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  1. By Ed Bott for The Ed Bott Report Believe it or not, some hardy souls are still running Windows 7 on PCs equipped with turn-of-the-century Pentium III CPUs. But the latest round of Windows 7 security patches won't install on those devices. Here's the background. In August 2000, nearly 18 years ago, Intel proudly showed off its newest CPU family, the Pentium 4. ZDNet was there to cover the announcement and highlighted one of the signature features of the new chip: I'm old enough to remember that announcement, and yes, the addition of support for Streaming SIMD Extensions 2 (SSE2) was a big deal at the time. It was a high-end feature in 2000, but by 2004 or so every mainstream processor supported this feature. The CPU in your more modern CPU almost certainly supports a later version; the latest and greatest release is SSE 4.2. The point is, if you're running a PC today, in mid-2018, that doesn't support SSE2, you should be charging admission to your computer museum. You probably upgraded it from Windows 98 to Windows XP and then to Windows 7, and you've been humming along for nearly two decades, which is impressive. SSE2 support became a big deal in 2012, when Microsoft announced that SSE2 support was one of three mandatory features for its new OS. Windows 10 has the same requirements. That was six years ago, an eternity in computing terms, so imagine my surprise when the subject came up again just last week, this time in the context of Windows 7. The problem began with the March 2018 monthly security update for Windows 7 (KB4088875), which included this warning under the "Known issues" heading: A Stop error occurs on computers that don't support Streaming Single Instructions Multiple Data (SIMD) Extensions 2 (SSE2). As my erstwhile coauthor and longtime friend Woody Leonhard noted in his wrap-up of the issue, the text alongside that issue, under the column labeled "Workaround," has changed over the past three months. Initially, it said, "Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release." But in the latest (June) update, the text now reads: "Upgrade your machines with a processor that supports SSE2 or virtualize those machines." Is this a violation of Microsoft's support commitment to its customers using Windows 7? Not under the terms of the Microsoft Business, Developer and Desktop Operating Systems Policy, which anticipates this very situation: And that's exactly what appears to have happened here. Beginning with the March update, those cumulative Windows 7 patches won't install on a Pentium III system. Microsoft hasn't disclosed the reason behind that incompatibility, but you don't need much of an imagination to figure that the problem is probably related to the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities, which affect two decades' worth of Intel CPUs. I've asked Microsoft for comment, and I expect a vigorous "No comment." (On the off chance that they surprise me, I will update this post.) But even without their comment I can surmise that the massive changes required by the Meltdown/Spectre patches were too much for the Pentium III family to handle, and so those machines reached the end of the Windows 7 support cycle about 18 months earlier than their younger brethren. Does Microsoft have a responsibility to support ancient CPU architectures like this? I have a hard time summoning much sympathy for anyone who has managed to squeeze 18 years of life from a PC and can probably replace it with one that is 20 times more powerful at about 20 percent of the price. What's remarkable, in fact, is how rarely this has happened in the past. Last year, Microsoft cut off support for feature updates for a very small number of Windows 10 PCs but agreed to continue providing security updates until 2023. And, of course, the whole "Vista Capable" debacle will forever be a stain on Microsoft's reputation. But those incidents involved hardware that was either brand new or only a few years old. When you're demanding support for hardware that's nearly old enough to vote, you have a much weaker case. And in this set of circumstances, the bottom line is that the support window for an 18-year-old device is being shaved by roughly 18 months. Given the sudden and violent nature of the Spectre/Meltdown issues, that hardly seems unfair. If you're one of the very small number of people still running Pentium III hardware, you might do well to recall the words of the great George Burns, who turned growing old into a career. "I get up every morning and read the obituary column," he once famously said. "If my name's not there, I eat breakfast." For anyone trying to extend the life of a 1990s-era PC, check the obituaries. Then skip breakfast and go shopping for a modern computing device. Source
  2. Q: Is it true that Windows 10 is more secure than Windows 7? A: Microsoft has made a concerted effort to get users to upgrade to Windows 10 since it was released in 2015 and touting security and performance have been their primary tactics. Despite their best efforts, Windows 7 continues to be a very popular operating system, especially with businesses, but that will have to change in the near future. Mainstream support for Windows 7 actually expired in early 2015 with extended support slated to end in January of 2020. The primary difference in these support levels is that when mainstream support ends, performance improvements, new features and free support also end. Extended support means that Microsoft will only provide bug fixes and security updates. Essentially, anyone running Windows 7 should be planning to transition to another supported OS over the next year and a half. Security comparison Microsoft has attempted to use scare tactics in the past to convince users to upgrade, but they have been called out on some of their claims by many in the tech community. However, a third-party security company recently published data on their users supporting Microsoft’s claims that Windows 10 is more secure. Webroot reported that only 15% of the total known malware files in 2017 were found on Windows 10 systems while 63 percent of the known malicious files were found on Windows 7 systems. There are a number of reasons for this pronounced imbalance, but a major difference is that Windows 10 forces automatic updates while Windows 7 allows users to fully control when updates are installed. There’s no doubt that Microsoft attempted to ‘harden’ Windows 10 against many of the known exploit strategies used by malicious code writers, which is also a likely contributor. A great example of this was seen during the WannaCry ransomware attacks last year as the vast majority of victims were running Windows 7 and Windows 10 users were completely unaffected. Since Windows 7 was originally released in 2009, hackers have had a longer time to discover exploits and create clever tactics to compromise users. Knowing of these tactics, Microsoft created Windows 10 with completely new code, making many of the Windows 7 specific exploits harmless to it’s users. Performance improvements Windows 10 was designed to startup faster and recognize substantially more RAM, so you may notice a slight increase in performance over Windows 7 on the same hardware. We’ve seen Windows 10 work very well on lots of older computers as well, especially if you add a little extra RAM while upgrading. If you really want to bump up the performance on an older computer, swap out the old hard drive for a new Solid State Drive (SSD) because your hard drive is always the biggest bottleneck to overall performance. More like Windows 7 One of the biggest complaints from those upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 10 is the overall look and feel. While you can never get Windows 10 to look and feel exactly like Windows 7, there are lots of little tweaks that can help minimize the differences so that it’s little more comfortable during your transition. Source
  3. All Activation Windows 7-8-10 v19.3 - 2018 All methods of activation in the hand tested after the "anti-piracy" KB971033 update DG Win & Soft offers you a complete collection of programs and ways to Activate Windows. All methods and programs personally verified by us many times and we can safely recommend them to you. NOTE: All programs must be Run as Administrator! Additional Information: - If you have a direct hand, you want to activate in the Off-line mode and no longer bother to search for keys every six months, then you are prepared activation via firmware BIOS. But be careful, because if your not the right things, you have a chance to bungle the operation and will have to contact the service center. And keep in mind that for every BIOS (AMI, Award, Phoenix) has its own specific program (AMI - amitool, etc.), what is your BIOS can see when you boot the computer. - If you do not want to make any changes either in your "iron", or in the Windows itself, and that your activation is not distinguished by anything from legal activation, your choice of KMS server. With the use of virtual machines, this method can also be called Off-line. But you should know that this method of activation for six months and 180 days, you again have to repeat it. Also, this method only and Professional version Enterprise - If you did not accept neither the first nor the second of our suggested methods you can use the activators. Without going into too much detail, we can say that activators emulate the BIOS with slicom 2.1. But no one gives a guarantee that Microsoft will not release a patch or update that will detect the presence of emulation and reset the activation. We recommend to start with Windows 7 Activator Loader eXtreme Edition (Napalum), because He has a huge number of settings and features and good will activate automatically What's new in the assembly: Updated KMS section All new marked as (New) Added build option in the form of installation executable file List of programs: Office 2013-2016 C2R (New) Office 2013-2016 C2R License v1.04 (New) Garbage Collector v1.3.4 (New) PIDKey v2.1.2.1017 MSActBackUp v1.2.3 Microsoft Product Keys 2.6.3 Re-Loader Activator 3.0 Beta 3 KMS Tools 08/07/2018 by Ratiborus (New) KMSAuto Lite 1.3.4 KMSAuto Net 2016 1.5.3 KMSmicro WO w7 v1.0.1 KMSpico 10.2.0 Final SuperMini_KMS AAct v3.8.4 (New) AAct Network 1.0.1 (New) Windows 7 Loader eXtremev3.503 Re-Loader Activator 2.6 Final Microsoft Toolkit 2.6.2 ODIN 1.3.7 by secr9tos GUI MBR SLIC Loader 0.621 v1.2 Windows Loader v2.2 WindSLIC-UEFI-SLIC-injector SLIC 2.1 BINS FAQ on creating firmware SLIC_ToolKit_V3.2 Programs for firmware Resetting the trial period (rearm) Three-component activation What's New in Build v19.3: • Added a new language to the shell • Now you can switch the language to English (US) and back to Russian (RU) (the switch is in the top panel) • A new kind of activator for the office + Garbage Collector • Updated other KMS • All marked with (New) Language: Russian, English OS: Windows (XP), Windows (Vista), Windows (7), Windows (8), Windows (10). Download - 326 MB: Site: https://sendit.cloud Sharecode[?]: /paezalxzmnzl Site: https://www.multiup.eu/ Sharecode[?]: download/bdd2bb77d29465432d86ac72a2b664c3/all-activation-windows-7-8-10-v19-3-20_-p2p.rar
  4. Microsoft's shift to Windows-as-a-service (WaaS) for Windows 10 crafted a repetitive, predictable schedule of version release and support expiration dates for Windows 10. Although consumers can essentially ignore any schedule - Microsoft decides when their devices are upgraded - business customers and their IT personnel should be marking the calendar with the important upcoming events. To keep up with 10's WaaS schedule, pencil in these dates. July 31, 2018 By this date Microsoft will proclaim 1803, aka the "April 2018 Update," as suitable for broad deployment across the enterprise. The update, which began reaching consumer customers April 30, will start landing on Windows 10 Pro and Windows 10 Enterprise PCs that use Windows Update for Business (WUfB) to download and install feature upgrades. Oct. 9, 2018 Microsoft retires Windows 10 1703, the early-2017 feature upgrade labeled Creators Update, for customers running Windows 10 Home and Windows 10 Pro. For Windows 10 Enterprise and Windows 10 Education, today is the end of support for version 1607, aka the Anniversary Update from 2016. Those customers must migrate to a newer version – 1703, 1709 or 1803 – by this date to continue receiving security patches. Jan. 15, 2019 Around this date, Microsoft will declare 1809 as thoroughly tested by consumers, and thus, ready for wide deployment throughout the enterprise. The September update will start appearing on Windows 10 Pro and Windows 10 Enterprise PCs that rely on Windows Update for Business (WUfB) March 12, 2019 Windows 10 1903 launches between this date and late April. April 9, 2019 Microsoft removes Windows 10 1709, aka 2017's Fall Creators Update, from the Windows 10 Home and Windows 10 Pro support lists, halting security and non-security updates to devices running those editions. icrosoft's latest moves have established that the company starts counting the months of support from the actual launch of the feature upgrade, not from the supposed March and September release targets. Microsoft sets the end-of-support date on the first Patch Tuesday – the second Tuesday of the month – following the 18th or 24th month anniversary of release. For example, Microsoft started shipping 1803 on April 30, 2018, making the 18th-month anniversary Oct. 30, 2019. But the stop-support date for Windows 10 1803 has been penciled in as Nov. 12, 2019, the next Patch Tuesday. Clear? Good. July 15, 2019 Around this date, Microsoft will notify customers -- on a post to a company blog -- that Windows 10 1903 is stable enough to deploy to all corporate PCs and will simultaneously begin seeding Windows 10 Pro and Windows 10 Enterprise PCs with the upgrade via Windows Update for Business (WUfB). Sept. 10, 2019 Windows 10 1909 begins reaching users at some point between this date and the end of October. Nov. 12, 2019 Microsoft halts support for Windows 10 1803, putting an end to security and non-security updates to devices running the feature upgrade. All editions of Windows 10 – Home, Pro, Enterprise and Education – will exit support on this date, according to the definitive "Windows lifecycle fact sheet." As of the 1709 feature upgrade, Microsoft has dropped the extra six months of support for Windows 10 Enterprise and Windows 10 Education customers. Microsoft was cagey when it first announced the extra six months earlier this year; it specifically called out the feature upgrades issued up until then – 1511, 1607, 1703 and 1709 – but said nothing about an extension for, say, 1803. At the time, Computerworld expected that the support addendum would be made permanent for Windows 10 Enterprise and Windows 10 Education, in part because research analysts confirmed that many of their corporate clients hoped for a 24-month support lifecycle. Microsoft didn't agree. This is also the date when Microsoft retires Windows 10 Enterprise 1709 and Windows 10 Education 1709 from support. Customers running those must upgrade to version 1809, 1903 or 1909 by this date to continue receiving security patches and non-security bug fixes. Jan. 14, 2020 Microsoft will retire Windows 7 from support on this date, marking the general deadline for enterprises to replace that OS with Windows 10. There will undoubtedly be laggards, and some companies will probably pay to extend support, assuming Microsoft offers something for Windows 7 that resembles the "Premium Assurance" for Windows Server and SQL Server. What with Windows 7 expected to remain on huge numbers of PCs come the 2020 retirement – perhaps on as up to 42% of all Windows personal computers – Computerworld believes it's inevitable that Microsoft will dangle a more-money-for-more-support deal. How much time? Computerworld's bet is just 12 months, the same stretch Microsoft offers Windows 10 Enterprise and Windows 10 Education volume licensees when they pay for what it calls "paid supplemental servicing," a new program the company kicked off in February. Jan. 15, 2020 Somewhere near this date, Microsoft will proclaim 1909 as sufficiently tested (by consumers) and ready for wide deployment (by commercial customers). The September update will begin appearing on Windows 10 Pro and Windows 10 Enterprise PCs that rely on Windows Update for Business (WUfB). March 10, 2020 Windows 10 2003 releases some time between this date and late April. April 14, 2020 Microsoft strikes Windows 10 1809 from the support list on this date or later, stopping security and non-security updates to devices running the edition. (The most likely alternate stop date would be May 12, 2020, which could come into play if Microsoft releases 1809 after Oct. 31, 2019.) Source
  5. The massive security hole introduced by Microsoft for 64-bit Win7 and Server 2008 R2 now has working proof-of-concept code — and it’s freely available on GitHub. While we haven’t seen exploits in the wild, it’s only a matter of days. Thinkstock/Microsoft Remember the Total Meltdown security hole? Microsoft spread the vulnerability in every 64-bit Win7 and Server 2008 R2 patch released this year, prior to March 29. Specifically, if you installed any of these patches: KB 4056894 Win7/Server 2008 R2 January Monthly Rollup KB 4056897 Win7/Server 2008 R2 January Security-only patch KB 4073578 Hotfix for “Unbootable state for AMD devices in Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1” bug installed in the January Monthly Rollup and Security-only patches KB 4057400 Win7/Server 2008 R2 Preview of the February Monthly Rollup KB 4074598 Win7/Server 2008 R2 February Monthly Rollup KB 4074587 Win7/Server 2008 R2 February Security-only patch KB 4075211 Win7/Server 2008 R2 Preview of the March Monthly Rollup KB 4091290 Hotfix for “smart card based operations fail with error with SCARD_E_NO_SERVICE” bug installed in the February Monthly Rollup KB 4088875 Win7/Server 2008 R2 March Monthly Rollup KB 4088878 Win7/Server 2008 R2 March Security-only patch KB 4088881 Win7/Server 2008 R2 Preview of April Monthly Rollup ... your machine was left in an exposed state. Microsoft made changes to your PC that makes it easy for a running to program to look at, or modify, any data on your computer. Security researcher Ulf Frisk posted details on March 27, giving the security hole the “Total Meltdown” moniker. That’s in reference to the well-publicized Meltdown and Spectre security holes, which initially started this year’s patching frenzy. All of these patches and repatches existed primarily to circumvent Meltdown and Spectre — two security vulnerabilities that, to this day, have never been spotted in the wild. Keep in mind that Total Meltdown only applies to 64-bit versions of Win7 and Server 2008 R2 — and that it doesn’t allow malicious programs to run on your machine, it “only” allows them to read or write data anywhere. Microsoft responded on March 29 with a patch, KB 4100480, which plugs the Total Meltdown security hole but introduces all sorts of additional problems. See threads started by MrBrian and Susan Bradley on AskWoody. According to the KB article, that patch has been superceded by the two April Win7 security patches, released on April 10: KB 4093118 Win7/Server 2008 R2 April Monthly Rollup KB 4093108 Win7/Server 2008 R2 April Security-only patch Both of those, in turn, were riddled with bugs. The Monthly Rollup, in particular, was so bad that Microsoft re-released it on April 12. But the new version kept installing and re-installing itself, even though Windows flagged it as already installed. If you get hit with that bug, the only solution at this point is to hide the update. In the past couple of days, self-described “Hacker and Infosec Researcher” XPN has posted details of a working exploit that takes advantage of Microsoft’s Total Meltdown security hole. The exploit code, updated yesterday, is available on GitHub. XPN also has a YouTube video showing how quickly it all goes by. Remember: This is code that can retrieve or change any data in memory from a running program. Before it kicks in, a would-be attacker has to get the program running on your machine. But once it's running, any program can get to any data on your machine. On AskWoody, GoneToPlaid lays it out: I looked at the proof of concept code posted on GitHub by XPN. No malware techniques whatsoever were required, except simply replacing tokens for EPROCESS with SYSTEM. Yet this is done after the code has already located all computer memory to read in less than a second. The code doesn’t go through the process of actually reading the memory since XPN was merely showing everyone how quickly the code was able to gain access to all computer memory, and then to change the access rights to all computer memory. As of this moment, I haven’t heard of any active exploits that take advantage of the Total Meltdown security hole, but with working code so easily available, it’s only a matter of time. A short amount of time, at that. How to tell if you’re exposed? Step 1. Look at your Update History and see if you have any patches installed this year. (See the list at the beginning of this article.) No patches from 2018? You’re off the hook for Total Meltdown, although you’re exposed for the (few) other real security holes plugged this year. Step 2. If you have any of the Windows patches listed above, look to see if you have KB 4100480, 4093108 or 4093118 installed. If any of those three are installed, you’re fine. Step 3. If you have one of the Total Meltdown-infected patches installed, and you haven’t yet installed KB 4100480, 4093108 or 4093118, you’re in for some interesting times. As best I can tell, you have three options: Take Susan Bradley’s advice and roll back your machine to its state before the patching insanity started in January. That’s a massive, thankless task, and it leaves you exposed to the (few) real security holes plugged this year. Download and manually install the KB 4093108 Security-only patch. Use Windows Update to install all of the checked April Windows patches, including the KB 4093118 Monthly Rollup. Be aware of the bugs in KB 4093108 and 4093118 (possible blue screen Session_has_valid_pool_on_Exit). In particular, note that Microsoft has removed the old requirement that your antivirus software give the go-ahead by modifying the QualityCompat registry key. It isn’t clear if that’s a move of desperation — designed to get this month’s security patches pushed onto every machine — or if antivirus manufacturers have cleaned up their products so the old restriction no longer applies (as is the case with Windows 10). By the way, there’s a silver lining to this dreck-drenched cloud. You Win7 folks won’t have any patches at all after Jan. 14, 2020 — a scant 21 months from now. Something to look forward to, amirite? Questions? Hit us on AskWoody. Source: Heads up: Total Meltdown exploit code now available on GitHub (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  6. Multiple, angry reports say the newly fixed Win7 Monthly Rollup for April installs successfully, then installs again, and again — on both 32- and 64-bit versions of Win7. The only known solution is to hide the update. Thinkstock/Microsoft Last week, Microsoft quietly re-released its buggy April Win7 Monthly Rollup patch, KB 4093118. You may recall the patch as a reaction to the Carnak the Magnificent situation we had with the original version of KB 4093118. With the re-release earlier this week of the original Carnak patch, KB 4099950, it’s not clear to me what the recommended installation sequence might be. But this much I know for sure. People all over the internet are complaining that this new version of KB 4093118 installs itself over and over again. An anonymous poster on AskWoody says: KB 4093118 has been installed 7 times on my computer and it still wants to install the same update again On the Microsoft Answers forum, JohnPaulson1 says: I keep downloading and installing this update 2018-04 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB4093118) Installation date: ‎4/‎18/‎2018 15:16 Installation status: Successful And after i do it it keeps appearing when I check for updates On a different Microsoft Answers forum thread, Peter Vaško reports: I cannot install monthly rollup security update KB4093118 on computers with 32bit windows 7… Installation always ends up with computers restarting right after boot. PC starts till 'Wait Please' message is displayed and then after few seconds it reboots. Only help is 'Safe Mode', roll back changes, normal boot. There’s a slightly different take from Liane12345: once you log in and the desktop appears the Computer restarts within 30 seconds And A.D. has another observation: KB4093118 keeps on reappearing after successful install. Update History shows several instances of this KB. The first one was at 11 Apr, now I have several rows from today. And on Technet, Michael Stephen Bryant says: This update reinstalls itself 5 times in a row then keeps asking to be uploaded. There are well-meaning posts advising those afflicted to reset Windows Update with various incantations, but I see no indication that any of those approaches work. The only approach that seems to work is to find the patch in the Windows Update list, right-click on it and choose Hide. Join us in a rousing rendition of “Feed me, Seymour” on the AskWoody Lounge. Source: The gift that keeps on giving: Win7 Monthly Rollup KB 4093118 installs over and over (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  7. A report on Myce suggests that Windows 7 PCs without installed antivirus solutions can't receive new updates via Windows Update anymore unless a change is made to the Windows Registry. Microsoft identified a compatibility issue with "Windows security updates released in January [2018] and a small number of antivirus products". Some antivirus products "make unsupported calls into Windows kernel memory" which can lead to blue screen errors on systems these products are installed on. The company states that devices that run incompatible software may not boot properly anymore. Any antivirus solution for Windows needs to set a key in the Windows Registry to confirm to the operating system that it is compatible and does not use these banned methods anymore. Windows PCs that don't have the Registry key set won't receive security updates anymore according to Microsoft. Microsoft security products such as Windows Defender Antivirus, System Center Endpoint Protection and Microsoft Security Essentials are compatible with the new requirements and set the required Registry key if no third-party solution is installed. Microsoft's Windows 7 operating system is special as it only includes a security tool called Defender which is limited when compared to Windows Defender or Microsoft Security Essentials. Defender won't set the Registry key which means that Windows 7 systems without installed antivirus solution won't have the key in the Registry set. This means ultimately that affected systems don't receive security updates despite the fact that they are still supported by Microsoft. Support for Windows 7 ends on January 14, 2020. Microsoft recommends that Microsoft Security Essentials or a compatible third-party antivirus application is installed on affected Windows 7 machines to resolve the issue. In a default installation of Windows 7 SP1 or Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1, customers will not have an antivirus application installed by default. In these situations, Microsoft recommends installing a compatible and supported antivirus application such as Microsoft Security Essentials or a third-party anti-virus application. The anti-virus software must set a registry key as described below in order to receive the latest Windows security updates. Set the Registry key to enable updates again Windows 7 administrators can set the required Registry key manually on the other hand. This should not cause issues on the machine as no incompatible antivirus solution is installed (none is installed). Tap on the Windows-key and type regedit.exe to launch the built-in Registry Editor. Confirm the UAC prompt if it is displayed. Go to Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\QualityCompat Right-click on QualityCompat and select New > Dword (32-bit) Value. Name it cadca5fe-87d3-4b96-b7fb-a231484277cc Give it the value 0 You can download the following Registry file instead and run it on machines to add the Registry key directly. Download it with a click on the following link: SetAntivirusRegistryKeyWindows.zip Ghacks.net
  8. A big shakeup last night rearranged the way the buggy March Win7 patches install and clean up after themselves, but added to the lengthy list of known bugs. The key looming bug — “Total Meltdown” — remains a patching enigma. Thinkstock Last night we were treated to new versions of the badly banged-up March Win7 patches. It looks like the new ones are the same as the old ones, but the internal handling instructions (the metadata) now force installation of a “Total Meltdown” fix-up patch prior to installing the old patch. Of course, none of this is documented anywhere. Starting with Günter Born’s report, and checking the Microsoft Update Catalog, I can see modified versions of: KB 4088875 – Win7 March Monthly Rollup (dated, in the Update Catalog, as April 4) KB 4088878 – Win7 March Security-only patch (also April 4) KB 4088881 – Preview of the Win7 April Monthly Rollup (also April 4) MrBrian analyzed the content of those patches and came to the conclusion: Literally nothing has changed in the Catalog for the x64 versions of these updates (the only ones that I checked). I assume the same is true for the other versions of these three updates. One can see this by downloading the given updates and checking their digital signature dates. The reason that the date changed in the Catalog for these three updates is because their metadata changed. … [It appears as if] Microsoft is now bundling the download and installation of KB4099950 when one installs any of these three updates in Windows Update. You may recall that KB 4099950 is the fix for the bug, introduced in the March Win7 patches, that knocks out Network Interface Cards and static IP addresses. I talked about KB 4099950 earlier this week. It looks like the metadata has been jiggered so any attempt to install the buggy Win7 patches KB 4088875, 4088878, or 4088881, automatically bundles the fix KB 4099950 and runs it before the original patches are installed. Which means that these new versions of KB 4088875, 4088878, or 4088881 still have the same bugs as the old ones, except the NIC/static IP bug is exterminated in advance because the KB 4099950 fix is automatically run before the original patch. Along with the horse-before-the-cart bundling, the KB articles for both of the Win7 March Monthly Rollup KB 4088875 and the Security-only patch KB 4088878 have yet another bug added to the officially acknowledged list: After you install this update, you may receive a Stop error message that resembles the following when you log off the computer: SESSION_HAS_VALID_POOL_ON_EXIT (ab) And they both now have this admonition: Important Please apply KB4100480 immediately after applying this update. KB4100480 resolves vulnerability in the Windows kernel for the 64-bit (x64) version of Windows. This vulnerability is documented in CVE-2018-1038 . KB 4100480 is the destructive fix for the Total Meltdown security hole — the one introduced by every Win7 patch this year — that I talked about earlier this week. For more details, see abbodi86’s description and MrBrian’s analysis. Remember: There are absolutely no known attacks for Meltdown or Spectre in the wild. But this Total Meltdown bug is a huge one, introduced while trying to fix Meltdown and Spectre. Several people are now reporting that Win7 March Monthly Rollup, KB 4088875, no longer appears in the Windows Update list, and the KB 4088881 Preview is no longer available. Of course there’s no documentation about any of this, but it looks as if Microsoft — which changed KB 4088875 to “important but not checked” a week after it was released — has now yanked the patch, at least for Windows Update users. Sometimes I wonder if things could get even more screwed up. Thx MrBrian, PKCano, abbodi86, gborn, and the AskWoody Street Irregulars. Join us for KB 4090450, 4088879, 2952664, 2976978 and more senseless things on the AskWoody Lounge. Source: Microsoft jiggles — but doesn’t fix — buggy Win7 patches KB 4088875, KB 4088878 (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard) Poster's note: Our old friends KB 2952664 (W7) and KB 2976978(W8.1) that make it easier to upgrade to Windows 10 are back, yet again. Hide 'em if you see 'em folks...
  9. Microsoft issued today an out-of-band security update for 64-bit versions of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. The security update —KB4100480— addresses a security bug discovered by a Swedish security expert earlier this week. The bug was caused by a patch meant to fix the Meltdown vulnerability but accidentally opened the kernel memory wide open. According to Ulf Frisk, Microsoft's January 2018 Meltdown patch (for CVE-2017-5754) allowed any app to extract or write content from/to the kernel memory. This all happened because the Meltdown patch accidentally flipped a bit that controlled access permissions to kernel memory. Frisk said that the March Patch Tuesday appears to have "fixed" the issue, as he was not able to interact with kernel memory. But today, Microsoft released KB4100480 to make sure the vulnerability was closed for good. The accidental bit flip bug now has its own CVE identifier of CVE-2018-1038. The flaw is not remotely exploitable, and attackers need either physical access to a PC, or they need to infect the PC with malware beforehand. Besides KB4100480, Microsoft released another out-of-band security update last Friday, March 23. KB3203399 resolved a vulnerability (CVE-2017-8551) in Microsoft Office that could lead to remote code execution and was meant for Microsoft Project Server 2013 Service Pack 1 users only. Source
  10. WALLONN7

    Total Meltdown?

    Total Meltdown? Did you think Meltdown was bad? Unprivileged applications being able to read kernel memory at speeds possibly as high as megabytes per second was not a good thing. Meet the Windows 7 Meltdown patch from January. It stopped Meltdown but opened up a vulnerability way worse ... It allowed any process to read the complete memory contents at gigabytes per second, oh - it was possible to write to arbitrary memory as well. No fancy exploits were needed. Windows 7 already did the hard work of mapping in the required memory into every running process. Exploitation was just a matter of read and write to already mapped in-process virtual memory. No fancy APIs or syscalls required - just standard read and write! Accessing memory at over 4GB/s, dumping to disk is slower due to disk transfer speeds. How is this possible? In short - the User/Supervisor permission bit was set to User in the PML4 self-referencing entry. This made the page tables available to user mode code in every process. The page tables should normally only be accessible by the kernel itself. The PML4 is the base of the 4-level in-memory page table hierarchy that the CPU Memory Management Unit (MMU) uses to translate the virtual addresses of a process into physical memory addresses in RAM. For more in-depth information about paging please have a look at Getting Physical: Extreme abuse of Intel based Paging Systems - Part 1 and Part 2. PML4 self-referencing entry at offset 0xF68 with value 0x0000000062100867. Windows have a special entry in this topmost PML4 page table that references itself, a self-referencing entry. In Windows 7 the PML4 self-referencing is fixed at the position 0x1ED, offset 0xF68 (it is randomized in Windows 10). This means that the PML4 will always be mapped at the address: 0xFFFFF6FB7DBED000 in virtual memory. This is normally a memory address only made available to the kernel (Supervisor). Since the permission bit was erroneously set to User this meant the PML4 was mapped into every process and made available to code executing in user-mode. "kernel address" memory addresses mapped in every process as user-mode read/write pages. Once read/write access has been gained to the page tables it will be trivially easy to gain access to the complete physical memory, unless it is additionally protected by Extended Page Tables (EPTs) used for Virtualization. All one has to do is to write their own Page Table Entries (PTEs) into the page tables to access arbitrary physical memory. The last '7' in the PML4e 0x0000000062100867 (from above example) indicates that bits 0, 1, 2 are set, which means it's Present, Writable and User-mode accessible as per the description in the Intel Manual. Excerpt from the Intel Manual, if bit 2 is set to '1' user-mode access are permitted. Can I try this out myself? Yes absolutely. The technique has been added as a memory acquisition device to the PCILeech direct memory access attack toolkit. Just download PCILeech and execute it with device type: -device totalmeltdown on a vulnerable Windows 7 system. Dump memory to file with the command: pcileech.exe dump -out memorydump.raw -device totalmeltdown -v -force . If you have the Dokany file system driver installed you should be able to mount the running processes as files and folders in the Memory Process File System - with the virtual memory of the kernel and the processes as read/write. To mount the processes issue the command: pcileech.exe mount -device totalmeltdown . Please remember to re-install your security updates if you temporarily uninstall the latest one in order to test this vulnerability. A vulnerable system is "exploited" and the running processes are mounted with PCILeech. Process memory maps and PML4 are accessed. Is my system vulnerable? Only Windows 7 x64 systems patched with the 2018-01 or 2018-02 patches are vulnerable. If your system isn't patched since December 2017 or if it's patched with the 2018-03 patches or later it will be secure. Other Windows versions - such as Windows 10 or 8.1 are completely secure with regards to this issue and have never been affected by it. Other I discovered this vulnerability just after it had been patched in the 2018-03 Patch Tuesday. I have not been able to correlate the vulnerability to known CVEs or other known issues. Update Windows 2008R2 was vulnerable as well. Source
  11. WARNING Released by Microsoft without documentation, it's safe to hide this patch if you don't want Windows 10 or its related updates There are reports this morning about a new patch, KB 3150513, appearing on Windows 8.1 systems -- and probably lurking on Windows 10 systems, too. Microsoft has not posted a KB article, and there's no notification about the patch in the official Windows Update list. Sound familiar? [ Your one-stop shop for Microsoft knowledge: Everything you need to know about Windows 10, in a handy PDF. Download it today! | Survive and thrive with the new OS: The ultimate Windows 10 survivor kit. | Stay up on key Microsoft technologies with the Windows newsletter. ] Fortunately, poster PeterBisco on the Microsoft Answers forum, has an explanation (originally posted on the Polish forum): I have made a look into Windows8.1 version of this update and found this: This update doesn't contain binary code. It just contains new data for AppRaiser (Windows 10 Compatibility tool). It contains files as: hwcompat_th1.txt hwcompat_th2.txt hwexclude_rs1.txt hwexclude_th1.txt hwexclude_th2.txt wucompat.txt appraiser.sdb hwcompat_rs1.txt appraiser_data.ini appraiser_telemetryrunlist.xml So if you want to upgrade to Windows 10, and you have all the Windows 10 related updates installed (e.g. KB3035583, KB2952664, etc.) then you are safe to install this patch. If you don't want Windows 10 or its related updates and you have hide them, you can hide this one as well, if you wish. AppRaiser is the Windows 10 compatibility appraiser, which you can download and run manually. It's the program that's supposed to tell you if you're running any software or have any hardware that will mess with the Windows 10 upgrade. Hiding this patch sounds like good advice to me. Source: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3065380/microsoft-windows/mystery-solved-kb-3150513-is-another-windows-10-update-enabling-patch.html
  12. Microsoft no longer installs the Windows 7 March Monthly Rollup automatically, but KB 4088875 is still available in the Update Catalog. Aren’t you glad you held off on patching this month? Thinkstock/Microsoft Pity the cannon fodder. Folks who had Windows Automatic Update turned on and installed Patch Tuesday’s Monthly Rollup for Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2, KB 4088875, have encountered a viper’s pit of problems. Based on reports from all over the globe, it looks like Microsoft is no longer pushing the buggy patch out the Windows Automatic Update chute — but the patch is still there if you go looking for it. Just don't go looking to Microsoft for explanations. Right out of the gate we were warned that KB 4088875 had problems. The KB article lists these: After installing this update, SMB servers may leak memory. A Stop error occurs if this update is applied to a 32-Bit (x86) machine with the Physical Address Extension (PAE) mode disabled. A Stop error occurs on machines that don't support Streaming Single Instructions Multiple Data (SIMD) Extensions 2 (SSE2). (“Stop error” is Microsoft speak for a bluescreen.) Microsoft basically says it doesn’t have fixes for any of those problems —but it pushed the update out the Automatic Update chute anyway. Shortly after the patch appeared, we started hearing from admins that both the pushed Monthly Rollup and the download-and-manually-install Security-only patch, KB 4088878, were causing problems with IP addresses on servers’ virtual Network Interface Cards (vNICs). After applying the update, the server — and sometimes individual machines — simply dropped off the network because their manual IP addresses had been altered. Since then, there’s been an avalanche of complaints. 2 scenarios where the bug is causing problems Susan Bradley has identified two specific scenarios where the bug kicks in: Scenario 1 — VMware. As noted on a reddit post, a new virtual Ethernet network card is installed/enabled after the update. The side effect has occurred before with other convenience rollups, and a workaround was previously posted to this KB and a script is provided to fix the issue. It is not impacting all servers; it appears to be impacting virtual machines on VMware. Scenario 2 — workstations. This one is a bit more fuzzy and not clear cut. I’ve seen reports where workstations with static IPs may be impacted with this update. There are definitely enough credible reports of chipsets being reset and losing their networking IP addresses. Note that I’m seeing this more in businesses than in consumer/peer-to-peer settings. A sign that Microsoft will pull the buggy patch? Microsoft hasn’t acknowledged the bug or pulled the bad patches, but they have taken a step that we’ve seen a few times before. When you run Windows Update on Win7, the KB 4088875 patch appears in the “Important” list — but it isn’t checked. Since it isn’t checked, it won’t be installed automatically. In the past, that’s been a precursor to Microsoft completely yanking the patch. At this point, the buggy patches are still available in the Windows Update Catalog, for KB 4088878 (still dated March 12) and KB 4088875 (now dated March 14). If you’ve applied the update and your machine isn’t connecting any more, try uninstalling KB 4088875 or KB 4088878. If you want to continue with the patch installed, there’s a useful 7-year-old article on TechNet from Dan Stolts, "How to Find a Lost, Missing, Hidden or Removed Network Card (NIC) or Other Device and Even Remove it," that may help you get your NIC back. I find it infuriating that Microsoft has stopped pushing the patch — they obviously know there's a problem — but as of Thursday morning, the company hasn’t acknowledged the bug. We really need more transparency from the Patching Monolith. Will Microsoft fess up and fix things? Ha! Join us on the AskWoody Lounge. Source: Microsoft stops pushing buggy Win7 patch KB 4088875, hopefully as a precursor to yanking it (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  13. Microsoft is now withholding security updates from Windows 7 users who don’t have an antivirus installed. There’s a way around this limitation, but you have to manually set a registry key. This is all thanks to the patch for Meltdown and Spectre that rolled out via Windows Update. Microsoft noticed that many antivirus applications were incompatible with the update and caused blue screen errors. To prevent Windows systems from becoming unstable, Microsoft decided to withhold this security patch from all Windows systems by default. Microsoft told antivirus companies that they had to set a registry key that flags their antivirus as compatible with the update. If the key is present, the patch will install. If the key isn’t, the patch won’t install—that gives antivirus companies time to update and test their software. But Microsoft actually went further than this. Windows PCs without the registry key won’t get any future Windows security patches, either. Having the registry key present is mandatory for updates. That’s supposed to motivate antivirus companies to update their software and make life easier for Microsoft in the future. On March 13, 2018, Microsoft lifted this limitation for Windows 10 users. All Windows 10 users will get security updates, whether or not they have the registry key set. But Windows 7 SP1 and Windows 8.1 users still need the registry key. Source
  14. All Activation Windows 7-8-10 v19.6 - 2018 All methods of activation in the hand tested after the "anti-piracy" KB971033 update DG Win & Soft offers you a complete collection of programs and ways to Activate Windows. All methods and programs personally verified by us many times and we can safely recommend them to you. NOTE: All programs must be Run as Administrator! Additional Information: - If you have a direct hand, you want to activate in the Off-line mode and no longer bother to search for keys every six months, then you are prepared activation via firmware BIOS. But be careful, because if your not the right things, you have a chance to bungle the operation and will have to contact the service center. And keep in mind that for every BIOS (AMI, Award, Phoenix) has its own specific program (AMI - amitool, etc.), what is your BIOS can see when you boot the computer. - If you do not want to make any changes either in your "iron", or in the Windows itself, and that your activation is not distinguished by anything from legal activation, your choice of KMS server. With the use of virtual machines, this method can also be called Off-line. But you should know that this method of activation for six months and 180 days, you again have to repeat it. Also, this method only and Professional version Enterprise - If you did not accept neither the first nor the second of our suggested methods you can use the activators. Without going into too much detail, we can say that activators emulate the BIOS with slicom 2.1. But no one gives a guarantee that Microsoft will not release a patch or update that will detect the presence of emulation and reset the activation. We recommend to start with Windows 7 Activator Loader eXtreme Edition (Napalum), because He has a huge number of settings and features and good will activate automatically What's new in the assembly: Updated KMS section All new marked as (New) Added build option in the form of installation executable file List of programs: Office 2013-2016 C2R 6.2 (New) Office 2013-2016 C2R License v1.05 (New) Garbage Collector v1.3.4 PIDKey v2.1.2.1017 MSActBackUp v1.2.3 Microsoft Product Keys 2.6.3 Re-Loader Activator 3.0 Beta 3 KMS Tools 01.03.2018 by Ratiborus (New) KMSAuto Lite 1.3.5.2 (New) KMSAuto Net 2016 1.5.3 KMSmicro WO w7 v1.0.1 KMSpico 10.2.0 Final SuperMini_KMS AAct v3.8.5(New) AAct Network 1.0.1 Windows 7 Loader eXtremev3.503 Re-Loader Activator 2.6 Final Microsoft Toolkit 2.6.2 ODIN 1.3.7 by secr9tos GUI MBR SLIC Loader 0.621 v1.2 Windows Loader v2.2 WindSLIC-UEFI-SLIC-injector SLIC 2.1 What's New in Build v19.6: AAct 3.8.5 KMS Tools 01.03.2018 KMSAuto Lite 1.3.5.2 Office 2013-2016 C2R License v1.0.5 Office 2013-2016 C2R Install v6.0.2 All marked with (New) Language: Russian, English OS: Windows (XP), Windows (Vista), Windows (7), Windows (8), Windows (10). Download - 327.61 MB: Site: https://openload.co Sharecode[?]: /f/5J9vMtSwvdE/ALTT1962018-MW.rar Pwd: www.megamw.com
  15. Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) has long been part of the value proposition for businesses to upgrade to Windows 10. Today, Microsoft announced that it's bringing the service to Windows 7 SP1 and Windows 8.1. The move is surprising, given that mainstream support for Windows 7 ended a few years ago, and it ended for Windows 8.1 earlier this year. Both operating systems are now in extended support, which means that they should only be receiving fixes at this point. Microsoft describes Defender ATP as "a unified endpoint security platform that helps stop breaches." With less than two years to go for Windows 7 extended support, the company says that it knows that many businesses might have a mix of Windows 7 and Windows 10 PCs, as they're in the process of upgrading their organization. It will be optional, with customers having the ability to add ATP Endpoint Detection & Response (EDR) functionality to their devices this summer. Obviously, it can run side-by-side with third-party antivirus solutions, but Microsoft says that it works better with Defender Antivirus, so administrators can see malware detections and possible solutions from the same console. The feature will be available for the older operating systems this summer for "customers moving to Windows 10." There will also be a preview this spring, as noted by ZDNet's Mary Jo Foley. Source
  16. Windows 7 Image Updater - SkyLake\KabyLake\CoffeLake\Ryzen Threadripper by Atak_Snajpera This tool was originally posted in January 2017 on a Polish forum and now he finally decided to make it more accessible outside polish internet. I hope this tool will make your life easier. What does this tool do? Integrates updates till 2018 Integrates necessary drivers for modern PCs/laptops (USB3.0/3.1,NVMe,wi-fi, LAN and so on) Integrates installer from Windows 10 (better support for NVMe drives) Integrates post-setup script which installs NET Framework 4.7, VC Redistributables and WuaCpuFix Important notes: This tool won't work with custom images containing both x86 and x64 versions! Make sure that you have more than 20 GiB of free space! Whole updating process may take even few hours! Yes .7z archive is huge because there are two windows 10 installers included (x86 and x64) and bunch of drivers! List of drivers in package: Alcor Micro Smart Card Reader Alcor Micro USB Card Reader Alpine Ridge USB AMD Chipset AMD GPU Asmedia USB Atheros Bluetooth Atheros Wireless Broadcom Wireless Genesys Card Reader Intel AHCI Intel Camera Intel Chipset Intel DPTF Intel GPU Intel IO Intel LAN Intel MEI Intel NVMe Intel USB Intel Wireless OCZ Toshiba NVMe Plextor NVMe Realtek Audio Realtek Bluetooth Realtek Camera Realtek Card Reader Realtek LAN Realtek Wireless Rivet Networks LAN Samsung NVMe DOWNLOAD http://download758.mediafire.com/72fgdyb9oa4g/rboz5cp9glofjd0/Windows_7_Image_Updater.7z Source https://forums.mydigitallife.net/threads/windows-7-image-updater-skylake-kabylake-coffelake-ryzen-threadripper.76335/
  17. WPD v1.1.582 Hi there! If you are here you have probably heard about rather tricky and complex Windows 10 privacy settings and how much data it can collect without user’s knowledge or consent. So, we have tried to resolve this problem and created WPD – a tweaker that contains all main settings in one place! You can customize Group Policy, Services and Tasks, responsible for data collection and sending, as you like. And furthermore, if you want, you can block a bunch of Microsoft's ip's to which data is sent. Disable Windows features and make various tweaks Wrapped in a clean and attractive interface, this program provides you with intuitive and practical options for tweaking your computer, whether you're running Windows 7 or 10. It doesn't require installation so you can copy the downloaded package to a USB flash drive to directly launch it on any PC without setup. Administrative rights are required, though. The main app menu is brought up to the screen at startup, allowing you to access the privacy-related features, firewall settings, apps to uninstall, or other tweaks to make. Configure privacy, firewall and app settings When it comes to privacy matters, you can deactivate the steps recorder, advertising ID, search companion, telemetry, Windows Error Reporting, handwriting auto learning, OneDrive (for file storage), and others. Some of the options displayed here might seem confusing. However, you don't have to look up definitions on the web since WPD shows descriptions in tooltips next to each option. Otherwise, you can disable everything listed here with the click of a button. As far as firewall settings are concerned, Windows Privacy Dashboard can be instructed to block Windows telemetry, third-party apps and Windows Updates from establishing Internet connections. If you change your mind and wish to reset these options to default, you can simply delete the newly created rules. Uninstall unwanted apps and perform tweaks Only Modern UI apps can be uninstalled with the aid of this utility, whether they came bundled with the operating system or got installed from other sources. Lastly, the tweaker gives you the possibility to hide sync provider notifications, allow the swap file to be cleared during restart, and prevent apps from using your camera, microphone and other devices. Taking everything into consideration, WPD turns out to be a straightforward and useful system tweaker. It enabled and disabled system settings without any issues on Windows 10 in our tests. WPD is free, totally portable, has a nice user-friendly interface, and doesn't contain any advertisement or malicious code. Currently we don't have a code signing certificate, so Widnows SmartScreen might be little nervous, just skip it. Supported OS: Windows 10 Enterprise 1709, 1703, 1607 Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB 2016, 2015 Windows 10 Pro 1709, 1703, 1607 Windows 10 Home 1709, 1703 Windows 8-8.1 Windows 7 Screenshots: Changelog: 1.1.582 - 10/18/2017 Added Fall Creators Update support. Added command line arguments. For more info check Readme file inside the archive. Added warning dialog box when trying to delete all apps. Fixed work on Windows 7 and Windows 8 Home. Updated build-in firewall rules. Firewall notification icon now requires only the first rule to be applied. Added notification label showing the date of the latest available rule (built-in or online). User interface improvements. Bug fixes. 1.1.512 - 08/09/2017 Updated build-in firewall rules. Minor fixes. Preparing for the Fall Creators Update. 1.1.475 - 07/03/2017 Appx package errors no longer terminate WPD. 1.1.474 - 07/02/2017 Added ability to create system restore point. Added new settings to the Tweaker tab. Added Windows 8-8.1 support. Updated build-in firewall rules. Better error handling. Minor fixes. 1.1.451 - 06/10/2017 Updated firewall rules. User interface improvements. 1.1.435 - 05/24/2017 Added new firewall tab. Added feedback button. Updated firewall rules. User interface improvements. 1.0.395 - 04/14/2017 Code has been rewritten and optimized. New UI. Added ability to delete built-in Windows Store apps. Added Switch All button to the privacy tab. Added full support of Windows 10 Home. Added new settings to the tweaker tab. Home: https://getwpd.com/ Download: https://getwpd.com/get/latest.zip Firewall rules: Oct 17, 2017 CRC32: 0FF17F90 gHacks.net Review: Control Windows 10 Privacy with WPD
  18. All Activation Windows 7-8-10 v17.0 - 2017 All methods of activation in the hand tested after the "anti-piracy" KB971033 update DG Win & Soft offers you a complete collection of programs and ways to Activate Windows. All methods and programs personally verified by us many times and we can safely recommend them to you. NOTE: All programs must be Run as Administrator! Additional Information: - If you have a direct hand, you want to activate in the Off-line mode and no longer bother to search for keys every six months, then you are prepared activation via firmware BIOS. But be careful, because if your not the right things, you have a chance to bungle the operation and will have to contact the service center. And keep in mind that for every BIOS (AMI, Award, Phoenix) has its own specific program (AMI - amitool, etc.), what is your BIOS can see when you boot the computer. - If you do not want to make any changes either in your "iron", or in the Windows itself, and that your activation is not distinguished by anything from legal activation, your choice of KMS server. With the use of virtual machines, this method can also be called Off-line. But you should know that this method of activation for six months and 180 days, you again have to repeat it. Also, this method only and Professional version Enterprise - If you did not accept neither the first nor the second of our suggested methods you can use the activators. Without going into too much detail, we can say that activators emulate the BIOS with slicom 2.1. But no one gives a guarantee that Microsoft will not release a patch or update that will detect the presence of emulation and reset the activation. We recommend to start with Windows 7 Activator Loader eXtreme Edition (Napalum), because He has a huge number of settings and features and good will activate automatically What's new in the assembly: Updated KMS section All new marked as (New) Added build option in the form of installation executable file List of programs: PIDKey v2.1.2.1017 MSActBackUp 1.1.0 Microsoft Product Keys 2.6.3 Re-Loader Activator 3.0 Beta 3 KMS Tools 12/10/2017 by Ratiborus (New) KMSAuto Lite 1.3.3 KMSAuto Net 2016 1.5.1 2017 KMSmicro WO w7 v1. 0.1 KMSpico 10.2.0 Final SuperMini_KMS AAct v3.7 (New) Windows 7 Loader eXtremev3.503 Re-Loader Activator 2.6 Final Microsoft Toolkit 2.6.2 ODIN 1.3.7 by secr9tos GUI MBR SLIC Loader 0.621 v1.2 Windows Loader v2.2 WindSLIC-UEFI-SLIC-injector SLIC 2.1 BINS FAQ for creating the firmware SLIC_ToolKit_V3.2 Programs for the firmware Reset of the trial period (rearm) Three-component activation Language: Russian, English OS: Windows (XP), Windows (Vista), Windows (7), Windows (8), Windows (10). Download - 490.6 MB: Site: https://www.multiup.eu/en Sharecode[?]: /download/00334f75cc207f13a42d28f9a05454eb/All.activation.Windows.7-8-10.v17.0-P2P.iso
  19. Two German sites report graphics problems in some applications when using multiple monitors. Solution: Uninstall the bad patches. Gerd Altmann (CC0) We now have solid reports of a bug in both of the Windows 7 security patches for this month, KB 4034664 (the monthly rollup, installed by Windows Automatic Update) and KB 4034679 (the manual security-only patch). If you have a Windows 7 machine with two or more monitors and there’s something weird happening with the second monitor, you may be able to solve the problem by uninstalling the bad patch. I first read about the problems last Saturday on Günter Born’s Born City blog. He documented bugs in the second-screen display of PDFs using PDF-Xchange Viewer, problems with the second screen in IrfanView, Adobe Reader, Excel VBA, MathLab, ACDSee, some Java applications, and Office 2013 garbling window titles, scrollbars, and other screen elements. This morning there’s a detailed analysis from Christian “NineBerry” Schwarz on his Wolfsbeeren blog: In applications, graphics or controls are not shown or shown distorted. You might, for example, only see an empty background with missing foreground graphics or missing controls. Or you see the Desktop or parts of a different application in parts of the currently active application. These graphical problems only appear on secondary monitors, not on the main monitor and possibly also depending on the position of the application window within the secondary monitor. Schwarz offers these workarounds: Upgrade to Windows 10 / Server 2012 Uninstall KB4034664 / KB4034679 patches from the system Log on with a user that is a full local administrator Only use the application on the main monitor, not a secondary monitor Arrange the monitors such that no part of a monitor has negative screen coordinates. He goes on to describe negative screen coordinates: When you have multiple monitors, one of these monitors becomes the main monitor. Screen coordinates are relative to the main monitor. So, screen coordinates can be negative when a monitor is positioned left of or higher than the main monitor. He then steps through the methods for resolving the problem. Schwartz tops it off with a Proof of Concept program that faithfully reproduces the problem in all its glory. Tired of being an unpaid beta tester? Join us on the AskWoody Lounge. Source: Two of this month’s Windows 7 patches cause second-screen problems (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  20. vissha

    WPD v1.1.512

    WPD v1.1.512 Hi there! If you are here you have probably heard about rather tricky and complex Windows 10 privacy settings and how much data it can collect without user’s knowledge or consent. So, we have tried to resolve this problem and created WPD – a tweaker that contains all main settings in one place! You can customize Group Policy, Services and Tasks, responsible for data collection and sending, as you like. And furthermore, if you want, you can block a bunch of Microsoft's ip's to which data is sent. Disable Windows features and make various tweaks Wrapped in a clean and attractive interface, this program provides you with intuitive and practical options for tweaking your computer, whether you're running Windows 7 or 10. It doesn't require installation so you can copy the downloaded package to a USB flash drive to directly launch it on any PC without setup. Administrative rights are required, though. The main app menu is brought up to the screen at startup, allowing you to access the privacy-related features, firewall settings, apps to uninstall, or other tweaks to make. Configure privacy, firewall and app settings When it comes to privacy matters, you can deactivate the steps recorder, advertising ID, search companion, telemetry, Windows Error Reporting, handwriting auto learning, OneDrive (for file storage), and others. Some of the options displayed here might seem confusing. However, you don't have to look up definitions on the web since WPD shows descriptions in tooltips next to each option. Otherwise, you can disable everything listed here with the click of a button. As far as firewall settings are concerned, Windows Privacy Dashboard can be instructed to block Windows telemetry, third-party apps and Windows Updates from establishing Internet connections. If you change your mind and wish to reset these options to default, you can simply delete the newly created rules. Uninstall unwanted apps and perform tweaks Only Modern UI apps can be uninstalled with the aid of this utility, whether they came bundled with the operating system or got installed from other sources. Lastly, the tweaker gives you the possibility to hide sync provider notifications, allow the swap file to be cleared during restart, and prevent apps from using your camera, microphone and other devices. Taking everything into consideration, WPD turns out to be a straightforward and useful system tweaker. It enabled and disabled system settings without any issues on Windows 10 in our tests. WPD is free, totally portable, has a nice user-friendly interface, and doesn't contain any advertisement or malicious code. Currently we don't have a code signing certificate, so Widnows SmartScreen might be little nervous, just skip it. Supported OS: Windows 10 Enterprise 1703, 1607 Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB 2016, 2015 Windows 10 Pro 1703, 1607 Windows 10 Home 1703 Windows 8.1 Windows 8 Windows 7 Screenshots: Changelog: 1.1.512 - 08/09/2017 Updated build-in firewall rules. Minor fixes. Preparing for the Fall Creators Update. 1.1.475 - 07/03/2017 Appx package errors no longer terminate WPD. 1.1.474 - 07/02/2017 Added ability to create system restore point. Added new settings to the Tweaker tab. Added Windows 8-8.1 support. Updated build-in firewall rules. Better error handling. Minor fixes. 1.1.451 - 06/10/2017 Updated firewall rules. User interface improvements. 1.1.435 - 05/24/2017 Added new firewall tab. Added feedback button. Updated firewall rules. User interface improvements. 1.0.395 - 04/14/2017 Code has been rewritten and optimized. New UI. Added ability to delete built-in Windows Store apps. Added Switch All button to the privacy tab. Added full support of Windows 10 Home. Added new settings to the tweaker tab. Home: https://getwpd.com/ Download: https://getwpd.com/get/latest.zip gHacks.net Review: Control Windows 10 Privacy with WPD
  21. Last month, we reported that the Steam user base on Windows 10 had climbed to an all-time high of 51.23%. This time, it appears that the operating system has lost some ground while Windows 7 is clambering up once again. According to Valve's hardware report - which is based on optional user surveys - for the month of July 2017, it appears that Windows 10 has fallen to 50.49%. More importantly, this decline has been attributed to the 64-bit version of the OS rather than the 32-bit iteration. Windows 7's user base climbed to 36.99%, which is an increase of 0.85 percentage points. All other versions of Windows lost some of their user base. As a result, the overall user base for Windows fell slightly as well, and now accounts for 96.12% of surveyed Steam users. The report indicated some positive news for operating systems developed by other companies. While the increases in percentage are within the margin of error, Apple's OS X/macOS grew to 3.11% and Linux progressed to 0.74%. There were no changes in the hardware side of the report with 8GB of system RAM still the most-used configuration. The display resolution for primary displays and multi-monitor setups remained 1920x1080 and 3840x1080 respectively. While the statistics in Steam's report are certainly interesting, it is important to remember that they are based on optional surveys. As such, any changes in the user base of a particular software or hardware wouldn't necessarily represent a shift in broader usage beyond the Steam gaming community. Source: Windows 10 faces slight decline in Steam user base as Windows 7 rises (Neowin)
  22. vissha

    WPD v1.1.451

    WPD v1.1.451 Hi there! If you are here you have probably heard about rather tricky and complex Windows 10 privacy settings and how much data it can collect without user’s knowledge or consent. So, we have tried to resolve this problem and created WPD – a tweaker that contains all main settings in one place! You can customize Group Policy, Services and Tasks, responsible for data collection and sending, as you like. And furthermore, if you want, you can block a bunch of Microsoft's ip's to which data is sent. WPD is free, totally portable, has a nice user-friendly interface, and doesn't contain any advertisement or malicious code. Currently we don't have a code signing certificate, so Widnows SmartScreen might be little nervous, just skip it. Supported OS: Windows 10 Enterprise 1703, 1607 Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB 2016, 2015 Windows 10 Pro 1703, 1607 Windows 10 Home 1703 Windows 7 Changelog: 1.1.451 - 06/10/2017 Updated firewall rules. User interface improvements. 1.1.435 - 05/24/2017 Added new firewall tab. Added feedback button. Updated firewall rules. User interface improvements. 1.0.395 - 04/14/2017 Code has been rewritten and optimized. New UI. Added ability to delete built-in Windows Store apps. Added Switch All button to the privacy tab. Added full support of Windows 10 Home. Added new settings to the tweaker tab. Home: https://getwpd.com/ Download: https://getwpd.com/get/WPD_1.1.451.zip gHacks.net Review: Control Windows 10 Privacy with WPD
  23. visualbuffs

    Windows 7 SP2

    if you had windows 7 service pack 1 iso then slipstream the so called service pack 2 download first the ff: (on windows update catalog site) click on it and then select the correct windows architecture 32 or 64 KB3020369 (April 2015 Servicing Stack Update) kb3177467 (perquisite for convenience) kb3125574 (Convenience Rollup) kb2670838 (Platform Update) KB2841134 (IE 11 ) using NTLITE free intergrate the above hotfixes accordingly to get sp2 atleast you make it your own. instead of downloading this so called sp2 on the torrent or any other common user who built custom iso without knowing whats inside the iso
  24. It's like the c:\con\con bug all over again. Those of you with long memories might remember one of the more amusing (or perhaps annoying) bugs of the Windows 95 and 98 era. Certain specially crafted filenames could make the operating system crash. Malicious users could use this to attack other people's machines by using one of the special filenames as an image source; the browser would try to access the bad file, and Windows would promptly fall over. It turns out that Windows 7 and 8.1 (and Windows Vista, but that's out of support anyway) have a similar kind of bug. They can be taken advantage of in the same kind of way: certain bad filenames make the system lock up or occasionally crash with a blue screen of death, and malicious webpages can embed those filenames by using them as image sources. If you visit such a page (in any browser), your PC will hang shortly after and possibly crash outright. The Windows 9x-era bug was due to an error in the way that operating systems handled special filenames. Windows has a number of filenames that are "special" because they don't correspond to any actual file; instead, they represent hardware devices. These special filenames can be accessed from any location in the file system, even though they don't exist on-disk. While any of these special filenames would have worked, the most common one used to crash old Windows machines was con, a special filename that represents the physical console: the keyboard (for input) and the screen (for output). Windows correctly handled simple attempts to access the con device, but a filename included two references to the special device—for example, c:\con\con—then Windows would crash. If that file was referenced from a webpage, for example, by trying to load an image from file:///c:/con/con then the machine would crash whenever the malicious page was accessed. The new bug, which fortunately doesn't appear to afflict Windows 10, uses another special filename. This time around, the special filename of choice is $MFT. $MFT is the name given to one of the special metadata files that are used by Windows' NTFS filesystem. The file exists in the root directory of each NTFS volume, but the NTFS driver handles it in special ways, and it's hidden from view and inaccessible to most software. Attempts to open the file are normally blocked, but in a move reminiscent of the Windows 9x flaw, if the filename is used as if it were a directory name—for example, trying to open the file c:\$MFT\123—then the NTFS driver takes out a lock on the file and never releases it. Every subsequent operation sits around waiting for the lock to be released.Forever. This blocks any and all other attempts to access the file system, and so every program will start to hang, rendering the machine unusable until it is rebooted. As was the case nearly 20 years ago, webpages that use the bad filename in, for example, an image source will provoke the bug and make the machine stop responding. Depending on what the machine is doing concurrently, it will sometimes blue screen. Either way, you're going to need to reboot it to recover. Some browsers will block attempts to access these local resources, but Internet Explorer, for example, will merrily try to access the bad file. We couldn't immediately cause the same thing to occur remotely (for example, by sending IIS a request for a bad filename), but it wouldn't immediately surprise us if certain configurations or trickery were enough to cause the same problem. Microsoft has been informed, but at the time of publication has not told us when or if the problem will be patched. Article source
  25. Numbers released by Kaspersky Lab on Friday reveal that over 98% of all documented WannaCry infections were running versions of the Windows 7 operating system. Out of all Windows 7 users, the worst hit were users running Windows 7 64-bit edition, accounting for more than 60% of all infections. The second and third most targeted OS versions were Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows 10, respectively. So! XP wasn't to blame after all The statistics come to disprove popular belief that WannaCry hit mostly Windows XP machines. "The Windows XP count is insignificant," said Costin Raiu, director of Global Research and Analysis Team at Kaspersky Lab. To infect all these computers, the WannaCry ransomware used an SMB worm that spread on its own to new computers that ran vulnerable SMB services. That SMB worm was powered by an exploit named ETERNALBLUE. The exploit is part of a collection of hacking tools a group of hackers calling themselves The Shadow Brokers have stolen from the NSA and leaked online in April 2017. ETERNALBLUE never worked properly on XP, only on Windows 7 Initial analysis of ETERNALBLUE revealed the worm could run on platforms from Windows XP up to Windows 8.1 and Server 2012. It was during the WannaCry outbreak that researchers discovered the worm only worked reliably on Windows 7, causing errors on other platforms, including Windows XP, on which most infosec talking heads falsely blamed for most WannaCry infections. Following this discovery, a user has patched the ETERNALBLUE exploit to work without errors on 64-bit editions of Windows 8/8.1 and Windows Server 2012. Currently, WannaCry's worm modules are still searching for new victims. The latest tally of computers that have been touched by this worm is 416,989, albeit not all computers have had their files encrypted, as WannaCry's ransomware payload has been defanged by a clever British researcher. Bleeping Computer has reached out to Kaspersky Labs to inquire on why we see Windows 10 machines in the chart, and any possible scenarios that WannaCry could have used to infect those systems. Article source
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