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  1. Microsoft: don't remove the Microsoft Store app Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system comes with the Microsoft Store application by default (formerly known as Windows Store) that is accessible via the operating system's Taskbar and Start Menu. Windows administrators and users who don't use the Store may remove it using third-party tools, e.g. using Geek Uninstaller or PowerShell. Some third-party applications prohibit the removal of the Store, O&O AppBuster does so for instance. The company published a new support article -- Removing, uninstalling, or reinstalling Microsoft Store app is not supported -- recently in which it recommends that the Microsoft Store application is not removed or uninstalled. In Windows 10, we do not recommend removing or uninstalling the Microsoft Store app. The reason that Microsoft gives reminds customers that Windows 10 offers no way of reinstalling the Microsoft Store when it is removed from devices running Windows 10. The only option that administrators have to restore Microsoft Store functionality is to reset the operating system or reinstall it according to Microsoft. If you uninstalled Microsoft Store by any means and want to reinstall it, the only Microsoft-supported method is to reset or reinstall the operating system, which will reinstall Microsoft Store. Microsoft omits the fact that Windows administrators may be able to register the Microsoft Store application again by running a command from an elevated PowerShell prompt: Use Windows-X to display the administrative menu on Windows 10. Select Windows PowerShell (Admin) from the prompt. Confirm the UAC prompt if it is displayed. Run the following command to register the Microsoft Store app again on the device: Get-AppXPackage *WindowsStore* -AllUsers | Foreach {Add-AppxPackage -DisableDevelopmentMode -Register “$($_.InstallLocation)\AppXManifest.xml”} Restart the computer after the command has been processed. Once you have run the command and restarted the device, try accessing the Microsoft Store application again. Microsoft highlights that IT professionals have various options to configure, limit, or block access to the Microsoft Store on client computer systems. Removing the Store application, for instance by using PowerShell commands to do so, is not recommended because it cannot be restored. The Configure access to Microsoft Store support document on the Microsoft Docs website lists several options to manage access to the application. Microsoft lists the following options: Block Microsoft Store using AppLocker Block Microsoft Store using Group Policy Block Microsoft Store using management tool Show private store only using Group Policy All methods are explained in the support document. Source: Microsoft: don't remove the Microsoft Store app (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  2. Windows 10 build 19025 is out in the Fast ring with a fix for Sandbox and more Today, Microsoft released Windows 10 Insider Preview build 19025 to the Fast ring, making it the second one this week. Once again, there are no new features to be aware of. It only contains a list of fixes, one of which resolves an issue that prevented Sandbox and WDAG from working properly. Here's the full list of fixes: We fixed an issue from the previous flight preventing Sandbox and WDAG from working. We fixed an issue resulting in certain fingerprint readers no longer working as of Build 19013. We fixed an issue that could result in VPN Settings hanging after upgrade. We’ve done some work to help address an issue that could result in certain modern UI components (including notifications and the network flyout), scaling either too large or too small after attaching an external monitor or remoting into the machine from a monitor with a different DPI. We fixed an issue impacted login performance for some users in recent builds. We fixed an issue resulting in Windows Hello authentication not working with certain apps in recent builds. We fixed an issue that could result in the mouse pointer not displaying when logging in to a PC locally after remoting in. We fixed an issue where, when using the touch keyboard docked on a large screen, the keys would stretch out to span the width of the monitor, rather than staying an optimal width for touch interaction. We fixed an issue that could result in ctfmon.exe crashing when using reconversion with the Japanese IME in certain text fields. We fixed an issue that could result in web activities in Timeline not opening if you had new Edge installed. We fixed an issue where a high number of app deployment failures in a short period of time could result in an unexpectedly large volume of disk space being used by evtx files saved under %windir%\temp. We fixed an issue resulting in some apps failing to update with error 0x8007000A. We fixed an issue resulting in jitters when using Magnifier in certain multi-monitor configurations. We fixed an issue where the mouse pointer did not start from where the Magnifier viewport was if it had moved from typing. We fixed an issue impacting Narrator performance reading aloud in Outlook after switching focus from an email back to the list of emails in your inbox. We fixed a memory leak in EoAExperiences.exe after using the text cursor indicator for prolonged periods of time. There are also some known issues to be aware of: BattlEye and Microsoft have found incompatibility issues due to changes in the operating system between some Insider Preview builds and certain versions of BattlEye anti-cheat software. To safeguard Insiders who might have these versions installed on their PC, we have applied a compatibility hold on these devices from being offered affected builds of Windows Insider Preview. See this article for details. We’ve heard that Settings still isn’t available outside of launching via the URI (ms-settings:) for some Insiders and are investigating. Some Insiders are reporting that after successfully installing printer drivers from the Optional Updates section, the same driver is still showing as available for install. We’re looking into the issue. We’re looking into reports where, when certain external USB 3.0 drives are attached, they stop responding with Start Code 10 or 38. As usual, this build is from the 20H1 development branch, but it's been a few weeks since we've seen any new features in a Fast ring build at all. Typically, this means that Microsoft is gearing up for RTM, something that's also usually signified by having more than one new build in a week. If so, it gives more credibility to an earlier report that 20H1 will RTM in December. If so, you can still expect to wait a few more months until this update is released to non-Insiders. Source: Windows 10 build 19025 is out in the Fast ring with a fix for Sandbox and more (Neowin)
  3. Windows 10 will soon stop support WEP WIFI encryption Of the number of technologies Microsoft will start deprecating in Windows 10, one familiar name is WEP WIFI encryption. Since the May 2019 Update, Windows 10 has been showing a warning when users connect to WIFI networks secured via WEP or TKIP warning users that these protocols are now easily hacked. Microsoft warns that in future releases Windows 10 will simply refuse to connect to such networks. Microsoft recommends users switch their legacy routers to those which support AES ciphers, available with WPA2 or WPA3. WEP dates all the way back to 1997 and was the only encryption protocol available to 802.11a and 802.11b devices. It was fully cracked in 2001, with only 1 minute of packet collection needed to expose the encryption key. Suffice to say if you are still using WEP its about high time that you replace your hardware, and Windows 10 will soon help nudge you along that way. Source: Windows 10 will soon stop support WEP WIFI encryption (MSPoweruser)
  4. With the November 2019 Update, Microsoft plots to kill My People In a list of technologies and features Microsoft is deprecating with the Windows 10 November 2019 Update is tucked away an item both familiar and largely unknown to most Windows 10 users. In their list, Microsoft says they are deprecating the My People app and shell extension, saying: My People is no longer being developed. It may be removed in a future update. My People was introduced with the Fall Creators Update and was meant to be a central hub for your frequently used contacts, allowing you to quickly initiate a conversation with your friends, fellow employees or loved ones at a click of a button, particularly if you pin their heads to your taskbar. In the end though, how to geek notes: In practice, very few apps have integrated with it. Even Microsoft’s own apps like Windows 10’s integrated SMS feature, Microsoft Teams, LinkedIn, Yammer, and Xbox Live Chat have ignored it. And, if Microsoft is ignoring it, why would popular services like Facebook bother using it? That lack of developer support makes the feature largely useless. The death of the technology is at the same hands as most of Microsoft’s new user interface computing efforts – lack of full buy-in from Microsoft and lack of significant support from developers. With neither, any attempt of Microsoft to innovate are simply doomed to fail. Source: With the November 2019 Update, Microsoft plots to kill My People (MSPoweruser)
  5. With Microsoft's launch of the Surface Pro X last week, questions were once again raised about the apps that can run on it. The answer is that like any Windows 10 on ARM PC, it can run native ARM (ARM and ARM64) apps, and it can run emulated 32-bit Intel (x86) apps. This leaves out 64-bit Intel (AMD64, or x64) apps, so if you want an app that's only available in an x64 flavor, such as Adobe Premiere Pro or Photoshop Elements, you can't use it. That's going to change though. Speaking with several sources, I can confirm that Microsoft is indeed working on bringing x64 app emulation to Windows on ARM. When that will happen is a bit more unclear, but it seems like it could be in Windows 10 21H1, which would mean that the general public will have access to it in the first half of 2021, and Windows Insiders will be able to test it out next year. When Windows on ARM was first introduced back at Qualcomm's Snapdragon Technology Summit in 2016, the official messaging was that 64-bit emulation was never going to happen. That messaging has changed, as we reached out to Microsoft for this story, and a company spokesperson said that there's nothing to share at this time. But no one ever said that 64-bit app emulation wasn't possible. In fact, I was told that it was more of an issue of performance. That's the other issue here; while Windows on ARM will be able to support emulation of both 32- and 64-bit apps, 32-bit will still be faster. 32-bit emulation uses WOW64, the exact same thing that x64 versions of Windows use to run 32-bit apps. This would presumably have to be something new. That brings another issue to light, and it's a question that there probably isn't an answer for yet, since we're still early in this process. It's unclear what the default will be. The way that typical installers work is that if your machine supports 64-bit, it delivers the 64-bit app. That's because in all current cases, 64-bit apps are equal or better than their 32-bit counterparts, at least in terms of performance. That will change for ARM though, where 32-bit apps will still offer a better experience. Another issue is how it will handle vendors that deliver different versions of apps based on what your system can handle. For example, Adobe Creative Cloud will offer you Photoshop 2018 on a 32-bit machine, and therefore it offers the same on an ARM64 machine. With 64-bit emulation, it's unclear if it will start offering Photoshop 2020 (or 2021 by that point) instead, even though performance will be worse than it already is. Qualcomm's current generation of PC chipsets is the Snapdragon 8cx, as well as Microsoft's SQ1, which is a slightly modified 8cx. These SoCs are built from the ground up for PCs, with emulation in mind. However, 64-bit app emulation won't be exclusive to the 8cx lineup; rather, you'll be able to use x64 apps on every generation of Windows on ARM processors, going all the way back to the Snapdragon 835. One good thing to come out of this is that it should be less confusing for consumers, just to be able to say that all Windows apps run on an ARM PC. Microsoft's first shot at Windows on ARM was Windows RT, an ill-fated version of the OS that looked and felt exactly like Windows 8, but it could only run ARM apps, most of which had to come from the Windows Store. The whole idea of Windows 10 on ARM was to get away from that, and that's why we have emulated apps. Windows on ARM is just supposed to be Windows, at least from an end user perspective. Microsoft doesn't want you to have to think about what you can and can't do. You should be able to use your ARM PC like any other. For the performance gap, it's worth noting that Qualcomm is moving at a pretty rapid pace when it comes to PC chipsets. The Snapdragon 850 and Snapdragon 8cx were both huge leaps from their predecessors, so if the company continues to innovate at such a rapid pace, hopefully we'll get to a point where emulation isn't even noticeable. Source: Exclusive: Microsoft is working to bring 64-bit Intel app emulation to Windows on ARM (via Neowin)
  6. Yesterday, Microsoft released the Windows 10 November 2019 Update. It's a small update, with a small list of new features. It's no surprise, since Windows 10 version 1909 is really just an enablement package that lights up some new features and bumps up the build number. Version 1903 and 1909 are even serviced with the exact same cumulative updates. Microsoft has updated its support documents to show which features are being removed or deprecated in the new update. Being that this is a small update, it should come as no surprise that this list is small as well. Here's the list of features being removed: Feature Details and mitigation PNRP APIs The Peer Name Resolution Protocol (PNRP) cloud service was removed in Windows 10, version 1809. We are planning to complete the removal process by removing the corresponding APIs. Taskbar settings roaming Roaming of taskbar settings is removed in this release. This feature was announced as no longer being developed in Windows 10, version 1903. And then there are the features that are being deprecated. This means that these features are still included in the OS, but they're not longer being actively developed. It also means that they may be removed in a future release. Here's the full list: Feature Details and mitigation Hyper-V vSwitch on LBFO In a future release, the Hyper-V vSwitch will no longer have the capability to be bound to an LBFO team. Instead, it can be bound via Switch Embedded Teaming (SET). Language Community tab in Feedback Hub The Language Community tab will be removed from the Feedback Hub. The standard feedback process: Feedback Hub - Feedback is the recommended way to provide translation feedback. My People / People in the Shell My People is no longer being developed. It may be removed in a future update. TFS1/TFS2 IME TSF1 and TSF2 IME will be replaced by TSF3 IME in a future release. Text Services Framework (TFS) enables language technologies. TSF IME are Windows components that you can add to enable typing text for Japanese, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, and Korean languages. Package State Roaming (PSR) PSR will be removed in a future update. PSR allows non-Microsoft developers to access roaming data on devices, enabling developers of UWP applications to write data to Windows and synchronize it to other instantiations of Windows for that user. The recommended replacement for PSR is Azure App Service. Azure App Service is widely supported, well documented, reliable, and supports cross-platform/cross-ecosystem scenarios such as iOS, Android and web. My People is probably the most consumer-facing feature that's being deprecated. Presumably, it wasn't being used much. The next feature update is Windows 10 20H1, which is due out in the first half of 2020. The good news is that it's pretty much done, so if a deprecated feature on the list isn't removed just yet, it probably won't be. Source: Here are the features being removed or deprecated in Windows 10 version 1909 (via Neowin)
  7. Windows 10 build 19023 is now available in the Fast ring Over the past few weeks, Microsoft has shifted its Insider build releases to Tuesday, and more often than not, they've been happening at 2PM Pacific Time. That means it's time for a new build, and this week we're getting build number 19023. As per usual with recent builds, there isn't really anything new in this build, and it's all about bug fixes and other improvements. Even the list of fixes is pretty short, though: We resolved an issue where, if a build attempted to download and install before you had completed the first log in of a prior install (such as Build 19013), you would experience a 2-hour window before you could install this new build. We fixed an issue resulting in a lag processing input when running a video fullscreen. We fixed an issue where the quick action section in the Action Center was slightly off-center in the last few builds. We fixed an issue that could result in Cortana’s voice activation setting switching from on back to off after explorer.exe restarted, or if you rebooted your PC. Just a reminder for Insiders, that as of the previous flight, based on feedback, we’ve decided to remove the downloads folder from Disk Cleanup. If you liked having this option, it’s still available via Storage Settings. Despite being a minor build, there are still some known issues to be aware of, particularly a new one preventing Windows Sandbox and Windows Defender Application Guard from working. Here's the full list: We’ve identified an issue preventing Sandbox and WDAG from working. If you rely on these features, you may consider pausing updates before taking this build. We know what’s causing this issue, and we’re working hard to get another flight out with the fix as quickly as possible. BattlEye and Microsoft have found incompatibility issues due to changes in the operating system between some Insider Preview builds and certain versions of BattlEye anti-cheat software. To safeguard Insiders who might have these versions installed on their PC, we have applied a compatibility hold on these devices from being offered affected builds of Windows Insider Preview. See this article for details. We’ve heard that Settings still isn’t available outside of launching via the URI (ms-settings:) for some Insiders and are investigating. Some Insiders are reporting that after successfully installing printer drivers from the Optional Updates section, the same driver is still showing as available for install. We’re looking into the issue. We’re investigating reports that certain fingerprint readers are no longer working as of Build 19013. If you’re impacted, for now you’ll need to log in with a password instead–appreciate your patience. The 20H1 development cycle started significantly earlier than usual for the Insider program, but there hasn't been much in the way of major new features. With reports suggesting that the update will be feature-complete sometime in December, it seems likely that we won't see any big new changes in this development cycle. The Windows 10 November 2019 Update, which was made available to seekers today, is also a pretty small update. Source: Windows 10 build 19023 is now available in the Fast ring (Neowin)
  8. A minor update that’s more like the traditional Windows service pack Microsoft is releasing its latest Windows 10 November 2019 Update to devices today. While most of Microsoft’s significant Windows 10 updates usually come with a host of new features, this one is much more like the service packs you’d find with previous versions of Windows. Most of the changes are minor, and you won’t see a lot of them as they’re behind-the-scenes improvements focused on stability, performance, and more. That doesn’t mean nothing has changed, though. The biggest changes can be found in the improvements that Microsoft is making to the notifications experience in Windows 10. This new November update has a manage notifications button in the notification center (Action Center) that leads to a better settings area where you can customize notifications. You’ll also be able to hover over notifications that appear and tap a settings button to permanently mute notifications from a particular app. Microsoft is even offering the ability to customize the number of notifications you see from apps. Elsewhere, there are a few changes to the Start menu and task bar. You can now hover over the Start menu hamburger menu without having to click it, and you’ll also be able to add events to your calendar from the task bar. Microsoft is also updating the search functionality inside File Explorer. It’s now powered by the same Windows search backend as the Start menu, so you can find files on your local PC or even cloud storage on OneDrive. Microsoft is starting to roll out the November 2019 Update to Windows 10 users today, and you can grab it directly from Windows Update by heading into Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update and checking for updates. Source: Windows 10 November 2019 Update is now available as more of a service pack (via The Verge)
  9. Microsoft releases Windows 10 SDK Preview build 19018 As usual on Tuesdays, Microsoft has released a new build of the Windows 10 SDK Preview. The release was a little later than usual this week, but it's still pretty much what you'd expect, with the build number matching that of last week's Windows 10 build for the Fast ring, which was 19018. It's still ahead of the build released to the Slow ring yesterday, though. While the SDK is available, there's no changeleog available just yet, because Microsoft hasn't published a blog post yet. Microsoft also hasn't released a new build of the Windows Servers Insider Preview this week, so it's still on build 19008 from a couple of weeks ago. As always, you'll need Visual Studio 2017 or newer to use the latest preview build of the SDK, and you'll also need to be running Insider builds of Windows 10 for it to work. The preview build of the SDK can be used alongside a stable version in a working enviroment, and you can continue to publish apps to the Microsoft Store, as long as they target a a generally available version of Windows 10. If you're interested, you can download the latest build of the SDK from the Windows Insider website. There are also corresponding builds of the Assessment and Deployment Kit (ADK), Windows Driver Kit (WDK), and Hardware Lab Kit (HLK). Source: Microsoft releases Windows 10 SDK Preview build 19018 (Neowin)
  10. Today is the second Tuesday of the month, making it Patch Tuesday. That means that there are cumulative updates available for all supported versions of Windows. The amount of supported versions goes up by one today, as version 1909 was released. Today also marked the end of support for version 1803, but only for Home and Pro SKUs, so there are still updates for Enterprise and Education. Moving forward, versions 1903 and 1909 will get the same updates, since it's just an enablement package that increases the build. Today's update is KB4524570, and that brings the build number to 18362.476 and 18363.476 for versions 1903 and 1909, respectively. You can manually download it here, and there's one highlight: Here's the full list of fixes: If you're on Windows 10 version 1809, you'll get KB4523205, bringing the build number to 17763.864. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Here's the full list of fixes: Finally, there are three known issues to be aware of: Symptom Workaround Certain operations, such as rename, that you perform on files or folders that are on a Cluster Shared Volume (CSV) may fail with the error, “STATUS_BAD_IMPERSONATION_LEVEL (0xC00000A5)”. This occurs when you perform the operation on a CSV owner node from a process that doesn’t have administrator privilege. Do one of the following: Perform the operation from a process that has administrator privilege. Perform the operation from a node that doesn’t have CSV ownership. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. After installing KB4493509, devices with some Asian language packs installed may receive the error, "0x800f0982 - PSFX_E_MATCHING_COMPONENT _NOT_FOUND." Uninstall and reinstall any recently added language packs. For instructions, see Manage the input and display language settings in Windows 10. Select Check for Updates and install the April 2019 Cumulative Update. For instructions, see Update Windows 10. Note If reinstalling the language pack does not mitigate the issue, reset your PC as follows: Go to the Settings app > Recovery. Select Get Started under the Reset this PC recovery option. Select Keep my Files. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. When setting up a new Windows device during the Out of Box Experience (OOBE), you might be unable to create a local user when using Input Method Editor (IME). This issue might affect you if you are using the IME for Chinese, Japanese, or Korean languages. Note This issue does not affect using a Microsoft Account during OOBE. To mitigate this issue, set the keyboard language to English during user creation or use a Microsoft Account to complete OOBE. You can set the keyboard language back to your preferred language after user creation. Once the OOBE is done and you are at the desktop, you can rename the current user using these instructions. If you prefer to create a new local user, see KB4026923. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. If you're on version 1803, you'll get KB4525237, which brings the build number to 17134.1130. You can manually download it here, and here are tne highlights: Here's the full list of fixes: This one also has a couple of known issues to be aware of: Symptom Workaround Certain operations, such as rename, that you perform on files or folders that are on a Cluster Shared Volume (CSV) may fail with the error, “STATUS_BAD_IMPERSONATION_LEVEL (0xC00000A5)”. This occurs when you perform the operation on a CSV owner node from a process that doesn’t have administrator privilege. Do one of the following: Perform the operation from a process that has administrator privilege. Perform the operation from a node that doesn’t have CSV ownership. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. When setting up a new Windows device during the Out of Box Experience (OOBE), you might be unable to create a local user when using Input Method Editor (IME). This issue might affect you if you are using the IME for Chinese, Japanese, or Korean languages. Note This issue does not affect using a Microsoft Account during OOBE. To mitigate this issue, set the keyboard language to English during user creation or use a Microsoft Account to complete OOBE. You can set the keyboard language back to your preferred language after user creation. Once the OOBE is done and you are at the desktop, you can rename the current user using these instructions. If you prefer to create a new local user, see KB4026923. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. Next up is Windows 10 version 1709, which, like 1803 will be going forward, is only supported for Enterprise and Education SKUs. Those users will get KB4525241, bringing the version number to 16299.1508. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Here's the full list of fixes: This update has the same known issues as the one above. Next up is Windows 10 version 1703, which isn't supported for any version of Windows 10 for PCs. Those with a Surface Hub will get KB4525245, bringing the build number to 15063.2172. Also, this update is where you'll find the changes that are included in this month's Windows 10 Mobile 1709 update. Windows 10 version 1607 is only supported for LTSC and Windows Server 2016 customers. Those users will get KB4525236, bringing the build number to 14393.3326. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Here's the full list of fixes: It also has two known issues: Symptom Workaround After installing KB4467684, the cluster service may fail to start with the error “2245 (NERR_PasswordTooShort)” if the group policy “Minimum Password Length” is configured with greater than 14 characters. Set the domain default "Minimum Password Length" policy to less than or equal to 14 characters. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. Certain operations, such as rename, that you perform on files or folders that are on a Cluster Shared Volume (CSV) may fail with the error, “STATUS_BAD_IMPERSONATION_LEVEL (0xC00000A5)”. This occurs when you perform the operation on a CSV owner node from a process that doesn’t have administrator privilege. Do one of the following: Perform the operation from a process that has administrator privilege. Perform the operation from a node that doesn’t have CSV ownership. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. Finally, the original version of Windows 10 is still supported for LTSC customers, and those users will get KB4525232, bringing the build number to 10240.18395. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Here's the full list of fixes: This update only has one known issue, the one that's common across all of the above updates. Source: Microsoft releases Windows 10 builds 18362.476 and 18363.476 - here's what's new (via Neowin) p/s: The title of the article is quite misleading as it only mentions updates for v1903 and v1909, but actually the Patch Tuesday updates are released for all supported releases of Windows 10 (except where noted), please read thoroughly before commenting.
  11. Hello everybody A few days ago, I decided to (try to) install windows 10 on my new desktop computer. First, all went fine and, as usual, I began to personalize it. The problems began to appear when I wanted to install and use other apps to see or modify photos, or read videos. After 1 or 2 days (?) Windows said that it resetted the default apps (viewer and paint). Well. I went back in parameters and modified the things to use my own apps. No way. It seemed to work, but later I obtained the same warning... and the sames changes... I googled my problem and saw that many users experience the same situation. I tried some workarounds, but at this time I found nothing to solve it. So I open this topic to ask the community if there is a "magic" way to prevent windows from resetting my defaults apps. If not, I sure will restore my old good seven system, or try a linux OS. Thank you
  12. Microsoft's Edge Chromium browser to ship in Windows 10 as soon as it's generally available Here at Microsoft's Ignite 2019 conference, the company announced the general availability date for its new Chromium-based Edge browser. The rebuilt Edge will be available on January 15. In fact, if you sign up for the Beta channel, you can get the release candidate right now. The next question is that of when the browser will actually ship with Windows 10, with many speculating that it might ship in 20H1 - which would be the first feature update after January 15 - or even 20H2, since 20H1 might RTM in December. As it turns out, neither of those theories are accurate, as the browser will start to be bundled with the OS right after the GA date. It's going to be a slow rollout though. We're not all going to wake up one day and find Legacy Edge replaced by the new Edge. That's how staged rollouts work though. There will be a small sample group that will get it first, and then that group will be expanded. As for new installations of Windows, the bits will be sent out to OEMs as soon as they're generally available. The point is that it doesn't require a Windows 10 feature update at all. The app can simply be bundled with the OS, and as we've seen, when Edge is installed from the production branch, it replaces Legacy Edge, or Edge Spartan. So if you buy a new PC next year, chances are that it will be running Edge Chromium out of the box. Source: Microsoft's Edge Chromium browser to ship in Windows 10 as soon as it's generally available (Neowin)
  13. This week at its Ignite 2019 conference, Microsoft announced that OneNote 2016 is being resurrected, after telling users for years that the desktop app is only in maintenance mode, and that we should all be using the UWP app, OneNote for Windows 10. Not only will the company be adding new features, but it will be installed by default with new Office installations beginning in March. Because of this, many were wondering about the future of OneNote for Windows 10, and whether it will continue to be supported going forward. The short answer is that it will be, and that shouldn't change in the immediate future. Everyone I talked to about this agreed though, that it won't make sense to support two apps on the same platform forever. Microsoft's official reason for bringing back OneNote 2016 is because it was listening to user feedback. Many were hesitant to move to the UWP app for some time, and it took time for the team to even get the two apps close to feature parity. Now, it seems that we have two apps that are better at different things. After all, OneNote for Windows 10 has been receiving new features regularly for a while now, while OneNote 2016 was in maintenance mode. One area where the UWP app is certainly stronger is with inking features. If the Redmond firm does kill off OneNote for Windows 10 at some point, it could be a blow to its credibility. As mentioned earlier, many were hesitant to make the switch from OneNote 2016, and there were pain points in the transition. After users sorted through all that and made OneNote for Windows 10 fit their work flow, asking them to switch back might be too much. But that's looking too far into the future for now. As it stands, both products are supported, and if Microsoft decides to kill off one of them, there's no telling which one that will be. Source: Microsoft will continue to support OneNote for Windows 10, but the future is uncertain (via Neowin)
  14. I IN NO WAY TAKE ANY CREDIT FOR THIS IT WAS TAKEN FROM MDL FORUM AND SOME POSTS MY MEMBERS ON THIS FORUM! Manual: Tools: Microsoft Telemetry Tools Bundle v1.31 Windows 10 Lite v9 Private WinTen v0.1h Blackbird v6 v1.0.79.3 [Works with Win 7/8/8/1/10] O&O ShutUp10 v1.6.1403 WPD - Windows Privacy Dashboard v1.3.1323 WindowsSpyBlocker v4.25.0 Spybot Anti-Beacon v3.1 [Works with Win 7/8/8/1/10] W10Privacy v3.3.1.0 Destroy Windows Spying v1.0.1.0 [Works with Win 7/8/8/1/10] [NOT RECOMMENDED AS NOT UPDATED ANYMORE] Disable Windows 10 Tracking v3.2.1
  15. Windows 10’s Start menu problem first surfaced in September and more users started reporting the issue after applying the updates released in October. Initially, Microsoft marked these issues as “resolved” and the company said that it will monitor the feedback from users. “We will continue monitoring to ensure users have a high-quality experience when interacting with these areas,” the firm said. In a post on the Microsoft Answers website, Microsoft engineer confirmed that installing KB4522355 will resolve issues with Start Menu and Microsoft Edge. While Microsoft has fixed Edge browser bug, it appears that some users on Windows 10 version 1903 are still experiencing problems with the Start Menu. Users have reported that Windows 10’s Start menu crashes or fails to launch after applying KB4522355. It appears to be a slightly different issue as the Start menu is not failing with a critical error. “Part of this update was to correct the start menu issue that many users were experiencing. However I’d like to report that this issue is still present and is still a huge issue. We are trying our best to get off of version 1803 because the end of life is approaching (November 12th, 2019) however this one particular issue is preventing us from doing so,” wrote a user who appears to be employed at an organization. Windows 10 KB4522355 Like every other Windows 10 update, KB4522355 also fails to install with a generic error message (0x800F081F ) for some users. A user said that the patch fails to install with the following error message: Windows failed to install the following update with error 0x800F081F: 2019-10 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1903 for x64-based Systems (KB4522355). KB4522355 could be a nightmare for some people, but it has been a smooth ride for the majority. Bluetooth issues resolved In an update to its support document, Microsoft confirmed that a recent Windows 10 cumulative should resolve a bug affecting the performance of Bluetooth adapters developed by Qualcomm. This change also means that Windows 10 version 1903 can be installed on more configurations. According to Windows Dashboard, the majority of problems have been resolved in Windows 10 version 1903. Users who are still experiencing issues should see improvements after Microsoft deploys Windows 10 November 2019 Update. Windows 10 19H2 (version 1909), which been touted as one of the most stable updates, should begin shipping to consumers on November 12. Source
  16. Hello experts, I have a Dell Latitude 3490 Laptop. It comes with Windows 10 Pro Pre-installed. Around 3 months before I did a Windows Update after that I have witnessed a "Yellow" "Lock" Icon present in the Drive volumes, I thought the Windows is protecting the drives, but i didn't know that it was "BitLocker Encryption" at that time. Three days before i had given my laptop to the Dell Service center as it couldn't power on. They have replaced the Motherboard. Now Windows is asking for BicLocker Recover Key which i don't have, The Laptop HDD is 1TB with 3 partitions, c = 150GB, d = 390GB, e = 390GB all three are encrypted with BitLocker. Note: I never enabled the BitLocker Encryption by myself so I don't have the password / Recovery Keys. Any help would be appreciated Thanks ppu
  17. In addition to this month bringing the release of the Ubuntu 19.10 "Eoan Ermine", Apple also shipped macOS 10.15 "Catalina" as the sixteenth major release of their macOS operating system. So with that it makes for an interesting time seeing how macOS 10.15 competes against both Ubuntu 19.10 and Windows 10 on an Apple MacBook Pro. Here are those results from dozens of benchmarks. Using an Apple MacBook Pro with Core i7-6700HQ Skylake CPU, 2 x 8GB RAM, 250GB Apple SSD, and Radeon Pro 450 graphics, macOS 10.15, Windows 10, and Ubuntu 19.10 were all benchmarked off this same system. All three operating systems were tested with their latest software updates as of testing. Normally we also include Intel's Clear Linux too for looking at the performance of a very optimized rolling-release Linux distribution, but unfortunately Clear Linux was having issues with its UEFI boot configuration in being able to boot on this MacBook Pro. It's worth noting that finally in Ubuntu 19.10 is good support for recent MacBook Pro laptops and other Linux distributions using the Linux 5.3 kernel or newer. The Linux 5.3 mainline kernel brought a driver for handling the Apple keyboards and trackpads for the MacBook/MacBookPro devices over the past couple of years. So with the newly released Ubuntu using Linux 5.3, the 2016 era MacBook Pro and newer are finally working decently out-of-the-box. Via the Phoronix Test Suite more than 80 benchmarks were run on macOS 10.15, Windows 10, and Ubuntu 19.10 from this MacBook Pro. First up was Valve's Dota 2 game that runs well across Windows/Linux/macOS. With Dota 2 using the OpenGL renderer, both Ubuntu 19.10 and Windows 10 were much faster than macOS 10.15. No surprise really considering Apple has deprecated OpenGL on macOS in favor of their own Metal graphics API. When running Dota 2 with Vulkan, the performance was now similar across all three platforms. It's worth noting the macOS 10.15 performance was much better with Vulkan -- which Valve is achieving through the use of MoltenVK to map to the Metal drivers. Windows did still have a slight lead, but for all key purposes the performance was similar. When running Xonotic that is OpenGL rendered and has similar quality builds across all three operating systems, Windows 10 was delivering much better performance with the Radeon Pro 450 than under Ubuntu 19.10 with its default drivers and macOS 10.15 with their lousy OpenGL driver coverage. Switching from gaming to the ParaView scientific visualization software that makes use of OpenGL but is also CPU heavy with MPI, Ubuntu 19.10 was tending to be the fastest from this MacBook Pro followed by macOS and then Windows. Windows did lead in the wavelet sub-test of ParaView. And for Java 2D rendering performance, with all three operating systems using OpenJDK 11, Ubuntu 19.10 was much faster with the exception of macOS 10.15 having better results for text rendering. When it came to running a variety of browser benchmarks on the MacBook Pro, macOS 10.15 did tend to deliver noticeable performance advantages over the same Firefox 69 build on Windows 10 and Ubuntu 19.10. When looking at the Google Chrome 77 performance across the three operating systems, macOS 10.15 still led in some of the tests but Windows 10 did pick up a few first place finishes. Ubuntu did pick up a victory in the graphics-heavy MotionMark benchmark. When running NAMD across the three operating systems, Ubuntu 19.10 did deliver the best performance. Ubuntu 19.10 also delivered the best Golang performance aside from the JSON parsing test where macOS Catalina was the victor. Running some Java language micro-benchmarks also allowed Ubuntu to rack up some more wins. In the Java-written DaCapo and Renaissance benchmarks, Ubuntu 19.10 was generally the front-runner here as well with all these tests on OpenJDK 11. When running Intel's OSPray ray-tracing tests across the three operating systems, the performance was similar. Intel Open Image Denoise saw slight leads with Ubuntu 19.10 and Windows 10. OIDn and OSPray are among the components to be making up part of the oneAPI graphics rendering toolkit and thus will become more important with time. C-Ray ray-tracing was the fastest on Ubuntu 19.10. XZ and 7-Zip compression was the fastest on Windows 10. Surprisingly, Windows 10 had the fastest Zstd compression results. Python scripts ran the fastest on Ubuntu 19.10. Ubuntu 19.10 also faired the best with the proprietary NeatBench video editor test. With the Appleseed production renderer, macOS 10.15 was able to yield the best performance in this creative workload. PHP performance was the fastest on Ubuntu 19.10 for those doing any server-side web development from your laptop. Git also ran the fastest on Ubuntu 19.10. Of 86 benchmarks carried out across all three operating systems, Ubuntu 19.10 was the fastest 48% of the time followed by Windows 10 with leads 31% of the time and macOS 10.15 at just under 20%. Of the three operating systems, macOS 10.15 was in last place about half the time. If taking the geometric mean of all the benchmark results, Windows 10 had an 18% advantage over macOS 10.15 Catalina. Ubuntu 19.10 meanwhile had a 29.5% advantage over Apple macOS and 9% over Windows 10 for this tests from the same MacBook Pro. Where macOS tended to perform the best was with the Firefox web browser benchmarks, the results on Google Chrome were mixed under Windows and macOS, and macOS also did well in some of the creative workloads like the Appleseed renderer. Windows 10 picked up some wins in gaming tests and other select workloads while Ubuntu 19.10 showed its best under the heavy CPU/system benchmarks. Source
  18. Microsoft releases Windows 10 build 19013 to the Fast ring with more kaomoji Microsoft released Windows 10 Insider Preview build 19013 to the Fast ring today, and as usual, it's pretty light on new features. It's the latest build from the 20H1 development branch, and if recent rumors are to be believed, 20H1 could RTM as soon as December. That means that you shouldn't expect anymore major new features. One of the new features in today's build is more kaomoji. You might recall that kaomoji was added to the emoji picker with Windows 10 version 1903, so now there are more than them. The other new feature is that the Windows Subsystem for Linux will release memory back to your system when you're not using it. Previously, your WSL VM could grow when you needed it to, but it couldn't shrink. Here's the full changelog: More kaomoji As some of you may know, with Windows 10 version 1903, we updated our WIN+(Period) / WIN+(Semicolon) keyboard shortcut to not only include emoji, but to also now contain kaomoji and special characters. What are kaomoji? Basically, they’re faces with expressions you can make by combining various characters–for example, you might be familiar with the shruggie: In any case, based on your feedback, in this build we’re updating our kaomoji list with a few more favorites, including: And more! Enjoy Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) 2 will now release unused Linux memory back to your Windows machine Previously, your WSL 2 Virtual Machine’s (VM) memory would grow to meet the needs of your workflow, but would not shrink back down when the memory was no longer needed. With this change, as memory is no longer in use in the Linux VM, it will be freed back to Windows, which will shrink in memory size accordingly. Other updates for Insiders PowerToys v0.12 now available! We’ve just released our 0.12 release of PowerToys on GitHub. We’ve gotten tons of great feedback and suggestions from the community and want to directly say thank you to everyone. New features include a great new utility called PowerRename, which makes it easy to batch rename a bunch of files, improvements to FancyZones, and support for Dark Mode. Check out our latest article for all the details. Your Phone app–Elevating the Phone screen feature by removing its dependency on Bluetooth connection Windows Insiders, we heard your feedback about the Phone screen feature’s dependency on Bluetooth Low Energy connectivity. To address your feedback, we partnered closely with Samsung to bring you a more streamlined experience across all Windows 10 PCs by removing the peripheral role dependency for Phone screen, which will expand the overall reach of this feature. Samsung Galaxy Note 10 was the first device to introduce this feature in August. After a positive response, we’ve recently enabled this feature across Samsung Galaxy Fold, S10, S10+, and S10e smartphones. You’ll need to update your supported Samsung devices with the recent software update that enables the ‘Link to Windows’ feature. To continue offering this experience to other smartphones, we’re expanding this feature support to Samsung Galaxy A30s, A50s, and A90 smartphones, and we’ll continue to add additional devices in the coming months. With the new experience rolling out, we’ll be removing the Bluetooth connectivity option, effective immediately. If you were previously enjoying Phone screen over Bluetooth and you have a phone model that doesn’t yet support Link to Windows, the Phone screen node will disappear automatically within the Your Phone app. We recommend that you unpair your devices by going to the Bluetooth settings on both your PC and your Android phone, so that you don’t have a connection that is no longer in use. Thank you for helping us refine the Phone screen experience so far! Phone screen requirements: Select Android phones running Android 9.0 or greater PC running Windows 10 October 2018 Update or later Android phone must be on and connected to the same network as the PC You will need a supported device to use this feature: Samsung Galaxy Fold Samsung Galaxy Note 10/ Note 10+ Samsung Galaxy S10/S10+/S10e Samsung Galaxy A30s/A50s/A90 Refer to the Your Phone FAQs for additional information. Preview new DirectX 12 features In the latest 20H1 builds, you can preview new DirectX 12 features, including DirectX Raytracing tier 1.1, Mesh Shader, and Sampler Feedback. In this blog post, the DirectX Team explains what each of these features are and how they will improve the gaming experience in Windows 10! While we're seemingly prepping for the 20H1 RTM, it's worth noting that Windows 10 19H2, or the November 2019 Update, still hasn't been released. That should be available in the coming weeks. Source: Microsoft releases Windows 10 build 19013 to the Fast ring with more kaomoji (Neowin)
  19. Microsoft really changed up the way it tests and delivers Windows 10 feature updates this year. Back in February, the Skip Ahead ring of the Windows Insider Program got its first 20H1 build. It was unprecedented, because 19H1 was still in testing. For the first time, Insiders were skipping two versions ahead. As it turned out, Microsoft was looking to align its Windows 10 development with Azure, so we got a minor update for the second half of 2019, with a big one coming in 2020. While we expected 20H1 to ship next spring, it turns out that that might not be the case. According to a report from Zac Bowden of Windows Central, 20H1 might RTM - meaning that it will be signed off for public release - as early as December. Moreover, Microsoft will reportedly shift the Windows 10 development schedule entirely, so future H1 updates will be ready in December, and H2 updates will RTM in June. So naturally, 20H2 should RTM in June, and that means that Windows 10X will be ready. Windows 10X is the OS that's going to be in foldable and dual-screen devices that are coming in the fall; those include the Surface Neo and Lenovo's foldable ThinkPad X1 PC. As far as when these versions will actually ship to the public, that's still an unknown. As it stands with the current development cycle, Microsoft holds a feature update for about two months from when it RTMs until it's generally available. One reason that that remains unclear is because Microsoft promised back in 2017 that Windows 10 and Office 365 ProPlus are going to be on the same release schedules, so if the Windows 10 schedule changes, so must Office 365. Source: Windows 10 to reportedly shift to December/June RTM schedule (via Neowin)
  20. As usual, Microsoft today released its mid-stream optional cumulative update for Windows 10 version 1903. Optional means that this will not be installed automatically, and you'll be able to choose whether to download and install it, or ignore it completely, in Windows Update. The update that you'll see is KB4522355, and it brings the build number to 18362.449. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Being that there's an unusually long list of highlights, it stands to reason that there's an unusually long list of fixes. Here's the full list: The good news is that Microsoft says that there aren't any known issues with this update. While it's optional, if you don't take today's update, all of these fixes will be bundled into this month's mandatory Patch Tuesday update on November 12. Source: Microsoft releases Windows 10 build 18362.449 with a ton of fixes (via Neowin)
  21. Windows 10 is not the perfect operating system for use with tablets, including Microsoft's own Surface Pro series. Stardock is introducing a solution today. Called TouchTasks, the app lets you set up various zones on your screen that serve as touch-centric shortcuts. There are a variety of different kinds of zones that you can set up as well. In the image above, it shows recent documents. There's also an app launcher that you can use, rather than the full-screen Start Menu that Microsoft provides, which only mirrors the tiles in your desktop Start Menu. "Using Windows as a tablet has been challenging for some people," said Brad Wardell, CEO of Stardock. "What we wanted to do is create an app that lets users configure points on the screen edge that work the way they want them to work." Using TouchTasks, you'll be able to set up five different zones on your screen: one on the left, one on the right, and three across the top. Once you install it, you'll get a quick full-screen tutorial that shows to tap outside of the visible area of the screen, since the touch-sensitive area is actually larger than the display. Four of the five zones are set by default, but you can customize them to do a variety of actions, or you can shut off any zone that you don't want to use. You can set a zone for displaying the on-screen keyboard, something that can be a pain point in Windows 10 when you tap a textbox and it doesn't come up. You can set another one to show brightness control, the task switcher, the Start Menu, and more. TouchTasks is available now for an introductory price of $4.99, although the normal price will be $9.99. You can check it out here. More pics: Source: Stardock is releasing an app to make Windows 10's tablet mode easier to use (via Neowin)
  22. The difference between Defer updates, Pause updates and Delay updates — and what happens with Win10 1909 Terminology surrounding Windows patches frequently goes through gut-wrenching, inexplicable changes — think Current Branch for Business, Semi-Annual Channel, and all the (Targeted) bafflegab. There’s another change afoot, though, with some real — if nuanced — differences. Thinkstock/Microsoft Yes, there’s a difference between Defer updates and Pause updates. But that’s just the tip of the micro-plastic-infused iceberg. The main sticking point: Win10 still has both concepts floating around, they conflict, and we don’t have any idea how the conflicts are being resolved — a problem that’s going to get worse with the release of Win10 version 1909, which doesn’t follow the Defer, Pause, push, pull or prod rules. This time the name change — Deferred updates, Paused updates — masks a Gordian knot of settings in various places, with conflicts galore. Be of good cheer. When Microsoft pushes Win10 version 1909 into the mix next month, we have yet another update with a new pedigree. Here's where things stand. If you scroll down the Windows Update Advanced Options pane for Windows 10 Pro versions 1803 or 1809, you see the old Deferral settings (screenshot). Woody Leonhard/IDG Although you can see the settings right there in black and white, they’ve been kicked under the bus. Back in February, “Semi-Annual Channel” was retroactively defined as “wait an extra 60 days on version upgrades.” Nonetheless, the other two settings — deferral settings — still have effect. Deferred Updates In practice, the meaning of Deferred updates in Advanced Options is reasonably clear: “Feature update … deferred for this many days” means that Windows Update will refrain from installing a new version of Win10 for the specified number of days after the new version is posted. There’s a little squishiness in the “posted” part — Win10 version 1809 being a case in point, with its horribly botched rollout over different days — and you may have to add 60 days depending on the Channel setting. But, well, Microsoft. “Quality update … deferred for this many days” means that Windows Update will wait the specified number of days after a cumulative update is pushed before it gets installed. Note in particular that some months — like September — have two pushed cumulative updates. The deferral applies to each pushed update, in turn. In both cases, we’re talking about the number of days that pass after the patch is released. The day you adjust the setting doesn’t make any difference, although if you change the setting while a deferral is in effect, the new setting takes precedence. For example, say Microsoft pushes a cumulative update on Oct. 3. You have quality update deferrals set to, say, 15 days. You change your mind and on Oct. 10, you change the quality update deferral setting to five days. In that case (although you may need to reboot), the Oct. 3 quality update will get installed. There are more changes coming. The upgrade to Win10 version 1909 apparently isn’t constrained by the Deferred update setting — there’s an independent “Download and install now” prompt. Confused? Yeah. You aren’t the only one. Paused updates Paused updates are a different kettle of fish entirely. Win10 version 1809 has a “Pause updates” slider in Advanced Options, but it only pauses for 35 days; there’s no finer setting. Win10 version 1903 has a plethora of pausing options. On the Windows Update main screen, you have a button marked “Pause updates for 7 days” (screenshot). Woody Leonhard/IDG Click that button and it’s replaced with another that says “Pause updates for seven more days.” You can click the button up to five times and each click adds seven more days to the pause. Dig deeper into the Advanced Options pane and you see the ability to “Pause updates until a specific date.” This pause, though, maxes out at seven days — an odd limitation, considering the 5 x 7 multi-click option on the main page. (Note that earlier versions of Win10 Pro 1903 allowed date-by-date pause extensions for up to 35 days. That’s no longer the case, per a clean install yesterday of build 18362.356.) Woody Leonhard/IDG When you pause updates, the pause takes effect from the point you set it. So if, on Oct. 1, you click three times to pause updates for 21 days, all cumulative updates will be held back until Oct. 22. Once Oct. 22 rolls around, though, you get the most recently pushed cumulative update — which may not be the one you thought you were blocking. Delayed updates So what’s a “Delayed update”? As best I can tell, there’s no official Microsoft definition of the term. It doesn’t appear in any of the current versions’ settings. Think of it as a generic term that may mean either Deferred or Paused updates, or both, in any combination. The case of the disappearing 1903 deferral settings When you install a clean copy of Win10 Pro version 1903, you see the Deferral settings shown in the first screenshot in this article. If you change any of the settings, on reboot the whole settings section disappears. I talked about that rather shocking revelation back in June. I have no idea why it happens, and as best I can tell, Microsoft has never discussed the disappearing deferrals. Group Policy behind the scenes Many of the defer and pause update options you see in the Settings app are available under the covers through the Group Policy Editor. (Remember, again, that we’re talking about Win10 Pro, Education, and maybe Enterprise, depending on your admin’s settings. This doesn’t apply to Win10 Home.) To see what’s happening down there, start gpedit.msc and navigate to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Windows Update. There you’ll find a bunch of defer and pause options, with the mother lode under Windows Update for Business. As you might expect, there’s a real hornet’s nest of settings, some of which work, many of which don’t, and the conflicts are glaring. For example, in Win10 1903 the Windows Update for Business > Select when Quality Updates are received setting says that you can pause quality updates — but that pause will last for 35 days. Period. There’s no seven-day option, no variable number of days option. It’s 35 days and that’s it. In Win10 version 1809, though, the analogous setting gives you a chance to specify the date Pause starts — and then it goes for 35 days. As is all too common with Group Policy, there’s no apparent relationship between what’s in the Settings app and what’s in effect under the hood. Don't get me started on the Registry values underpinning all of this mayhem. Conflicts. Oy, we got conflicts. So what happens when a Pause and a Deferral collide? Or when a Group Policy conflicts with something you can see in the Settings app? Short answer: It’s complicated. Longer answer: The exact resolution seems to vary depending on which build of what version you’re using. PKCano undertook an extensive testing of the conflicts between Group Policy, Settings app, and what actually happens back in July. The results are ugly, to say the least. Since then there have been numerous attempts to reconcile conflicting Defer, Pause, Settings app, GP settings and values in the Registry — and it’s an unholy mess. My main observation — not backed by any exhaustive research, but just from listening to the howls of patching pain — is that Windows Update tries to honor all five sources of settings, and usually opts to hold off if any of them say to block an update. The new 1909 kid on the block At this point, it looks like the Win10 version 1909 announcement arrives as part of a cumulative update, and it’s only installed if you explicitly click on “Download and install now.” Whether the appearance of the announcement is subject to Defer or Pause update rules is an unknown at this point, but it seems likely that installation of Win10 version 1909 will be wholly dependent on clicking yet another link, ignoring any other Defer or Pause setting, either in the Settings app or in Group Policy. Which is good. Anything to break free of this patching tar patch. The future’s unclear at this point. Just for starters, we have no idea if Microsoft will continue to deliver a major Win10 upgrade in March followed by a Service Pack in September. The Service Pack, also known as an optional feature update, or an “Enablement Package” (sheesh), likely won't follow any of the old Defer or Pause rules — although it may mimic version 1909. Of course, we don’t know for sure. Microsoft hasn’t told us. Heaven only knows what will happen when version 1903 gets within four months of end of support. Then we enter uncharted waters once again. Feeling pushed? Join us on AskWoody. Thx @b, @PKCano Source: The difference between Defer updates, Pause updates and Delay updates — and what happens with Win10 1909 (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  23. Microsoft releases Windows 10 build 19008 with fixes Today, Microsoft released Windows 10 Insider Preview build 19008 to the Fast ring. There really isn't much that's new; in fact, there aren't any new features listed at all. The timing is a bit strange, since the Insider team usually sticks to 10am or 2pm PT for build releases, and this one arrived at 4:19pm. While there aren't any new features, there are a bunch of fixes, improvements, and known issues to be aware of. Here's what got fixed and improved in build 19008: For Insiders that were experiencing their PCs getting stuck on restart and shutdown on Builds 18999-19002: A fix for this was included with the update to Build 19002.1002, but in case you didn’t see it, including a note here too. If you didn’t install Build 19002.1002, you may need to use the workaround in order to upgrade to this build. We fixed an issue where, when optional updates were available, Insiders with the Settings header might see the Windows Update indicator in a warning state, although the main page of Windows Update Settings showed that everything is up to date. We fixed an issue resulting in sometimes not being able to bring Settings back up after minimizing the window. We’ve done some work to improve the launch speed of the taskbar jump lists. We fixed an issue resulting in the Program Compatibility Assistant popping up for some Insiders We fixed an issue resulting in Windows Hello unexpectedly showing an error message periodically saying “Can’t turn camera on” on recent builds. We cleaned up some UI in the Mouse pointer settings in Ease of Access. We fixed a bug in Narrator where Narrator was not reading link text in the proper language in the Chrome Browser. Here are the known issues: BattlEye and Microsoft have found incompatibility issues due to changes in the operating system between some Insider Preview builds and certain versions of BattlEye anti-cheat software. To safeguard Insiders who might have these versions installed on their PC, we have applied a compatibility hold on these devices from being offered affected builds of Windows Insider Preview. See this article for details. We’re investigating an issue where initiating “Reset this PC” with the cloud download option isn’t working on this build or the previous one when started from Windows RE. We’ve heard that Settings still isn’t available outside of launching via the URI (ms-settings:) for some Insiders and are investigating. When using dark theme, the hardware keyboard text prediction candidate window is unreadable due to black text on a dark grey background. Bluetooth devices may not reconnect as expected after closing the device lid for certain devices. We’re working on a fix, but in the meantime, you can toggle Bluetooth off and back on in the Settings app or reboot the device and that should resolve the issue. Some Insiders are still reporting that after successfully updating to a new build, the Windows Update Settings page may show the same build needs to install. You can verify the build was successfully installed by checking the build number in the corner of the screen or going to Win + R, typing winver, and confirming the build number. We’re investigating this issue. Some Insiders are still reporting that when viewing Optional drivers in the new section on the Windows Update page, there may be older drivers showing as available for download. If accepted, they will attempt to install and fail to do so. We’re investigating this issue. There are a couple other things of note. Microsoft is promising a surprise that's coming soon for the Windows Insider Program's fifth anniversary. It seems like it will be a new badge, and you'll have to be receiving builds by October 31 to receive it. Also, while this is once again a preview build for Windows 10 version 20H1, the Slow ring has been testing 19H2. But being that 19H2 is about to be released to the general public, the Slow ring will start getting 20H1 builds soon. That means that if you don't want 20H1, it's time to switch to the Release Preview ring. Source: Microsoft releases Windows 10 build 19008 with fixes (Neowin)
  24. Microsoft is expected to kick off the rollout of Windows 10 November 2019 Update, or version 1903, in the coming weeks, and the company has now made the final build available for more insiders. The software giant recently confirmed that Windows 10 build 18363.418 is the final release that would be pushed to production devices as well, and today, it’s making it available for Release Preview ring insiders running build 18362.10024. Previously, this build was available for insiders on 18363.xxx builds in the Release Preview ring, but users moving from Slow ring to Release Preview didn’t get it as the whole thing is an enablement package that activates the new features coming to users with the November update. “Today, we have released 19H2 Build 18363.418 to Windows Insiders who are on Build 18362.10024 and in the Release Preview ring. If you are on Build 18362.10024 and still in the Slow ring, you will *not* receive this update,” Microsoft explains in an announcement today. “You will need to switch to the Release Preview ring as recommended in the below blog post to pick up the final 19H2 build today. If you remain in the Slow ring, you will be updated to 20H1 very shortly. Now’s the time to double-check your Windows Insider Program settings!” Update just around the corner Windows 10 November 2019 Update won’t be a massive update, as the number of new features is rather small. On the other hand, this new release tests a new update system that allows feature updates to be shipped as typical cumulative updates. This means it won’t land as a full new build, making the whole update process smoother and reducing the likelihood of hitting issues. According to recent speculation, Windows 10 version 1909 could land for production devices on November 12, the same day when the software giant releases the November Patch Tuesday updates with security fixes. Source
  25. NOTE: The preview image may belong to older versions. CMD script file works with "TrustedInstaller" Rights (thanks BAU from MDL) This tool includes 4 different activation methods. KMS Inject activation, Digital activation, KMS 2038 activation and Online KMS activation There is also a script for convert VOLUME verions from RETAIL version for Office 2016 and 2019 products. While this script is being created, abbodi1406’s (MDL) script is referenced. Thank him so much for being a source of inspiration and help. Some security programs will report infected files, that is false-positive due KMS emulating. Digital and Online KMS activations methods are requires internet connection. If use this tool remove any other KMS solutions and temporary turn off AV security protection. $OEM$ Activation About: 3 methods are (Inject, Digital and KMS38) also $OEM$ activation support. To preactivate the system during installation, copy $OEM$ folder to "sources" folder in the installation media (iso/usb). $OEM$ activation method also enable the KMS task scheduling system during installation. (digital and KMS2038 activation method except) Thanks @ShiningDog for the kms server addresses. It is the only KMS application that hosts all methods and receives zero warning by security programs... 😎 WHAT TO KNOWS: Run KMS Suite either on the desktop or in the root directory of any disk. Do not run through folders with long names and folders inside the folder. If RETAIL Office is installed on your computer, the activation query will not show any results. During normal activation in the Inject method, Windows and Office can be activated separately, but in the KMS Task Scheduling module and the $OEM$ Activation option Windows and Office are activated together KNOWN BUGS: When the KMS Suite is run on RETAIL and OEM Windows 7, sometimes Office products can not detect and activate. If this happens, close and reopen the script and reactivating. Download Links: (English interface) Site: https://mega.nz Sharecode: /#!sZJAzSIQ!zZeimVm0KPDnygdYyXTg8I-dbh3SEu3bxIn6bQ9QXgY File : KMS-Digital-Online_Activation_Suite_v8_ENG.rar CRC-32 : 2a4edac1 MD4 : c2eced3e3f81d62e4a4729c012321af2 MD5 : 4bca41f7913de1a271540e07395ba626 SHA-1 : 848cfc6d638881512e86c9b9ee60f58f106eea42 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- (Turkish interface) Site: https://mega.nz Sharecode: /#!5cYiTIoB!7ViFtGK0RVp3JLUO6wDzesxziYWVj5Q_RLiFADGoQ2M File : KMS-Dijital-Online_Aktivasyon_Suite_v8_TUR.rar CRC-32 : 0e074022 MD4 : 5a5e65167a72d0127295122daa2aaadf MD5 : 3a7b6d7fe578a057a6d2690059f4c961 SHA-1 : 0d7c4e72c8ff584f81c9847f5f1bbd9254d21fb2 RAR Pass: 2019 Note: Use WinRar v5x for extract # Special Thanks TNCTR Family Nsane Family abbodi1406 CODYQX4 Hotbird64 qewlpal s1ave77 cynecx qad Mouri_Naruto WindowsAddict angelkyo mspaintmsi BAU Virustotal results of the application exe and dll files Virustotal results of dll files of KMSInject method x64 KMS.dll (April 27, 2019): https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/1902f84a3dae23a598ddda1447957b421511d5df77480aa590f6463830685d7e/detection x86 KMS.dll (April 27, 2019): https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/6a35996e6fc50af1a1a19d39233cc43055da92adf76cb567c39265ad007459e8/detection Virustotal results of exe and dll files of the Digital & KMS38 Activation method: gatherosstate.exe (September 15, 2019) https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/028c8fbe58f14753b946475de9f09a9c7a05fd62e81a1339614c9e138fc2a21d/detection slc.dll (September 15, 2019) https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/9395a37c42e83568dc5ecb25d9e9fca4c6c1c4f47e336fb6ccae62df5c696b4d/detection Changelog:
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