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  1. vissha

    Windows 95 1.3

    Windows 95 brings you back to 1995 allowing you to run Windows 95 as a portable app without the need for installation, partitioning or dual booting. Video tutorial available. You can relive the good old days (yes, 1995 is the good old days) with this bit of nostalgic software that can be run on multiple operating systems including Windows 10. Of course, many of us recall reinstalling Windows 95 repeatedly, especially if you were or are a gamer. We considered Windows 95 a three-year-plus beta of Windows 98SE when Microsoft finally got it "right." We also think that the new generation of computer users will enjoy seeing what Windows used to be as it approaches the Quadranscentennial celebration. We don't know where we found the word Quadranscentennial, but we did, so there it is. Windows 10 haters might discover that Windows 10 isn't so bad after all. Changelog: Added more credits Added more help Home: https://github.com/felixrieseberg/windows95 Download Page: https://github.com/felixrieseberg/windows95/releases Downloads for macOS Standalone Downloads for Windows Setup, 64-bit Setup, 32-bit Standalone, 32-bit Standalone, 64-bit Downloads for Linux deb, 64-bit rpm, 64-bit
  2. An electron version of Windows 95 Windows 95 is the operating system that’s now used as a yardstick for what’s possible on modern devices and platforms. We’ve seen Microsoft’s popular OS appear on the Apple Watch, an Android Wear smartwatch, and even the Xbox One. Today, someone has gone a step further and made Windows 95 into an app that you can run on macOS, Windows, and Linux. Slack developer Felix Rieseberg is responsible for this glorious app, allowing nostalgia lovers to play around with Windows 95 in an electron app. Rieseberg has published the source code and app installers for this project on Github, and apps like Wordpad, phone dialer, MS Paint, and Minesweeper all run like you’d expect. Sadly, Internet Explorer isn’t fully functional as it simply refuses to load pages. The app its only 129MB in size and you can download it over at Github for both macOS and Windows. Once it’s running it surprisingly only takes up around 200MB of RAM, even when running all of the old Windows 95 system utilities, apps, and games. If you run into any issues with the app you can always reset the Windows 95 instance inside the app and start over again. Enjoy this quirky trip down memory lane. Source
  3. Windows 95 still powering Pentagon PCs The United States Department of Defense is now migrating to Windows 10 as part of a broader effort announced in collaboration with Microsoft, and the transition to the new operating system is projected to be finalized in the fall of this year. In the meantime, however, there are lots of computers operated by the Pentagon that are still running older Windows versions, and according to officials, some are even powered by Windows 95 or 98. Speaking about Pentagon’s efforts to boost security of its systems, Daryl Haegley, program manager for the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy, Installations and Environment, has revealed that many of the critical computers are currently powered by unsupported Windows versions, including not only Windows XP (which is no longer getting updates since April 2014) but also releases that are more than 20 years old. “About 75 percent of the devices that are control systems are on Windows XP or other nonsupported operating systems,” he said, adding that these stats were collected after visits to different 15 military sites. Don’t worry, be happy Haegley says there’s no reason to worry, though, adding that all these computers do not have an Internet connection, so they are harder to hack. This isn’t impossible, though, especially if these systems are part of larger networks where other computers are connected to the web. “A lot of these systems are still Windows 95 or 98, and that’s OK—if they’re not connected to the internet,” Haegley explained. DefenseOne says that systems running Windows 95 or 98 feature sensors that connect to the Internet anyway, so they’re more or less vulnerable to attacks, and running old operating systems certainly doesn’t help. In the end, Haegley calls for the US DoD to expand its bug bounty programs and call for security researchers to look for vulnerabilities not only in its websites but also in critical systems that could be exposed to cyberattacks launched by other states. Source
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