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  1. This tool includes 4 different activation methods. KMS Inject activation, Digital activation, KMS 2038 activation and Online KMS activation There is also a script for convert VOLUME verions from RETAIL version for Office 2016 and 2019 products. While this script is being created, abbodi1406’s (MDL) script is referenced. Thank him so much for being a source of inspiration and help. Some security programs will report infected files, that is false-positive due KMS emulating. Digital and Online KMS activations methods are requires internet connection. If use this tool remove any other KMS solutions and temporary turn off AV security protection. $OEM$ Activation About: 3 methods are (Inject, Digital and KMS38) also $OEM$ activation support. To preactivate the system during installation, copy $OEM$ folder to "sources" folder in the installation media (iso/usb). $OEM$ activation method also enable the KMS task scheduling system during installation. (digital and KMS2038 activation method except) Thanks @ShiningDog for the kms server addresses. It is the only KMS application that hosts all methods and receives zero warning by security programs... 😎 WHAT TO KNOW: Run KMS Suite either on the desktop or in the root directory of any disk. Do not run through folders with long names and folders inside the folder. If RETAIL Office is installed on your computer, the activation query will not show any results. During normal activation in the Inject method, Windows and Office can be activated separately, but in the KMS Task Scheduling module and the $OEM$ Activation option Windows and Office are activated together KNOWN BUGS: When the ONLINE & KMS & 2038 & Dijital Aktivasyon Suite is run on RETAIL and OEM Windows 7, sometimes Office products can not detect and activate. If this happens, close and reopen the script and re-enable. Download Links: (English interface) Site: https://mega.nz Sharecode: /mega.nz/#!dAJnWCiY!QfKFtoYQdVVTllycG5oK3tTsYzjt6KWVj6GpYbiJ-zM File : KMS-Digital-Online_Activation_Suite_v7.7_ENG.rar CRC-32 : c9d7924a MD4 : 690f7949ebfbdd82a45e98598f0c00eb MD5 : 388e9a4d62bd95324046675b769600ae SHA-1 : 3b8fa7583fe0a6928adca2efc519bc93d9acef54 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- (Turkish interface) Site: https://mega.nz Sharecode: /#!pUJFwYJB!a1tE-KBIbya8uX5DaMIf0obS0TLzKTilkhrQKaSZ0NQ File : KMS-Dijital-Online_Aktivasyon_Suite_v7.7_TUR.rar CRC-32 : acaae3e6 MD4 : dd560db8035280a53e30380036fbafde MD5 : 0abff22b2fc683f9cc4c789b46f8dc28 SHA-1 : 450cb1b824b34e49c1c04d2b06fec54c5174df41 RAR Pass: 2019 Note: Use WinRar v5x for extract # Special Thanks TNCTR Family Nsane Family abbodi1406 CODYQX4 Hotbird64 qewlpal s1ave77 cynecx qad Mouri_Naruto WindowsAddict angelkyo mspaintmsi Virustotal results of the application exe and dll files Virustotal results of dll files of KMSInject method x64 KMS.dll (April 27, 2019): https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/1902f84a3dae23a598ddda1447957b421511d5df77480aa590f6463830685d7e/detection x86 KMS.dll (April 27, 2019): https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/6a35996e6fc50af1a1a19d39233cc43055da92adf76cb567c39265ad007459e8/detection Virustotal results of exe and dll files of the Digital & KMS38 Activation method: gatherosstate.exe (September 15, 2019) https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/028c8fbe58f14753b946475de9f09a9c7a05fd62e81a1339614c9e138fc2a21d/detection slc.dll (September 15, 2019) https://www.virustotal.com/gui/file/9395a37c42e83568dc5ecb25d9e9fca4c6c1c4f47e336fb6ccae62df5c696b4d/detection Changelog:
  2. How to download and install an earlier version of Windows 10 Microsoft maintains support for several versions of its Windows 10 operating system for Home users and even more versions for Enterprise customers. While it is often a good idea to upgrade or install the latest version that Microsoft released, e.g. Windows 10 version 1903 at the time of writing, there may be times where you may want to install an earlier version. One situation where this may be desirable is if major issues in the latest version make you want to sit it out or upgrade to it at a later point in time. The downside to installing an earlier version of Windows 10 is that it is not supported for as long as the current version of the operating system. Home editions of Windows 10 are supported for 18 months in total whereas Enterprise September releases for 30 months. The guide provides guidance on downloading and installing earlier versions of Windows 10 or using the download to upgrade to an older version of Windows 10. Part 1: the download Many users use Windows Update or the Microsoft Update Assistant tool to upgrade; the options are not available in this situation as the latest version of Windows is offered when these services are used. One of the easiest options available is to use the free tool Rufus to download the ISO image. Download the portable version of Rufus and run it after the download finishes. Note that you need to allow the program to check for updates as you won't get the download option otherwise. You should see an arrow next to Select in the interface. Click on the arrow and select Download to enable the download options. Click on the boot selection menu afterwards and select Disc or Iso image (please select) from the items that are presented to you. A click on the download button downloads a small script and displays the download ISO image dialog to you. Select Windows 10 as the version, click continue, and under Release the version of Windows that you want to download. You will notice that all previous versions of Windows are offered in the menu even those that are no longer supported. Select continue after you have made the selection and select the Edition in the next step and the desired language as well as the architecture (32-bit or 64-bit) in the two final steps. You may select to download using a browser to run the download in the system's default browser. The Windows 10 ISO image should get downloaded to the local system once you have made the final selection. Installing the upgrade You may use Rufus to copy the Windows 10 ISO image to an USB device for installation or burn the ISO to DVD. It is just a matter of booting the DVD or USB device to start the installation or upgrade process. You can check out our guide on upgrading Windows 10 for detailed instructions. Closing Words Home users may use the method described above to upgrade to earlier supported versions of Windows 10 or install an earlier version of the operating system from scratch. Currently, that would mean upgrade from Windows 10 version 1803 to 1809, and in the future to 1903 when 1909 gets installed or to 1909 when 20H1 gets installed. Source: How to download and install an earlier version of Windows 10 (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  3. Windows 10 Version 1903 (19H1; May 2019 Update) FINAL Build 18362 Discussion 【 General information 】 - Official announcement - How to get the Windows 10 May 2019 Update - New features - New features for IT pros - Windows 10, Version 1903 Known issues - Microsoft makes Windows 10 1903 available on MSDN - Windows 10 May 2019 Update includes .NET Framework 4.8 - Microsoft updates the Windows 10 CPU requirements for the May 2019 Update - How to install, reinstall, upgrade and activate Windows 10 - Frequently asked questions (FAQs) ---> Include: additional info, error reporting, error solving, ...and similar staff =========================================================================================================== 【 Downloads 】 - RTM Build 18362.30 UUP (All Languages): mkuba50 project -- adguard project ESD (All Languages): HERE SVF (All Languages): SVF2ISOConverter (Credits to @s1ave77) -- GezoeSloog Repository -- mehdibleu Repository (Credits to @mehdibleu) ISO: Enterprise Evaluation ISOs (Credits to @DiamondMon and WZT) TechBench (All Languages) MSDN (English only) VLSC (English only): The same as MSDN Media Feature Pack for N versions of Windows 10: HERE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - RTM Build 18362.175 ESD (All Languages): HERE SVF (All Languages): GezoeSloog Repository -- ISO (English only): HERE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - RTM Build 18362.239 ESD (All Languages): HERE SVF (All Languages): GezoeSloog Repository ISO (English only): HERE =========================================================================================================== 【 Checksums 】 - RTM Build 18362.30 - RTM Build 18362.175 - RTM Build 18362.239 =========================================================================================================== 【 Updates 】 - May 21, 2019—KB4505057 (OS Build 18362.116) - May 29, 2019—KB4497935 (OS Build 18362.145) - June 11, 2019—KB4503293 (OS Build 18362.175) - June 27, 2019—KB4501375 (OS Build 18362.207) - July 9, 2019—KB4507453 (OS Build 18362.239) - July 26, 2019—KB4505903 (OS Build 18362.267) - August 13, 2019—KB4512508 (OS Build 18362.295) =========================================================================================================== 【 Activation 】 - Windows 10 Activation Keys ---> Credits to @vyzzer - Windows 10 Digital License (HWID) & KMS38 Generation ---> Credits to @s1ave77 - Microsoft Activation Scripts ---> Credits to @WindowsAddict =========================================================================================================== 【 Tools 】 - svfx v2.1.11 - Windows and Office Genuine ISO Verifier - SVF2ISOConverter v0.51.01 (SVF.ISO.CONVERTER-master) - decrypt-multi-release_v190521 ⇝ update revision: "Fix names for 19H1 (18362.30)" =========================================================================================================== 【 Tutorials 】 - How to use SVF patches - How to download with @s1ave77's tool "SVF.ISO.CONVERTER-master" - How to convert ESD to ISO =========================================================================================================== Here will be the discussion related ONLY to the final Windows 10 version released to the production; If you want to discuss pre-release versions released to insiders in the fast ring, slow ring or release preview ring, I suggest you to open a new thread where you can freely discuss such pre-release versions. Here will be shared ONLY official releases; please don't share here homebrew ISOs.
  4. I IN NO WAY TAKE ANY CREDIT FOR THIS IT WAS TAKEN FROM MDL FORUM AND SOME POSTS MY MEMBERS ON THIS FORUM! Manual: Tools: Microsoft Telemetry Tools Bundle v1.20 Windows 10 Lite v9 Private WinTen v0.1h Blackbird v6 v1.0.78 [Works with Win 7/8/8/1/10] O&O ShutUp10 v1.6.1403 WPD - Windows Privacy Dashboard v1.3.1203 WindowsSpyBlocker v4.23.1 Spybot Anti-Beacon v3.1 [Works with Win 7/8/8/1/10] W10Privacy v3.3.0.4 Destroy Windows Spying v1.0.1.0 [Works with Win 7/8/8/1/10] [NOT RECOMMENDED AS NOT UPDATED ANYMORE] Disable Windows 10 Tracking v3.2.1
  5. Microsoft’s Your Phone app for Windows 10 now shows battery icon of your smartphone Microsoft’s Your Phone app for Windows 10 devices allows you to easily access the most recent photos on your Android phone, read and reply to your text messages from your PC and receive and manage your phone’s notifications. In a recent update, Microsoft has expanded the features of the app by introducing a battery indicator next to the name of your smartphone. As you may have guessed it already, the battery indicator will give you live updates about the health of the battery of your smartphone. Otherwise, taking Your Phone app to version 1. 19082. 1006.0, the update introduces bug fixes and performance improvements. You can download Your Phone app on your Windows 10 PC from the below link, or else you can head over to Microsoft Store to download the install the app. Source: Microsoft’s Your Phone app for Windows 10 now shows battery icon of your smartphone (MSPoweruser)
  6. Now available for download on GitHub Microsoft revealed earlier this year that PowerToys were coming back to Windows 10. PowerToys used to be useful little utilities that would let you further customize Windows, and now Microsoft is releasing two new utilities for Windows 10 under the PowerToys brand. The first is a Windows key shortcut guide that is a full screen overlay with dynamic shortcuts for each active window or app. You can use the utility to hold down the Windows key and discover keyboard shortcuts, and it’s useful if you’re not familiar with most of the built-in Windows keyboard shortcuts or you want to find quicker ways to get things done in certain apps. The second utility is a FancyZones window manager, and you’ll definitely want to check this out if you like to run multiple apps side-by-side. You can set custom zones and then simply drag and drop apps into these layouts to have them automatically resize. It’s great if you really want to customize your desktop and window management even further on Windows 10. Microsoft has even created a 5-minute tutorial video to step through all the different ways you can use FancyZones. Unfortunately, it doesn’t appear to work well with multiple monitor setups right now, though. Windows fans were happy to see the return of PowerToys earlier this year, and these two utilities mark the first release of this effort for Windows 10. Microsoft is making them available open source on GitHub, and there will be many more to follow. Microsoft is now embracing this enthusiasm for PowerToys to let the community contribute and make some powerful Windows 10 utilities. “When the PowerToys project was first announced this spring, we didn’t think the reception would be as enthusiastic as it has been,” explains Microsoft’s dev platform team. “Given this enthusiasm, we’re anticipating many developers will want to contribute to PowerToys, and we’ve made sure that the documentation, project architecture, and tools are ready for the community to dive in.” You can download FancyZones and the Windows key shortcut guide utilities as part of the new PowerToys project over at GitHub. Source
  7. Patching behavior in Win10 1903 changes dramatically – for the better Patching in Windows 10 version 1903 has turned the old “Check for updates” turkey shoot into something manageable, according to a new report by Ed Bott. If true, this will be the second significant reason to upgrade to 1903 (if Microsoft ever bashes the big bugs). Thinkstock For years, my main objection to Windows 10 has been its cavalier attitude toward patching: You got the monthly cumulative update (“quality updates”) whenever Microsoft pushed it; you got new versions (“feature updates”) when Microsoft’s vaunted AI (now called ML) decided your machine could take them; and heaven help you if you clicked “Check for updates.” As you no doubt know by now, clicking “Check for updates” installed anything and everything Microsoft had stockpiled for your machine, often to deleterious effect. Back in April, Microsoft’s Mike Fortin announced a change of heart: [W]e have heard clear feedback that the Windows update process itself can be disruptive, particularly that Windows users would like more control over when updates happen. Today we are excited to announce significant changes in the Windows update process, changes designed to improve the experience, put the user in more control, and improve the quality of Windows updates. Let’s leave aside the “improve the quality of Windows updates” part and focus on the procedural changes Fortin promised. We are adding new features that will empower users with control and transparency around when updates are installed. In fact, all customers will now have the ability to explicitly choose if they want to update their device when they “check for updates” or to pause updates for up to 35 days. The details didn’t quite work out that way, but it’s ballpark-close. Said Fortin: Users can still “Check for updates” to get monthly quality and security updates... All Windows 10 devices with a supported version will continue to automatically receive the monthly updates. This new “download and install” option will also be available for our most popular versions of Windows 10, versions 1803 and 1809, by late May. In fact, until a few weeks ago, Windows Update in 1903 was all over the map. Many folks found that 1803 and 1809 sported “Download and install now” links for the “feature update” to version 1903. But many also found that managing cumulative updates (and, presumably, version changes) in 1903 Pro, in particular, was an unholy mess: The "Choose when updates are installed" block in 1903 Pro Advanced Options would appear, gray out, or disappear entirely. We weren’t – and still aren’t – sure if the deferral settings made in Group Policy are honored by the updater. Microsoft’s announcement that the next feature update – version 1909 – would be treated like a cumulative update just compounded the confusion. Earlier today, Ed Bott revised his How to manage Windows 10 updates FAQ on ZDnet, and it includes several significant revelations: Microsoft releases cumulative updates on the second Tuesday of each month. This is called the "B" release. On the third and fourth Tuesday of each month, you might see "C" and "D" releases. These are preview releases of the following month's "B" release, and they contain only non-security fixes. In fact, the second (and third) monthly cumulative updates can appear on any day of the week, including Saturdays, on any day of any month, but never mind. These preview releases are not installed automatically. They are visible only if you go to the Windows Update page in Settings and manually check for updates. The only way to install one of these optional updates is to click the Download And Install Now link below its entry. That’s something I’ve never read before. Fortin hinted at it, and sure enough, as of a few weeks ago, it looks like Microsoft has cleaned up its act: Microsoft That’s a sea change, to my mind anyway. With Win10 1903, Win10 Home and Pro users are allowed to defer cumulative updates in seven-day increments, up to 35 days. (In Pro you can defer updates by any number of days up to 35.) This puts on an extra protective layer, and Home customers need not monkey with metered connections or wushowhide. We still don’t know what’s happening with the disappearing “Choose when updates are installed” part of the 1903 Pro user interface. Nobody’s explained exactly how the 1909 upgrade/update/locked feature/service pack will work. But at least it looks like we’re headed in the right direction. Now if Microsoft could just get 1903 stable. In-the-wild observations and musings always welcome on AskWoody.com. Source: Patching behavior in Win10 1903 changes dramatically – for the better (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  8. Quickly check the GPU Temperature in the Windows 10 Task Manager Microsoft extended the functionality of the Task Manager in the Windows 10 operating system. Not all features that Microsoft introduced are great. The rather useless basic mode that reveals virtually no information at all needs to be mentioned in this regard. A click on "more details" opens the real Task Manager and Windows remembers the state so that you don't have to repeat the process each time you open it. The Task Manager features process information but also hardware readings and startup management features. The hardware information is interesting in particular; while not as extensive as in the Resource Monitor, it is often good enough for a quick check that reveals what is going on. Furthermore, it is just a couple of key-presses away and the information is readily available. A click on Performance displays the readings. When you check the GPU reading in that build or newer builds, you may notice that it includes the temperature of the graphics processing unit. May, because there are certain requirements that need to be met for that. First, that the temperature is only displayed for dedicated GPUs, and second, that WDDM 2.4 or higher is installed. One way to find out if the latter is the case is to open the DirectX Diagnostic Tool and check the Driver Model version under Display. You may start the tool by opening start, typing dxdiag.exe and selecting the item from the results. The GPU listing displays the load and the temperature right when Performance is opened. A click on GPU displays graphs and additional information, and it is possible to change the graphs by selecting a different source; temperature is not available yet there so that it is not possible to check temperature over time yet. Microsoft did not reveal whether it plans to integrate that option in future builds. The temperature may change rather quickly depending on the tasks. It is probably best to keep the Task Manager option to quickly check the temperature whenever you need to. Third-party programs are still better suited if you need additional details. Check out programs like HWMonitor or SpeedFan or our overview of PC temperature monitors.. You may also be interested in the following tutorials: Hard Drive Temperature Thresholds, What You Need To Know Monitor your Windows PC's performance while playing games Closing Words The GPU temperature reading may be handy for a quick check but since there is no history, it is not suitable for extensive troubleshooting. Source: Quickly check the GPU Temperature in the Windows 10 Task Manager (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  9. AdDuplex: Windows 10 May 2019 Update triples its usage share, now running on 33% of the devices AdDuplex has published their report for August, revealing how well various versions of Windows 10 are scoring. The report has finally brought some good news for the latest Windows 10 May 2019 update. As you can see in the above image, the Windows 10 May 2019 Update usage share now stands at 33% which is triple usage share since last month. Windows 10 April 2018 Update(1803) is still on top with 33.1% of usage share. Windows 10 October 2018 Update sits right next to the May 2019 with a 28.7% share. Windows 10 Fall Creators Update and holds a 2.2% of the share, while the Windows 10 Creators along with older version hold only 2.8% Note, the data is based on more than 100,000 PCs running UWP store apps, therefore, it never paints the whole picture — the actual data might be a lot different from that of the AdDuplex. Source: AdDuplex: Windows 10 May 2019 Update triples it’s usage share, now running on 33% of the devices (MSPoweruser)
  10. Microsoft: Enterprises have upgraded Windows 10 just once a year from the start The company's decision to extend support for the fall editions of Windows 10 Enterprise and Education reflects an upgrade cadence companies have already been following. Microsoft / Valery Brozhinsky / Fermate / Getty Images When Microsoft extended support for Windows 10 Enterprise and Education - making it much easier for organizations to upgrade the OS just once a year - it simply bowed to a reality that had been in place since the operating system's debut in 2015, according to a company document. In a corner of a September 2018 document titled "Joint FAQs" and labeled "For Partner Use Only," Microsoft acknowledged that many of its larger customers had been on an annual upgrade cadence since their beginnings with Windows 10. The FAQ was a companion to a Sept. 6, 2018 announcement of a change to Windows 10's support, the third that year. "All future feature updates of Windows 10 Enterprise and Education editions with a targeted release month of September (starting with 1809) will be supported for 30 months from their release date," wrote Jared Spataro, a Microsoft executive, in the post to a company blog. "This will give customers with longer deployment cycles the time they need to plan, test, and deploy." Before Spataro's missive, all Windows 10 SKUs (stock-keeping units) were allowed 18 months of free support. As Computerworld wrote in this FAQ here and here and here, the 30-month support extension for enterprises meant that annual-and-just-annual feature upgrades were eminently doable. By exclusively deploying each fall's upgrade, even the least agile organizations could slow down Microsoft's Windows-as-a-service tempo. Turns out that they were so desperate to get out from under Microsoft's mandated upgrade-every-six-months pace that they'd been doing yearly from the get-go. "With the six-month release cadence, not every customer could test every release," Microsoft said in the FAQ for partners. "In fact, we saw strong customer adoption of 1607, with many customers then adopting 1709 and skipping 1703 altogether." Here's how that cadence looks when turned into table format. IDG/Gregg Keizer [Note: The intervals are for comparisons only, as they measure from one release date to another. They do not reflect likely deployment timelines for organizations.] Customers who adopted 1607, whether by upgrading from the original 1507 release (shown in the table) or first deploying Windows 10 with 1607 (more likely), jumped over April 2017's 1703 and landed on 1709 sometime after the latter's October 2017 launch. From there it's a guess, as Microsoft published the FAQ four months after 1803 and three and a half months before 1809 was ready for even the most daring. One possibility is that enterprises on 1709 upgraded to 1809 even in the face of that version's disastrous debut and resulting re-release. More probable, Computerworld believes, organizations rightly steered clear of the 1809 debacle and knowing by then that each yy09 version came with 30 months of support, decided to wait until this year's 1909 showed. Because 1709 will be supported for Enterprise and Education until April 14, 2020, those customers will have approximately seven months from 1909's expected release to make the migration. That may seem like a tight timetable, but there are extenuating circumstances with 1909 that make it less of an ordeal than at first glance. "We decided to formalize this cadence - formalizing the way customers were already behaving," Microsoft stated in the FAQ. "The goal is to provide relief to those customers. "We fully appreciate that we have customers who may have 'normalized' to the 'March/April' releases and are skipping one," Microsoft added, referring to organizations that had also gone annual but had selected the yy03 upgrade to do that. Those enterprises will undoubtedly want to slip versions to yy09 for the 30-month support benefit, meaning that they'll have to do a second upgrade only six months after a first, or wait 18 months to move from spring to fall. "We know that they will figure out how to adjust," the FAQ continued. "We will be here to help that happen." But the message from Microsoft to its partners, and thus for passage from partners to customers, is harsher for customers not running the pricier Windows 10 Enterprise and Windows 10 Education SKUs. In response to the question "Why doesn't this change apply to Windows 10 Home and Pro users?" Microsoft said: "We are happy with the success that our consumer customers have had with twice-yearly updates; these individuals do not face the deployment management challenges that prompt our larger customers to need extra time. If a small business customer has an IT environment complex enough to warrant a longer servicing period, they should evaluate if Enterprise Edition is right for them." Ouch. Source: Microsoft: Enterprises have upgraded Windows 10 just once a year from the start (Computerworld - Gregg Keizer)
  11. Windows 10 quick tips: 13 ways to speed up your PC If you want to speed up Windows 10, take a few minutes to try out these tips. Your machine will be zippier and less prone to performance and system issues. Thinkstock Want Windows 10 to run faster? We've got help. In just a few minutes you can try out this baker’s dozen of tips; your machine will be zippier and less prone to performance and system issues. 1. Change your power settings If you’re using Windows 10’s “Power saver” plan, you’re slowing down your PC. That plan reduces your PC’s performance in order to save energy. (Even desktop PCs typically have a “Power saver” plan.) Changing your power plan from “Power saver” to “High performance” or “Balanced” will give you an instant performance boost. To do it, launch the Control Panel app, then select Hardware and Sound > Power Options. You’ll typically see two options: “Balanced (recommended)” and “Power saver." (Depending on your make and model, you might see other plans here as well, including some branded by the manufacturer.) To see the “High performance” setting, click the down arrow by “Show additional plans.” IDG Change your power settings in Control Panel to give your PC a performance boost. (Click image to enlarge it.) To change your power setting, simply choose the one you want, then exit Control Panel. “High performance” gives you the most oomph, but uses the most power; “Balanced” finds a happy medium between power use and better performance; and “Power saver” does everything it can to give you as much battery life as possible. Desktop users have no reason to choose “Power saver,” and even laptop users should consider the “Balanced” option when unplugged — and “High performance” when connected to a power source. 2. Disable programs that run on startup One reason your Windows 10 PC may feel sluggish is that you’ve got too many programs running in the background — programs that you rarely or never use. Stop them from running, and your PC will run more smoothly. Start by launching the Task Manager: Press Ctrl-Shift-Esc, right-click the lower-right corner of your screen and select Task Manager, or type task manager into the Windows 10 search box and press Enter. If the Task Manager launches as a compact app with no tabs, click “More details” at the bottom of your screen. The Task Manager will then appear in all of its full-tabbed glory. There's plenty you can do with it, but we're going to focus only on killing unnecessary programs that run at startup. Click the Startup tab. You'll see a list of the programs and services that launch when you start Windows. Included on the list is each program's name as well as its publisher, whether it's enabled to run on startup, and its “Startup impact,” which is how much it slows down Windows 10 when the system starts up. To stop a program or service from launching at startup, right-click it and select “Disable.” This doesn't disable the program entirely; it only prevents it from launching at startup — you can always run the application after launch. Also, if you later decide you want it to launch at startup, you can just return to this area of the Task Manager, right-click the application and select “Enable.” IDG You can use the Task Manager to help get information about programs that launch at startup and disable any you don't need. (Click image to enlarge it.) Many of the programs and services that run on startup may be familiar to you, like OneDrive or Evernote Clipper. But you may not recognize many of them. (Anyone who immediately knows what “bzbui.exe” is, please raise your hand. No fair Googling it first.) The Task Manager helps you get information about unfamiliar programs. Right-click an item and select “Properties” for more information about it, including its location on your hard disk, whether it has a digital signature, and other information such as the version number, the file size and the last time it was modified. You can also right-click the item and select “Open file location.” That opens File Explorer and takes it to the folder where the file is located, which may give you another clue about the program’s purpose. Finally, and most helpfully, you can select “Search online” after you right-click. Bing will then launch with links to sites with information about the program or service. If you’re really nervous about one of the listed applications, you can go to a site run by Reason Software called Should I Block It? and search for the file name. You’ll usually find very solid information about the program or service. Now that you’ve selected all the programs that you want to disable at startup, the next time you restart your computer, the system will be a lot less concerned with unnecessary programs. 3. Shut off Windows tips and tricks As you use your Windows 10 PC, Windows keeps an eye on what you’re doing and offers tips about things you might want to do with the operating system. In my experience, I’ve rarely if ever found these “tips” helpful. I also don’t like the privacy implications of Windows constantly taking a virtual look over my shoulder. Windows watching what you’re doing and offering advice can also make your PC run more sluggishly. So if you want to speed things up, tell Windows to stop giving you advice. To do so, click the Start button, select the Settings icon and then go to System > Notifications & actions. Scroll down to the Notifications section and uncheck the box marked “Get tips, tricks, and suggestions as you use Windows.” IDG Turning off Windows' suggestions for you should help things run more smoothly (and give you back a measure of privacy). (Click image to enlarge it.) That’ll do the trick. 4. Stop OneDrive from syncing Microsoft’s cloud-based OneDrive file storage, built into Windows 10, keeps files synced and up to date on all of your PCs. It’s also a useful backup tool so that if your PC or its hard disk dies, you still have all your files intact, waiting for you to restore them. IDG Here’s how to turn off OneDrive syncing temporarily, to see if that boosts system performance. (Click image to enlarge it.) It does this by constantly syncing files between your PC and cloud storage — something that can also slow down your PC. That's why one way to speed up your PC is to stop the syncing. Before you turn it off permanently, though, you’ll want to check whether it is actually slowing down your PC. To do so, right-click the OneDrive icon (it looks like a cloud) in the notification area on the right side of the taskbar, then click the More button at the bottom of the screen. From the popup screen that appears, click “Pause syncing” and select either 2 hours, 8 hours or 24 hours, depending upon how long you want it paused. During that time, gauge whether you're seeing a noticeable speed boost. If so, and you decide you do indeed want to turn off syncing, right-click the OneDrive icon, and from the popup, select Settings > Account. Click “Unlink this PC,” and then from the screen that appears, click “Unlink account.” When you do that, you’ll still be able to save your files to your local OneDrive folder, but it won’t sync with the cloud. If you find that OneDrive slows down your PC but prefer to keep using it, you can try to troubleshoot OneDrive problems. For info on how to do that, check out Microsoft’s “Fix OneDrive sync problems” page. 5. Turn off search indexing Windows 10 indexes your hard disk in the background, allowing you — in theory — to search your PC more quickly than if no indexing were being done. But slower PCs that use indexing can see a performance hit, and you can give them a speed boost by turning off indexing. Even if you have an SSD disk, turning off indexing can improve your speed, because the constant writing to disk that indexing does can eventually slow down SSDs. To get the maximum benefit in Windows 10, you need to turn indexing off completely. To do so, type services.msc in the Windows 10 search box and press Enter. The Services app appears. Scroll down to either Indexing Service or Windows Search in the list of services. Double-click it, and from the screen that appears, click Stop. Then reboot your machine. Your searches may be slightly slower, although you may not notice the difference. But you should get an overall performance boost. IDG Here’s how to turn off Windows 10 indexing. (Click image to enlarge it.) If you’d like, you can turn off indexing only for files in certain locations. To do this, type index in the Windows 10 search box and click the Indexing Options result that appears. The Indexing Options page of the Control Panel appears. Click the Modify button, and you’ll see a list of locations that are being indexed, such as Microsoft Outlook, your personal files, and so on. Uncheck the box next to any location, and it will no longer be indexed. 6. Clean out your hard disk If you’ve got a bloated hard disk filled with files you don’t need, you could be slowing down your PC. Cleaning it out can give you a speed boost. Windows 10 has a surprisingly useful built-in tool for doing this called Storage Sense. Go to Settings > System > Storage and at the top of the screen, move the toggle from Off to On. When you do this, Windows constantly monitors your PC and deletes old junk files you no longer need — temporary files, files in the Downloads folder that haven’t been changed in a month, and old Recycle Bin files. You can customize how Storage Sense works and also use it to free up even more space than it normally would. Underneath Storage Sense, click “Configure Storage Sense or run it now.” From the screen that appears, you can change how often Storage Sense deletes files (every day, every week, every month or when your storage space gets low). You can also tell Storage Sense to delete files in your Download folder, depending on how long they’ve been there, and set how long to wait to delete files in the Recycle Bin automatically. You can also have Storage Sense move files from your PC to the cloud in Microsoft’s OneDrive cloud storage if they’re not opened for a certain amount of time (every day, or every 14 days, 30 days or 60 days). IDG Here’s how to customize the way Storage Sense works, and to tell it to delete old versions of Windows. (Click image to enlarge it.) You can also delete old versions of Windows that might be hogging space. At the bottom of the screen, check the box next to “Delete previous versions of Windows.” Storage Sense will then delete old versions of Windows ten days after you’ve installed an upgrade. Note that if you do this, you won’t be able to revert to the older version of Windows. 7. Clean out your Registry Under the Windows hood, the Registry tracks and controls just about everything about the way Windows works and looks. That includes information about where your programs are stored, which DLLs they use and share, what file types should be opened by which program, and just about everything else. But the Registry is a very messy thing. When you uninstall a program, for example, that program’s settings don’t always get cleaned up in the Registry. So over time, it can get filled with countless outdated settings of all types. And that can lead to system slowdowns. Don’t even think of trying to clean any of this out yourself. It’s impossible. To do it, you need a Registry Cleaner. There are plenty available, some free and some paid. But there’s really no need to outright buy one, because the free Auslogics Registry Cleaner does a solid job. Before using Auslogics or any other Registry Cleaner, you should back up your Registry so you can restore it if anything goes wrong. (Auslogics Registry Cleaner does this for you as well, but it can’t hurt to have it backed up twice.) To do your own Registry backup, type regedit.ext in the search box, then press Enter. That runs the Registry editor. From the File menu, select Export. From the screen that appears, make sure to choose the “All” option in the Export range section at the bottom of the screen. Then choose a file location and file name and click Save. To restore the Registry, open the Registry editor, select Import from the File menu, then open the file you saved. Now download, install and run Auslogics Registry Cleaner. On the left-hand side of the screen you can select the kinds of Registry issues you want to clean up — for example, File Associations, Internet or Fonts. I generally select them all. IDG Auslogics Registry Cleaner scans for and fixes problems in your Windows Registry. (Click image to enlarge it.) Next, tell it to scan the Registry for problems. To do that, click “Scan Now,” and from the drop-down menu that appears, select Scan. That lets you first examine the Registry problems it finds. If you instead choose “Scan and Repair,” it makes the fixes without you checking them. It now scans your Registry for errors, then shows you what it found. It ranks the errors according to their severity to help you decide which to fix. Click Repair when you’ve made your decision, and make sure that “Back Up Changes” is checked, so you can restore the Registry easily if something goes wrong. 8. Disable shadows, animations and visual effects Windows 10 has some nice eye candy — shadows, animations and visual effects. On fast, newer PCs, these don't usually affect system performance. But on slower and older PCs, they can exact a performance hit. It's easy to turn them off. In the Windows 10 search box, type sysdm.cpl and press Enter. That launches the System Properties dialog box. Click the Advanced tab and click Settings in the Performance section. That brings you to the Performance Options dialog box. You'll see a varied list of animations and special effects. IDG The Performance Options dialog box lets you turn off effects that might be slowing down Windows 10. (Click image to enlarge it.) If you have time on your hands and love to tweak, you can turn individual options on and off. These are the animations and special effects you'll probably want to turn off, because they have the greatest effect on system performance: Animate controls and elements inside windows Animate windows when minimizing and maximizing Animations in the taskbar Fade or slide menus into view Fade or slide ToolTips into view Fade out menu items after clicking Show shadows under windows However, it's probably a lot easier to just select “Adjust for best performance” at the top of the screen and then click OK. Windows 10 will then turn off the effects that slow down your system. 9. Turn on automated Windows maintenance Every day, behind the scenes, Windows 10 performs maintenance on your PC. It does things like security scanning and performing system diagnostics to make sure everything is up to snuff — and automatically fixes problems if it finds them. That makes sure your PC runs at peak performance. By default, this automatic maintenance runs every day at 2:00 a.m., as long as your device is plugged into a power source and is asleep. There’s a chance, though, that the feature has been accidentally turned off or you haven’t had your PC plugged in for a while, so the maintenance hasn’t been done. You can make sure it’s turned on and runs every day, and run it manually if you’d like. Run the Control Panel app and select System and Security > Security and Maintenance. In the Maintenance section, under Automatic Maintenance, click “Start maintenance” if you want it to run now. To make sure that it runs every day, click “Change maintenance settings,” and from the screen that appears, select the time you’d like maintenance to run, and check the box next to “Allow scheduled maintenance to wake up my computer at the scheduled time.” Then click OK. IDG You can designate a time each day for Windows to run its maintenance tasks. (Click image to enlarge it.) 10. Get help from the Performance Monitor There's a great tool in Windows 10 called the Performance Monitor that can, among other things, create a detailed performance report about your PC, detail any system and performance issues, and suggest fixes. To get the report, type perfmon /report into your search box and press Enter. (Make sure there's a space between “perfmon” and the slash mark.) The Resource and Performance Monitor launches and gathers information about your system. It will say that it will take 60 seconds, but I've found that it takes several minutes. When the Monitor finishes, it will launch an interactive report. IDG The Performance Monitor reports details on system and performance issues. (Click image to enlarge it.) You'll find a lot of extremely detailed information in the report, and it can take a lot of time to go through. Your best bet is to first look at the Warning section, which details the biggest issues (if any) it found on your PC, such as problems with Windows, with drivers and so on. It also tells you how to fix each problem — for example, how to turn on a device that has been disabled. It is also worthwhile to scroll down to the Resource Overview section, where you'll find an analysis of how well your CPU, network, disk and memory are performing. Each result is colour-coded, with green meaning no problems, yellow meaning potential issues, and red showing a problem. Beyond that, the Resource Overview also reports performance metrics and explanatory details. For example, for the CPU, it might show green and a utilization of 21%, with the details “Normal CPU load.” Or for Memory, it might show yellow, with 62% utilization and the details “1520 MB is available.” Based on what you get, you might want to do something about your hardware — for example, add more memory. 11. Kill bloatware Sometimes the biggest factor slowing down your PC isn't Windows 10 itself, but bloatware or adware that takes up CPU and system resources. Adware and bloatware are particularly insidious because they may have been installed by your computer's manufacturer. You'd be amazed at how much more quickly your Windows 10 PC can run if you get rid of it. First, run a system scan to find adware and malware. If you've already installed a security suite such as Norton Security or McAfee LiveSafe, you can use that. You can also use Windows 10's built in anti-malware app — just type Windows Defender in the search box, press Enter, and then click Scan Now. Windows Defender will look for malware and remove any it finds. It's a good idea to get a second opinion, though, so consider a free tool like Malwarebytes Anti-Malware. The free version scans for malware and removes what it finds; the paid version offers always-on protection to stop infections in the first place. IDG Malwarebytes Anti-Malware is a useful application that will scan for and fix Windows 10 PC problems. (Click image to enlarge it.) Now you can check for bloatware and get rid of it. Several free programs will do this for you; your best bet is to run several of them, because no single one will find all the bloatware on your PC. Good choices are the PC Decrapifier, Should I Remove It? and SlimComputer. For more details about removing bloatware, check out Computerworld's article “Bloatware: What it is and how to get rid of it.” 12. Defrag your hard disk The more you use your hard disk, the more it can become fragmented, which can slow down your PC. When a disk gets fragmented, it stores files willy-nilly across it, and it takes a while for Windows to put them together before running them. Windows 10, though, has a built-in defragmenter you can use to defragment your hard disk. You can even tell it to run automatically so it stays constantly defragmented. To do it, type defrag into the search box and press Enter. From the screen that appears, select the drive you want you want to defragment. Click the Optimize button to defragment it. Select multiple disks by holding down the Ctrl key and clicking each you want to defragment. If you want to have your disk or disks defragmented automatically, click the Change settings button, then check the box next to “Run on a schedule.” Now select the frequency at which you want the disk(s) defragmented by clicking the drop-down next to Frequency and selecting Daily, Weekly or Monthly. (Weekly will be your best bet.) From this screen you can also choose multiple drives to defragment. IDG You can set Windows 10's built-in disk defragmenter to run automatically on a schedule. (Click image to enlarge it.) 13. Shut down and restart Windows Here’s one of IT’s not-quite-secret weapons for troubleshooting and speeding up a PC: Shut it down and restart it. Doing that clears out any excess use of RAM that otherwise can’t be cleared. It also kills processes that you might have set in motion and are no longer needed, but that continue running and slow your system. If your Windows 10 PC has turned sluggish over time for no apparent reason, you may be surprised at how much more quickly it will run when you do this. Try just some of these tricks, and you'll find that you've got a faster Windows 10 PC — and one that is less likely to have any reliability problems. This article was originally published in February 2016 and most recently updated in August 2019. Source: Windows 10 quick tips: 13 ways to speed up your PC (Computerworld - Preston Gralla)
  12. Microsoft releases Windows 10 Build 18965 with Feedback Hub updates and more Microsoft today released Windows 10 Build 18965 to Insiders in the Fast ring. This new build comes with improvements to Feedback hub, a new app restart setting, new Windows Insider Achievements page and more. Find the full change log below. What’s new in Windows 10 Build 18965: Control over restarting apps at sign-in As some of you already know, apps have the ability to register for restart, which helps in a few situations, including enabling you to get back to what you were doing if you need to restart your PC. Previously this option was tied to the “Use my sign-in info to automatically finish setting up my device” option under Sign-in options in accounts settings. We’ve heard feedback that some of you would prefer more explicit control over when Windows automatically restarts apps that were open when you restart your PC, and with 20H1 we’re bringing that option to you. Windows now puts you in control with a new app restart setting. When turned on, Windows automatically saves your restartable apps when signing out, restarting, or shutting down Windows, and restarts them next time you sign in. This setting is off by default and you can change it any time in Settings > Accounts > Sign-in options, and can find it by searching for “restart apps” in Start or the search box. Other updates for Insiders Feedback Hub updates The Feedback Hub team has been hard at work lately to bring you some app updates based on your feature requests, and we have a few changes and improvements to share about the latest version that’s currently rolling out to Insiders in the Fast ring. Feedback Search UI updates On the Feedback section of the app, you will now be able to more clearly see the differentiation between Problems and Suggestions, with each showing an icon, colour, and labels Problem or Suggestion displayed above each feedback entry. We also have updated iconography and displays for Adding similar feedback to problems, upvoting suggestions, and adding comments to feedback. Adding similar feedback In the past, Feedback Hub allowed two kinds of participation on feedback: upvoting and adding more details. The notion of voting on Suggestions makes a lot of sense – engineers at Microsoft want to know which features the community wants us to build next, and voting on feature suggestions is a great way to see where your interest lies. However, voting on Problems was trickier – roblems are not a matter of popularity, and what helps engineers here resolve problems is having clear descriptions of how the issue arose. Feedback is especially helpful if it includes a reproduction of the problem, diagnostics that help our teams pinpoint what went wrong so they can fix issues faster. Voting on the search page often did not provide enough detail as to what was happening, and we saw that few people went into existing feedback to add their personal reproductions of the issues. With the new Add similar feedback feature, selecting a problem with symptoms that match your own will take you to the feedback form, with the title pre-filled. You edit the title or add your own description to let us know exactly what was happening when you encountered the problem. We’ll already have your category selected to ensure the right feature team sees your feedback, and in our new Similar Feedback section, the feedback you selected will already be selected. As usual, the last step involves optionally adding your own reproduction of the issue or any attachments you like. Windows Insiders Achievements We are excited to announce a refresh of the Windows Insider Achievements page. We’ve made achievements more discoverable by moving them from your profile page to their own landing page, and we added additional features that allow you to categorize and track your progress. Be sure to check it out today and begin unlocking badges. We would love to hear your feedback on social media by using the hashtag #Builds4Badges. The information previously found in your profile (Device ID and User ID) is now located in the settings section of Feedback Hub. As always, we appreciate your feedback – if you have any suggestions or problems to report, you can share them in the Feedback Hub under Apps > Feedback Hub. General changes, improvements, and fixes for PC We fixed an issue resulting in the screens shown while updating Windows unexpectedly saying “managed by your organization” for some Insiders. We fixed an issue resulting in the taskbar unexpectedly hiding sometimes when launching the touch keyboard. We fixed an issue where some of the colours weren’t correct in Language Settings if using High Contrast White. We fixed an issue that could result in background tasks not working in certain apps. We fixed an issue where if you set focus to the notification area of the taskbar via WIN+B, then opened a flyout and pressed Esc to close it, then the focus rectangle would no longer show up correctly anymore. We fixed an issue where on the Bluetooth & Other Settings page, the device type wasn’t read out loud when using a screen reader. We fixed an issue resulting in help links not being accessible when adding a new wireless display device on the Bluetooth & Other Settings page if the text scaling was set to 200%. Known issues Insiders may notice a new “Cloud download” option in the Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) under “Reset this PC.” This feature is not working quite yet. We’ll let you know once it is, so you can try it out! There has been an issue with older versions of anti-cheat software used with games where after updating to the latest 19H1 Insider Preview builds may cause PCs to experience crashes. We are working with partners on getting their software updated with a fix, and most games have released patches to prevent PCs from experiencing this issue. To minimize the chance of running into this issue, please make sure you are running the latest version of your games before attempting to update the operating system. We are also working with anti-cheat and game developers to resolve similar issues that may arise with the 20H1 Insider Preview builds and will work to minimize the likelihood of these issues in the future. Some Realtek SD card readers are not functioning properly. We are investigating the issue. We’re working on a fix for an issue resulting in the minimize, maximize, and close title bar buttons not working for certain apps. If you’re using an impacted app, Alt+F4 should work as expected to close the app if needed. Some WSL distros will not load (Issue #4371). We’re investigating reports that DWM is using unexpectedly high system resources for some Insiders. There’s an issue impacting a small number of Insiders which started on the previous flight, involving a lsass.exe crash and resulting in a message saying, “Windows ran into a problem and needs to restart.” We’re working on a fix and appreciate your patience. Source: Microsoft releases Windows 10 Build 18965 with Feedback Hub updates and more (MSPoweruser)
  13. Uninstalling Paint will soon be possible Initially destined to be replaced with Paint 3D and shift into to the Microsoft Store; Microsoft will soon make it possible to uninstall Paint from Windows 10. In the latest Windows Insider Build that was released to Insiders of branch 20H1; users noticed that Paint is no longer a system component, but an optional feature component. The feature is evidently still in the early stages of development, as uninstalling Paint currently yields no effect in Build 18956. Other changes to Paint in the Windows 20 May 2019 Update include accessibility improvements, as well as introducing the possibility of using the program with the keyboard. While we can see the point of Windows Server not needing Paint pre-installed, I suspect very few users will take Microsoft up on their offer of ditching the much-beloved application. Source: Uninstalling Paint will soon be possible (MSPoweruser)
  14. Windows 10 after four years: A solid report card, but serious challenges ahead Four years after its launch, Windows 10 has gone from being a curiosity to owning a solid majority of the Windows desktop market. But Microsoft still has a tough challenge on its hands convincing Windows 7 holdouts to migrate. Windows 10 is now four years old. If during that time we have learned anything from the original release of Windows 10 and its six (soon to be seven) subsequent feature updates, that lesson is simple, short, and sweet: Embrace change. Previous "big bang" releases meant exactly the opposite of change for Microsoft's OEM partners and for its corporate customers running Windows. Once you deployed a Windows version, you could hang on to it for up to 10 years without having to worry about changes in its underlying architecture or its user experience. With Windows 10, that advice is no longer operative. In the new era, Microsoft trickles out new features for its flagship desktop operating system every six months. Until recently, in fact, most Windows 10 devices automatically downloaded and installed those semi-annual feature updates, resulting in much wailing and gnashing of teeth among those forced to wait (and wait and wait, sometimes) for the update to complete. As of the most recent release, the May 2019 Update, those feature updates are now optional, with users having the option to skip an update or two. The respite ends when the currently installed version is no longer supported, which means procrastinators have up to 18 months to avoid these big feature updates. That decision is part of a major change in Microsoft's release calendar and support lifecycle that was in turn a response to the embarrassing rollout of version 1809. Besides the ability for users to skip feature updates, the changes include additional layers of testing from the Windows Insider Program and a 30-month enterprise support calendar for the H2 releases. The latter change in policy effectively turns the upcoming version 1909 release into a Long Term Support version. What's worth noting here is that, update snafus aside, Windows 10 is a very good operating system. The design language is consistent and attractive and has evolved nicely with the platform. As I noted four years ago in my review of the initial release of Windows 10, I can't think of a Windows desktop program that doesn't run well on Windows 10. It works very well with a mouse and keyboard or with a touchscreen and pen. The steady transition from the old Control Panel to the new, modern Settings app has been impressive, especially if you factor in the graphic changes that come with Fluent Design. Part of what makes this evolution possible is the aforementioned Windows Insider Program, which allows Microsoft's customers to provide real-time feedback during the development process. That feedback has not only made some new features better, it has stopped Microsoft from releasing new features that might have been confusing or poorly received. I issued report cards for Windows 10 after each of its first three years. As we pass the four-year mark, it's time to do it again. My 2019 report card uses the same categories as last year. Adoption rate: C- As of May 2019, Microsoft's official count of Windows 10 active devices (those which have connected to Microsoft's servers at least once in the past 28 days) had passed 800 million, up from about 400 million in September 2016 and 600 million in November 2017. Many of those are new PCs purchased as replacements for older devices; the other large chunk of new activations are PCs that have been upgraded in corporate installations. Unless there's a sudden surge in the number of corporate upgrades and replacements, the worldwide installed base of Windows 10 will fall well shy of the 1 billion mark on January 14, 2020, when Windows 7 reaches its official end of support. The most recent usage data from the US Government's Data Analytics Program offers a good measure of how the overall migration to Windows 10 has been going so far. As of July 31, 2019, Windows 7 accounted for more than 1 in every 4 visits to U.S. government websites from Windows PCs. Windows 10 adoption rates need to accelerate if Microsoft is to wean its user base from Windows 7 before support ends in January 2020. Source: U.S. Data Analytics Program Windows 10 will probably crack the 80% mark by the time Windows 7 officially exits support, but that means several hundred million PCs will still be running older Windows versions past that date. Some of those machines will be installed in enterprises that will grudgingly pay for extended support. But another very large number will simply stop receiving updates, making it uncomfortably likely that next year will see a sequel to the WannaCry ransomware outbreak that struck after Windows XP support ended. Upgrades and updates: C+ Everything seemed to be going so well for the "Windows as a Service" concept last year at this time. Microsoft had finally settled into a schedule of two feature updates per year, one in April and another in October, plus cumulative updates on the second Tuesday of each month. The two 2018 updates had been relatively problem-free. And then the wheels fell off. Here's how I wrote about the mess that was Windows 10 version 1903 earlier this year: Microsoft had grown cocky after a handful of relatively trouble-free feature updates to Windows 10, and had even bragged about how quickly it was able to roll out those semi-annual feature updates. That hubris caught up with them in late 2018. Only days after rolling out version 1809 to the public, a pair of data-destroying bugs forced the company to pull the update from its servers. It took more than five weeks before the update was relaunched. That painful experience inspired Microsoft to rethink its enthusiasm for those every-six-months updates. In the wake of the version 1809 debacle, the company promised major changes in the way it tracks product release, including a renewed focus on product quality. The problems were significant enough that the normally stubborn Windows product team finally surrendered to public pressure and announced it would make feature updates optional until the current version was no longer supported. In addition, Microsoft is taking the unusual step of publicly declaring that this year's October release will be a relatively minor update, presumably to encourage corporate holdouts to upgrade before the New Year. Those changes, along with much clearer notifications of restarts associated with pending updates, should go a long way toward mollifying Windows 10 users who are annoyed by updates that kick off at unexpected and invariably inconvenient times. But they'll first have to earn back the trust of customers who are wary of being burned again. Privacy: A The competition has made this category too easy for Microsoft. As I noted last year, the deluge of privacy complaints from Windows 10's first year has turned into a trickle and Windows 10 telemetry has become, for all but the most diehard critics, a non-issue. After underestimating the public suspicion of data collection efforts from Big Tech, Microsoft quickly recalibrated. In early 2017 the company began sharing detailed information about exactly what it is and isn't monitoring with its telemetry software. It also modified Windows 10's default privacy settings to deal with complaints from European regulators. Then, with the release of Windows 10 version 1803, Microsoft provided a new utility, the Windows Diagnostic Data Viewer, which allows anyone with an administrator account to inspect the telemetry data being collected from a device. That same update also included a Delete button that instantly clears any saved telemetry data. As any Sherlock Holmes fan will appreciate, the most persuasive piece of evidence here is the dog that didn't bark. Privacy researchers have had four years to dig into telemetry transmissions from Windows 10, using their own tools as well as the official data viewer. So far, no privacy advocates or government agencies have come forward with any discoveries that contradict Microsoft's insistence that telemetry data is used only for product improvement. Meanwhile, Facebook and Google have come under increasing pressure from privacy advocates and government regulators on multiple continents for egregious violations involving user data. In comparison, Microsoft's modest data collection, which isn't tied to advertising, looks like a model of restraint. Security: A/B As in previous years, I've assigned two grades to this category, reflecting the two very different groups of customers that use Windows. Over the past year, Microsoft has continued to expand its range of security features for enterprise customers, earning a solid A on my report card. Many of those security features aren't available for the consumer and small business segments of the market, which is why I've assigned a B for that category. The list of enterprise features includes Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection, which is designed to detect threats that have made it past other defenses. For corporate customers, it's become a solid alternative to third-party security tools. And speaking of third-party security software, maybe the time has come to dump third-party antivirus software altogether. It's consistently the biggest source of compatibility issues with new Windows 10 feature updates, and Microsoft Defender long ago passed the "good enough" landmark. Apps: Incomplete Once upon a time, Microsoft had high hopes for its Windows Store. It was to be a hub for games and music and movies and books and, of course, apps. That effort began with Windows 8 and accelerated through Windows 10, but lately the renamed Microsoft Store seems much less strategic. For starters, it no longer includes any music or books. Both product categories were part of Microsoft's relentless shift away from nearly all consumer products and services, with the only exception being Xbox. For Windows 10's two-year anniversary, I awarded an Incomplete in this category as we awaited the arrival of some key desktop apps in the Microsoft Store. Last year, those apps arrived, but they've done little to revitalize the app landscape. As I noted in last year's report card: You can now get Microsoft Office, Apple's iTunes, Slack, and Spotify from the Store, along with some other lower-profile desktop apps, courtesy of a software tool called the Desktop Bridge (previously code-named Centennial). Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be a lot of reason to detour through the Store when every one of those apps is also available as a conventional download. Meanwhile, Windows 10 crapware is a major annoyance for consumers and small business customers. When you install Windows 10 Pro on a new PC and sign in with a local account or a Microsoft account, you get more than you expected, with decidedly non-professional games like Candy Crush Soda Saga, Bubble Witch 3 Saga, and March of Empires splattered across the Start menu whether you want them or not. For enterprise customers, there's a way to avoid these junk apps (see "Avoid Windows 10 crapware: How to get rid of Candy Crush and all the rest"), but everyone else has to grit their teeth and find the uninstall option. The most important change in the Windows 10 app landscape is Microsoft's surprising decision to rip the Microsoft rendering engine out of its default Edge browser and replace it with one based on the open-source Chromium codebase. The developer previews have been available for a few months and the early experience is promising. But until the new code ships in Windows, this category will once again get an Incomplete. Hardware: A- It's hard to believe that Windows Phone was a big part of the original game plan for Windows 10, but that was four long years ago. Today, Microsoft's mobile ambitions are officially dead and buried, and the operating system aims squarely at PC markets. As I noted last year, it doesn't hurt Microsoft's cause that Apple is stumbling badly in the Mac market, criticized for the quality of its keyboards, a lackadaisical approach to design, and a lackadaisical attitude about its professional customers. This year, the run of bad news for would-be Mac owners continues with the news that recent-vintage 15-inch MacBook Pro models are banned from airplanes because of the risk of battery fires. Meanwhile, the embarrassment of riches in PC hardware continues, with a new crop of ARM-based notebooks vying for battery life records with devices built around latest-generation Intel processors. And the 10th-generation Intel processors due at the end of this year should enable more efficient designs, with more connectivity options than ever before. Every year, some pundits declare the PC dead. But sales are holding steady and are even up year over year, as mobile professionals, gamers, and corporate IT departments decide that there really isn't a credible alternative yet. Maybe next year. Source: Windows 10 after four years: A solid report card, but serious challenges ahead (ZDNet - Ed Bott)
  15. How to enable Clipboard History in Windows 10 and customize it Windows 10 has a ton of features baked into the OS; one such feature is the Clipboard History which some find mighty useful, others not so much. It has been around for about a year but in case you haven't used it, here's a tutorial. The Windows Clipboard stored a single entry for the longest time. Whenever you put something into the clipboard, all what was stored in it was erased. If you wanted the clipboard to store multiple entries, you had to use third-party programs like Clipboard Master. The Clipboard History feature unlocks multiple save slots to store multiple items in the clipboard for later use. The feature is available in recent versions of Windows 10 but it is disabled by default. How to enable Clipboard history in Windows 10 Open the Settings app and navigate to the System screen. Locate the Clipboard option on the side-bar, and click on it. The right-pane should display the corresponding options. The Clipboard History option has a toggle beneath it which you can click to enable or disable depending on its state. Now that you have enabled the feature, it's time to test it to find out how useful it is. To do so, use the following shortcut: press the Windows and V keys together. A pop-up window will appear on the screen. It should be empty now because you just enabled it and have not copied something to the clipboard yet. The popup confirms that the history feature is enabled. Try copying something to the clipboard, e.g. a line from this guide. Now open the Clipboard History panel again and you should see the copied text now on the screen. Try copying something else and it should also be visible on the panel along with the older content. This can be very useful in case you accidentally copied something else to the clipboard but don't want to type it again. In fact, text is not the only content that is stored in the history. It also works with images that you copy to the clipboard. That's really handy but that's just about it. You can't use it to recover files that you copy to the Clipboard or other data. Now that you know how to enable and view the Clipboard History, there are a few ways that you can use it. To paste content from the history place the cursor in the application that you want to paste the content into, e.g. Firefox, Chrome, Word, Excel, or any location that accepts text input. Once you have done that switch to the Clipboard History pane and left-click on the content. It will be pasted at the cursor location instantly. Advanced Options You can optionally choose to sign in to your Microsoft Account to save the Clipboard History to the cloud. The option for this is available at the Clipboard settings screen. If you choose to enable it, the history will be synced across other devices that you sign in to. So, you can copy something to the clipboard on your PC and sync it with your phone or another Windows PC or device that you use. Personally I don't use this as clipboard content may contain important data. Speaking of which, you can manually clear the clipboard by clicking the X next to each entry or use the Clear Clipboard option in the Settings screen to delete all the data that was stored previously. Have you noticed the pin icon next to each entry in the Clipboard History? You can use it to pin specific items to the panel. It is a little odd though, because in most programs pinning something puts the item at the top of the screen. Pinned items in Clipboard History are instead saved from being deleted when you clear the clipboard. Well, I suppose it works like a real board where you pin and remove stuff. I love this feature but I wish that the panel would stay in the background instead of automatically closing when I switch to another app. You can try some free alternatives like ClipAngel or CopyQ if you don't like Windows' Clipboard manager. Source: How to enable Clipboard History in Windows 10 and customize it (gHacks)
  16. Windows 10: A guide to the updates Here's what you need to know about each update to Windows 10 as they roll out from Microsoft. Now updated for KB4512508 (OS Build 18362.295), released Aug. 13, 2019. Microsoft The launch of a major Windows 10 update like the May 2019 Update isn’t the end of a process — it’s really just the beginning. As soon as a big feature update is released, Microsoft quickly gets to work on improving it by fixing bugs, releasing security patches, and occasionally adding new features. Here we’ve summarized what you need to know about every Windows 10 update being released to the public. First come updates to the currently shipping version of Windows 10 — version 1903, known as the May 2019 Update — with the most recent updates on top. (Note that the May 2019 Update is on a phased rollout, so you may not have received it yet.) Below that are updates to version 1809, known as the October 2018 Update; version 1803, the April 2018 Update; version 1709, the Fall Creators Update; and finally updates to version 1703, the Creators Update. For each build, we’ve included the date of its initial release and a link to Microsoft’s announcement about it. Note: If you're looking for information about Insider Program previews for upcoming feature releases of Windows 10, see “Windows 10 Redstone: A guide to the builds.” And if you’re still using an earlier version of Windows, see the Microsoft support site for details about updates to Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 version 1607 / Windows Server 2016. Updates to the May 2019 Update (version 1903) KB4512508 (OS Build 18362.295) Release date: August 13, 2019 This update fixes an issue that may prevent devices from starting up or cause them to continue restarting if they are connected to a domain that is configured to use MIT Kerberos realms. In addition, there are security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Wireless Networking, Windows Cryptography, Windows Datacenter Networking, Windows Virtualization, Windows Storage and Filesystems, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, Windows Linux, Windows Kernel, Windows Server, Windows MSXML, Internet Explorer, and Microsoft Edge. For more details, go to the August 2019 Security Update notes. There are two known issues in this build, including one in which Windows Sandbox may fail to start with "ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND (0x80070002)" on devices in which the operating system language is changed during the update process when installing Windows 10, version 1903, and another in which devices that start up using Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) images from Windows Deployment Services (WDS) or System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) may fail to start with the error "Status: 0xc0000001, Info: A required device isn't connected or can't be accessed" after installing this update on a WDS server. What IT needs to know: Because this is a security update, it should be applied relatively soon. Over the next few weeks, check for reports about problematic issues, and if all seems well, apply the update. (Get more info about KB4512508.) KB4505903 (OS Build 18362.267) Release date: July 26, 2019 This build has more than three dozen bug fixes, including for an issue that prevented Windows Hello face recognition from working after a restart, another that prevented some people from changing the display brightness after their devices resumed from Sleep or Hibernation, another that reduced Bluetooth audio quality when certain audio profiles were used for extended periods, and another that caused a mouse press and release to sometimes produce an extra mouse movement. There are several known issues in this build, including one in which Windows Sandbox may fail to start with "ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND (0x80070002)" on devices in which the operating system language is changed during the update process when installing Windows 10, version 1903, and another in which devices connected to a domain that is configured to use MIT Kerberos realms may not start up or may continue to restart. Devices that are domain controllers or domain members are both affected. (Get more info about KB4505903.) KB4507453 (OS Build 18362.239) Release date: July 9, 2019 This build fixes several minor bugs, including one in which BitLocker would go into recovery mode when it was being provisioned at the same time updates were being installed, and another in which Mixed Reality users saw a tilted world after connecting their headsets. Also included are security updates to Windows Wireless Networking, Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows Server, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Kernel, Microsoft HoloLens, Internet Explorer, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Virtualization, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Microsoft Graphics Component, Microsoft Edge, and Windows Cryptography. For details, go to the July 2019 Security Update notes. There are several known issues in this build, including one in which opening or using the Window-Eyes screen reader app may result in an error and some features may not function as expected, and another in which Windows Sandbox may fail to start with "ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND (0x80070002)" on devices in which the operating system language is changed during the update process when installing Windows 10, version 1903. What IT needs to know: Because this is a security update, it should be applied relatively soon. Over the next few weeks, check for reports about problematic issues, and if all seems well, apply the update. (Get more info about KB4507453.) KB4501375 (OS Build 18362.207) Release date: June 27, 2019 This build fixes a variety of minor bugs, including one in which the cursor didn’t display when it was hovered over the keyboard magnifier, and another that caused Office 365 applications to stop working after opening when they were deployed as App-V packages. There is one known issue in the build, in which Windows Sandbox may fail to start with "ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND (0x80070002)" on devices in which the operating system language is changed during the update process when installing Windows 10, version 1903. (Get more info about KB4501375.) KB4503293 (OS Build 18362.175) Release date: June 11, 2019 This build addresses only security issues. In one, the build prevents connections between Windows and Bluetooth devices that are not secure and use well-known keys to encrypt connections, including security fobs. You’ll have to contact the manufacturer of your Bluetooth device to see if there’s a software update for it. For more details, see CVE-2019-2102 and KB4507623. Also included are security updates to Windows Virtualization, Microsoft Scripting Engine, Internet Explorer, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Shell, Windows Server, Windows Authentication, Windows Cryptography, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows SQL Components, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, and Internet Information Services. For details, go to the June 2019 Security Update notes. There is one known issue in the build, in which Windows Sandbox may fail to start with "ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND (0x80070002)" on devices in which the operating system language is changed during the update process when installing Windows 10, version 1903. What IT needs to know: Because this is a security update, it should be applied relatively soon. Over the next few weeks, check for reports about problematic issues, and if all seems well, apply the update. (Get more info about KB4503293.) KB4497935 (OS Build 18362.145) Release date: May 29, 2019 This build addresses two dozen minor bugs in the just-released version of Windows 10, including one in which a File Share Witness does not remove Server Message Block (SMB) handles, which causes a server to eventually stop accepting SMB connections, and another in which Night light mode may be turned off during display mode changes. There are two known issues in the build, including one in which Windows Sandbox may fail to start with "ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND (0x80070002)" on devices in which the operating system language is changed during the update process when installing Windows 10, version 1903. (Get more info about KB4497935.) Windows 10 May 2019 Update (version 1903) Release date: May 21, 2019 Version 1903, called the Windows 10 May 2019 Update, is the most recent feature update to Windows 10. Here’s a quick summary of what’s new for users in it. (For more details, see our full review.) Windows 10 Home and Pro users can now control whether to install the twice-yearly feature updates like the Windows 10 May 2019 Update via a new “Download and install now” option. However, when users’ current version of Windows reaches what Microsoft calls “end of service” — the point at which Microsoft no longer supports it — Windows 10 will install the latest feature update automatically. End of service is typically 18 months after a Windows 10 feature update is released. Windows 10 users can pause any minor Windows updates that Microsoft issues in between the big feature updates for up to 35 days. Cortana and the search box have been separated. To perform a Cortana search, you can say “Hey Cortana” and speak your search, click the Cortana icon to the right of the search box and speak, or press the Windows key + C and speak. All other searches are done by Windows Search. You can now use search to find files in any location on your PC, not just in default libraries and folders like OneDrive, Documents, Downloads, Music, Pictures, Videos, and Desktop. However, that requires indexing, which reduces laptop battery life and could slow down PC performance. You can uninstall more built-in apps than previously, including 3D Viewer (previously called Mixed Reality Viewer), Calculator, Calendar, Groove Music, Mail, Movies & TV, Paint 3D, Snip & Sketch, Sticky Notes, and Voice Recorder. What IT needs to know: The Professional and Enterprise versions of Windows 10 get a new security tool called Windows Sandbox. It lets you test out software and websites in their own containers, so that if they’re dangerous, they can’t get to Windows 10 itself. Close the sandbox, and the software or website vanishes. IT administrators can also extend the safety features of Windows Defender Application Guard beyond Edge via browser extensions for Chrome and Firefox and an app from the Microsoft store. When users browse to an untrusted site in Chrome or Firefox, the site will open in Edge, inside a virtual machine using Windows Defender Application Guard. Updates to the October 2018 Update (version 1809) KB4497934 (OS Build OS 17763.529) Release date: May 21, 2019 This build brings a major change to the way you update Windows 10. You no longer have to accept every one of Microsoft’s twice-yearly feature updates such as the just released Windows 10 May 2019 Update (version 1903). When there’s a new feature update available, a “Download and install now” link appears in the Windows Update Settings pane. If you don’t want to install it, don’t click the link. However, there is one caveat: When your current version of Windows nears what Microsoft calls “end of service” — the point at which Microsoft no longer supports it — Windows 10 will install the latest feature update. In addition, this update fixes more than 20 issues in the latest version of Windows 10, including one that caused Microsoft Edge to hide annotations added to a PDF file, such as inked notes, highlights and comments, and another that failed to record a local user’s last logon time even when the user had accessed the server’s network share. There are a handful of issues with this build, including one in which when attempting to print from Microsoft Edge or other Universal Windows Platform (UWP) applications you may receive the error, "Your printer has experienced an unexpected configuration problem. 0x80070007e." There may also be issues using the Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) to start a device from a Windows Deployment Services (WDS) server configured to use Variable Window Extension. (Get more info about KB4497934.) KB4494441 (OS Build 17763.503) Release date: May 14, 2019 This build fixes minor issues in the latest version of Windows 10, including one that caused zone transfers between primary and secondary DNS servers over TCP to fail, and another that caused “Error 1309” while installing or uninstalling certain types of .msi and .msp files on a virtual drive. In addition, security updates are included for Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Graphics, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Cryptography, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, Windows Kernel, Windows Virtualization, and Windows Server. For more information about them, see the May 2019 Security Updates Release Notes. There are several issues in the build, including one in which when attempting to print from Microsoft Edge or other Universal Windows Platform (UWP) applications you may receive the error "Your printer has experienced an unexpected configuration problem. 0x80070007e." There may also be issues using the Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) to start a device from a Windows Deployment Services (WDS) server configured to use Variable Window Extension. What IT needs to know: Because this is a security update, it should be applied relatively soon. Over the next few weeks, check for reports about problematic issues, and if all seems well, apply the update. (Get more info about KB4494441.) KB4495667 (OS Build 17763.475) Release date: May 3, 2019 This build fixes more than two dozen minor issues in the latest version of Windows 10, including one that caused some touch screens to stop working after restarts, and another that caused Internet Explorer Automation to fail in certain instances. The build also adds several minor features, including one that allows the built-in Administrator account to run Microsoft Office setup after downloading the installer in Microsoft Edge. There are several issues in the build, including one in which Custom URI Schemes for Application Protocol handlers may not start the corresponding application for local intranet and trusted sites on Internet Explorer. There may also be issues using the Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) to start a device from a Windows Deployment Services (WDS) server configured to use Variable Window Extension. And when attempting to print from Microsoft Edge or other Universal Windows Platform (UWP) applications, you may receive the error "Your printer has experienced an unexpected configuration problem. 0x80070007e." (Get more info about KB4495667.) KB4493509 (OS Build 17763.437) Release date: April 9, 2019 This build fixes a handful of minor bugs in the latest version of Windows 10, including one that may cause authentication issues for Internet Explorer 11 and other applications that use WININET.DLL, and another that may cause compound document (OLE) server applications to display embedded objects incorrectly if you use the PatBlt API to place embedded objects into the Windows Management Framework (WMF). In addition, security updates are included for Windows Datacenter Networking, Windows Server, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, Windows Kernel, Windows Input and Composition, Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Virtualization, Windows MSXML, Windows SQL components, and Microsoft Edge. For more information about them, see the April 2019 Security Updates Release Notes. There are several known issues in the build, including one in which Custom URI Schemes for Application Protocol handlers may not start the corresponding application for local intranet and trusted sites on Internet Explorer. There may also be issues using the Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) to start a device from a Windows Deployment Services (WDS) server configured to use Variable Window Extension. What IT needs to know: Because this is a security update, it should be applied relatively soon. Over the next few weeks, check for reports about problematic issues, and if all seems well, apply the update. (Get more info about KB4493509.) KB4490481 (OS Build 17763.404) Release date: April 2, 2019 This build fixes several dozen minor issues with the latest version of Windows 10, including one that prevented users from configuring their screens for high-dynamic-range (HDR) video playback, and another that failed to register USB cameras correctly for Windows Hello after their initial setup. It also fixes an issue that caused Windows to reuse an expired Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) lease if the lease expired while the OS was shut down, and another that prevented the authentication credentials dialog from appearing when an enterprise web server attempted to connect to the internet. There are several issues in the build, including one in which Internet Explorer 11 and other applications that use WININET.DLL may have authentication issues, and another in which Custom URI Schemes for Application Protocol handlers may not start the corresponding application for local intranet and trusted sites on Internet Explorer. (Get more info about KB4490481.) KB4489899 (OS Build 17763.379) Release date: March 12, 2019 This build fixes several minor issues with the latest version of Windows 10 and includes security patches. Among other issues, it fixes a tracking and device calibration issue in Microsoft HoloLens that some people have experienced. Although people may see an improvement 10 to 15 minutes after installing the update, Microsoft recommends resetting the holograms for best results. In addition, security updates are included for Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows Shell, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Kernel-Mode Drivers, Windows Server, Windows Linux, Windows Hyper-V, Windows Datacenter Networking, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Wireless Networking, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, Windows Kernel, Windows, and Windows Fundamentals. The Security Update Guide’s Release Notes has details. There are several issues in the build, including one in which after installing the update on machines that have multiple audio devices, applications that provide advanced options for internal or external audio output devices may stop working unexpectedly. What IT needs to know: Because this is a security update, it should be applied relatively soon. Over the next few weeks, check for reports about problematic issues, and if all seems well, apply the update. (Get more info about KB4489899.) KB4482887 (OS Build 17763.348) Release date: March 1, 2019 This build fixes several dozen minor issues with the latest version of Windows 10. Among them is one that caused the Action Center to suddenly appear on the wrong side of the screen before appearing on the correct side and another that caused the screen to remain black after resuming from Sleep if the laptop lid was closed while the laptop was being disconnected from a docking station. The build also turns on a patch called “Retpoline” for some Windows devices, which may improve protection against the Spectre variant 2 vulnerability. For more details, see “Mitigating Spectre variant 2 with Retpoline on Windows.” There is one known issue in the build, in which Internet Explorer 11 may have authentication issues when two or more people use the same user account for multiple, concurrent login sessions on the same Windows Server machine. (Get more info about KB4482887.) KB4487044 (OS Build 17763.316) Release date: February 12, 2019 This build fixes several minor issues with the latest version of Windows 10. Among them is one in which Windows Hello for Business Hybrid Key Trust deployment sign-on fails if Windows 2019 Server domain controllers (DC) are used for authentication. It also fixes a bug in Microsoft HoloLens that allows users to bypass the lock screen sign-in process in some workflows. In addition, security updates are included for Microsoft Scripting Engine, Microsoft Edge, Windows Server, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, Internet Explorer, Windows Wireless Networking, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Graphics, and Windows App Platform and Frameworks. The Security Update Guide’s Release Notes has details. There is one known issue in the build, in which after installing the previous build, KB4480116, some users cannot load a webpage in Microsoft Edge using a local IP address. Browsing fails or the webpage becomes unresponsive. What IT needs to know: Because this is a security update, it should be applied relatively soon. Over the next few weeks, check for reports about problematic issues, and if all seems well, apply the update. (Get more info about KB4487044.) KB4476976 (OS Build 17763.292) Release date: January 22, 2019 This build fixes 20 minor issues with the latest version of Windows 10. Among them is one in which File Explorer stopped working when you clicked the Turn On button for the timeline feature when the "Allow upload of user activities" group policy was disabled. This build also fixed a problem that caused Remote Desktop Services to stop accepting connections after accepting several connections, and another one that caused Microsoft Edge to stop working with certain display drivers. There are two known issues in the build. In one, applications that use a Microsoft Jet database with the Microsoft Access 97 file format may fail to open if the database has column names greater than 32 characters. The database will display the error “Unrecognized Database Format.” In the other issue, after installing the previous build (KB4480116), some users some users cannot load a webpage in Microsoft Edge using a local IP address. Browsing fails or the webpage becomes unresponsive. (Get more info about KB4476976.) KB4480116 (OS Build 17763.253) Release date: January 8, 2019 This minor build has several security updates and addresses a single minor issue. It fixes the problem in which using esentutl /p to repair a corrupt Extensible Storage Engine (ESE) database results in a mostly empty database that is corrupted and can’t be mounted. One security update addresses a vulnerability in session isolation that affects PowerShell remote endpoints. For security reasons, from this build and onward, PowerShell remote endpoints cannot be configured to work with non-administrator accounts. In addition, security updates are included for Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows MSXML, Windows Kernel, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Wireless Networking, Microsoft JET Database Engine, Windows Linux, Windows Virtualization, and the Microsoft Scripting Engine. The Security Update Guide’s Release Notes has details. What IT needs to know: Because this is a security update, it should be applied relatively soon. Over the next few weeks, check for reports about problematic issues, and if all seems well, apply the update. (Get more info about KB4480116.) KB4483235 (OS Build 17763.195) Release date: December 19, 2018 This minor build has only a single change: a security update to Internet Explorer. What IT needs to know: Because this is a security update, it should be applied relatively soon. Over the next few weeks, check for reports about problematic issues, and if all seems well, apply the update. (Get more info about KB4483235.) KB4471332 (OS Build 17763.194) Release date: December 11, 2018 This minor security update fixes an issue that may prevent the use of the Seek Bar in Windows Media Player when playing specific files. The issue does not affect normal playback. The build also has security updates for Windows Authentication, Microsoft Scripting Engine, Internet Explorer, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Wireless Networking, Windows Kernel, Microsoft Edge, and Microsoft Scripting Engine. See the Security Update Guide for details. There are no known issues in the update. What IT needs to know: Because this is a security update, it should be applied relatively soon. Over the next few weeks, check for reports about problematic issues, and if all seems well, apply the update. (Get more info about KB4471332.) KB4469342 (OS Build 17763.168) Release date: December 5, 2018 This non-feature update fixes 20 minor issues, including one that can cause mapped drives to fail to reconnect after starting and logging onto a Windows device, and another in which there are long delays when taking a photo with the Camera app in certain lighting conditions. There are two known issues in this update, including one in which users may not be able to use the Seek Bar in Windows Media Player when playing specific files. This issue does not affect normal playback. Microsoft expects a fix to be available in mid-December. (Get more info about KB4469342.) KB4467708 (OS Build 17763.134) Release date: November 13, 2018 This update addresses several security issues, including security updates for Microsoft Edge, Windows Scripting, Internet Explorer, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Graphics, Windows Media, Windows Kernel, Windows Server, and Windows Wireless Networking. In addition, it provides protections against a subclass of speculative execution side-channel vulnerability known as Speculative Store Bypass (CVE-2018-3639) for AMD-based computers. These protections are not enabled by default in the update. To turn the protections on after installing the update, follow the instructions in KB4073119. For Windows Server guidance, follow the instructions in KB4072698. Additionally, IT staff should follow the mitigations that have already been released for Spectre Variant 2 (CVE-2017-5715) and Meltdown (CVE-2017-5754). In addition to the security updates, the build fixes several issues, including one that prevented users from signing in to a Microsoft account (MSA) as a different user if signing in a second time, and another that caused the on-screen keyboard to appear when running automated tests or when you install a physical keyboard. There are two known issues in this update, one in which some users cannot set Win32 program defaults for certain app and file type combinations using the Open with... command or Settings > Apps > Default apps, and another in which Microsoft Notepad and other Win32 programs cannot be set as default applications. What IT needs to know: Because this is a security update, it should be applied relatively soon. Over the next few weeks, check for reports about problematic issues, and if all seems well, apply the update. (Get more info about KB4467708.) KB4464455 (OS Build 17763.107) Release date: November 13, 2018 This minor, non-feature update fixes a variety of small issues, including one in which Internet Explorer performance became degraded when using roaming profiles or when the Microsoft Compatibility List wasn’t being used. Other issues fixed include one that caused a long delay in taking a photo using the Camera app in certain lighting conditions, and one that caused applications to lose IPv4 connectivity when IPv6 is unbound. There are two known issues in this update: one in which some users cannot set Win32 program defaults for certain app and file type combinations using the Open with... command or Settings > Apps > Default apps, and another in which Microsoft Notepad and other Win32 programs cannot be set as default applications. (Get more info about KB4464455.) KB4464330 (OS Build 17763.55) Release date: October 9, 2018 This very minor, non-feature update fixes an issue in which an incorrect timing calculation may prematurely delete user profiles on devices subject to the "Delete user profiles older than a specified number of day” group policy. It also has security updates for Windows Kernel, Microsoft Graphics Component, Microsoft Scripting Engine, Internet Explorer, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Linux, Windows Wireless Networking, Windows MSXML, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, Windows Peripherals, Microsoft Edge, Windows Media Player, and Internet Explorer. (Go to the Security Update Guide for more details about these updates.) There are no known issues with the update. What IT needs to know: Because this is a security update, it should be applied relatively soon. Over the next few weeks, check for reports about problematic issues, and if all seems well, apply the update. (Get more info about KB4464330.) Windows 10 October 2018 Update (version 1809) Release date: October 2, 2018; paused October 5; re-released November 13, 2018 Version 1809, called the Windows 10 October 2018 Update, is the feature update that preceded the May 2019 Update. Here’s a quick summary of what’s new for users in it. (For more details, see our full review.) A new, powered-up Windows Clipboard can hold multiple clips, store clips permanently, let you preview clips and choose which one you’d like to paste into a document, and share clips across Windows 10 devices. A new screenshot and annotation tool called Snip & Sketch lets you capture and annotate the entire screen, a rectangular portion of the screen or a freehand-drawn portion of it. After you take a screen capture, you can annotate it and then save it to a file, copy it to the Clipboard, open it in another program or share it via email, social media and other methods. Storage Sense, which helps save storage space, now works with OneDrive Files On-Demand to clean out files you’ve downloaded from OneDrive cloud storage to your PC but that you don’t use any longer. You can choose how long you would like the cloud files to stay on your PC unused before you want them deleted, from never to 60 days. The Microsoft Edge browser lets you set autoplay permissions for sound and video on websites on a site-by-site basis. It also lets you look up word definitions in its built-in eReader for books and PDFs, and mark up PDFs and books using a highlighter and by adding notes. The new Your Phone app links Windows 10 devices to iOS and Android phones. It allows you to start web browsing on an iOS or Android device and then continue where you left off on your PC. It also lets you view photos on your Android phone from your Windows 10 PC. Search Previews have been powered up slightly. You no longer need to click to display the preview panel; it opens automatically. It also now shows files found on your PC. Smaller changes include a new dark theme for File Explorer; the addition of the SwiftKey swipe keyboard, which lets you enter text by swiping a finger across an onscreen keyboard; updates that are less intrusive; and faster sign-ins on shared PCs. What IT needs to know: There are few significant changes that affect IT in the Windows 10 October 2018 Update, other than New Microsoft Edge Group Policies that let admins enable and disable full-screen mode, printing, the favorites bar, and browser history saves. IT can also allow or ban Edge extensions (not that there are many available) and configure the Home button and new tab page and startup options. Source: Windows 10: A guide to the updates (Computerworld - Preston Gralla)
  17. Microsoft rolling out “Always-on-Top Mode” feature to the Windows 10 Calculator app The default Calculator app in Windows 10 went through a lot of change in the last few months. One of the major changes that Microsoft announced was open-sourcing of the Calculator app in the month of March this year. The software giant has since then been announcing various cool features such as the Always-on-Top Mode in the Calculator app. That said, the Always-on-Top Mode is now available in the Calculator app and it is now rolling out to Windows Insiders in the Fast ring. The feature was first announced as a new feature in the Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 18956, which was released last week, but it wasn’t available from day one. For those unaware, as the name suggests, the feature adds the ability to put Calculator in an Always on Top mode. Once you have the updated version, you’ll be able to switch into the Always on Top mode by clicking the icon next to the calculator mode name. If you’re on the Fast ring and running Build 18956, you should receive the update. Once you install the latest update(Version 10.1907.24.0), you will notice the change. Source: Microsoft rolling out “Always-on-Top Mode” feature to the Windows 10 Calculator app (MSPoweruser)
  18. Is Windows pushing you to upgrade? Don’t be bullied. There’s a middle path. Many people running Win10 version 1803 — the most common version of Win10 — are seeing dire notices that they need to upgrade to 'the next version of Windows,' by which Microsoft means 1903. Hogwash. You have options. Here’s what you can do. Gerd Altmann (CC0) Microsoft’s in a full-court press to get folks running Win10 version 1803 to upgrade to version 1903. Ostensibly it’s because version 1803 patches will stop after Nov. 12, and the laggards still stuck on the “old” version — first declared suitable for business a scant year ago — need the enlightened, new 1903. Waiting for three or four months just won’t do. The reality is a bit more nuanced. (If you aren’t sure of your Windows 10 version, click the search box next to the Start button, type About, and choose About your PC.) Vox dei If, like most Windows 10 users, you’re on version 1803, you may have recently started seeing announcements in Windows Update like this one: Woody Leonhard/IDG While you’re certainly welcome to click Download and install now, you might want to think for a minute before you make the leap. There’s a reason why Microsoft itself isn’t recommending version 1903 for business deployment just yet. Don’t get bullied into making a decision that’s good for Microsoft but may prove problematic for you. Updateus Interruptus The push to 1903 can be confusing. For some who clicked the wrong buttons, a nascent version of 1903 may already lie waiting. If your machine has an Alien chestburster on board, you'll see a Windows Update message that looks like this: Woody Leonhard/IDG If you get into that pickle — where Win10 1903 has been downloaded, but not yet installed — not to worry. Simply go to the folder C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution and delete all the files. Reboot Windows, and you'll be back to the devil ye ken. You have a choice — three of them, actually Right now, if you’re running Win10 version 1803, you have three straightforward choices (assuming you want to stay with Windows, of course): Stick with 1803 Microsoft promises to deliver its last cumulative update for Win10 1803 on Patch Tuesday, Nov. 12 (unless you have a site license and spend a bundle). In the normal course of events — barring a major bug in the update — you wouldn’t normally expect to have a new patch until Patch Tuesday, Dec. 10. So depending on how you look at it, you have three or four months left to go before the security patches dry up. Why stick with 1803? It’s stable. At least, by Win10 standards. When you weigh the feature improvements in Win10 1809 and 1903 with 1803, many people feel the benefits aren’t worth the possible pain. Every month you can wait, the next and next-next versions of Windows get more stable. To a first approximation anyway. So far, Microsoft’s been respectful about pushing people from 1803 to 1903, but you should expect that the pressure will heat up. Some people have reported completely unexpected upgrades — most ominously on machines that have set their internet connections to metered — but for most people, right now, that gentle nudge in the screenshot is all you have to deal with. Heaven only knows whom Microsoft will throw under the bus as we get closer to November. Move to Win10 1809 Welcome to the middle ground. I’ve moved my production machines to version 1809, and plan to keep them there for a while — long enough for the kinks to get worked out of 1903, anyway. After a truly horrendous launch, Win10 1809 has stabilized reasonably well. The main benefit to upgrading to Win10 1809 is that Microsoft will keep patching it until May 12, 2020. By that time, who knows? Version 1903 Service Pack 1 (a.k.a. version 19H2 and, colloquially, version 1909) may be ready for prime time. Microsoft is showing a sincere effort to stabilize 1903 for a longer run, instead of tossing new versions out every six months, as has been the habit. If you upgrade to 1903 in December, there’s a decent chance you’ll effectively end up with Win10 1903 Service Pack 1.2 or 1.3, and that may be a decent landing spot. If you’re running 1803 Pro and want to move to 1809, it’s easy — in spite of Microsoft’s nudge to get you to leapfrog versions, up to 1903. PKCano has gone through voluminous details, but here’s the Cliff Notes bottom line: Step 1. In Win10 1803 Pro, using an Admin account, click Start, Settings, Update & Security. Then click Advanced Options (it’s at the bottom). See the screenshot Woody Leonhard/IDG Step 2. The arithmetic is ridiculously convoluted, but if you perform this little pirouette in the next couple of months, choose “Semi-Annual Channel” and “120” in the top two boxes. (After November, I’m not sure how or if these settings will work: We enter uncharted territory once again with feature updates masquerading as quality updates.) Step 3. Don’t do anything. Don’t click “Check for updates.” Just use your PC as usual, possibly turning it off then on again to awake the upgrade genie. You may have to wait a day, but sooner or later you’ll get upgraded to 1809. As a Win10 renter, you’ll never be able to get off the upgrade karmic wheel, but at least this approach will give you a version that’s been baked for a while. Gulp; install Win10 version 1903 Win10 version 1903 isn’t evil. If you’ve already upgraded to Win10 version 1903 and you aren’t having any problems, stay put. Sooner or later — hopefully with the advent of Service Pack 1 — version 1903-slash-1909 may end up being the most stable version of Win10 yet. If you really want to move to Win10 version 1903, two recommendations from Ye Old School of Hard Knocks. First, don’t force it. If Microsoft isn’t pushing 1903 on your machine, there’s likely a reason. If you don’t see “Download and install now,” don’t sweat it. Your time will come. There’s nothing in 1903 that you absolutely need, unless a single-column Start menu rings your chimes, or you want to banish Cortana ASAP. Second, when it’s time to make the change, don’t click Check for updates or Download and install now. Instead, go to the Update Assistant site and take the throttle. Better yet, if you’re adept at such things, download the ISO and install from there. One of the reasons why this is so stressful — we’ve never done it before. Microsoft keeps changing the rules, the definitions, the details. While it’s certainly true that most people upgrade to 1903 with no problems, it’s also true that lots and lots of people hit road bumps. The longer you wait, the better your chances. We got your back on AskWoody.com. Source: Is Windows pushing you to upgrade? Don’t be bullied. There’s a middle path. (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  19. How to disable "Get even more out of Windows" on Windows 10 Windows 10 may display a "Get even more out of Windows" prompt occasionally that displays additional services that users may set up. The prompt may be displayed on the first start of the device, after the installation of a feature update, or at random provided that it has not been turned off. Microsoft launched the post-upgrade setup experience in May 2018 in Insider Preview build 17682 and we looked at the feature in January 2019 when it became clear that Windows 10 version 1903 would include it. The screen looked a bit different back then but the listed services have not changed since then. The Get even more out of Windows prompt highlights a number of services that are powered by a Microsoft Account: Set up Windows Hello -- Sign in faster and more securely. Link your phone and PC -- Help your devices work in harmony. Do more across devices -- Enjoy more seamless experiences. Get Office 365 ready -- Have your apps ready for launch. Protect your files with OneDrive -- Keep them backed up and accessible. Some Windows 10 users may find the prompt useful as it allows them to set up some of these services directly. It is possible to set these up elsewhere on the system which means that the prompt's main purpose is to get more users to discover these options and use them. It is a good idea to disable the prompt if you don't want to use any of the features or set up some of them already. The prompt may be superfluous in this case and is best disabled to speed things up. Disabling the experience Windows administrators and users have two options to disable the prompt on machines running Windows 10. The first option disables it in the Settings application, the second option using the Registry. Settings app This option is the safer option as it does not require manipulating the Registry. Here is what you need to to: Open the Settings application, e.g. from Start or by using the keyboard shortcut Windows-I. Go to System > Notifications & actions in the Settings application. Locate "Suggest ways I can finish setting up my device to get the most out of Windows" under Notifications on the page that opens. Uncheck the box to disable the "Get more" prompt". Close the Settings application. The Registry You may also change a value in the Windows Registry to block the prompt on the device. We have prepared to Registry files that you can download to disable or enable the feature. You may also make the change manually if you prefer to do so. To download the archive with the two Registry files, click on the following link: Registry file Manual instructions Here is what you need to do: Open the Windows Registry Editor, e.g. by opening Start, typing regedit.exe, and selecting the result to load it. Confirm the UAC prompt that Windows displays. Go to Computer\HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\UserProfileEngagement, e.g. by pasting the path into the address field of the Registry Editor. Check if the Dword ScoobeSystemSettingEnabled exists. If it does not exist, right-click on UserProfileEngagement and select New > Dword (32-bit) Value. Name it ScoobeSystemSettingEnabled. Double-click on the Dword ScoobeSystemSettingEnabled Give it the value 0 to disable the feature. Give it the value 1 to enable the feature. Restart the Windows PC. Source: How to disable "Get even more out of Windows" on Windows 10 (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  20. Confirmed – the next major version of Windows 10 to be code-named Vibranium All the way back in October 2018 we heard that the next major version of Windows 10 would be code-named Vibranium, with the more minor Windows 10 19H2 update being code-named Vanadium. Now the Windows 10 SDK Preview Build 18950 has confirmed the news, with reference (discovered by Tero Alhonen) to Windows 10 VB. In case you mistake this for Windows 10 Visual Basic edition, the SDK also provides more verbose confirmation in the USB driver. We of course already know quite a bit about Windows 10 20H1 code-named Vibranium, as this is the OS currently in the Windows 10 Insider Fast Ring. From a recently leaked build however, we also know that Microsoft is working on a new Start Menu and other significant changes for the operating system, meaning we may see some meaningful changes hit consumers next year. Source: Confirmed – the next major version of Windows 10 to be code-named Vibranium (MSPoweruser)
  21. Microsoft releases Windows 10 Build 18956 with redesigned Network Status page and more Microsoft today released the new Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 18956 (20H1) to Insiders in the Fast ring. This build comes with improved Network Status page, Chinese IME improvements, Notification settings improvements, updated Calculator app and more. This new build also includes several bug fixes and a few known issues. Find the full change log below. Change log for Windows 10 Build 18956: A redesigned Network Status page in Settings Based on your feedback, we’re revamping the Network & Internet landing page in Settings to provide more information at a glance about your device’s connectivity, combining several pages to give you one clear view of how you are connected to the internet. New view of active connections: We now show all available connection interfaces on the Status page, so you can quickly see what is connected and view and change properties as needed. If you have multiple connections, only one will be used for internet connectivity at a time, and that one is still shown in the Status diagram at the top of the page. Integrated Data Usage: As you may have noticed in the picture above, you can now see how much data is being used by a network right from the Status page! If it looks like you’re using a lot of data, you can drill into the Data Usage page to create a limit for that network, which will warn you if you get close or go over your limit. You can also see how much data each app is using on that network. We hope you like the changes! If you have any feedback about these, you can share it via the Feedback Hub under Network and Internet > Networking Experience – Look and Feel. Traditional Chinese IME Improvements Thank you everyone who’s shared feedback about the new Traditional Chinese Bopomofo / ChangJie / Quick IME so far! The development team has been working on improving the quality and fixing bugs based on what you’ve told us, including: Bopomofo, ChangJie, and Quick IMEs: We improved the speed of toggling conversion mode ([?] mode and [?] mode). Now it you can switch between the two faster. Bopomofo IME: We heard feedback that some of you’ve been accidentally hitting the Shift + Space keyboard shortcut, resulting in the character width changing unexpectedly between Half-width and Full-width, so we’ve added a new setting for this if you’d prefer to disable the keyboard shortcut (Note: The default is enabled). To access this setting, right click the [?/?] icon in the taskbar, click Settings > General > “Use Shift + Space to switch character width”. As you may have noticed in the screenshot above, we’re now adding the ability to change the candidate font size, separate from the rest of the system if you find that you need it to be a bit bigger. (You can still change the system font size under [Ease of Access]>[Display]>[Make text bigger].) We also fixed issues where: The candidate numbers sometimes disappeared from the candidate window. Shift+Number wasn’t working for selecting an associated phrase. Thanks again! If you have any further feedback about these experiences, let us know. Notification settings improvements now rolling out to all of Fast Thanks everyone who’s tried out our improvements so far. We’re now starting to roll these out to all Insiders. To recap what you’ll see when you have the change: If you hover your mouse over an incoming notification, you’ll now see a settings icon to make it easy to adjust that app’s notification settings. We’ve updated the design of the per-app notification settings for visual clarity. There’s now a direct link to notification settings at the top of the Action Center. Notifications & Action Settings now has a checkbox for muting the sound of all notifications. By default, the senders in Notifications & Action Settings are now sorted by “most recently sent a notification.” Cortana rollout increasing to more Insiders using English (United States) We’re increasing the rollout of the new Cortana experience to now be available for 50% of the Insiders using English (United States). You may need to reboot before you see the change on your PC. Looking for something to try once it appears for you? Try “What’s the weather?” or “Tell me a joke” to get started. Other Updates for Insiders Calculator app updates Over the next few days we’ll be starting to roll out a Calculator app update to Insiders in the Fast ring. This app is most notable because it adds the ability to put Calculator in an Always on Top mode! Thanks everyone who shared feedback requesting this – we look forward to you trying it out. Once you have the updated version, you’ll be able to switch into the Always on Top mode by clicking the icon next to the calculator mode name. General changes, improvements, and fixes for PC We’re in the process of returning Tamper Protection to being on by default for all Insiders. You’ll see this change reflected on your PC across the next few weeks. We fixed an issue where, if snipping via Print Screen was enabled, certain UI would unexpectedly dismiss before it could be captured in the snip. We fixed an issue resulting in the touch keyboard button not launching the touch keyboard on certain devices. We fixed an issue where, if you dragged File Explorer while the search dropdown was visible, the dropdown could end up disconnected from the search box. We fixed an issue where, if a search was in progress in File Explorer, then it’d take two clicks on the X to clear the search results. We fixed an issue where using the “Automatically type into Search Box” view setting would result in the first letter of your File Explorer search being dropped. We fixed an issue where File Explorer recent searches weren’t disabled when the group policy “Turn off display of recent search entries in the File Explorer search box” was enabled. We fixed an issue where explorer.exe would crash when searching File Explorer starting in a OneDrive folder if OneDrive was not running. We fixed an issue where Homegroup options might still appear in the “Give access to” File Explorer context menu entry, despite the Homegroup feature no longer being available. We fixed an issue resulting in some Insiders experiencing a taskbar search crash right after log-in. Known Issues There has been an issue with older versions of anti-cheat software used with games where after updating to the latest 19H1 Insider Preview builds may cause PCs to experience crashes. We are working with partners on getting their software updated with a fix, and most games have released patches to prevent PCs from experiencing this issue. To minimize the chance of running into this issue, please make sure you are running the latest version of your games before attempting to update the operating system. We are also working with anti-cheat and game developers to resolve similar issues that may arise with the 20H1 Insider Preview builds and will work to minimize the likelihood of these issues in the future. Some Realtek SD card readers are not functioning properly. We are investigating the issue. Occasionally, the candidate selection in prediction candidate window for the Japanese IME doesn’t match with the composition string. We are investigating the issue. When connected via cellular, the Network status will be incorrect, but the device is able to use the connection. Source: Microsoft releases Windows 10 Build 18956 with redesigned Network Status page and more (MSPoweruser)
  22. You can make Windows 10 volume control look better and these are the steps to follow Windows 10 is often criticized for UI inconsistency and the outdated UI of volume control, of which the outdated volume control UI is perhaps a lot easier to address. Unfortunately, Microsoft never put that in their “To-Do List.” While there is no information as to when Microsoft is going to start work on it and replace the outdated volume control with a modern one, a third-party developer took the pain and came up with a new program called AudioFlyout to replace the outdated UI. You can download the program from his GitHub page here. [EDIT: Ignore the download instructions here... to get the executable, follow the instructions in my reply 2 posts down] Once you click on the link follow the below steps: Hit on Download and Clone and then click on Download ZIP Download and extract the AudioFlyout.zip archive from the link at the bottom of the article. Right-Click, with the mouse button, on the AudioFlyout.exe file and click on Run as administrator. If you require a User Account Control click Yes. Congratulations! You’ve successfully replaced the old volume control UI. Source: You can make Windows 10 volume control look better and these are the steps to follow (MSPoweruser)
  23. More detail on Microsoft’s ‘new’ Windows 10 Cloud Reinstall feature We wrote a week ago about a new “Cloud Download” restore feature for Windows 10 which would download a new copy of Windows 10 from Microsoft’s cloud when you wish to reset/fix your PC. Now more detail has emerged, courtesy of Windows 10 hacker Albacore. He revealed the feature currently downloads Windows 10 Build 14393 ie Redstone 1, from August 2016, suggesting it is in fact an old feature which Microsoft is reviving. The feature first showed up in Build 14908, from 2016, and download the same build of Windows as the Media Creation Tool, with no sophisticated customization or differential downloading. As currently designed it would obviously only work with networking already set up, ie from inside Windows, as a refresh or reset option. Interestingly the Surface Hub does include a Recover from the Cloud option which works when the device is otherwise inaccessible and downloads Windows from the Cloud. Microsoft notes: If for some reason the Surface Hub becomes unusable, you can still recover it from the cloud without assistance from Microsoft Support. The Surface Hub can download a fresh operating system image from the cloud, and use that image to reinstall its operating system. You may have to use this type of recovery process under the following circumstances: The Surface Hub or its related accounts have entered an unstable state The Surface Hub is locked This, of course, works best when your device is plugged into an Ethernet port. Ultimately, like the Surface Hub, we see this as a way for Microsoft to turn your PC into an appliance which can be reliably reset, just like your router. We will keep an eye on the feature and let our readers know more as it emerges. Source: More detail on Microsoft’s ‘new’ Windows 10 Cloud Reinstall feature (MSPoweruser)
  24. Some flagship devices like Samsung Galaxy Book2 and Microsoft Surface Go come pre-installed with Windows 10 in S mode (formerly known as Windows 10 S). Windows 10 in S Mode locks installation of apps only from the Microsoft Store and users cannot download or install .exe apps. Fortunately, Microsoft allows users to switch out of Windows 10 in S mode from the Microsoft Store, but users are reporting that this Store feature is broken and they cannot switch out of Windows 10 in S Mode. On Reddit, Twitter, Microsoft’s answer forum discussions, users are reporting that the ‘Switch out of S mode’ page in the Microsoft Store doesn’t load. The Switch out of S mode page in Microsoft Store is rendering a blank screen without the loading circle in the middle. It seems that this is a known issue and Microsoft is working on a resolution. A Microsoft support representative told me that the company is aware of the problems with Windows 10 in S Mode: This is not expected behavior and the issue is not with your PC. Microsoft is aware that some users are unable to upgrade to Pro Edition or switch out of S mode as a result of this blank page. We are investigating the cause and when a resolution is available the Store will update without any user action necessary. There is no current estimate on when this condition will be resolved. The company hasn’t shared ETA on when it will be fixed, but things should go back to normal in a few days or a week. Source
  25. Windows 10’s Mail and Calendar app gets updated with many new features Microsoft is rolling out a new update to Mail and Calendar, a default email app for Windows 10. The new update brings plenty of new features such as the ability to browse and select contacts from the Windows people picker, ability to switch to the people app from Mail and Calendar app and more. The latest update pushes the app to version 16005.11629.20316.0. You can see the changelog below. Browse and select contacts from the Windows people picker when addressing email Switch to the People app from Mail and Calendar Download and save all attachments in an email at once You can update the Mail Calendar app from the below link, or you can head over to the Microsoft Store and Check for Updates. https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/p/mail-and-calendar/9wzdncrfhvqm Source: Windows 10’s Mail and Calendar app gets updated with many new features (MSPoweruser)
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