Rollup Fixed a Bitlocker issue that caused Bitlocker to go into recovery mode. Same as KB4507457. KB4507457 -- Security-only Update Security updates to Windows Wireless Networking, Windows Server, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Kernel, and Windows App Platform and Frameworks Windows 10 version 1803 KB4507435 Fixed a Bitlocker issue that caused the encryption software to go into recover mode. Security updates to Windows Wireless Networking, Windows Server, Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Kernel, Internet Explorer, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Virtualization, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Microsoft Edge, Windows Cryptography, and Windows Fundamentals. Windows 10 version 1809 and Windows Server 2019 KB4507469 Fixed a Bitlocker issue that caused the encryption software to go into recover mode. Fixed an issue that caused the camera to become unresponsive. Security updates to Windows Server, Microsoft Scripting Engine, Microsoft Graphics Component, Internet Explorer, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Virtualization, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Kernel, Microsoft Edge, Windows Cryptography, and Windows Fundamentals. Windows 10 version 1903 KB4507453 Fixes of the preview release plus security updates. Other security updates Known Issues Windows 7 Service Pack 1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 Issue with McAfee Enterprise software that causes slow startup or the system to become unresponsive. Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2 Still the long standing issue with Cluster Shared Volumes that throws the error "STATUS_BAD_IMPERSONATION_LEVEL (0xC00000A5)". Issue with McAfee Enterprise software that causes slow startup or the system to become unresponsive. Windows-Eyes screen reader may may throw errors on launch or during use, and some features may not work properly. Windows 10 version 1803 Still the long standing issue with Cluster Shared Volumes that throws the error "STATUS_BAD_IMPERSONATION_LEVEL (0xC00000A5)". Black screen during first logon after installing updates. Issue with Window-Eyes screen reader app that may not work correctly. Windows 10 version 1809 and Server 2019 Long standing issue with Cluster Shared Volumes. Error "0x800f0982 - PSFX_E_MATCHING_COMPONENT_NOT_FOUND" on devices with "some Asian language packs installed". Black screen during first logon after installing updates. Issue with Window-Eyes screen reader app that may not work correctly. Windows 10 version 1903 Windows Sandbox may fail to start. The Remote Access Connection Manager (RASMAN) service may stop working and you may receive the error “0xc0000005” on devices where the diagnostic data level is manually configured to the non-default setting of 0. Security advisories and updates ADV190015 | June 2019 Adobe Flash Security Update ADV190020 | Linux Kernel TCP SACK Denial of Service Vulnerability ADV990001 | Latest Servicing Stack Updates Non-security related updates KB4501375 --Windows 10 version 1903 and Windows Server version 1903 Several fixes, see our coverage of KB4501375 here. KB4509479 -- Windows 10 version 1809 and Windows Server 2019 Fixed a Storage Area Network (SAN) connection issue. KB4501371 --Windows 10 version 1809 and Windows Server 2019 Several fixes, see our coverage of KB4501371 here. KB4509478 -- Windows 10 version 1803 Same as KB4509479 for Windows 10 version 1809. KB4503288 -- Windows 10 version 1803 Several fixes, see our coverage of KB4503288 here. KB4509477 -- Windows 10 version 1709 Same as KB4509479 for Windows 10 version 1809. KB4503281 -- Windows 10 version 1709 Microsoft Office Updates You find Office update information here. How to download and install the July 2019 security updates The July 2019 security updates are distributed through Windows Update, WSUS, and other means. Most client-based Windows systems are configured to check for updates automatically. Windows administrators who don't want to wait may run manual checks for updates. It is generally not recommended as bugs may be discovered after the general availability. Backups are recommended if the installation of updates can't be delayed. Do the following to run a manual check for updates: Tap on the Windows-key, type Windows Update, and select the result. A click on "check for updates" runs a manual check. Updates may be installed automatically or on user request depending on system settings. Direct update downloads Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP KB4507449 -- 2019-07 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7 KB4507456 -- 2019-07 Security Only Quality Update for Windows 7 Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2 KB4507448 -- 2019-07 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 8.1 KB4507457 -- 2019-07 Security Only Quality Update for Windows 8.1 Windows 10 (version 1803) KB4507435 -- 2019-07 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1803 Windows 10 (version 1809) KB4507469 -- 2019-07 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1809 Windows 10 (version 1903) KB4501375 -- 2019-07 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1903 Additional resources July 2019 Security Updates release notes List of software updates for Microsoft products List of the latest Windows Updates and Services Packs Security Updates Guide Microsoft Update Catalog site Our in-depth Windows update guide How to install optional updates on Windows 10 Windows 10 Update History Windows 8.1 Update History Windows 7 Update History Source: Microsoft Windows Security Updates July 2019 overview (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  6. It's time to install the June Windows and Office patches June was a lazy, buggy month with silver bullet patches galore. Things have calmed down now, and it’s time to get the lot installed. If you’re using iSCSI, or you have custom views for the Event Viewer, you get to deal with this month’s bugs. Lucky you. But for most folks the patching coast is clear. Microsoft / IDG May had a hair-raising threat from a worm that still hasn’t emerged, but if you’re using Windows 7, 8.1, XP, Vista, or one of the Server variants and skipped the May patches, you need to drop everything and get the May or June patches installed. BlueKeep is coming. Those of you who blocked a specific port to keep BlueKeep at bay may be in for a nasty surprise. Special shout-out for iSCSI and Event Viewer custom views If you have problems connecting to your iSCSI array after installing this month’s patches, you need to click “Check for Updates” and allow Microsoft to install the fix for iSCSI bugs they introduced in earlier patches. If you have custom views in Event Viewer (which is probably more widespread than you think) and after installing this month’s updates you get a “MMC has detected an error in a snap-in and will unload it” error, you didn’t do anything wrong. If it really, uh, bugs you, there’s a fix in the Monthly Rollup previews, KB 450327 for Windows 7 and KB 4503283 for Windows 8.1. Unless you have those specific problems, I recommend (as always) that you avoid anything called “Preview” like the plague. Pass the Preview problems on to the gullible. About Windows 10, version 1903 The latest version of Windows 10, version 1903, is still on my no-fly list. We’re seeing more odd problems emerge, and the Update advanced options vanishing trick remains unexplained. I’m sorely tempted to keep my production machines on 1809 until we see Win10 version 1903 Service Pack 1 - also known as version 1909. Waiting for the first Service Pack is traditionally good advice. How to update your Windows system Here’s how to get your Windows system updated the (relatively) safe way. Step 1. Make a full system image backup before you install the latest patches. There’s a non-zero chance that the patches — even the latest, greatest patches of patches of patches — will hose your machine. Best to have a backup that you can reinstall even if your machine refuses to boot. This, in addition to the usual need for System Restore points. There are plenty of full-image backup products, including at least two good free ones: Macrium Reflect Free and EaseUS Todo Backup. For Windows 7 users, if you aren’t making backups regularly, take a look at this thread started by Cybertooth for details. You have good options, both free and not so free. Step 2a. For Windows XP, Server 2003, and Embedded POSReady 2009 If you haven’t yet installed the May BlueKeep patch, manually download and install KB 4500331. In the Microsoft Update Catalog listing, find the version of Windows XP that concerns you, and on the right, click Download. Choose the language you’re using, and click the link underneath that language. Click Save File. When the windowsxp-kb4500331-blah-blah.exe file has downloaded, double-click on it and stand back. Step 2b. For Windows 7 and 8.1 If you have McAfee Endpoint Security, make sure it’s up to date. Microsoft says it’s still having problems with McAfee. Microsoft is blocking updates to Windows 7 and 8.1 on recent computers. If you are running Windows 7 or 8.1 on a PC that’s 24 months old or newer, follow the instructions in AKB 2000006 or @MrBrian’s summary of @radosuaf’s method to make sure you can use Windows Update to get updates applied. If you’re very concerned about Microsoft’s snooping on you and want to install just security patches, realize that the privacy path is getting more difficult. The old “Group B” — security patches only — isn’t dead, but it’s no longer within the grasp of typical Windows customers, and you absolutely must install the appropriate May security patch. If you insist on manually installing security patches only, follow the instructions in @PKCano’s AKB 2000003 and be aware of @MrBrian’s recommendations for hiding any unwanted patches. For most Windows 7 and 8.1 users, I recommend following AKB 2000004: How to apply the Win7 and 8.1 Monthly Rollups. Realize that some or all of the expected patches for June may not show up. Or if they do show up, they may not be checked. DON'T CHECK any unchecked patches. Unless you're very sure of yourself, DON'T GO LOOKING for additional patches. In particular, if you install the June Monthly Rollup, you won’t need (and probably won’t see) the concomitant patches for May. Don't mess with Mother Microsoft. If you see KB 4493132, the “Get Windows 10” nag patch, make sure it’s unchecked. Watch out for driver updates — you’re far better off getting them from a manufacturer’s website. After you’ve installed the latest Monthly Rollup, if you’re intent on minimizing Microsoft’s snooping, run through the steps in AKB 2000007: Turning off the worst Win7 and 8.1 snooping. If you want to thoroughly cut out the telemetry, see @abbodi86’s detailed instructions in AKB 2000012: How To Neutralize Telemetry and Sustain Windows 7 and 8.1 Monthly Rollup Model. Realize that we don’t know what information Microsoft collects on Window 7 and 8.1 machines. But I’d be willing to bet that fully-updated Win7 and 8.1 machines are leaking almost as much personal info as that pushed in Windows 10. Step 3. For Windows 10 prior to version 1903 If you're running Windows 10 1803 and want to upgrade to Windows 10 1809, just to put off the inevitable push to 1903, there's good news. @PKCano has gone through the steps to navigate an upgrade from 1803 to 1809, without poking the 1903 dog. If you want to stick with your current version of Win10 Pro, you can follow my advice from February and set “quality update” (cumulative update) deferrals to 15 days, per the screenshot below. If you have quality updates set to 15 days, your machine already updated itself on June 26. Don’t touch a thing; in particular, don’t click Check for updates. Woody Leonhard/IDG For the rest of you, including those of you stuck with Windows 10 Home, go through the steps in "8 steps to install Windows 10 patches like a pro." Make sure that you run Step 3 to hide any updates you don’t want (such the Windows 10 1809 upgrade or any driver updates for non-Microsoft hardware) before proceeding. Step 3a. For Windows 10 version 1903 If you’ve already moved to Windows 10 Pro, version 1903, and you set a 15-day deferral on quality updates, you’ll no doubt discover that the settings shown in the screenshot no longer appear on your machine. Microsoft hasn’t yet deigned to tell us what’s going on, but you can rest assured that your 15-day deferral was obeyed — and you got the June patches on June 26. Don’t worry about changing the deferral settings just yet. Windows 10 version 1903 customers are starting to play with the “Pause updates for 7 days” button, but the results I’ve seen aren’t yet conclusive. When we have more experience with the new settings in Windows 10 1903, I’ll update these steps specifically for 1903. Until then, we’re watching and waiting to see how things really work — and in the interim, these steps should work just fine in 1903. Stay tuned for details. Thanks to the dozens of volunteers on AskWoody who contribute mightily, especially @sb, @PKCano, @abbodi86 and many others. We’ve moved to MS-DEFCON 4 on the AskWoody Lounge. Source: It's time to install the June Windows and Office patches (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  7. Windows 10 Barely Moves the Needle on Global Market Share Data shows Windows 10 records minor share increase New data provided by NetMarketShare shows that while Windows 10 continues to be the leading choice for desktop computers across the world, it barely moved the needle on global market share numbers last month. Windows 10 increased its share from 45.73% to 45.79%, despite the arrival of the May 2019 Update. Microsoft started the rollout of Windows 10 May 2019 Update, or version 1903, in late May. Last month, the company made it available for all seekers on Windows Update, meaning all users are allowed to download the update with a manual check for updates. Windows 7, whose support comes to an end in January 2020, dropped from 35.44% to 35.38%. The 2009 Windows operating system will go dark on January 14, 2020, so Microsoft now recommends users to upgrade to Windows 10 in order to continue to receive updates. The transition from Windows 10 to Windows 7, however, happens at a rather slow pace, so right now, more than 3 in 10 PCs out there still run Windows 7. Windows XP going dark Windows 8.1, which is the third Windows version that still receives support, actually increased its share from 3.97% to 4.51%. At the same time, macOS 10.14 declined from 5.34% to 5.31%. The good news is that Windows XP, the operating system that no longer receives updates since April 2014, is going down at a faster pace and has now reached 1.81% share. Windows XP is mostly used on devices in various organizations and enterprises across the world because of compatibility reasons and the high costs of upgrades to newer Windows. Linux, which has long been considered the main alternative to Windows, is now running on 1.55% of the desktop computers out there, according to the same source. Below is a summary of the June 2019 market share figures: Windows 10 Windows 7 macOS 10.14 Windows 8.1 May 2019 45.73% 35.44% 5.34% 3.97% June 2019 45.79% ↗ 36.38% ↘ 5.31% ↘ 4.51% ↗ Source: Windows 10 Barely Moves the Needle on Global Market Share (Softpedia - Bogdan Popa)
  8. Microsoft Patch Alert: The Windows patching heavens buzz with silver bullets June was one of the buggiest patching months in recent memory – and we still don’t have a straight answer on Win10 1903’s bizarre Update advanced options behavior. Thinkstock/Microsoft How many bugs could a WinPatcher patch, if a WinPatcher could patch bugs? Ends up that June’s one of the buggiest patching months in recent memory – lots of pesky little critters, and the ones acknowledged by Microsoft led to even more patches later in the month. In June, we saw eight single-purpose Windows patches whose sole mission is to fix bugs introduced in earlier Windows patches. I call them silver bullets – all they do is fix earlier screw-ups. If you install security patches only, these eight have to be installed manually to fix the bugs introduced earlier. It’s a congenital defect in the patching regimen – bugs introduced by security patches get fixed by non-security “optional” patches, while waiting for the next month’s cumulative updates to roll around. The Win10 Silver Bullets Every modern version of Win10 except 1903 – which is to say, versions 1607, 1703, 1709, 1803, 1809, Server 2016 and Server 2019 – all got three cumulative updates this month. The third cumulative update for June resolves this one issue: Devices may have issues connecting to some Storage Area Network (SAN) devices using Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) after installing KB4497934. You may also receive an error in the System log section of Event Viewer with Event ID 43 from iScsiPrt and a description of “Target failed to respond in time for a login request.” In other words, it’s a silver bullet – an optional patch that fixes a bug introduced in an earlier patch that you’ll only get if you download and install it manually, or if you click on “Check for updates.” What’s strange about this bevvy of patches is the timing. Apparently, the bug arrived with the third May cumulative updates on May 21. I first saw mention of it on a Dell support forum, on June 11 and posted about it on June 19. Microsoft hadn’t acknowledged the bug at the time. (The first official announcement I saw was on June 26, the date all four silver bullets appeared.) That’s more than a little disconcerting because Microsoft should be warning us about these problems quickly on the Release Information Status page. The Win7 and 8.1 silver bullets On June 20, Microsoft released silver bullet patches for Win7, 8.1, Server 2008 R2 SP1, 2012, 2012 R2, and Internet Explorer 11 to fix bugs introduced in the June 11 Monthly Rollups and Security-only patches. The update for 7 SP1 and Server 2008 R2 SP1 KB 4508772, for Windows 8.1 and Server 2012 R2 KB 4508773 and for Server 2012: “Addresses an issue that may display the error, ‘MMC has detected an error in a snap-in and will unload it.’ when you try to expand, view, or create Custom Views in Event Viewer. Additionally, the application may stop responding or close. You may also receive the same error when using Filter Current Log in the Action menu with built-in views or logs.” Cumulative Update for Internet Explorer 11 KB 4508646 “Addresses an issue that causes Internet Explorer 11 to stop working when it opens or interacts with Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) markers, including Power BI line charts with markers.” The bug fixes are not included in the June Monthly Rollups or Security-only patches (June 11, 2019), but are included in the Preview Monthly Rollups released on June 20. Once again, bugs introduced by security patches are getting the latest fixes in non-security patches. More Win10 1903 bugs The second monthly cumulative update for Win10 1903 appeared late, as usual, on June 27. KB 4501375 includes fixes for several acknowledged bugs, including the MMC error with Custom Views described in the preceding section. Many people are complaining that this particular patch was downloaded without their consent – which is to say, without clicking “Check for updates.” @abbodi86 looked into it and discovered: Based on my tests… KB4501375 (18362.207) behaves exactly the same way that Feature Updates behave on 1809 and 1803 – the “download and install now” behavior. In other words, KC 4501375 will be bundled and offered as [a] secondary update with any available update even if you don’t “Check for updates.” It’s possible that the latest .NET cumulative update will trigger this behavior. That said, deferring Feature Updates (version updates) for just 1 day makes KB4501375 go away. Win10 1903’s disappearing Update advanced Options We’re still in a quandary about the behavior of Win10 1903’s update deferrals. In Win10 1903 Pro, if you go into Windows Update, advanced options, you get a pane that looks like this. Microsoft Windows 10 1903 Pro update advanced settings. Several of you have noted that if you specify deferral options as I have here (non-zero numbers in either of the two bottom boxes), the entire “Choose when updates are installed” part of the advanced options dialog disappears. @abbodi86 has undertaken some experiments with the settings. Here’s what he has concluded: Yep, the Feature Update deferral box disappears once i change the entries to non-zero. Maybe it’s an intentional move so the user cannot change the period frequently? 🙂 Anyway, the Feature Update deferral period can be still controlled with registry setting [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsUpdate\UX\Settings] “DeferFeatureUpdatesPeriodInDays”=dword:0000016d Group policy can be used to show you the feature update deferral period. The box will show up greyed, but at least you can know the period @abbodi goes on to say that he tested changing the Quality Update deferral period the same way, with the same result — if you set it to anything other than zero, the whole section disappears. It may be related to an internal conflict with the way Semi-Annual Channel (Targeted) was removed. Maybe, just maybe, this is the way it’s supposed to work. If so, I’d like to nominate this particular behavior for the “Harebrained Design” hall of fame. Giving a user an option, any option, then forcing them to dig into Group Policy to modify it, stinks. On the radar If you’ve been struggling with the “Intel” microcode updates for Meltdown/Spectre and other “Side Channel vulnerabilities,” you aren’t alone. The latest twist appears with Karl-WE’s enormous leg work, posted on GitHub, that brings some sense to the ongoing litany of patches. In particular, Karl notes – and MS Security Response Center guru Jorge Lopez confirms – that the phrase in KB 4346085 that says: Important Install this update for the listed processors only. is, quite simply, wrong. Some of the updates apply to processors that are not listed. You’re better off trusting Windows Update to pick the ones that are right for your machine. Says Lopez: “The team didn't want to mislead anyone reading this KB in isolation to think that installing this KB/deploying across a fleet would mean they have met the requirement for microcode for these side-channel issues - that is only true for the processors listed on the KB. We will update the line, that's not the right way to provide that warning. So yes, you don’t have to go through some complicated deployment matrix on this KB, but you still have to do so to determine what is protected or not (vuln scanning tools should help). The logic to apply or not a microcode update is part of the boot sequence in the OS - if the processor has a microcode revision that is older than what the OS has, the OS will update the CPU microcode as part of the boot sequence. Expect to see a correction to the KB article shortly. To end on a positive note… remember the BlueKeep vulnerability? The one that had me crying that the sky is falling and you needed to install the May patches, like, right away? Kevin Beaumont (Twitter’s @GossiTheDog) has good news: If anybody is pondering why there’s no public BlueKeep Remote Code Execution exploit, it’s a mix of difficulty [There’s a high bar for exploitation - in theory it is ‘just’ a use after free bug, but to be able to kernel spray you have to reverse engineer the RDP driver. There’s no documentation on how to do it for this.] and a handful of people in the InfoSec world being very responsible. Yes, you still need to make sure you have the fix installed. You should’ve done it in May. When the exploit hits it’ll be painful. But at least we’ve been spared a bloodbath of unprecedented proportions. Join us for more thrilling Tales from the Crypt on the AskWoody Lounge. Source: Microsoft Patch Alert: The Windows patching heavens buzz with silver bullets (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  9. WireGuard on Windows early preview WireGuard for Windows is still in pre-alpha, but it's looking very good. WireGuard is a new peer-to-peer VPN technology that has the potential for greater speed, smaller attack surface, and easier configuration than commonly used and better-established VPN platforms such as OpenVPN and IPSec. It has been available on Linux, FreeBSD, macOS, Android, and even iOS for quite some time now, with Windows being the one platform frustratingly missing. There are good reasons for that—lead developer Jason Donenfeld didn't want to inherit the problems of OpenVPN's OpenTAP adapter code, and when he investigated Microsoft's built-in VPN API, he didn't like that either. So his first move was to take a giant step backward on the Windows platform and develop an extremely simple virtual adapter that could be used not only for WireGuard, but also for other projects that might need the same kind of very basic, socket-and-tunnel functionality. This became Wintun. For the moment, WireGuard for Windows is still in what creator Jason Donenfeld refers to as "pre-alpha," with an alpha build due out sometime in the next week or two. The good news is that it's an easy install now, with no dev-fu required to get it running happily on a Windows 10 (or Server 2016, as seen below) system. There are self-contained, signed MSI installers for both 64-bit and 32-bit builds there; downloading and running them just works, with no complaints from Defender about unsigned or untrusted anything. I was curious about what makes v0.0.14 "pre-alpha" rather than merely "alpha." Donenfeld told me one reason he called it pre-alpha was to keep journalists like me (as well as the generally unadventurous) from writing about it before it's ready. Pressed for more detail, it became clear that he's laser-focused on security—and Windows as a platform diverges far more radically from Linux, Android, macOS, and iOS in that regard than any of them do from one another. There's no access to Windows kernel source code, and the documentation is insufficient for his needs. As a result, he has spent hundreds of hours in a disassembler, reverse-engineering ntoskrnl.exe and ndis.sys to make absolutely sure he understands exactly what's going on at an extremely low level most developers never bother with. The WireGuard-Windows project maintains an attack surface document specifically documenting possible ways to attack the code, and while we were chatting on Twitter, Donenfeld finished a fascinatingly detailed mailing list post about Windows' Network Location Awareness Signatures. All this makes it very clear that the Windows port of WireGuard isn't really "just a port"; it's a ground-up project in its own right, with a level of platform-specific attention to detail that would shame most Windows-native developers. With all my questions about the current and near-future state of the project answered, I downloaded the current version of WireGuard for Windows and took it for a quick spin on a bare metal Windows 2016 instance at Packet. The short version: it's pretty sweet. Once the installer for WireGuard has run, a close facsimile of the mobile interface you'd see on WireGuard for Android, iOS, or macOS pops up. You can easily import, export, activate, deactivate, or destroy tunnel configurations. Tunnel configuration can be imported either directly from a raw .conf file (format just like the ones used in text-based Linux configs in our prior coverage) or from a ZIP file that can contain multiple tunnels. The interface is barebones and offers no hand-holding, but it works very well—even including a context-sensitive text editor that catches and red-underlines many common errors, such as invalid IPv4 or IPv6 addresses. In one last and particularly appreciated touch, it turns out that tunnel states persist across reboot—if you had a tunnel active when you restart your Windows machine, it will automatically activate itself after the reboot; there's no need to run the UI or do anything else to restart it. Similarly, if a tunnel was deactivated at shutdown or reboot, it will still be down after the machine restarts. Beyond all this, if you know how to use WireGuard on other platforms, you know how to use it on Windows. Connection times are still instantaneous, and the throughput is good. I achieved 1.2Gbps upload throughput across a WireGuard tunnel from the Windows 2016 machine above to a Linux machine (also at Packet). Download throughput across the tunnel capped at 380Mbps, but Donenfeld says that's a known bug that has been fixed in master, and the improved, faster code will be available to the general public in the upcoming 0.1 alpha release. Listing image by Jim Salter Previous WireGuard coverage on Ars If you're not sure what the fuss about WireGuard is, we've got you covered. In short, it's a completely new VPN protocol that aims to be completely secure by default, using orders of magnitude fewer lines of code and much simpler configuration files than earlier protocols like OpenVPN or IPSec. For more detail, check out our earlier WireGuard coverage: WireGuard VPN Review Testing WireGuard on iVPN Source: WireGuard on Windows early preview (Ars Technica)
  10. Firefox will use BITS on Windows for updates going forward Mozilla plans to change the updating technology that the organization's Firefox web browser uses on the Windows platform. The organization plans to use BITS, the Background Intelligent Transfer Service, on Windows to handle Firefox updates. BITS is a Windows file transfer service that supports downloading files and resuming interrupted file transfers while being "mindful" of the responsiveness of other network applications and network costs. Current versions of Firefox use a task called Mozilla Maintenance Service and a background update component to push updates to Firefox installations. The functionality was launched in 2012 to improve the updating experience especially on Windows. Firefox 68 could be the first stable version of Firefox to use BITS on Windows devices according to Mozilla's plans. The functionality is still in active development and it is possible that things may get delayed. The use of BITS is just the first step in Mozilla's plan, however. The organization wants to roll out another new component to handle background updates better. The component is called Background Update Agent and it is designed to download and apply updates to Firefox. The background process may download and install updates even if the Firefox web browser is not running on the system. Mozilla hopes that the new updating mechanism will be beneficial to Firefox users with slow Internet connections. The organization noticed that updates would often be terminated prematurely when users exited the browser on slow Internet connections. Mozilla engineer Matt Howell created the bug 2 years ago on Mozilla's bug tracking website. The Update Agent is being planned as a background process which will remain running after the browser is closed to download and apply updates. This should make updating more convenient for everyone and reduce the time to get new updates for users who aren't well supported by the current update process because they don't run Firefox very much and/or they have slow Internet connections. BITS preferences Note that BITS functionality is still in development at the time of writing and that some things may not work correctly right now. Firefox 68 will support two BITS related preferences; one determines whether BITS is enabled and in use, the other whether the Firefox version is part of a trial group. Load about:config in the Firefox address bar and hit enter. Confirm that you will be careful. Search for bits The preference app.update.BITS.enabled determines whether the new update functionality is enabled. True means BITS is used and enabled. False means BITS is not used and not enabled. The preference app.update.BITS.inTrialGroup is a temporary preference used during tests. Restart Firefox. Mozilla plans to add a preference to Firefox's options that gives users control over the background updating process. Firefox users may disable background updating using the preference so that the process won't download and install updates while Firefox is not running. Closing Words The use of BITS should improve Firefox's update process, especially for users on slow connections. Mozilla hopes that the new functionality will leave less Firefox installations behind version-wise. Users who don't want it will be able to disable the background updating in the options. (via Techdows) Source: Firefox will use BITS on Windows for updates going forward (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  11. Microsoft's risky strategy: Develop on Windows, deploy to Linux Visual Studio code with Docker and remoting to Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 Docker has published details of what its container technology will look like for developers working on Windows, after the release of Microsoft's Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2) that is currently in preview. WSL 2 takes a different approach than the existing WSL. Instead of redirecting system calls to run Linux binaries, WSL 2 runs a Linux kernel in a Hyper-V Virtual Machine, but with integration with the host Windows operating system, so you still get most of the features of WSL 1.0. Linux compatibility in WSL 1.0 was insufficient to support Docker containers, but in WSL 2 they will work. Docker is embracing this change. The brief history of Docker on Windows looks like this. First there was Docker Toolbox, released in August 2015, which uses the VirtualBox hypervisor to run Linux in a VM. Then came Docker Desktop, released in 2016, which uses Hyper-V for Linux support, to the relief of developers juggling with incompatible Windows hypervisors. Then in 2017, Docker, working with Microsoft, added support for Windows Server Containers – containers that run Windows rather than Linux applications. At the time, Microsoft enthused that this would "revolutionise the way [customers] build software and modernise existing applications, all with the same platform." The current version of Docker Desktop for Windows installs with Linux containers as the default, but with an option to switch to Windows containers. Diagram showing how Docker works with WSL 2E Now Docker has said it will: Replace the Hyper-V VM we currently use by a WSL 2 integration package. This package will provide the same features as the current Docker Desktop VM: Kubernetes 1-click setup, automatic updates, transparent HTTP proxy configuration, access to the daemon from Windows, transparent bind mounts of Windows files, and more. The big feature this will enable for developers is the ability to use Linux tools to interact with the Linux Docker daemon (service). Docker added: With WSL 2 integration, you will still experience the same seamless integration with Windows, but Linux programs running inside WSL will also be able to do the same. Other advantages include dynamic memory allocation in WSL 2, enabling Docker to make more efficient use of resources, much faster cold start-up which means the Docker daemon does not need to run when not in use, and more reliable container access to files on the Windows side. Docker envisages developers using the "Remote to WSL" extension in Visual Studio Code (VS Code) in order to edit code in Windows while interacting with Linux though the VS Code terminal. All good news? It is from Docker's perspective since it will have less work to do in order to run well on Windows, and the benefits for developers are real. Microsoft dons penguin suit The surprising aspect to all this is the effort Microsoft is making to promote Linux application development to its developers on Windows. The reason for this change of heart is the Azure platform, which means Microsoft can profit almost as much from hosting Linux applications as from Windows, particularly if those applications use other Azure services. Projects like the cross-platform .NET Core and SQL Server for Linux are also part of this trend. The Docker news is of no interest to developers using Windows Containers, but there are not many of them. At Microsoft's Build conference last month, Gabe Monroy, lead program manager for the Azure Container Compute team, was asked whether Windows Containers are for legacy and Linux Containers for new projects. "I think that is a fair description," he said, demonstrating how the company's thinking on the subject has shifted. Similarly, WSL 2 makes life better for developing Linux applications on Windows, but there are downsides. Running Linux in a VM as opposed to redirecting system calls is better for compatibility but inherently worse for integration. One aspect of this is that in WSL 2 I/O performance to files within the Linux VM is much faster, but I/O performance between Linux and the host is worse. Another is that WSL 2 has no access to serial or USB ports. "I primarily want my source of truth (my files) to be on the Windows side of things. WSL1 had the perfect working model for me," said a developer in response to the announcement of WSL 2 previews for those on Windows Insider builds. Microsoft's response? "We understand that this could be a blocker for many people, and so we aren't discontinuing working on WSL 1." This will be a half-truth though; Microsoft will now put most of its effort into WSL 2. Develop on Windows, deploy to Linux is an interesting strategy for Microsoft and one with obvious risks for the future of the Windows side. Source
  12. Collider scopes alternative The Large Hadron Collider at CERN INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE OF BOFFINS CERN is to switch to Linux to save costs. Last year, the company launched the 'Microsoft Alternatives Project' to examine ways that the company could work smarter by switching to Linux-based operating systems. Its initial goal was to "investigate the migration from commercial software products (Microsoft and others) to open-source solutions, so as to minimise CERN's exposure to the risks of unsustainable commercial conditions." Also to 'seek out new life and new civilisations, to bol…. Sorry, that's Star Trek. Moving on then. CERN appears to be one of the first major organisations switching to Linux as an alternative to switching to Windows 10 ahead of Windows 7 reaching end of life next January. The company also refers to 'licence fee increases' as a reason for the change. CERN has traditionally been allowed to take Microsoft products at the 'academic institution' rate but was recently forced to change to a 'by-the-seats' model based on the number of users. According to a ZDNet, the implementation of the scheme will begin this summer with a pilot of an open source mail service, initially for volunteers and the IT staff. This will then be rolled out across the complex later in the year. The change is not completely alien to the boffin brigade - OpenStack is already widely in use and has only recently stopped developing its own 'Scientific Linux' distro with Fermilab, based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, after it became obvious that CentOS could fulfil the same functions out of the box. At present, there's no indication of what the replacement for Windows will be, or what existing distro (if any) it will be based on, nor when it will be rolled out, but there's little doubt that CERN is setting the tone for the next six months, where we're likely to see a lot more organisations voting with their feet over their future, post Windows 7. Source
  13. Windows 10 users can now access the iCloud app on-the-go. The new iCloud for Windows app is available starting today in the Microsoft Store. ICloud for Windows users can now access their files via iOS devices and Macs, Apple and Microsoft announced Tuesday. The companies said the new iCloud app, listed for the first time in the Microsoft Store, will allow Windows 10 users to be more productive when away from their PC. The cloud system allows users to store files and folders on the internet rather than on their computer's physical hard drive, with iCloud including the ability to view files from File Explorer or the app without absorbing PC space. For those working on projects with different devices, the companies reiterated that edits will be synced across all devices with the cloud. So if you're working on a Microsoft Word document on your iPhone, for instance, your changes will show when you open the same document on your PC. You can also collaborate with others by inviting people to add their own multimedia content in Shared Albums. Additionally, you can share your Microsoft files with someone who has an iOS device. Apple and Microsoft didn't immediately respond to requests for comment. Source
  14. It’s time to install the May Windows and Office patches Win10 version 1903 isn’t yet ready for prime time, but the other Windows and Office patches are reasonably stable. If you haven’t yet installed the XP/Vista/Win7 patches to guard against the “wormable” BlueKeep Remote Desktop hole, better do so now. Thinkstock/Microsoft May 2019 will go down in the annals of Patch-dom as the month we all ran for cover to fend off another WannaCry-caliber worm, but a convincing exploit never emerged. Microsoft officially released Windows 10 version 1903 on May 21, but I haven’t yet heard from anyone who’s been pushed. All of the complaints I hear are from those “seekers” who went to the download site and installed 1903 with malice and forethought. A triumph of hope over experience. This month, if you let Windows Update have its way on your machine, you may end up with a different build number than the person sitting next to you. Blame the gov.uk debacle for that: Folks with Windows set up for U.K. English get an extra cumulative update pushed onto their machines, whilst those who don’t fly the Union Jack will get the fix in due course next month. The ongoing saga of BlueKeep Remember the “wormable” Remote Desktop security hole that was going to bring down all older Windows machines? As of this writing, early Tuesday morning, there are exactly no known exploits. Lots of people have tried. Plenty of people are selling snake oil. But nobody has yet figured out how to exploit BlueKeep in order to run a nasty program. Before you feel too smug, realize that I continue to recommend that you install the latest Windows 7, XP, Vista, Server 2003, 2008 or 2008 R2 patches. I’m convinced a weapons-grade BlueKeep attack is on the way, and your only gold-standard defense is to fix the bug in Microsoft’s Remote Desktop Protocol. Tell your friends. This is the real thing. The one Windows 7 patch to avoid Once again this month, you should studiously avoid KB 4493132, a Windows 7 patch that does nothing but nag you to move to Windows 10. The case against installing Windows 10 version 1903 right now Windows 10 version 1903 has one truly important new feature: The ability to push off updates. That may be the single most important new feature in Windows 10 since it was released almost four years ago. We still haven’t seen the feature in real-life action, and there’s some ambiguity between the descriptions and the settings, but I have great hope. Don’t make the mistake of jumping in right now before Microsoft’s has a chance to iron out the inevitable problems. At the very least, you should wait until Microsoft declares that version 1903 is stable enough for broad deployment in large organizations. There’s supposed to be a “Download and install now” link arriving soon in Win10 1803 and 1809 to give you some control over when the upgrade to 1903 gets pushed onto your machine. Unfortunately, there’s also a promise from Microsoft that it’ll start pushing 1903 onto 1803 machines this month. We still don’t know when the 1803-to-1903 forced upgrades will start, and we don’t know how hard Microsoft will push. Stay tuned. How to update your Windows system Here’s how to get your system updated the (relatively) safe way. Step 1: Make a full system image backup before you install the latest patches. There’s a non-zero chance that the patches — even the latest, greatest patches of patches of patches — will hose your machine. Best to have a backup that you can reinstall even if your machine refuses to boot. This, in addition to the usual need for System Restore points. There are plenty of full-image backup products, including at least two good free ones: Macrium Reflect Free and EaseUS Todo Backup. For Windows 7 users, if you aren’t making backups regularly, take a look at this thread started by Cybertooth for details. You have good options, both free and not-so-free. Step 2a: For Windows XP, Server 2003, and Embedded POSReady 2009 Manually download and install KB 4500331. In the Microsoft Update Catalog listing, find the version of Windows XP that concerns you and on the right, click Download. Choose the language that you’re using, and click on the link underneath that language. Click Save File. When the windowsxp-kb4500331-blah-blah.exe file has downloaded, double-click on it and stand back. Step 2b: For Windows 7 and 8.1 If you have McAfee Endpoint Security, make sure it’s up to date. Microsoft says it’s still having problems with McAfee. Microsoft is blocking updates to Windows 7 and 8.1 on recent computers. If you are running Windows 7 or 8.1 on a PC that’s 24 months old or newer, follow the instructions in AKB 2000006 or @MrBrian’s summary of @radosuaf’s method to make sure you can use Windows Update to get updates applied. If you’re very concerned about Microsoft’s snooping on you and want to install just security patches, realize that the privacy path’s getting more difficult. The old “Group B” — security patches only — isn’t dead, but it’s no longer within the grasp of typical Windows customers. If you insist on manually installing security patches only, follow the instructions in @PKCano’s AKB 2000003 and be aware of @MrBrian’s recommendations for hiding any unwanted patches. For most Windows 7 and 8.1 users, I recommend following AKB 2000004: How to apply the Win7 and 8.1 Monthly Rollups. Realize that some or all of the expected patches for May may not show up, or if they do show up, they may not be checked. DON'T CHECK any unchecked patches. Unless you're very sure of yourself, DON'T GO LOOKING for additional patches. In particular, if you install the May Monthly Rollups or Cumulative Updates, you won’t need (and probably won’t see) the concomitant patches for April. Don't mess with Mother Microsoft. If you see KB 4493132, the “Get Windows 10” nag patch, make sure it’s unchecked. Watch out for driver updates — you’re far better off getting them from a manufacturer’s website. After you’ve installed the latest Monthly Rollup, if you’re intent on minimizing Microsoft’s snooping, run through the steps in AKB 2000007: Turning off the worst Win7 and 8.1 snooping. If you want to thoroughly cut out the telemetry, see @abbodi86’s detailed instructions in AKB 2000012: How To Neutralize Telemetry and Sustain Windows 7 and 8.1 Monthly Rollup Model. Realize that we don’t know what information Microsoft collects on Windows 7 and 8.1 machines. But I’d be willing to bet that fully-updated Win7 and 8.1 machines are leaking almost as much personal info as that pushed in Windows 10. Step 3: For Windows 10 If you want to stick with your current version of Windows 10 — a reasonable alternative — you can follow my advice from February and set “quality update” (cumulative update) deferrals to 15 days, per the screenshot below. If you have quality updates set to 15 days, your machine already updated itself on May 29. Don’t touch a thing and in particular don’t click Check for updates. Woody Leonhard For the rest of you, including those of you stuck with Win10 Home, go through the steps in "8 steps to install Windows 10 patches like a pro." Make sure that you run Step 3 to hide any updates you don’t want (such the Windows 10 1809 upgrade or any driver updates for non-Microsoft hardware) before proceeding. When we have more experience with the new settings in Windows 10 1903, I’ll update these steps specifically for 1903. Until then, we’re watching and waiting, to see how things really work — and in the interim, these steps should work just fine in 1903. Stay tuned for details. Thanks to the dozens of volunteers on AskWoody who contribute mightily, especially @sb, @PKCano, @abbodi86 and many others. We’ve moved to MS-DEFCON 4 on the AskWoody Lounge. Source: It’s time to install the May Windows and Office patches
  15. How to make sense of Windows updates and upgrades with Microsoft's new release dashboard Microsoft's new Windows release health dashboard is a one-stop shop for Windows 10 users seeking information on the status of upgrades and ongoing problems. Thinkstock/Microsoft Making good on a pledge in November, Microsoft has unveiled a site showing the problems that prevent users from receiving Windows upgrades. Dubbed the "Windows release health dashboard," the list of blockers came out of a promise in late 2018 by Microsoft's top Windows executive. Writing upon the re-release of Windows 10 October 2018 Update, aka 1809 in the firm's four-digit yymm code, Mike Fortin, corporate vice president, said: "We will continue to invest in clear and regular communications with our customers when there are issues." Fortin was referring to bugs that Microsoft decided were significant enough to justify withholding one of the twice-annual Windows 10 feature upgrades from relevant machines. Rather than offer an upgrade that might cripple or degrade a system, Microsoft would simply refuse to give those PCs the update. Even though Microsoft has practiced upgrade blocking for decades, it wasn't until last fall that the company detailed the issues preventing some PCs from receiving a Windows 10 upgrade. Those issues were published on the Windows 10 update history support page and included short descriptions of the blocking bugs. That page was a precursor to the health dashboard. "The new Windows release health dashboard is now live, offering timely information on the current rollout status and known issues (open and resolved) across both feature and monthly updates," said John Cable, director of program management on the Windows servicing and delivery team. "The new dashboard provides a single page for each currently-supported version of Windows so you can quickly search for issues by keyword, including any safeguard holds on updates, see the current status of each issue, and find important announcements." (Note: The dashboard, with the latest 1903 feature upgrade front and center, is here. Odd, nowhere does Microsoft label this as "Dashboard.") What the dashboard does Each Windows 10 feature upgrade - from the initial release (1507) to the just-issued (1903) - has its own dedicated page on the dashboard, sometimes shared with an edition of Windows Server. Windows 10's predecessors, including Windows 7 and Windows 8.1, and their Server colleagues, also sport pages. All are listed in the column at the left side of the display. Microsoft Clicking a version of Windows 10 - or one of the earlier operating systems - in the list on the left expands the item, letting users drill down. Click to expand any Windows 10 feature upgrade at the left, or one of the earlier operating systems. Two items - "Known issues and notifications" and "Resolved issues" - appear. The former not only itemizes existing problems in a summary near the top of the page but describes them in greater detail down lower. Among the details, many issues sport a line titled "Next steps" that outlines what action Microsoft has taken and when a fix can be expected. The company also makes recommendations - such as not to manually install the feature upgrade - shows possible workarounds that users can apply and in some cases, classifies the problem as a blocker halting upgrade distribution. Those are typically offered after a heading of "Note." As issues accumulate they are clumped together as months. Whether resolved or not, the problems remain as a record. Fixed bugs are listed on a separate page reached by clicking the "Resolved issues" heading at the left. Notably, each resolution shows an addressed-by date and the support document(s) which first mentioned the problem and possibly later, the solution if it entailed another update from Redmond. Microsoft Problems are described in detail, users are pointed to support documents that accompanied the fix and Microsoft explains what it or a third party did to address the issue. In this case, Microsoft released another update, one determined important enough to distribute outside the normal Tuesday schedule. Although the dashboard may impress some users in its detail, veterans will recognize that most of the information has been copied from individual support documents - identified by the KB prefix, which stands for knowledge base - and pasted here. That's by design. "Finding out about known issues and whether or not they'd been reported, took time and effort," Melissa Martin, a senior program manager, acknowledged in a video posted on Microsoft's website. "It was a multi-step process. Known issues were included in the release notes or support articles, also known as KBs, and once an issue was resolved the original KB was updated with a link to the resolving KB." The dashboard is meant to serve as a one-stop shop for all that already-crafted information, Martin noted. Update comms Microsoft also billed the dashboard as a source of general information about the Windows upgrade process. "One of the most exciting features of the new Windows release health dashboard is the ability to see the current roll-out status, the status of known and recently-resolved issues, and news about Windows updates, all in one place," said Martin (emphasis added). Microsoft Recent feature upgrades, like 1903, prominently show update status information (the part shaded blue), including how users can currently obtain the build and if Microsoft has put it into general distribution. Although Microsoft hasn't said it aloud, it's reasonable to assume that the company will use the status section of an upgrade's page to communicate to commercial customers when testing can be wrapped up and broad deployment begun. That milestone, formerly marked by the labeling change from Semi-Annual Channel (Targeted), or SAC-T, to Semi-Annual Channel, aka SAC, is to be continued, Microsoft has said - but without the transition in nomenclature. (Microsoft ditched SAC-T earlier this year.) Unless Microsoft is misleading users about the dashboard's purpose, the notification should appear here. Also on the dashboard will be links to recent announcements related to updates and upgrades, practices and policies. Microsoft relies almost exclusively on blog posts for such announcements - even major proclamations made at the firm's conferences are usually repeated in blog form - and are to be collected in the "Message center" area of the dashboard. Microsoft In the 'Message center,' the dashboard displays the latest blogged announcements from Microsoft about updates and upgrades. Each feature upgrade's page also offers links to the most recent posts. For a finishing touch, the dashboard also links directly to the Windows 10 release information page, the official list of feature upgrades and their monthly cumulative updates. This page provides a host of nuts and bolts information about Windows 10, including build numbers, date of each update and upgrade, and perhaps most importantly, end-of-support deadlines. Microsoft Microsoft dumps tons of information in the Windows 10 release information page. Putting it on the dashboard may get that information to more users. Source: How to make sense of Windows updates and upgrades with Microsoft's new release dashboard (Computerworld - Gregg Keizer)
  16. It’s been a long time coming Microsoft had a dream with Windows 8 that involved universal Windows apps that would span across phones, tablets, PCs, and even Xbox consoles. The plan was that app developers could write a single app for all of these devices, and it would magically span across them all. This dream really started to fall apart after Windows Phone failed, but it’s well and truly over now. Microsoft has spent years pushing developers to create special apps for the company’s Universal Windows Platform (UWP), and today, it’s putting the final nail in the UWP coffin. Microsoft is finally allowing game developers to bring full native Win32 games to the Microsoft Store, meaning the many games that developers publish on popular stores like Steam don’t have to be rebuilt for UWP. “We recognize that Win32 is the app format that game developers love to use and gamers love to play, so we are excited to share that we will be enabling full support for native Win32 games to the Microsoft Store on Windows,” explains Microsoft’s gaming chief Phil Spencer. “This will unlock more options for developers and gamers alike, allowing for the customization and control they’ve come to expect from the open Windows gaming ecosystem.” This is a big shift for Microsoft’s Windows app store, particularly because games are one of the most popular forms of apps that are downloaded from app stores. Previously, developers were forced to publish games for Windows 10 through the Universal Windows Platform, which simply doesn’t have the same level of customization that game developers have come to expect from Windows over the years. The writing has been on the wall for UWP for months now. Microsoft recently revealed its effort to switch the company’s Edge browser to Chromium and away from UWP to make it available on Windows 7, Windows 8, and macOS. Microsoft’s Joe Belfiore admitted in an interview with The Verge earlier this month that UWP was a “headwind” for Edge. “It’s not that UWP is bad, but UWP is not a 35-year-old mature platform that a ridiculously huge amount of apps have been written to,” Belfiore said at the time. I’ve heard many stories of Microsoft engineers and developers complaining about UWP putting restrictions on their own apps, and third-party app developers have often had to make a choice between creating a UWP app for Windows 10 or a traditional desktop app that will run across Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10. Microsoft has steadily expanded its definition of UWP to allow developers to repackage desktop apps into the Microsoft Store, but the original vision was for new style apps (think back to Windows 8) that would run across PCs, phones, tablets, the Xbox, and HoloLens. With the death of Windows Phone, that original plan for UWP looked unlikely to work out. Microsoft even recently put its touch-friendly UWP versions of Office on hold, preferring to focus on the web, iOS, Android, and its desktop apps instead. Office was always the centerpiece for UWP and a good example of how to build a more demanding app on Microsoft’s new platform. Microsoft is finally listening to app and game developers and not trying to force UWP on them anymore. “You’ve told us that you would like us to continue to decouple many parts of the Universal Windows Platform so that you can adopt them incrementally,” explained Kevin Gallo, Microsoft’s Windows developer platform chief, earlier this month. This means developers will be able to adopt some of the good parts of UWP over time. In a separate interview with ZDNet, Gallo revealed, “by the time we are done, everything will just be called ‘Windows apps.’” Microsoft isn’t there just yet, but it’s aiming to make every UWP feature available to all developers. Ultimately, this is good news for both developers and Windows users. We might now start to see more games in the Microsoft Store that work how PC gamers expect them to and hopefully more apps. The Windows Store has been full of junk over the years, and Microsoft has had a hard time attracting developers. Microsoft’s new approach even impressed Epic CEO Tim Sweeney earlier this year. Microsoft’s previous walled garden approach to the store generated fierce criticism from Sweeney. He wasn’t happy that Microsoft was building a closed platform within Windows 10, and he protested the company’s attempts to force developers to distribute these apps through the Microsoft Store. Microsoft even created S Mode versions of Windows and a Windows RT operating system that were locked to store apps by default. The backing of Sweeney and Microsoft’s new move to bring more of its own games to Steam are good signs that Spencer is changing more than just the Xbox console inside of Microsoft. Now, we’ll have to wait to see what app and game developers do this time around with a Microsoft Store and Windows app platform that’s a lot less restricted. Source
  17. The Chinese military is also working on a similar plan to replace Windows with a custom OS. Russian authorities have moved closer to implementing their plan of replacing the Windows OS on military systems with a locally-developed operating system named Astra Linux. Last month, the Russian Federal Service for Technical and Export Control (FSTEC) granted Astra Linux the security clearance of "special importance," which means the OS can now be used to handle Russian government information of the highest degree of secrecy. Until now, the Russian government had only used special versions of Windows that had been modified, checked, and approved for use by the FSB. What is Astra Linux? But starting last month, the Russian military can now start transitioning to Astra Linux, a Debian derivative developed by Russian company RusBITech since 2008. RusBITech initially developed the OS for use in the Russian private market, but the company also expanded into the local government sector, where it became very popular with military contractors. A few years back, the OS received certifications to handle Russian government information labeled as "secret" and "top secret" --two data secrecy levels situated underneath "special importance" according to Russian law. Since then, Astra Linux has slowly made its way into government agencies and is currently in use at the Russian National Center for Defence Control, among various other government and military agencies. Already used by the Russian military In January 2018, the Russian Ministry of Defence announced plans to transfer military systems from the Windows OS to Astra Linux, citing fears that Microsoft's closed-source approach might hide Windows backdoors that can be abused by US intelligence to spy on Russian government operations. Since then, RusBITech has been going through the Russian government's certification process to get a "special importance" classification for Astra Linux -- which it did, on April 17, according to two local media reports [1, 2]. In addition to the FSTEC certification, Astra Linux also received certificates of conformity from the FSB, Russia's top intelligence agency, and the Ministry of Defense, opening the door for full adoption by Russia's top military and intelligence agencies. The certification was granted for Astra Linux Special Edition version 1.6, also known as the Smolensk release, per local reports. This is a commercial (paid) release. The news comes after earlier this week it was reported that the Chinese military was taking similar steps to replace the Windows OS on military systems amid fears of US hacking. The Chinese military didn't go for a Linux distro but instead alluded to plans of developing a custom OS instead. Source
  18. Microsoft hints at new features and big changes coming in Windows 11 When compared to Windows Vista and Windows 8, Windows 10 has been a runaway success. That’s not to say that Microsoft’s latest operating system is perfect, but it improved upon its predecessors in nearly every way and has only gotten better in the years since it first rolled out to the public. But nearly four years on, Microsoft has begun to look to the future and may have given us a peek at Windows 11 in a new blog post. After offering a rundown on all of the latest Windows PCs from a variety of manufacturers, Microsoft Corporate Vice President Nick Parker changed gears to talk about the “modern operating system” that will power all these machines. Although he never mentions Windows by name, he certainly seems to be hinting at something big. Parker says the foundation of the modern OS will be enablers (“that deliver the foundational experiences customers expect from their devices”) and delighters (“that deliver innovative human centric experiences”). Enablers consist of seamless updates that occur in the background without any interruptions, comprehensive protection from malicious attacks, the ability to be connected to Wi-Fi and 5G at all times, and sustained performance. Delighters, on the other hand, are what elevate the experience of actually using an OS. Cloud connectivity, intelligent AI, multi-sense interaction, and something Parker calls “form factor agility,” which is quite a buzz-phrase. Finally, here is an interesting quote from Parker about the so-called modern OS from Microsoft: These enablers and delighters underpin our vision for a Modern OS, they will provide the foundational elements for an evolution of the PC ecosystem and enable partners to deliver the more human-centric experiences of tomorrow. Microsoft is investing to enable these modern OS experiences, and to deliver new ones that take advantage of silicon advancements, powerful PCs, the cloud and power of AI. All in all, it’s a rather vague list of features and concepts that may or may not be the defining features of Windows 11, or Windows Lite, or whatever comes next from Microsoft. He may just be talking about the next evolution of Windows 10, but four years is the longest the company has gone without releasing a new OS since Windows XP. Perhaps Microsoft is setting the stage for a major announcement in the months to come. Source
  19. Windows 10 Pro x64 1903 18362.145 multi-38 Standard May 2019 38 language iso image can choose what language to install from start of installation Power Plan Pre Set = High Performance Autounattend file details Added to build Microsoft Windows Updates Microsoft Framework 2.0 - 4.8.0 Digital Windows 10 License use Rufus to make USB installation media from iso image When making bootable usb don’t forget to choose the correct partition scheme for your system MBR or GPT Torrent Download .
  20. With one final April patch delivered in May, the time looks ripe to install last month’s patches. One antivirus manufacturer has a significant disagreement with Microsoft about the April patches, but you can easily bypass the problem — if you know the trick. Thinkstock/Microsoft April was a tough month for Win 7, 8.1, Server 2008 R2, 2012 and 2012 R2 customers who ran specific antivirus products. Blue screens, freezes, slow-as-sludge drippings all bedeviled a large number of Sophos, Avira, Avast, AVG and even McAfee users. Looks like we’re over that hump, with the AV manufacturers scurrying to fix their wares. Current state of AV Microsoft claims that it has “mitigated” (interesting choice of terminology) the blue screens and freezes with certain Sophos, McAfee and Avast (including AVG) products. In fact, if you check with the individual manufacturers' websites, they all claim to have shipped and installed fixes of various types that will allow Monthly Rollups and Security-only patches to proceed without gumming up the works. The one holdout? Avira. It’s a particularly interesting exception because Avira has claimed from the start that the April Win10 version 1809 cumulative update also clogged up the works with its antivirus product. I’ve seen rumors — but no definitive confirmation — that other AV products have had the same problem. At any rate, Avira at this point says it’s fixed everything: We have looked into the issue… and have found a way to fix it. We have recently released an update that should fix this issue. Your Avira Product will be automatically updated, and you don’t have to do anything else in the product. In a private communication, an Avira spokesperson says that Microsoft is no longer blocking the problematic patches on machines running Avira. Microsoft has a contrary opinion: Microsoft has temporarily blocked devices from receiving this update if Avira antivirus software is installed. … We are presently investigating this issue with Avira and will provide an update when available. There’s no mention on the Microsoft sites about slowdowns with the Win10 1809 patch. At this point, your best bet is to get Avira updated — manually if need be — and move on. I'd be willing to bet that the patches will install on updated Avira machines. (If you discover something contrary, hit me on AskWoody.com!) This whole incident left a bad taste in my mouth. As I mentioned before, whoever made the decision to release the six (now nine) problematic Windows patches either: Didn’t know they’d wreak havoc on millions of computers, or Didn’t care You can choose which one’s worse. More than that, the incident(s) exposed a bizarre behavior with Avast/AVG products: In order to update the software, you’re supposed to turn on your machine and do nothing for 15 minutes, while the AV package updates itself. As an anonymous poster on AskWoody put it: I have AVG and I have many items blocked in the firewall. Avast / AVG needs to have a way to manually download the patch from the AVG support download site and they need a warning to the person that an AVG update is about to commence, unblock or allow the files and registry keys to be modified. Updating in the background when the operator is away is not a good idea. Avast / AVG should be more transparent. The one Win7 patch to avoid Once again this month, you should studiously avoid KB 4493132, a Win7 patch that does nothing but nag you to move to Windows 10. Looks like the nag hasn’t had much effect, but why install it in the first place? It may be time for 1809 Although there are acknowledged problems with Win10 version 1809, they’re relatively minor. Given that Win10 version 1903 is nipping on our heels, I’m upgrading my Win10 machines to 1809. Better the devil ye ken. If you want to stay with 1803, it’s hard to blame you — the list of new features in 1809 reads like the ingredients list for a bottle of water. Mostly, if you move to 1809, you’re buying yourself six more months before you have to upgrade. Again. Woody Leonhard/IDG The safest way to move to 1809 is to run the “feature update” deferral down to zero and wait for Microsoft to take over. (See general instructions here.) That way the monkey’s on Microsoft’s back to make sure your machine is ready for 1809. Put the branch readiness level at “Semi-Annual Channel,” turn the feature update deferral to 0, and wait. If Microsoft figures your machine can take it, you’ll get 1809 sooner or later. But you won’t get 1903. Why? Even though Microsoft has changed the terminology, we’re assured “Semi-Annual Channel” will keep new versions off your machine until at least 60 days after release — and we’re told that 1903 won’t be released until the end of May. We've also been promised that Win10 1803 will sprout a new "Download and install" link — likely for both Home and Pro — by late May. We still haven't seen it in action, but if it works as promised, that'll be an enormous improvement over the blind-men-and-elephant approach we have right now. Update Here’s how to get your system updated the (relatively) safe way. Step 1. Make a full system image backup before you install the latest patches. There’s a non-zero chance that the patches — even the latest, greatest patches of patches of patches — will hose your machine. Best to have a backup that you can reinstall even if your machine refuses to boot. This, in addition to the usual need for System Restore points. There are plenty of full-image backup products, including at least two good free ones: Macrium Reflect Free and EaseUS Todo Backup. For Win 7 users, If you aren’t making backups regularly, take a look at this thread started by Cybertooth for details. You have good options, both free and not-so-free. Step 2. For Win7 and 8.1 If you have an antivirus product from Sophos, Avira, Avast, AVG or McAfee, make sure it’s up-to-date. Each product’s different. Yes, I know that many products from those vendors don’t have any problems — but it’s better to get buckled up anyway. Microsoft is blocking updates to Windows 7 and 8.1 on recent computers. If you are running Windows 7 or 8.1 on a PC that’s 18 months old or newer, follow the instructions in AKB 2000006 or @MrBrian’s summary of @radosuaf’s method to make sure you can use Windows Update to get updates applied. If you’re very concerned about Microsoft’s snooping on you and want to install just security patches, realize that the privacy path’s getting more difficult. The old “Group B” — security patches only — isn’t dead, but it’s no longer within the grasp of typical Windows customers. If you insist on manually installing security patches only, follow the instructions in @PKCano’s AKB 2000003 and be aware of @MrBrian’s recommendations for hiding any unwanted patches. For most Windows 7 and 8.1 users, I recommend following AKB 2000004: How to apply the Win7 and 8.1 Monthly Rollups. Realize that some or all of the expected patches for April may not show up or, if they do show up, may not be checked. DON'T CHECK any unchecked patches. Unless you're very sure of yourself, DON'T GO LOOKING for additional patches. In particular, if you install the April Monthly Rollups or Cumulative Updates, you won’t need (and probably won’t see) the concomitant patches for March. Don't mess with Mother Microsoft. If you see KB 4493132, the “Get Windows 10” nag patch, make sure it’s unchecked. Watch out for driver updates — you’re far better off getting them from a manufacturer’s website. After you’ve installed the latest Monthly Rollup, if you’re intent on minimizing Microsoft’s snooping, run through the steps in AKB 2000007: Turning off the worst Win7 and 8.1 snooping. If you want to thoroughly cut out the telemetry, see @abbodi86’s detailed instructions in AKB 2000012: How To Neutralize Telemetry and Sustain Windows 7 and 8.1 Monthly Rollup Model. Realize that we don’t know what information Microsoft collects on Window 7 and 8.1 machines. But I’d be willing to bet that fully-updated Win7 and 8.1 machines are leaking almost as much personal info as that pushed in Win10. Step 3. For Windows 10 You can follow the steps at the beginning of this article to leave your machine open for updating to Win10 version 1809 (my new current preference). When Win10 version 1903 appears we’ll have full instructions for blocking it. Of course, all bets are off if Microsoft, uh, forgets to honor its own settings. If you want to stick with your current version of Win10 — a reasonable alternative — you can follow my advice from February and set “quality update” (cumulative update) deferrals to 15 days, per the screenshot. If you have quality updates set to 15 days, your machine already updated itself on April 24. Don’t touch a thing and in particular don’t click Check for updates. Woody Leonhard/IDG For the rest of you, including those of you stuck with Win10 Home, go through the steps in "8 steps to install Windows 10 patches like a pro." Make sure that you run Step 3, to hide any updates you don’t want (such the Win10 1809 upgrade or any driver updates for non-Microsoft hardware) before proceeding. These steps will change drastically when Win10 1903 starts rolling out, particularly if Microsoft keeps its promise about "Download and install now." Stay tuned for details. Thanks to the dozens of volunteers on AskWoody who contribute mightily, especially @sb, @PKCano, @abbodi86 and many others. We’ve moved to MS-DEFCON 4 on the AskWoody Lounge. Source: Now’s the time to install the April Windows and Office patches (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  21. Microsoft published a new support page on its Docs website that provides administrators and users with information about known issues and fixed issues for Windows. The page, which is titled Windows 10 release information, includes information for Windows 10, Windows Server, and previous versions of Windows including Windows 8.1 and Windows 7. If you check the issues of the current version of Windows 10, Windows 10 version 1809, you will find a list of current and resolved known issues listed on the page. Each issue is listed with a summary, the update it originated in, the status, and last update. Links point to the KB article of the update and to additional details on the Windows 10 Release Information page. Note: The formatting of the table is fixed, it appears which means that you may not see all columns of the table on the page. A click on the details link jumps to a section on the same page that describes the issue in detail. There you find information about affected platforms, workarounds, and other information that may help you mitigate the issue ore solve it. Microsoft lists Windows 10 version 1507 to 1809, Windows Server 2019 and 2016, Windows 7 SP1, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2008 R2, 2012 R2 and 2012 on the page currently. Windows 7, 8.1 and the old server versions are listed under previous versions on the page. The May 2019 Update release will see Windows 10 version 1903 added to the page. That's not all though; you find a message center listed on the page that lists recent announcements. These announcements provide important information from Microsoft teams and employees in regards to Windows. Recent announcements include an article on the benefits of Windows 10 Dynamic Updates, information that Windows Server 2008 R2 systems need a servicing stack update to add support for SHA-2 code signing, or that Windows 10 version 1809 is designated for broad deployment. These announcements are posted on various blogs and sites that Microsoft maintains. Closing Words The Windows 10 Release Information page is a useful addition as it collects information from various sources and displays them all in a single location. Instead of having to browse dozens of pages to find relevant information, administrators and users find them in a single location. Known issues alone is useful, as you find all known issues for all supported versions of Windows there. Summaries, descriptions, and links provide all the information that is available in a single location. The message center offers useful information from Microsoft. While you can follow teams and blogs using various methods -- not all support RSS or email notifications -- it is quite the hassle to stay up to date when it comes to vital Windows related information. The message center does not support RSS, unfortunately, but you can use a website monitor like Distill for web browsers, Web Alert for Android, or these site monitoring tools. The usefulness of the resource depends on the update frequency. If Microsoft manages to update the page regularly and shortly after information become available, it could very well become one of the best resources for Windows administrators and users (apart from this blog, of course). Source: Bookmark Tip: Windows Release Information by Microsoft (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  22. First a quote from Microsoft Developer Network's (MSDN) support article: As you most probably already use Hyper-V and have a version or two of Windows installed on its virtual machines (judging by the fact that you found here), we can use a shortcut simplifying the process and use already existing VHD files of your Windows virtual machines. There's nothing wrong in running your Windows virtual machines as intended in Hyper-V. However, sometimes you might want unrestricted access to physical hardware on your host machine. Native boot gives you exactly that: when a VHD with Windows installed on it is used for native boot in a dual / multiple boot scenario, it will no longer use Hyper-V emulated, virtualized hardware devices but is instead as any operating system installed directly to physical hardware. In this tutorial we will add a Windows 10 Pro virtual machine's virtual hard disk file to my Windows 10 boot menu, to be able to choose which of the two Windows systems will be started when the machine will be booted. The tutorial might look a bit complicated but I assure you, this is really easy and fast. You set up your virtual machine's VHD for native boot in a minute :). Notice that you can use the method told in this tutorial on both BIOS (MBR) and UEFI (GPT) systems, mounting both MBR partitioned Generation 1 VHD files and GPT partitioned Generation 2 VHD files regardless if the host is MBR or GPT partitioned. A VHD from Generation 2 UEFI vm can boot natively on a BIOS (MBR) host, and a VHD from Generation 1 BIOS vm boots without an issue on UEFI (GPT) host. This method can be used to natively boot VHD files from Hyper-V virtual machines running Windows 8.1, Windows 10, Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows Server 2016. Part One Preparations A Hyper-V virtual machine when created and before any checkpoints have been made consists of one VHD or VHDX file, a Virtual Hard Disk file. Later on when you for security or other purposes make checkpoints, Hyper-V adds a so called child VHD to the vm. As geeks love difficult words, we say this vm is from now on using differencing disk. It means that we have a base disk (also called parent disk), in Hyper-V usually a .vhdx file, and for that base a child disk with extension .avhdx, letter A coming from word automatic meaning it is managed automatically by Hyper-V without user interaction. In other words, keep your hands away, don't move, rename or delete them manually, only use Hyper-V Manager for any changes. Here's a screenshot of a typical Hyper-V vm (#1) and its checkpoints (#2), I have also pasted an extract from my virtual hard disk folder into this screenshot (#3): I created the vm and installed Windows in a .vhdx file (yellow highlight). When I made first checkpoint, the differencing data was stored in first .avhdx file (blue highlight), next checkpoint created again a differencing .avhdx to store changes since first checkpoint and so on. To get our vm to boot natively outside Hyper-V, we need to merge existing checkpoints (child disks) to base disk (parent). Native boot with a VHD or VHDX file is only possible if it has no child disks. Unfortunately this also means that when you remove the VHD or VHDX from native boot menu and continue using it in Hyper-V, you no longer have any checkpoints and can't restore the vm to earlier state. Think how important your checkpoints are, you wont get them back once deleted and merged to parent! 1.1) If the vm you want to use in native boot has any checkpoints, select the first checkpoint, right click and select Delete Checkpoint Subtree to remove all checkpoints. Hyper-V merges the data they contain to base disk and finally removes the child disks: 1.2) You can leave the .vhd or .vhdx file in its current location, or copy it to another drive. You can even copy the virtual hard disk to another computer and use it on that computer for native boot. If your intention is to continue using it also in Hyper-V in addition to native boot, leave it where it is 1.3) Download and install the free Macrium Reflect. Although mostly known of its disk imaging and cloning capabilities, Macrium also offers the easiest way to fix Windows boot records. We will use it later in Part Four to reset Windows boot records and boot menu Macrium Reflect Free download: Macrium Reflect Free Part Two Add VHD to boot menu 2.1) Open your virtual hard disks folder, default location if you have not changed it in Hyper-V settings is C:\Users\Public\Documents\Hyper-V\Virtual Hard Disks 2.2) Double click the VHD file you want to boot natively and add to boot menu. This mounts the VHD on your host system. In this example I have copied the virtual hard disk to another computer and double click it to mount it to the host system: 2.4) Windows now mounts all partitions of this disk to host. Because the Hyper-V vm on this disk was setup as Generation 1 (BIOS / MBR partitioning), my host now shows two new drives, drive G: which is the system reserved partition of Windows 10 installation on that virtual hard disk, and drive H: which is the Windows partition of that installation: Notice that the VHD will be automatically unmounted when we restart in step 2.9; it only needs to be mounted now to be added to boot menu, later on there's no need to mount it. 2.5) Old school geek as I am, I always need to check. I open drive H: to see it really contains the virtual Windows 10 installation I want to use in native boot: 2.6) Open an elevated (admin) Command Prompt, type bcdboot H:\Windows and press Enter (replace drive letter H with actual drive letter for the mounted virtual hard disk containing Windows): 2.7) To prepare for the unexpected, to easily restore the default boot records let's not continue before we have added Macrium Rescue WinPE system to the boot menu. Start Macrium Reflect, open Other tasks menu, select Add Recovery Boot Menu Option: 2.8) Select Windows PE 10.0 menu and click OK, accept all possible prompts: 2.9) Restart Windows. You will be shown the Windows 10 boot menu Optional: 2.10) The physical PC, a laptop in this case has now been booted with a virtual hard disk from a Hyper-V virtual machine. It now uses the physical hardware and can access all host machine resources. Our virtual Windows is now physical (blue highlighted disk), with access to original host Windows hard disks (yellow): 2.11) If we check Disk Management we will see that the VHD was added as last hard disk, in this case Disk 3. Checking its properties we can clearly see that we are dealing with a virtual disk: OK, let's boot back to host, the original Windows installation by restarting and selecting it from boot menu 2.12) For your own comfort it might be a good idea to rename boot menu operating systems, the boot menu showing two identical "Windows 10" entries can be confusing. To do that open an elevated (admin) Command Prompt, type bcdedit and hit Enter. Boot records will be shown. Scrolling down the list you will find an entry titled Windows Boot Loader for each of our three operating systems. We are interested in three details on each entry: Identifier (yellow highlight in below screenshot), Device (blue) and Description (green): 2.13) As we have two identical "Windows 10" entries, lets change the VHD entry's name to something more descriptive. Checking the Device type in all three entries we can see that our VHD's Identifier is {default}. The command syntax to change the boot menu description is bcdedit /set {Identifier} description "AnyName". In this example I changed its name to My VHD with command bcdedit /set {default} description "My VHD": Looking better, easier to understand which entry starts what OS: Part Three Remove VHD from boot menu 3.1) I played with another VHD, this time Windows 8.1 but would like to remove it now from boot menu: 3.2) Open elevated (admin) Command Prompt, type bcdedit and hit Enter, browse to Windows Boot Loader entry you want to remove, note the identifier (Windows 8.1 VHD identifier highlighted): 3.3) Type bcdedit /delete {Identifier}, hit Enter to remove the VHD from boot menu: Note There are three different identifiers: The chosen default OS has identifier {default}, the current OS you are signed in at the moment is {current}. All other entries have a long hexadecimal identifier, as in this example the Windows 8.1 VHD identifier above. Typing these long hexadecimal strings is both boring and also might easily be typed wrong. In Command Prompt you can just select the string with mouse and hit Enter to copy it to Clipboard, then paste it to your command. Part Four Troubeshooting, reset boot menu 4.1) Anything can happen. A restart can suddenly show this when you select an OS from boot menu (in screenshots current Windows 10 recovery prompt and old style legacy prompt which can be shown depending on if you have manually changed to legacy boot menu, or added Windows 7 or older OS on multi boot system): This does not happen often but when it happens you might be unable to boot to any of the installed operating systems except Macrium WinPE rescue system which we added to boot menu in steps 2.7 and 2.8. In modern prompt, press F9 to open boot menu. In old style prompt press Enter. You can now select another operating system from menu, or use Macrium to fix boot records as told below (if you did not add Macrium to Windows Boot Menu, restart your PC now booting from Macrium boot disk / USB and continue from 4.3). 4.2) Select Macrium Reflect System Recovery and hit Enter: 4.3) When Macrium has started, select Fix Windows boot problems top left: (Screenshot from a BIOS system, process exactly the same in UEFI.) 4.4) Click Next: 4.5) Click Next: 4.6) Click Finish: 4.7) Click Yes: 4.8) Windows boot records have been reset, your original physical Windows 10 installation will start, no boot menu is shown. To continue playing with native boot you have to add your VHD files again as well as the Macrium rescue boot option as told in Part Two. Note When boot records have been reset with Macrium as told in Part Four above, your Hyper-V virtual machines might not start telling you that one of the Hyper-V components is not running: By reseting boot records Macrium has caused the hypervisor not to work properly. Luckily this is not an issue, we can fix it easily. Simply give this command in an elevated Command Prompt and restart your Hyper-V host PC: Code: bcdedit /set hypervisorlaunchtype auto Hyper-V virtual machines will again run without issues. Information You can naturally also reset your boot records whenever you want to, when you no longer want to boot to your VHD files. Notice that you can update Windows on the natively booted VHD normally, install software, do everything else but you cannot upgrade it to next builds: When / if you want to upgrade, boot to your original host OS, run the VM in Hyper-V and upgrade. When done you can again boot to it using the method told in this tutorial. Tenforums.com
  23. We waited an extra 10 days for this? Microsoft has released its second monthly patches for Windows. Oddities abound, but there’s no fix for the mammoth bluescreen antivirus conflict in Win7 or 8.1, and precious little improvement unless you’re using Japanese calendars. Franck V. (CC0) Microsoft usually releases patches on Tuesdays at 10 a.m. Redmond time. So it came as something of a surprise when we saw the second round of April patches rolling out on the fourth Thursday of the month at 2:30 p.m. Admins, who have come to expect this kind of erratic behavior, are pulling out more gray hair. I could understand if the Fourth Tuesday patches included something critical that required last-minute tweaking. But…, Microsoft. Here’s a rundown of this month’s second-wave patches: Win10 version 1809 - nothing. Delays in the 1809 patches are old news, but the usual excuse involves extra testing in the Windows Insider Release Preview (beta testing) ring. This month, 1809 isn’t in the Release Preview ring. It’s just AWOL. Win10 version 1803 - cumulative update KB 4493437 has a bunch of little “quality” (non-security) fixes, plus 10 separate Japanese date bug fixes. The IE “Custom URI Schemes” bug introduced earlier has apparently been fixed. Both of the other acknowledged bugs are still there, including Rename on a Cluster Shared Volume crashing the system. Win10 versions 1709, 1703, 1607, 1507 - get equally ginormous volumes of little fixes, plus 10 or 11 Japanese date bug fixes, depending on version. Windows 8.1, Server 2012 R2 - Preview of Monthly Rollup KB 4493443 contains seven Japanese date bug fixes and nothing else. Windows 7, Server 2008 R2 - Monthly Rollup Preview KB 4493453 has eight Japanese date bug fixes and bupkis. There are also similarly stunted Monthly Rollup Previews for Server 2008 SP2 and Server 2012, as well as non-cumulative Security-only patches for Win 8.1 and Win 7. The latter contain 17 separately identified Japanese calendar-related fixes -- and nothing else. All of these patches are reserved for those who either specifically select them in Windows Update, download and install them manually, or (shudder) click "Check for updates." Microsoft’s been trying to fix the Japanese calendar every couple of weeks for almost a year. Guess it’s a hard Computer Science problem. Most disconcerting, at least to me, is that there appears to be no resolution to the “dirty six” Win 7 and 8.1 patches released earlier this month that bluescreened PCs running various antivirus programs. Microsoft has promised that Win10 1809 and 1803 would grow a new way to block the installation of Win10 1903, via an opt-in link called Download and install now. I don’t see any hint of that feature just yet. You have to ask yourself why all of these lame patches took so long – and when (or if!) we’ll see a Win10 1809 patch. Join the night watch on the AskWoody Lounge. Winter is coming. Source: Second-wave April Windows patches arrive, not with a bang, but a Japanese whimper (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  24. Hash Check Via MSDN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/downloads/default.aspx#searchTerm=Windows%208.1%20with%20Update&ProductFamilyId=0&Languages=en&PageSize=10&PageIndex=0&FileId=0 Details: November 2014 update rollup for Windows RT 8.1, Windows 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2: New features and improvements/List of the fixed issues: Windows 8.1 RTM Installations-Keys Full versions : Core/Standard .......: 334NH-RXG76-64THK-C7CKG-D3VPTProfessional ........: XHQ8N-C3MCJ-RQXB6-WCHYG-C9WKBProfessional WMC ....: GBFNG-2X3TC-8R27F-RMKYB-JK7QTProfessional VL .....: GCRJD-8NW9H-F2CDX-CCM8D-9D6T9Professional VL WMC .: 789NJ-TQK6T-6XTH8-J39CJ-J8D3PEnterprise ..........: FHQNR-XYXYC-8PMHT-TV4PH-DRQ3HN-versions:Core/Standard N .....: 6NPQ8-PK64X-W4WMM-MF84V-RGB89Professional N ......: JRBBN-4Q997-H4RM2-H3B7W-Q68KCProfessional VL N ...: HMCNV-VVBFX-7HMBH-CTY9B-B4FXYEnterprise N ........: NDRDJ-3YBP2-8WTKD-CK7VB-HT8KWAll Other Edition Installation Keys:http://pastebin.com/M5VV6750 Windows 8.1 with Update [November 2014 Rollup] - MSDN DVD ISO English FTP Direct Download Links #351 >>> Windows 8.1 with Update (multiple editions) - DVD (English) File: en_windows_8.1_with_update_x64_dvd_6051480.isoCRC-32: cd5bc9f1MD4: 86112ed6364204bc96a3046fd931b2cbMD5: e0d4594e56c0545d379340e0db9519a5SHA-1: a8b5df0b0816280ae18017bc4b119c77b6c6eb7magnet:?xt=urn:btih:df6c4765ded49d65a29bef89014bdb9ba3758f66&dn=en_windows_8.1_with_update_x64_dvd_6051480.isoOr with Public Tracker Magnet Linkmagnet:?xt=urn:btih:DF6C4765DED49D65A29BEF89014BDB9BA3758F66&dn=en_windows_8.1_with_update_x64_dvd_6051480.iso&tr=http%3a%2f%2f94.228.192.98%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fannounce.torrentsmd.com%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fbeta.mytracker.me%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fexodus.desync.com%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fretracker.local%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2ftracker.blazing.de%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2f10.rarbg.com%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2fbt.rghost.net%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2fopen.demonii.com%3a1337%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.istole.it%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.jamendo.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.openbittorrent.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.prq.to%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.publicbt.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.token.ro%3a80%2fannounceOr Multi Collection Magnet Link:magnet:?xt=urn:btih:2F7D04E7F4B3D29AEF3AB54D86016B47A80AE7B8&dn=Windows%208.1%20with%20Update%203%20%28English%29&tr=http%3a%2f%2fbt.nnm-club.info%3a2710%2f002e7cdbb48cbaace76c0eed6f2ec311%2fannounce Windows 8.1 with Update (multiple editions) (x86) - 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DVD (English) File: en_windows_8.1_pro_n_vl_with_update_x86_dvd_6051127.isoCRC-32: 1afbb41cMD4: 4b2816dc9058017de71085017833a770MD5: 36cfcecf1c7817976a2f42d06092b617SHA-1: ea571feb0ad31f1daa4916f161dc87416d8690camagnet:?xt=urn:btih:6dc4a106185e640a67d0105af951f63b21576eb9&dn=en_windows_8.1_pro_n_vl_with_update_x86_dvd_6051127.isomagnet:?xt=urn:btih:6DC4A106185E640A67D0105AF951F63B21576EB9&dn=en_windows_8.1_pro_n_vl_with_update_x86_dvd_6051127.iso&tr=http%3a%2f%2f94.228.192.98%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fannounce.torrentsmd.com%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.jamendo.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fexodus.desync.com%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fretracker.local%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2ftracker.blazing.de%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.publicbt.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2f10.rarbg.com%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2fbt.rghost.net%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.token.ro%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.istole.it%3a80%2fannouncemagnet:?xt=urn:btih:07F0BF62E1510171E9E4A477EDCBF0A75DAE84B2&dn=Windows%208.1%20N%20with%20Update%203%20%28English%29&tr=http%3a%2f%2fbt.nnm-club.info%3a2710%2f002e7cdb7ba87f9f4d7dde0bb759b601%2fannounce Windows 8.1 Enterprise N with Update - DVD (English) File: en_windows_8.1_enterprise_n_with_update_x64_dvd_6050225.isoCRC-32: 7b73f762MD4: 7700c9878a61eeb98c8a0754d3c0a8f8MD5: 3dd3707820473dfa2adff73b2c44d4f3SHA-1: 33e141a1a7f02b4b3b4f590fb5ae47b71f18c3b8magnet:?xt=urn:btih:55208160763ccd10206f8952a96991835fc78e4f&dn=en%5Fwindows%5F8.1%5Fenterprise%5Fn%5Fwith%5Fupdate%5Fx64%5Fdvd%5F6050225.iso&tr=udp://open.demonii.com:1337/announcemagnet:?xt=urn:btih:55208160763ccd10206f8952a96991835fc78e4f&dn=en_windows_8.1_enterprise_n_with_update_x64_dvd_6050225.isomagnet:?xt=urn:btih:55208160763CCD10206F8952A96991835FC78E4F&dn=en_windows_8.1_enterprise_n_with_update_x64_dvd_6050225.iso&tr=http%3a%2f%2f94.228.192.98%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fannounce.torrentsmd.com%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.jamendo.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fexodus.desync.com%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fretracker.local%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2ftracker.blazing.de%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.publicbt.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2f10.rarbg.com%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2fbt.rghost.net%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.token.ro%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.istole.it%3a80%2fannouncemagnet:?xt=urn:btih:07F0BF62E1510171E9E4A477EDCBF0A75DAE84B2&dn=Windows%208.1%20N%20with%20Update%203%20%28English%29&tr=http%3a%2f%2fbt.nnm-club.info%3a2710%2f002e7cdb7ba87f9f4d7dde0bb759b601%2fannounce Windows 8.1 Enterprise N with Update (x86) - DVD (English) File: en_windows_8.1_enterprise_n_with_update_x86_dvd_6050217.isoCRC-32: 3d8eee43MD4: b4007d7e4b7688ac036b5f090c418d92MD5: 826a4b6107f78e1e3310185534dc5155SHA-1: e4651c6ed8b6e5ad30da429a1dfb4be8760504f0magnet:?xt=urn:btih:a867941e07ad4f6e2e880b0850d8cd2181342921&dn=en%5Fwindows%5F8.1%5Fenterprise%5Fn%5Fwith%5Fupdate%5Fx86%5Fdvd%5F6050217.iso&tr=udp://open.demonii.com:1337/announcemagnet:?xt=urn:btih:a867941e07ad4f6e2e880b0850d8cd2181342921&dn=en_windows_8.1_enterprise_n_with_update_x86_dvd_6050217.isomagnet:?xt=urn:btih:A867941E07AD4F6E2E880B0850D8CD2181342921&dn=en_windows_8.1_enterprise_n_with_update_x86_dvd_6050217.iso&tr=http%3a%2f%2f94.228.192.98%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fannounce.torrentsmd.com%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.jamendo.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fexodus.desync.com%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fretracker.local%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2ftracker.blazing.de%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.publicbt.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2f10.rarbg.com%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2fbt.rghost.net%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.token.ro%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.istole.it%3a80%2fannouncemagnet:?xt=urn:btih:07F0BF62E1510171E9E4A477EDCBF0A75DAE84B2&dn=Windows%208.1%20N%20with%20Update%203%20%28English%29&tr=http%3a%2f%2fbt.nnm-club.info%3a2710%2f002e7cdb7ba87f9f4d7dde0bb759b601%2fannounce ---------------------------------- * Windows 8.1 Language Pack with Update (Multiple Languages) * ---------------------------------- Languages: English, Japanese, Korean, Arabic, Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, German, Greek, Spanish, Estonian, Finnish, French, Hebrew, Croatian, Hungarian, Italian, Lithuanian, Latvian, Dutch, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese-Brazil, Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Slovenian, Serbian, Swedish, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Chinese - Hong Kong SAR, Chinese - Simplified, Portuguese-Portugal Windows 8.1 Language Pack with Update - DVD (Multiple Languages) File Name: mu_windows_8.1_language_pack_with_update_x64_dvd_6066963.isoSHA1: 70940468031652C3E7384AB92D4F7969FBF5A004magnet:?xt=urn:btih:BFCC5C9B8D97F4758622025E92F70FE970663726magnet:?xt=urn:btih:B21CC217C3A836FD12E57F3BCC7CFD72E8996A2Cmagnet:?xt=urn:btih:BFCC5C9B8D97F4758622025E92F70FE970663726&dn=mu_windows_8.1_language_pack_with_update_x64_dvd_6066963.iso&tr=http%3a%2f%2fannounce.torrentsmd.eu%3a6969%2fannounce.php%3fpasskey%3d1d5007ada34c95a6523ba4e4458cd7ec&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.publicbt.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.openbittorrent.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fannounce.torrentsmd.me%3a8080%2fannounce.php%3fpasskey%3d1d5007ada34c95a6523ba4e4458cd7ec Windows 8.1 Language Pack with Update (x86) - DVD (Multiple Languages) File Name: mu_windows_8.1_language_pack_with_update_x86_dvd_6066964.isoSHA1: B6EAC4C1F57493C5B6F67A20A214BF4B0B62BF59magnet:?xt=urn:btih:5BECDDB1EA903A24BCA157EC843FFD35010E8C0Bmagnet:?xt=urn:btih:B21CC217C3A836FD12E57F3BCC7CFD72E8996A2Cmagnet:?xt=urn:btih:5BECDDB1EA903A24BCA157EC843FFD35010E8C0B&dn=mu_windows_8.1_language_pack_with_update_x86_dvd_6066964.iso&tr=http%3a%2f%2fannounce.torrentsmd.eu%3a6969%2fannounce.php%3fpasskey%3d1d5007ada34c95a6523ba4e4458cd7ec&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.publicbt.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.openbittorrent.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fannounce.torrentsmd.me%3a8080%2fannounce.php%3fpasskey%3d1d5007ada34c95a6523ba4e4458cd7ec ------- * Windows Server 2012 R2 with Update [November 2014 Rollup] - MSDN Edition(s) * -------- [English l Release Date: 12/15/2014] Hash Check Via MSDN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/downloads/default.aspx#searchTerm=Windows%20Server%202012%20R2&ProductFamilyId=0&Languages=en&PageSize=10&PageIndex=0&FileId=0 Windows Server 2012 R2 Installations-Keys: Windows Server 2012 R2 with Update (x64) - DVD (English) Windows Server 2012 R2 VL with Update (x64) - DVD (English) Windows Storage Server 2012 R2 & Windows Server 2012 R2 Foundation with Update x64 DVD (English) Windows Server 2012 R2 Essentials with Update (x64) - DVD (English) --------------------------------- * Windows Server 2012 R2 Language Pack with Update (Multiple Languages) * ---------------------------------- Languages: Windows Server 2012 R2 Language Pack with Update (x64) - DVD (Multiple Languages) ---------------------------- * Windows Embedded 8.1 Industry with Update Edition(s)* ---------------------------------- Windows Embedded 8.1 Industry Installations-Keys: Embedded=6Q7P9-NFD2F-7JGQR-3X277-9BQMREmbeddedEval=VV6W8-NF7BJ-FKHGQ-P424D-FHC7KEmbeddedAutomotive=J2ND2-BCW98-8669Y-HPBF3-RDY99EmbeddedE=MNKW8-HYCCD-G88JY-283WV-W9FX9EmbeddedEEval=VKKC6-NQQQH-JW3QX-XRVKX-KJJK9EmbeddedIndustry=GN7VX-YKPC2-XY98J-9RYKX-KP9HVEmbeddedIndustryA=TP7MN-9H7FK-P4PJM-K6KJT-Y97RYEmbeddedIndustryE=NDXXJ-YX29Q-JDY6B-C93G8-TQ6WHEmbeddedIndustryEEval=PPBKC-NQYJM-JJ8X6-26W42-VFQ4REmbeddedIndustryEval=XDJ76-KNBM8-BB9BK-B4CHH-XD6VRAll Edition Installation Keys: http://pastebin.com/M5VV6750 Windows Embedded 8.1 Industry Enterprise & Pro with Update (x64/x32) - DVD (English) magnet:?xt=urn:btih:e4697090636dd157ab6e1eab46fc3ce7bdb06de6 magnet:?xt=urn:btih:E4697090636DD157AB6E1EAB46FC3CE7BDB06DE6&dn=en_Windows_8.1_Embedded_with_Update_3&tr=http%3a%2f%2f94.228.192.98%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fannounce.torrentsmd.com%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.jamendo.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fexodus.desync.com%3a6969%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2fretracker.local%2fannounce&tr=http%3a%2f%2ftracker.blazing.de%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.publicbt.com%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2f10.rarbg.com%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2fbt.rghost.net%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.token.ro%3a80%2fannounce&tr=udp%3a%2f%2ftracker.istole.it%3a80%2fannounce Credit & Thanks to: Threat, GezoeSloog, Paul [MDL]ru-board, NNM-Club also every nsane members contributing download links & discussion. : ) Some Of the Important Direct l Magnet l Torrent Download Links: * Be caution some links may be removed or Remote Upload may fail to order to get the original MSDN Hash etc... *
  25. April 2019 Windows patches wreaked havoc on many PCs, with crashes linked to Sophos, Avast and Avira products and debilitating slowdown reports on Win10 1809 machines. Who’s testing this stuff? Ends up the answer isn’t all that simple. Thinkstock/Microsoft This month’s Patch Tuesday sent many Windows users running for cover. As I reported on Wednesday morning, Win7 and 8.1 machines running Sophos antivirus products frequently refused to boot. The dragnet has since expanded, with both Avira and Avast now admitting their products are having problems, and rumors are swirling about many other antivirus manufacturers. You have to ask: Who’s testing this stuff? In a nutshell, we’ve seen PC-breaking behavior with all of these April patches: Win7 and Server 2008 R2 Monthly Rollup (KB 4493472) and Security-only (KB 4493448) patches Win8.1 and Server 2012 R2 Monthly Rollup (KB 4493446) and Security-only (KB 4493467) patches Server 2012 Monthly Rollup (KB 4493451) and Security-only (KB 4493450 ) patches Microsoft has modified the Knowledge Base articles for all six of those patches to include the admonition: Microsoft and Sophos have identified an issue on devices with Sophos Endpoint Protection installed and managed by either Sophos Central or Sophos Enterprise Console (SEC) that may cause the system to freeze or hang upon restart after installing this update. Which is a bit disingenuous. In fact, Sophos, Avast and Avira have all reported problems with various combinations of those patches. I’ve seen an anonymous report that the Win7 patch interferes with McAfee virus definition updates. Nobody knows what to think because there's been no clear advice from Redmond. Microsoft now says that it ... has temporarily blocked devices from receiving this update if the Sophos Endpoint is installed until a solution is available. Spiceworks has a long-running thread on the screw-up. Much to their credit, both Sophos and Avast have named employees working on the reports. I’ve heard persistent rumors that Microsoft is also blocking the six patches on machines with other antivirus products (Avast? Avira? McAfee?) but there’s no official confirmation. If Microsoft had a solid reputation for reporting the antics of its installers, I’d be skeptical of the rumors. But, of course, Microsoft’s reputation is precisely the opposite. We’re coming up on three days after the bomb dropped, and we really have no idea. There’s an additional problem that’s starting to rear its ugly head. I’m seeing many reports of this month’s first cumulative update for Win10 version 1809, KB 4493509, slowing machines down to the point they’re unusable. Avira has mentioned this problem, too. Right now, with the background decibel level so high, it’s hard to know exactly what’s causing problems. But anyone running Windows 7, 8.1, Server 2008 R2, 2012, or 2012 R2 should be cautious. And Win10 version 1809 cumulative updates are always a crapshoot — as many of you can painfully attest. Why isn’t anybody testing this stuff? Good question, but there’s no easy answer. Clearly, there was some change in those six patches that broke a long-standing entry into the internals of Windows. Clearly, at least some Sophos, Avast and Avira products used the now-broken hook. Does Microsoft have the right to cut off a hole in Windows, even if it’s being used by antivirus vendors? Certainly. Do the antivirus vendors have a right to know about — be explicitly warned about — changes that are coming that’ll break their products? I would answer yes. Should everybody — Microsoft and the antivirus vendors — be testing this stuff before it’s released? Absolutely. We’re talking about major AV products here, with millions of users. We can point the finger in a dozen different directions, but there’s one sad fact: Whoever decided to release these six patches either a) didn’t know or b) didn’t care that they’d brick millions of machines. Which is worse? Doesn't matter. We, the customers, got screwed. All in all, it would be a very good idea to sit out this month’s patches until Microsoft and the AV vendors get their acts together. I know there are people who say you have to prioritize one patch or another — get those patches installed right away, bucko! — but at this point, unless you’re protecting state secrets, there’s no point in sticking your finger in the pencil sharpener. We’ve moved to MS-DEFCON 1 on the AskWoody Lounge. Source: This month’s Windows patching debacle gradually comes into focus (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
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