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  1. Apple releases iOS 14.0.1 with default app setting fix If this was a normal year, we'd all have been downloading iOS 14 yesterday, and waiting to pick up our iPhone 12 devices tomorrow. But it's not a normal year, the iPhone 12 is delayed from its normal timeframe, and Apple didn't have to tie iOS 14 to its release, so it actually released the OS last week. Now, the first bug fix updates are rolling out in the form of iOS 14.0.1, iPadOS 14.0.1, watchOS 7.0.1, tvOS 14.0.1, and macOS 10.15.7 Catalina. The iOS and iPadOS updates do fix a key issue. iOS 14, for the first time, offered the ability to choose a default browser or a default email client. There was an issue though, as users quickly found that that setting was reset upon rebooting their device. This update fixes that. There are plenty of other fixes as well. There are fixes for widgets, such as a fix for an issue that prevented images from appearing in News. There are also camera fixes if you're still using an iPhone 7 or 7 Plus, and there's a fix for connecting to Wi-Fi networks. Finally, Apple listed a fix for an issue with sending emails with some mail providers. The updates are rolling out now, although there are already minor updates in beta. Apple releases iOS 14.0.1 with default app setting fix
  2. Microsoft releases Windows 10 builds 18363.1110, 17763.1490 - here's what's new Patch Tuesday was only last week, but that can only mean one thing: it's time for more patches. Indeed, it's time for what Microsoft calls C week updates, since Microsoft uses letters to indicate the week of the month. C and D week updates are always optional, so you have to explicitly opt into taking them. The updates arriving today are for Windows 10 versions 1909, 1903, and 1809, which are three of the four supported versions of the OS for consumers. If you're on version 1909 or 1903, you'll get KB4577062, bringing the build number to 18363.1110 or 18362.1110, respectively. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Adds a notification to Internet Explorer 11 that informs users about the end of support for Adobe Flash in December 2020. For more information, see KB4581051. Updates an issue that causes certain apps to go into an unwanted repair cycle. As a result, a user cannot use that app during that time. Updates an issue that might display 4K high dynamic range (HDR) content darker than expected when you configure certain non-HDR systems for HDR Streaming. Updates an issue to reduce the likelihood of missing fonts. Updates an issue that causes a device to stop responding after you have been using a pen for several hours. Reduces distortions and aberrations in Windows Mixed Reality head-mounted displays (HMD). Here's the full list of fixes: Adds a notification to Internet Explorer 11 that informs users about the end of support for Adobe Flash in December 2020. For more information, see KB4581051. Addresses an issue with Microsoft Edge IE Mode that occurs when you enable Configure enhanced hang detection for Internet Explorer mode in Microsoft Edge. Addresses an issue that causes certain apps to go into an unwanted repair cycle. As a result, a user cannot use that app during that time. Addresses an issue that, in certain scenarios, causes applications to stop working if they are created using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The error is, “Class not registered” error. Addresses an issue that might display an empty black screen when a device is connecting to a Windows Virtual Desktop (WVD) machine. Addresses an issue that might display 4K high dynamic range (HDR) content darker than expected when you configure certain non-HDR systems for HDR Streaming. Addresses an issue that causes a stop error when the initialization of the graphics adapter fails. Addresses an issue to reduce the likelihood of missing fonts. Addresses an issue that causes a device to stop responding after you have been using a pen for several hours. Addresses an issue that fails to recognize the first East Asian language character typed into a Microsoft Foundation Class Library (MFC) DataGrid. Addresses an issue in which selecting I forgot my Pin from Settings>Accounts>Sign-in options fails in a Windows Hello for Business On-Premise deployment. Addresses an issue that causes File Explorer to close unexpectedly when you use a Ribbon shell extension under specific circumstances. Addresses an issue that affects default application associations during certain upgrade scenarios. This might cause numerous toast notifications to appear when you first sign in after the upgrade. Addresses an issue that generates a "No features to install" message when you add a feature, even if you provide administrative credentials. Addresses an issue that causes a stop error when using Microsoft Surface Slim Pen on certain editions of Microsoft Surface Pro X or Microsoft Surface Laptop 3. Updates 2021 time zone information for Fiji. Addresses stop error 0xC2 in usbccgp.sys. Addresses an issue that causes random line breaks when you redirect PowerShell console error output. Addresses an issue with creating HTML reports using tracerpt. Allows the DeviceHealthMonitoring Cloud Service Plan (CSP) to run on Windows 10 Business and Windows 10 Pro editions. Addresses an issue that prevents the content under HKLM\Software\Cryptography from being carried over during Windows feature updates. Addresses an issue that displays an error that states that a smart card PIN change was not successful even though the PIN change was successful. Addresses an issue that might create duplicate Foreign Security Principal directory objects for Authenticated and Interactive users in the domain partition. As a result, the original directory objects have “CNF” added to their names and are mangled. This issue occurs when you promote a new domain controller using the CriticalReplicationOnly flag. Addresses an issue that prevents you from enabling BitLocker after installing the Server Core App Compatibility Feature on Demand (FOD). Addresses an issue that causes an access violation in lsass.exe when a process is started using the runas command in some circumstances. Addresses an issue in which Windows Defender Application Control enforces package family name rules that should be audit only. Addresses an issue, which occurs after an update, that causes devices that have the Dynamic Root of Trust for Measurement (DRTM) enabled to unexpectedly reset when hibernating. Updates the configuration of Windows Hello Face recognition to work well with 940nm wavelength cameras. Reduces distortions and aberrations in Windows Mixed Reality head-mounted displays (HMD). Ensures that new Windows Mixed Reality HMDs meet minimum specification requirements and default to a 90Hz refresh rate. Addresses an issue that causes a stop error on a Hyper-V host when a virtual machine (VM) issues a specific Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) command. Addresses an issue that prevents Always On VPN (AOVPN) from automatically reconnecting when resuming from Sleep or Hibernate. Adds an Azure Active Directory (AAD) Device Token that is sent to Windows Update (WU) as part of each WU scan. WU can use this token to query for membership in groups that have an AAD Device ID. Addresses an issue that fails to log events 5136 for group membership changes in certain scenarios. This occurs when you use the “Permissive Modify” control; for example, the Active Directory (AD) PowerShell modules use this control. Addresses an issue with the Microsoft Cluster Shared Volumes File Systems (CSVFS) driver that prevents Win32 API access to SQL Server Filestream data. This occurs when the data is stored on a Cluster Shared Volume in a SQL Server failover cluster instance, which is on an Azure VM. Addresses an issue that causes a deadlock when Offline Files are enabled. As a result, CscEnpDereferenceEntryInternal holds parent and child locks. Addresses an issue that causes deduplication jobs to fail with stop error 0x50 when you call HsmpRecallFreeCachedExtents(). Addresses an issue that causes applications stop working when they use Microsoft’s Remote Desktop sharing APIs. The breakpoint exception code is 0x80000003. Removes the HTTP call to www.microsoft.com that the Remote Desktop Client (mstsc.exe) makes at sign out when using a Remote Desktop Gateway. Adds support for certain new Windows Mixed Reality motion controllers. Addresses an issue with evaluating the compatibility status of the Windows ecosystem to help ensure application and device compatibility for all updates to Windows. Addresses an issue with setting the “Restrict delegation of credentials to remote servers” Group Policy with the “Restrict Credential Delegation” mode on the RDP client. As a result, the Terminal Server service tries to use “Require Remote Credential Guard” mode first and will only use “Require Restricted Admin” if the server does not support “Require Remote Credential Guard". If you're still on Windows 10 version 1809, you'll get KB4577069, bringing the build number to 17763.1490. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Adds a notification to Internet Explorer 11 that informs users about the end of support for Adobe Flash in December 2020. For more information, see KB4581051. Updates an issue to reduce the likelihood of missing fonts. Updates an issue that causes applications to close unexpectedly when a user inputs East Asian characters after changing the keyboard layout. Updates an issue that causes Microsoft Office applications to close unexpectedly when using a Korean Input Method Editor (IME). Here's the full list of fixes: Adds a notification to Internet Explorer 11 that informs users about the end of support for Adobe Flash in December 2020. For more information, see KB4581051. Addresses an issue with using Group Policy Preferences to configure the homepage in Internet Explorer. Addresses an issue with Microsoft Edge IE Mode that occurs when you enable Configure enhanced hang detection for Internet Explorer mode in Microsoft Edge. Addresses an issue that might generate the error ”0x80704006. Hmmmm…can’t reach this page” when using Microsoft Edge Legacy. This issue occurs when you attempt to reach websites on non-standard ports. Any website that uses a port listed in the Fetch Standard specification under bad ports or port blocking might cause this issue. Addresses an issue that displays nothing on the screen for 5 minutes or more during the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) session. Addresses an issue that, in certain scenarios, causes applications to stop working if they are created using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The error is, “Class not registered” error. Addresses an issue that might display an empty black screen when a device is connecting to a Windows Virtual Desktop (WVD) machine. Addresses an issue that causes Cortana to stop working on multiuser devices when you install, uninstall, and reinstall the same update. Addresses an issue that causes a stop error when the initialization of the graphics adapter fails. Addresses an issue to reduce the likelihood of missing fonts. Addresses an issue that displays a black screen momentarily when an application calls the Desktop Window Manager (DWM) Thumbnail API. Addresses an issue that fails to recognize the first East Asian language character typed into a Microsoft Foundation Class Library (MFC) DataGrid. Addresses an issue that causes File Explorer to close unexpectedly when you use a Ribbon shell extension under specific circumstances. Addresses an issue that generates a "No features to install" message when you add a feature, even if you provide administrative credentials. Provides the ability to set a Group Policy that displays only the domain and username when you sign in. Addresses an issue that affects default application associations during certain upgrade scenarios. This might cause numerous toast notifications to appear when you first sign in after the upgrade. Addresses an issue that causes applications to close unexpectedly when a user inputs East Asian characters after changing the keyboard layout. Updates 2021 time zone information for Fiji. Addresses an issue that affects the Microsoft’s System Centre Operations Manager’s (SCOM) ability to monitor a customer's workload. Addresses a performance issue that occurs when PowerShell reads the registry to check if the ScriptBlockLogging registry key is in the registry. Addresses an issue with creating HTML reports using tracerpt. Addresses an issue that causes an access violation in lsass.exe when a process is started using the runas command in some circumstances. Addresses an issue that prevents the content under HKLM\Software\Cryptography from being carried over during Windows feature updates. Addresses an issue that prevents you from enabling BitLocker after installing the Server Core App Compatibility Feature on Demand (FOD). Addresses an issue that might create duplicate Foreign Security Principal directory objects for Authenticated and Interactive users in the domain partition. As a result, the original directory objects have “CNF” added to their names and are mangled. This issue occurs when you promote a new domain controller using the CriticalReplicationOnly flag. Addresses an issue that prevents a call to NCryptGetProperty() from returning the correct pbOutput value when pszProperty is set to "Algorithm Group" and you are using a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 1.2 device. Addresses an issue in which Windows Defender Application Control enforces package family name rules that should be audit only. Addresses an issue in which the WinHTTP AutoProxy service does not comply with the value set for the maximum Time To Live (TTL) on the Proxy Auto-Configuration (PAC) file. This prevents the cached file from updating dynamically. Addresses an issue that might redirect Software Load Balancing (SLB) traffic to a different host when that traffic goes through a multiplexer. This causes the connection to an application to fail. Adds new functionality to the robocopy command. Adds Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificate authentication over HTTP/2. Addresses an issue that prevents Always On VPN (AOVPN) from automatically reconnecting when resuming from Sleep or Hibernate. Addresses an issue that causes Microsoft Office applications to close unexpectedly when using a Korean Input Method Editor (IME). Adds an Azure Active Directory (AAD) Device Token that is sent to Windows Update (WU) as part of each WU scan. WU can use this token to query for membership in groups that have an AAD Device ID. Addresses an issue that fails to log events 5136 for group membership changes in certain scenarios. This occurs when you use the “Permissive Modify” control; for example, the Active Directory (AD) PowerShell modules use this control. Addresses an issue that causes a deadlock when Offline Files are enabled. As a result, CscEnpDereferenceEntryInternal holds parent and child locks. Addresses an issue that causes deduplication jobs to fail with stop error 0x50 when you call HsmpRecallFreeCachedExtents(). Removes the HTTP call to www.microsoft.com that the Remote Desktop Client (mstsc.exe) makes at sign out when using a Remote Desktop Gateway. Addresses an issue with evaluating the compatibility status of the Windows ecosystem to help ensure application and device compatibility for all updates to Windows. Addresses an issue with setting the “Restrict delegation of credentials to remote servers” Group Policy with the “Restrict Credential Delegation” mode on the RDP client. As a result, the Terminal Server service tries to use “Require Remote Credential Guard” mode first and will only use “Require Restricted Admin” if the server does not support “Require Remote Credential Guard". This one also has one known issue to be aware of: Symptom Workaround After installing KB4493509, devices with some Asian language packs installed may receive the error, "0x800f0982 - PSFX_E_MATCHING_COMPONENT_NOT_FOUND." Uninstall and reinstall any recently added language packs. For instructions, see Manage the input and display language settings in Windows 10. Select Check for Updates and install the April 2019 Cumulative Update. For instructions, see Update Windows 10. Note If reinstalling the language pack does not mitigate the issue, reset your PC as follows: Go to the Settings app > Recovery. Select Get Started under the Reset this PC recovery option. Select Keep my Files. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. As mentioned above, these updates are optional, so you can get them via Windows Update, but you have to opt in. If you don't take them, the fixes will be bundled into next month's Patch Tuesday updates. Microsoft releases Windows 10 builds 18363.1110, 17763.1490 - here's what's new
  3. Microsoft will bundle updates to streamline patching Microsoft plans to change how it delivers updates to some parts of Windows 10, saying the new bundling tactic will end confusion and streamline the OS's regular refreshes. Stadtratte / Getty Images Microsoft this week changed how it will deliver updates to the parts of Windows 10 that receive and install files from Windows Update, claiming that a new bundling approach will eliminate confusion and streamline the OS's regular refreshes. Up to now, Microsoft has distributed each servicing stack update (SSU) separately from any cumulative update (CU). The new practice will combine the two – SSU and CU – into one package for download and deployment by IT administrators. Most Windows end users would be hard pressed to define SSU, even though their PCs have received numerous examples. Not an update to the Windows Update service itself, an SSU is instead a refresh of the components of Windows 10 needed to receive, verify and install files from that service. SSUs are a necessary part of the Windows servicing and maintenance ecosystem, as Microsoft makes plain. "Servicing stack updates improve the reliability of the update process to mitigate potential issues while installing the latest quality updates and feature updates," Microsoft said in a support document. "If you don't install the latest servicing stack update, there's a risk that your device can't be updated with the latest Microsoft security fixes." But because SSUs have been issued separately from CUs – and the fact that a given CU may require a specific SSU to already be in place before that CU can be installed – loopholes to confusion existed. "First, it doesn't occur every month," said Aria Carley, a Microsoft program manager, in a post to a company blog, referring to appearances of SSU. "Second, the error message that the [CU installation] failure can produce, 'update isn't applicable,' doesn't make the root cause immediately apparent." This separate distribution of SSUs and CUs will stop, at least for some Windows 10 users. Customers running Windows 10 2004, the feature upgrade Microsoft released in late May, who have installed the September SSU will (in the future) see "a single cumulative monthly update ... that includes the month's cumulative fixes and the appropriate servicing stack updates for that month, if applicable," according to Carley. At some point – Microsoft didn't make it clear when this would kick in – IT administrators using WSUS (Windows Server Update Services) or Microsoft Catalog will be able to retrieve a combined update package. Likewise, the accompanying support document will include information on both the SSU and CU. "The SSU and CU will be packaged together, and the client will orchestrate the installation," Carley wrote. "Select the monthly cumulative update you want to deploy, and we will take care of the rest!" For now, only Windows 10 2004 will be eligible to receive these combined SSU+CU packages. But Microsoft implied that it would extend the functionality to more versions down the road; almost certainly, those versions will include Windows 10 20H2, the minor upgrade slated to ship this fall. Microsoft will bundle updates to streamline patching
  4. Microsoft releases Windows 10 build 19041.508, 18363.1082 - here's what's new Today is the second Tuesday of the month, making it Patch Tuesday. And that means that all supported versions of Windows are getting updates. For Windows 10, that still means all versions except for one, version 1511. For those that are on the latest version of Windows 10, version 2004, and also for Insiders on 20H2, you'll get KB4571756, bringing the build number to 19041.508 and 19042.508, respectively. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Updates to improve security when using input devices (such as a mouse, keyboard, or pen). Updates to improve security when Windows performs basic operations. Updates for storing and managing files. Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Office products. Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses an issue with a possible elevation of privilege in windowmanagement.dll. Addresses a security vulnerability issue with user proxies and HTTP-based intranet servers. After installing this update, HTTP-based intranet servers cannot leverage a user proxy by default to detect updates. Scans using these servers will fail if the clients do not have a configured system proxy. If you must leverage a user proxy, you must configure the behavior using the Windows Update policy “Allow user proxy to be used as a fallback if detection using system proxy fails.” This change does not affect customers who secure their Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) servers with the Transport Layer Security (TLS) or Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocols. For more information, see Ensuring clients stay secure, changes to scans against Windows Server Update Service (WSUS) servers. Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Shell, Windows Cloud Infrastructure, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Management, Windows Kernel, Windows Virtualization, Windows Storage and Filesystems, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, and the Microsoft JET Database Engine. There's also one known issue to be aware of: Symptom Workaround Users of the Microsoft Input Method Editor (IME) for Japanese or Chinese languages might experience issues when attempting various tasks. You might have issues with input, receive unexpected results, or might not be able to enter text. For more information about the issues, workaround steps, and the currently resolved issues, please see KB4564002 Those on Windows 10 versions 1909 and 1903 will get KB4574727, bringing the build number to 18363.1082 and 18362.1082, respectively. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Updates to improve security when Windows performs basic operations. Updates to improve security when using input devices (such as a mouse, keyboard, or pen). Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Office products. Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses a security vulnerability issue with user proxies and HTTP-based intranet servers. After installing this update, HTTP-based intranet servers cannot leverage a user proxy by default to detect updates. Scans using these servers will fail if the clients do not have a configured system proxy. If you must leverage a user proxy, you must configure the behavior using the Windows Update policy “Allow user proxy to be used as a fallback if detection using system proxy fails.” This change does not affect customers who secure their Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) servers with the Transport Layer Security (TLS) or Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocols. For more information, see Ensuring clients stay secure, changes to scans against Windows Server Update Service (WSUS) servers. Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Shell, Windows Cloud Infrastructure, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Management, Windows Kernel, Windows Virtualization, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, and the Microsoft JET Database Engine. For those that are on Windows 10 version 1809, you'll get KB4570333, bringing the build number to 17763.1457. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Office products. Updates to improve security when using input devices such as a mouse, keyboard, or pen. Updates to improve security when Windows performs basic operations. Updates for storing and managing files. Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses a security vulnerability issue with user proxies and HTTP-based intranet servers. After installing this update, HTTP-based intranet servers cannot leverage a user proxy by default to detect updates. Scans using these servers will fail if the clients do not have a configured system proxy. If you must leverage a user proxy, you must configure the behavior using the Windows Update policy “Allow user proxy to be used as a fallback if detection using system proxy fails.” This change does not affect customers who secure their Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) servers with the Transport Layer Security (TLS) or Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocols. For more information, see Ensuring clients stay secure, changes to scans against Windows Server Update Service (WSUS) servers. Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Shell, Windows Cloud Infrastructure, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Management, Windows Kernel, Windows Virtualization, Windows Storage and Filesystems, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, and the Microsoft JET Database Engine. There are two known issues in this update: Symptom Workaround After installing KB4493509, devices with some Asian language packs installed may receive the error, "0x800f0982 - PSFX_E_MATCHING_COMPONENT_NOT_FOUND." Uninstall and reinstall any recently added language packs. For instructions, see Manage the input and display language settings in Windows 10. Select Check for Updates and install the April 2019 Cumulative Update. For instructions, see Update Windows 10. Note If reinstalling the language pack does not mitigate the issue, reset your PC as follows: Go to the Settings app > Recovery. Select Get Started under the Reset this PC recovery option. Select Keep my Files. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. After installing KB4550969 or later, when using Microsoft Edge Legacy, you might receive the error,”0x80704006. Hmmmm…can’t reach this page” when attempting to reach websites on non-standard ports. Any website that uses a port listed in the Fetch Standard specification under bad ports or port blocking might cause this issue. To mitigate this issue, you can do one of the following: Update to the new, Chromium-based Microsoft Edge and configure it to allow the port used for the affected site. See the note below. Use Internet Explorer 11 to access the website. Update Windows 10 to a newer version. Configure the website to use a standard port on the server side. Don’t use a port that is listed in the Fetch Standard specification under bad ports or port blocking. Note The new, Chromium-based Microsoft Edge will also fail to connect to websites on non-standard ports by default. This is an expected behavior. However, you can allow sites on the affected non-standard port by using the parameter --explicitly-allowed-ports=####, where #### is the port you require. For example, when you need to access a website on port 6667, type c:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft\Edge\Application\msedge.exe--explicitly-allowed-ports=6667 We are working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. While versions 1809 and above are still supported for all SKUs, older versions are only supported for certain SKUs. Version KB Build Download Support 1803 KB4577032 17134.1726 Update Catalog Enterprise and Education SKUs 1709 KB4577041 16299.2107 Update Catalog 1703 KB4577021 15063.2500 Update Catalog Surface Hub only 1607 KB4577015 14393.3930 Update Catalog Long-Term Servicing Branch 1507 KB4577049 10240.18696 Update Catalog As usual, you can grab the update that corresponds to your version of Windows 10 manually, you can push it to install through Windows Update, or you can wait for it to be installed automatically. Microsoft releases Windows 10 build 19041.508, 18363.1082 - here's what's new
  5. Microsoft releases new Intel microcode updates for all supported Windows 10 versions Microsoft has released new Intel microcode updates for all supported Windows 10 versions that revise mitigation for four Microarchitectural Data Sampling (MDS) threats. The updates are being made available via the Update Catalog for all users. However, users running certain versions of Intel’s processors will receive the updates through Windows Update. Microcode updates are aimed at patching hardware vulnerabilities that require not only a software fix, but also firmware level changes. The best examples of such updates are the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities that required multiple software and microcode updates. The recent updates target multiple processor generations – across desktops and laptops. The following KB articles for the respective Windows 10 versions provide more information on the list of processors being patched: Version KB Article Windows 10 (version 1507) KB4494454 Windows 10 version 1607 KB4494175 Windows 10 version 1703 KB4494453 Windows 10 version 1709 KB4494452 Windows 10 version 1803 KB4494451 Windows 10 version 1809 KB4494174 Windows 10 version 1903 and version 1909 KB4497165 Windows 10 version 2004 KB4558130 The updates also apply to the corresponding Windows Server versions, such as Windows Server 2016 and 2019. Users can head to the Update Catalog here and search for the relevant KB articles to download the updates manually. You can also head to the pages to search for the processor generations for which the updates are being served through Windows Update. Source: Microsoft via BleepingComputer Microsoft releases new Intel microcode updates for all supported Windows 10 versions
  6. Windows 10 KB4565351 & KB4566782 updates plagued with issues Windows as a Service is updated frequently with fixes and improvements. On August 11, Microsoft published the latest batch of monthly security updates for Windows 10 version 1909, version 1903, and version 2004. Users are now reporting that the Windows 10’s August 2020 cumulative updates fail with an uninformative error message of some variety. Windows 10 KB4565351 and KB4566782 are causing installation problems for users whose machines run the November 2019 Update (1909) and May 2020 Update (version 2004). When installing Windows 10 KB4565351 (v1909) and KB4566782 (v2004), users are saying that they are being greeted with unhelpful error messages, including 0x800f0988, 0x800f081f, and 0x800f08a. “There were some problems installing updates, but we’ll try again later. If you keep seeing this and want to search the web or contact support for information, this may help: (0x800f081f),” one of the error messages reads. Windows 10 KB4566782 installation issues The installation issue appears to be hitting both Windows 10 KB4566782 (version 2004) and KB4565351 (version 1909/1903). The most-reported error code is 0x800f081f and it could be related to missing files in the WinSXS folder that stores different copies of DLL and system files. “Can not install KB4566782 on two completely separate computers, one at work, one at the office. It restarts, keeps rotating on a black screen and eventually unable to be installed when you reboot,” one user noted on Twitter. The issue has also been reported by users on Microsoft’s community forum, Reddit, and Feedback Hub. While there’s no official workaround, you can try manually downloading and installing the cumulative update from the Microsoft Update Catalog. This could allow you to install the updates when the automatic installation is failing. To fix Windows Update error code 0x800f081f, manually install the patch by following these steps: Open the Microsoft Update Catalog website. Enter the update package number into the search bar. Highlight the correct version that’s compatible with your PC. Click ‘Download’ next to the update package. Click on .msu link to download it. Double-click on .msu file to apply the update. Reboot. Alternatively, you can pause the update that caused the installation in the first place. This can be found by going to Settings -> Update and Security -> Windows Update -> Pause updates. Apparently, this doesn’t seem to have worked for everyone and people are still failing to install Windows 10 August 2020 cumulative updates. If nothing works for you, it might be better to wait until Microsoft refreshes the update package on Windows Update. Other problems It’s worth noting that Windows 10 KB4565351 is also breaking audio for some users and there are reports of Blue Screen of Death with “SYSTEM THREAD UNHANDLED EXCEPTION” error on Feedback Hub. In a Reddit post, one user noted that KB4565351 trashed the audio drivers with “no audio output is enabled” error. Likewise, another user observed that the sound stops coming from their USB headphones when the update is applied. Windows 10 KB4565351 & KB4566782 updates plagued with issues
  7. Microsoft releases Windows 10 build 19041.423 with a bunch of notable fixes Today, Microsoft is releasing a new cumulative update for Windows 10 version 2004, and as with all mid-stream updates, it's optional. That means that if you go and check for updates, it will show up in the 'Optional updates' section, and you'll have to opt into installing it if you want it. It will not be installed automatically. The update is KB4568831, and it brings the build number to 19041.423. It's also available for those running Windows 10 version 20H2 on the Beta channel, but the build number will be 19042.423. It contains a number of notable fixes too. For example, there are some ARM64 and cellular fixes, so once this update is bundled into the 2004 installation images, it should fix the block for Microsoft's own Surface Pro X. It should also fix Nvidia issues for the Surface Book 3. Here's the list of highlights: Updates an issue with pasting mixed content of images and text from Microsoft Word into Internet Explorer. Updates an issue that might cause the Magnifier to stop working in Microsoft Excel in certain scenarios. As a result, Microsoft Excel might also stop working. Updates an issue that might display 4K high dynamic range (HDR) content darker than expected when you configure certain non-HDR systems for HDR Streaming. Updates an issue that causes the Settings page to close unexpectedly, which prevents default applications from being set up properly. Updates an issue that prevents some applications from printing to network printers. Updates an issue that might prevent internet connectivity on some cellular modems after upgrading to Windows 10, version 2004. Updates an issue that prevents family safety features, such as time limits and activity reporting, from working on ARM64 devices. Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses an issue that prevents you from using sharing functionality in Microsoft Office. This occurs when Conditional Access is enabled. Addresses an issue that occurs when a third-party application loads hidden tabs into Internet Options. Addresses an issue in Microsoft Edge IE mode that occurs when you open multiple documents from a SharePoint site. Addresses an issue in Microsoft Edge IE mode that occurs when you browse using anchor links. Addresses an issue with pasting mixed content of images and text from Microsoft Word into Internet Explorer. Addresses an issue that might cause Microsoft browsers to incorrectly bypass proxy servers. Addresses an issue in the Windows Push Notification (WNS) service that prevents you from selecting a virtual private network (VPN) interface to make outbound connections. As a result, you lose connectivity with the WNS service when forced tunneling is used. Addresses an issue that might cause the Magnifier to stop working in Microsoft Excel in certain scenarios. As a result, Microsoft Excel might also stop working. Addresses an issue that prevents you from installing some .msi apps. This occurs when a device is managed by a Group Policy that redirects the AppData folder to a network folder. Addresses an issue that might display 4K high dynamic range (HDR) content darker than expected when you configure certain non-HDR systems for HDR Streaming. Addresses an issue that causes new child windows to flicker and appear as white squares on server devices that are configured for stark visual contrast. Addresses an issue that causes the Settings page to close unexpectedly, which prevents default applications from being set up properly. Addresses an issue that causes all open Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps to close unexpectedly. This occurs when their installer calls the Restart Manager to restart File Explorer (explorer.exe). Addresses an issue that prevents Windows 8.1 apps from projecting to a secondary display when those apps use the StartProjectingAsync API. Addresses an issue that prevents family safety features, such as time limits and activity reporting, from working on ARM64 devices. Addresses an issue with File Explorer’s preview of .msg files when Microsoft Outlook 64-bit is installed. Addresses an issue that causes a KERNEL_SECURITY_CHECK_FAILURE (139) stop error when Windows resumes from Sleep and turns on certain Bluetooth headsets. Addresses an issue that might prevent certain display driver reset utilities from properly reinstalling the same driver on the system. Addresses a reliability issue in WDF01000.sys. Addresses an issue that causes memory leaks when an application calls the CryptCATAdminCalcHashFromFileHandle() function. The leaked memory is reclaimed when the application closes. Improves support for non-ASCII file paths for Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) Auto Incident Response (IR). Addresses an issue that prevents some machines from automatically going into Sleep mode under certain circumstances because of Microsoft Defender ATP Auto IR. Addresses an issue that prevents some machines from running Microsoft Defender ATP Threat & Vulnerability Management successfully. Addresses an issue that prevents Microsoft Defender ATP from applying file exclusions in some cases, which leads to application compatibility issues. Addresses an issue in Microsoft Defender ATP that prevents some machines from reporting the installed applications to Threat & Vulnerability Management. Addresses an issue that causes automatic investigations to fail in Microsoft Defender ATP. Improves Microsoft Defender ATP's ability to identify malicious code injection activities. Addresses an issue that prevents some applications from printing to network printers. Addresses an issue that might cause a printer to be a hidden device in Device Manager after a restart. Addresses an issue that might cause the Print Management console to display script errors when you enable the Extended View option. Addresses an issue that causes printing to fail in certain scenarios. Addresses an issue that might prevent a Windows 10 device from reaching the internet when using a wireless wide area network (WWAN) LTE modem. However, the Network Connectivity Status Indicator (NCSI) in the notification area might still indicate that you are connected to the internet. Addresses an issue that might prevent internet connectivity on some cellular modems after upgrading to Windows 10, version 2004. Addresses an issue that causes telephony applications to lose the first four digits. Addresses an issue with in-memory parity bitmaps that can cause data integrity issues on Parity Storage Spaces. Addresses an issue that prevents the creation of a storage pool using Manage Storage Spaces in Control panel. Addresses an issue that might cause the Microsoft Remote Assistance process (msra.exe) to stop working when a user is receiving assistance during a computer session. The error is 0xc0000005 or 0xc0000409. There's also one known issue: Symptom Workaround When using some apps, such as Microsoft Excel, users of the Microsoft Input Method Editor (IME) for Chinese and Japanese might receive an error, or the app might stop responding or close when attempting to drag using the mouse. For more information and workaround steps, please see KB4564002. As always, you can manually download and install the update, or you can opt into it via Windows Update. Microsoft releases Windows 10 build 19041.423 with a bunch of notable fixes
  8. Windows Update is a bifurcated mess Windows 10 now has two different Windows Update subsystems, running simultaneously, with different rules, conflicting goals and little documentation. Can’t see this week's Previews? You aren’t alone. Franck V. (CC0) This week’s “Preview” patches led to some bizarre, unexplained, and self-contradictory behavior. Here’s what we’ve been able to piece together, based on what actually happened – not on what Microsoft says is supposed to happen. Two general sets of “Preview” patches arrived on Tuesday: Optional, non-security, C/D Week Cumulative Updates for Win10 versions 1809, 1903, 1909, and various Servers, but not Win10 version 2004. Microsoft stopped distributing the C/D Week patches in March because of the “public health situation,” but started pushing them again this week. July 21, 2020 Cumulative Update Previews for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.8 on various versions of Win10. These are optional, non-security Preview patches released later in the month. Microsoft pushes Previews for .NET patches on Win10 infrequently; this year we’ve only seen two, one of them in January, the other in February. They’re Previews, which means the fixes on offer are still in testing. Normal users shouldn’t go anywhere near them. In the past, the Preview patches (for both Win10 and .NET) have appeared as a jumbled mess in the Win10 updating scheme, leading to a universal cry to avoid clicking “Check for updates.” Not long ago, doing so gave Microsoft carte blanche to install anything and everything in the update queue, including any of these “Preview” test patches lying around. Starting with Win10 version 1903, though, Microsoft changed its wayward ways by adding an important new feature that allows you to Pause Updates. At about the same time, Microsoft implemented (but didn’t bother to document) the Download and install prompt that we now take for granted. The prompt forces you to approve an optional update before it's installed. Microsoft showed off a version of that option in an article last week (see screenshot). Microsoft Don’t expect to see that Download-and-install prompt on your machine any time soon. Microsoft hasn’t even released the “2020-07 Cumulative Update Preview for Windows 10 Version 2004.” The Download-and-install intermediate step is an important one. It keeps normal users from accidentally installing test versions of upcoming patches – the Preview updates. Download and install? Not. With Microsoft’s new-found (and greatly appreciated!) implementation of the “Download and install” block on optional updates, you might expect that the two new Preview patches would appear as Download-and-install options on Win10 version 1909 (and 1809 and 1903) machines. As I explained earlier this week, that didn’t happen. Working on two production Win10 version 1909 machines I found that, much to my surprise, the Win10 Preview and the .NET Preview behave quite differently – and neither triggered the polite "Download and install" prompt. The .NET Preview behaved more-or-less like an old-fashioned Windows patch: On a Win10 version 1909 machine with Pause Updates set, clicking on Resume Updates installed the .NET Preview KB 4562900. That’s behavior consistent with (but different from) the old Check for updates sandbagging – if you Resume Updates, you get the optional, non-security .NET Preview installed whether you want it or not, with no warning. Bam. On a Win10 version 1909 without Pause Updates set, the .NET Preview appears in the wushowhide list. Thus, you can manually block installing the .NET Preview, if you know the tricks. Clicking on Check for updates installs the Preview, just like in the not-so-good old days. The optional, non-security, C/D Week Win10 version 1909 Preview didn’t show up at all on my machines. Try as I might, with Updates Paused or Resumed, clicking Check for updates with wild abandon, I couldn’t get the Win10 Cumulative Update Preview KB 4559004 to install, and couldn’t even get it to show up, with or without a Download and install prompt. That left me scratching my head. The bifurcated Update It turns out that Windows Update isn’t the single, monolithic system that’s advertised in Microsoft’s Download and install announcements. As @abbodi86 points out: .NET, Flash and CPU Microcode updates (including this week's .NET Preview) are handled by the legacy “blast them if they check for updates” Windows Update program Cumulative Updates (including this week’s Win10 Cumulative Update Preview), version changes (“feature updates”) and Chromium-based Edge updates are now handled by the new, polite “Download and install” Windows Update program. It seems that the folks at Microsoft didn’t know about the schizoid behavior, either. In the original Knowledge Base article for the .NET Cumulative Update Preview, under "How to obtain and install the update," Microsoft’s instructions used to say: Go to Settings> Update & Security > Windows Update. In the Optional updates available area, you'll find the link to download and install the update. That would correspond to the new, polite way of doing things. But sometime in the past couple of days, that KB article has been modified to say: To download and install this update, go to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update, and then select Check for updates. That's accurate – it’s the old “blast them if they check for updates” approach. There’s no record of when that change was made. The missing optional, non-security, C/D Week Preview On your machine, can you see KB 4559004, the Win10 version 1909 (or 1903) cumulative update Preview? (For Win10 version 1809 customers it’s KB 4559003.) Neither can I, as you can see in the screenshot below. Microsoft The Preview should appear as a Download and install option – at least, that’s what Microsoft’s Chris Morrisey described a week ago: In response to feedback, these validated, production-quality optional releases will be now called "Preview" releases for clarity, and will be offered only for Windows 10 and Windows Server, version 1809 and later.... To simplify update management for IT, these "Preview" releases will be delivered in the "C" week only…for those in the Windows Insider Program or Windows Insider Program for Business, in-development versions of these non-security updates will be released to the Release Preview Channel in the "B" week. Which contradicts almost everything we saw this week. Once again, @abbodi86 came to the rescue, clarifying: You will only see the Win10 Cumulative Update Preview on machines that have joined the Release Preview Channel. As of Friday morning on this “C” week, that means Win10 1809, 1903 and 1909 machines in the Windows Insider Release Preview Channel will get the Preview offer in polite “Download and install” fashion. You won’t see the Preview offered to Win10 version 2004 machines. It isn’t out yet – Morrisey’s comment about “B” week notwithstanding. There’s also some (undocumented) relationship between the TargetReleaseVersion group policy and whether the Preview patch shows up. I talked about Win10 version 2004’s TargetReleaseVersionInfo in June. Apparently the policy now has some effect on versions 1809, 1903 and 1909. Perhaps some day Microsoft will document some of this stuff. But I won’t hold my breath. Windows Update – the user interface, the group policies, the registry settings, and interactions within the spaghetti code – has been an unholy mess for years. With new definitions, new settings, (partially) deprecated settings, conflicting settings, and completely inscrutable – sometimes demonstrably wrong – documentation, it’s a wonder that we get any work done. We keep plugging on AskWoody.com. Windows Update is a bifurcated mess
  9. Microsoft's Windows 10 servicing calendar: a showcase for contradictions The latest calendar concept details when different parts of the Windows 10 upgrade process take place, how each successive refresh syncs with other versions, and how disparate parts of the product line like Windows and Office/Microsoft 365 are scheduled. NiroDesign / Getty Images Windows 10 may be half a decade old, but some things never change. Or if they do, that change comes slowly, in fits, starts, stops and bursts. Witness the recent "Transform Windows feature updates with a servicing calendar" — a piece by James Bell, a senior product marketing manager in the Microsoft 365 deployment group, posted June 18 on the company's Tech Community website. Bell used the space to introduce what he called a "Windows servicing calendar" designed to, as he put it, "shift your Windows 10 servicing cadence from a project-based effort to a more fluid process that aligns across the release cycles of Windows, Office and endpoint management tools, such as Configuration Manager." Essentially, the calendar concept is simply a graphical way to illustrate when different parts of the Windows 10 upgrade process take place, how each successive refresh syncs — or doesn't — with those it follows and precedes, and how disparate parts of Microsoft's product line, notably Windows and Office/Microsoft 365, are also scheduled. Microsoft Microsoft's "Rapid Cadence" servicing calendar illustrates the original upgrade pace for Windows 10, the model that urged (or required) customers to deploy a refresh every six months. The graphical approach is not new. Computerworld has been using it for years to clarify Microsoft's oft-bewildering and ever-changing upgrade scheduling. And Computerworld cribbed it from Gartner Research, whose analysts Stephen Kleynhans and Michael Silver applied it to reports early in Windows 10's history. It isn't the calendars and their occupying arrows designating support cycles, per se, that drew our eyes. Instead, it's what Bell exposed as he touted the scheme, particularly where he seems to contradict current Microsoft practice, if not strictly policy. Because Microsoft often obfuscates, reading between lines is a mandatory skill for customers who want to know what's really going on — or at the very least, have a better shot at understanding where the Redmond, Wash. company is headed. We plucked two elements from Bell's piece that we think are particularly incompatible with Microsoft's public stance to parse. That horse is long gone Even after customer resistance to the concept of a greatly accelerated development-and-release tempo, Microsoft still urged users to consider a deploy-every-upgrade strategy. If that was impossible or undesirable for every endpoint in an organization, at minimum, the faster cadence should apply to some of the systems, Microsoft recommended. "While we encourage organizations to strive towards deploying every release to at least some portion of their estate, we also recognize that organizations with very high device counts, and the need for no/low disruption environments will choose to update less frequently," wrote Bell (emphasis added). Claiming that a "rapid cadence is within reach for enterprises of any size," Bell also implied that a slower annual rhythm — where a feature upgrade is deployed just once each year — was the starting point for enterprises and thus might even be only temporary. "They are starting their journey with the Windows 10 servicing process," Bell said when listing common characteristics of companies doing annual upgrades. "For those unfamiliar with new processes that support Windows 10 servicing, moving from a once every 3-5 year project to a twice-per-year feature update process can be daunting." In contrast, Bell touted an every-six-month pace by minimizing the effort involved and portraying it as the better goal for customers. "Once enterprises are familiar with deploying feature updates on an annual cadence, shifting to a rapid cadence is often possible with minor increases in effort, as plan and prepare motions are well established," he said. "Enterprises that benefit from the rapid servicing process ... continuously update supporting infrastructure to unlock new working scenarios." But this continued encouragement to deploy multiple upgrades each year was irreconcilable with Microsoft's long-running efforts to reduce the number of refreshes. In the five years since Windows 10's launch and the introduction of its radical servicing model, Microsoft has trimmed the number of updates from three to two per year (and last year and this, arguably to just one), and extended support from 12 months to 18 months for all SKUs (stock-keeping units), then later yet from 18 to 30 for Enterprise and Education. The effect of each of those moves individually and the whole collectively, was to prompt users to reduce their participation in the rapid-release model. Fewer feature upgrades meant fewer of them forced upon Windows 10 Home and unmanaged Windows 10 Pro. (Until a year ago, Microsoft decided when a device running Home or Pro downloaded and installed each feature upgrade.) Extending support lifecycles allowed customers, particularly commercial customers running Enterprise or Education to avoid more of the upgrades without risking running systems lacking released patches. It's been clear to Computerworld that Microsoft has, as it's claimed, changed its release and support practices because of customer feedback. (What's unclear is how demanding or widespread that feedback has been; it's fair to assume that it took much to move Microsoft from a cornerstone of the Windows 10 philosophy.) What's odd, however, is that it continues to argue for a fast, six-month cadence when its own actions have attested to the benefits of a slower tempo. Take Microsoft's 2019 announcement that henceforth, all users, including those with Windows Home and unmanaged Windows Pro, control upgrade timing through the Download and install now (DaIN) option. But by reserving for itself the right to forcibly upgrade a device as the current edition neared support retirement — a reasonable demand in light of many users' lethargy in updating — Microsoft also established annual refreshes for those machines (see this Computerworld piece). Whether Microsoft anticipated that DaIN would result in a majority of users moving from twice-a-year to annual was immaterial: it was the result. That Microsoft continues to tout the faster cadence is the preverbal shutting of the barn door after the horse is out. From major-major to major-minor It was also apparent from Bell's explanations that the original intent of Windows 10 servicing — to deliver two more-or-less equally-equipped feature upgrades each year — has not yet died, contrary to the pattern the company set in 2019 and intends to repeat in 2020. A quick summary is necessary. During 2017 and 2018, Microsoft delivered two upgrades annually, each fleshed out with new features and functionality. (Microsoft set that cadence as official policy in April 2017, after distributing just one upgrade in each of the two preceding years.) Call that a major-major tempo, with the refreshes roughly equal. However, Microsoft dispensed with that practice in 2019. The firm released a feature-rich upgrade in the spring, followed by a Service Pack-like update in the fall that was little more than a bugs-now-fixed retread of its immediate predecessor. Last week, Microsoft confirmed what Computerworld had long forecast, that the company would play the same major-minor beat in 2020. The reasons differed each year, and for current purposes, those hardly matter. What does is that Microsoft, through Bell's advice, continues to assume that major-major is the true Windows 10 practice. Bell showed that was the case by how he outlined customers' progression through H2, the update released in a year's second half, in the calendar he dubbed "Rapid Cadence." (He put that label on the grab-all-updates option.) There were no differences in the recommended handling of H1 and H2, even though the latter last year and this were but a shadow of their precursors. Under Bell's scheme, each refresh would receive the same four-month process of Plan, Prepare and Deploy. In a major-minor cadence, customers should not have to go through as rigorous a process for a year's minor update as they did for the preceding major release, simply because so little is changed. Deployment should also be a shorter stage, again because there should be nothing new, or not enough to make IT admins re-run a lengthy roll-out with multiple pools of users. It's unclear if Bell's calendar was portraying a major-major tempo because that's what Microsoft plans to do in, say, 2021, or because he thought differences in H1 and H2 were unnecessary or potentially confusing to readers. Does Microsoft — after two consecutive years of major-minor — believe it can go back to the more aggressive, less-customer-friendly major-major? Who knows? Computerworld has praised the major-minor practice, predicted it would repeat in 2020 and has urged Microsoft to continue that cadence as the next best move to abolishing the year's second update entirely. Those stances haven't changed. Microsoft would be well served to install major-minor as the permanent tempo for Windows 10. It would allow for extended testing (not that that results in a bug-free release), allow enterprises and large organizations to reduce their upgrade frequency to once every two years and put Windows on the same reasonable-for-a-reason pace as every other major OS, from macOS to Android. Here's hoping that Bell's calendar example was short of detail for some reason other than that it's a prediction of 2021. Microsoft's Windows 10 servicing calendar: a showcase for contradictions
  10. Configure updates and reboot options for Windows 10 using group policies With Windows 10 1903, Microsoft introduced a new Group Policy setting to speed up the distribution of updates. It overrides a number of older options. In addition, they will soon deprecate several Windows Update settings, giving admins less control. Microsoft has repeatedly introduced new concepts to determine when to download and install updates and when to restart the computer. These concepts are reflected in a long list of settings, some of which are mutually exclusive or no longer have any effect in Windows 10. The aim of all methods is to get security-critical updates to computers as quickly as possible and to set the reboots in such a way that they will not interrupt users' work or even cause them to lose data. Countdown starting with the release of an update ^ The primary goal of the new setting Specify deadlines for automatic updates and restarts is to ensure update distribution as quickly as possible. Therefore, the configured deadlines relate to the patch release dates. A new setting for Windows Update allows you to force the installation of patches within a certain period All previous options for controlling reboots only began counting from the point at which the update was installed and a restart was pending. This applies, for example, to Specify the deadline before a pending restart will automatically be executed outside of active hours. Microsoft only introduced this setting with Windows 10, and it is the predecessor of the new option. Both options let you set your own deadlines for quality and feature updates, up to a maximum of 30 days (the default is 7 days). After the deadlines expire, users can no longer postpone restarting their computers, and updates will take effect immediately afterward. However, the new setting offers two additional options. First, you can set an additional "grace period" so that users do not have to restart their computers immediately after a long absence, for example, after returning to work from a holiday. Interaction with active hours Furthermore, the option Do not restart automatically until end of grace means that computers will only be updated after a manual reboot within the set period. If you do not check this box, Windows will try to find a convenient time for a reboot outside of the "active hours." After the grace period expires, Windows Update will force users to reboot even during working hours. This option has the same effect as the setting Turn off auto-restart for updates during active hours. However, this requires a static definition of the active hours. To prevent restarts during active hours, specify the start and end times Since version 1903, Windows 10 determines the active hours automatically based on user activity. If you want to use this feature, you should therefore avoid defining fixed start and end times. Converting from notifications to reminders During the defined period, the update client changes the way it interacts with the user. In the first few days, it uses toast notifications to alert the user to a pending update. After that, it automatically switches to the Engaged restart reminder, where the user can initiate a reboot immediately, schedule it for a specific time, or simply postpone it. After a few days, Windows 10 switches to the insistent reminder You can explicitly configure the switch from the toast notification to the more urgent version using the setting Specify Engaged restart transition and notification schedule for updates. Here you set the time for the notification change yourself. Up till now, you could configure the changeover of upcoming update notifications exactly, but the new option disallows this However, if you use the new setting to plan the restart, it will override the configuration for this transition. The new option is therefore much more robust than the previous one, which always deactivated itself in case of conflicts. New setting deactivates four old ones The goal is largely to determine the behavior of the update installation and the reboot with a single setting. This is also demonstrated by the fact that it eliminates another important option. Until now, it was possible for users to prevent reboots as long as they were logged in. However, this no longer applies with the new setting. In summary, the new setting overrides four previous ones if they are enabled. These are: Specify the deadline before a pending restart will automatically be executed outside of active hours Specify Engaged restart transition and notification schedule for updates Always automatically restart at the scheduled time No auto-restart with logged-on users for scheduled automatic update installations Various update settings outdated ^ A recent Microsoft white paper contains a table with Group Policy Object (GPO) and mobile device management (MDM) settings for Windows Update that the vendor recommends you should disable. They are either obsolete or will be phased out in the near future. GPO and MDM settings for Windows Update that Microsoft recommends you no longer use Interestingly, this also includes the configuration of automatic updates. As is well known, this setting is required for clients who get their updates from WSUS. Thus, group policies in this respect only catch up with the settings app where automatic update configuration has already disappeared with previous versions of Windows 10. The GUI no longer provides configuration of automatic updates The Microsoft document does not detail the impact of this decision, but in another section, it says that in case of delayed updates, you should check whether Dual Scan was intentionally deactivated, and hence, clients switched back to WSUS. Outlook This means Microsoft apparently considers Dual Scan to be the preferred configuration. Thus, the big picture for the new update management becomes visible. Users should generally obtain OS updates via Windows Update and restrict WSUS to other products such as Office. WSUS support for the Unified Update Platform has not been available to date and may never come, which further confirms this. Client configuration will boil down to a single setting described above, which sets deadlines for installing the updates. It completely defines the system behavior during this phase. It's possible to adjust the power options via GPO to increase the maintenance window for patch management as a complementary action. The goal of these changes is to speed up update distribution by disallowing admins from explicitly approving patches as in WSUS. And users can only delay rebooting their computers up to a maximum of 30 days after an update's release. The same timeframe is available to admins in Windows Update for Business (WUfB) to postpone quality updates. However, the recommendation in Microsoft's white paper is two to three days. Overall, there's no additional deferral gained by this because with the new setting, the clock is ticking from the time Microsoft releases an update. WUfB also only grants a 30 day delay from the release of a quality update The new setting's importance is also clear because Microsoft has updated the servicing stack of older Windows 10 versions (1709 and later) to support it there also. But to configure it, you need the .admx templates for 1903 or 1909. Source: Configure updates and reboot options for Windows 10 using group policies (4sysops)
  11. Patch Tuesday: Here's what's new for Windows 7 and 8.1 this month Today is the second Tuesday of May, and that means it's time for this month's Patch Tuesday. Microsoft is rolling out cumulative updates for all supported versions of Windows, and that includes Windows 8.1 and Windows 7. Keep in mind, Windows 7 actually reached end of support earlier this year, so you'll only be getting updates if you're a business user paying for extended security updates. These monthly updates come in two flavors - monthly rollup and a security-only update - and by default, you'll get the monthly rollup automatically. For Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2, the monthly rollup update is KB4556846, and you can download it manually here, though you can also get it through Windows Update. It includes the following changes: Updates the 2020 start date for daylight saving time (DST) in the Kingdom of Morocco. For more information, see KB4557900. Addresses an issue that causes offline file syncing to stop responding or fail in mobsyc.exe. Security updates to Internet Explorer, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Kernel, Windows Core Networking, Internet Information Services, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Active Directory, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, and Windows Storage and Filesystems. The update has no known issues. As for the security-only update, it's labeled as KB4556853 and you can download it manually here. This one won't be sent out through Windows Update, so you'll need to download and install it yourself. As you'd expect, this update focuses exclusively on security fixes and improvements: Updates the 2020 start date for daylight saving time (DST) in the Kingdom of Morocco. For more information, see KB4557900. Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Kernel, Windows Core Networking, Internet Information Services, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Active Directory, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, and Windows Storage and Filesystems. It also has no known issues As for Windows 7, the monthly rollup update is KB4556836 and it can be downloaded manually here. Again, it's only available for businesses that are paying for extended security updates, since support for Windows 7 officially ended back in January. It includes the following changes: Addresses an issue that prevents certain apps from installing if they are published using a Group Policy Object. Addresses an issue that causes Windows to incorrectly report the connection state of a network interface. The issue might cause software that queries the media connection state to receive a result of “Unknown” from a network interface after installing Windows updates released after February 11, 2020. This issue has been observed in the Network Access Manager component of the Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client. Updates the 2020 start date for daylight saving time (DST) in the Kingdom of Morocco. For more information, see KB4557900. Security updates to Internet Explorer, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Apps, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Kernel, Internet Information Services, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Active Directory, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, and Windows Storage and Filesystems. There aren't any known issues with the update itself, but editions not supported by by Windows 7 ESUs will see an error if they try to install the update: Symptom Workaround After installing this update and restarting your device, you might receive the error, “Failure to configure Windows updates. Reverting Changes. Do not turn off your computer,” and the update might show as Failed in Update History. This is expected in the following circumstances: If you are installing this update on a device that is running an edition that is not supported for ESU. For a complete list of which editions are supported, see KB4497181. If you do not have an ESU MAK add-on key installed and activated. If you have purchased an ESU key and have encountered this issue, please verify you have applied all prerequisites and that your key is activated. For information on activation, please see this blog post. For information on the prerequisites, see the "How to get this update" section of this article. Finally, the Windows 7 security-only update is KB4556843 and it can be downloaded manually here. It includes the following security fixes: Updates the 2020 start date for daylight saving time (DST) in the Kingdom of Morocco. For more information, see KB4557900. Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Apps, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Kernel, Internet Information Services, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Active Directory, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, and Windows Storage and Filesystems. The single known issue is the same as what's in the monthly rollup. Source: Patch Tuesday: Here's what's new for Windows 7 and 8.1 this month (Neowin)
  12. Microsoft releases the Windows 10 May 2020 Update to MSDN The Windows 10 May 2020 Update rollout has begun today, even if it's not coming to the average person's computer just yet. Microsoft released the official SDK today, but the Windows 10 feature update is also now available on MSDN, as spotted by WZor. According to ZDNet's Mary Jo Foley, the update was originally supposed to roll out to everyone today, but Microsoft pushed it back a bit to patch a zero-day security vulnerability. And of course, the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic is forcing Microsoft to focus more on stability for those that are working from home, so it's in no rush to roll out big new feature updates. This is also why there are no more optional mid-stream cumulative updates. Once the Windows 10 May 2020 Update is generally available, it's still not going to be forced onto anyone's PCs like feature updates were in the old days. Eventually, it's going to pop up in Windows Update in the Settings app, and there will be an option to choose to install it. If you ignore it, you won't be automatically upgraded to anything new until the version you're on is nearing the end of support. As for when the May 2020 Update is actually going to roll out to the general public, we're expecting that to happen in a couple of weeks on May 28. In the meantime, you can always enroll your PC in the Release Preview ring of the Windows Insider Program, where it's already available. Source: Microsoft releases the Windows 10 May 2020 Update to MSDN (Neowin)
  13. Microsoft Patch Alert: April 2020, another 'wacky' month It’s been a wacky Windows patching month, with seemingly random bluescreen and Bluetooth bugs, a recurrence of the “disappearing data” temporary profile bug, and an elusive bug in v4 printer connection – all punctuated by an extraordinary (and welcome!) solicitation for help from Microsoft. Thinkstock The patching pace this month returned to normal: We had the Patch Tuesday patches on April 14, followed by the “optional, non-security, C/D Week” patches one week later (Monthly Rollup Preview for you Win8.1 afficionados). With a bit of luck, that’s the last round of confusing “optional” Win10 patches: Microsoft promises we won’t see any more of them. We also had an out-of-band patch for Office 2016 Click-to-Run, Office 2019 (which is only available as Click-to-Run) and Microsoft 365 Apps for Enterprise (previously known as Office 365 ProPlus). The big concern with those patches falls into the “it’s not a bug, it’s a feature” column. More big, scary zero-day vulnerabilities For the Chicken Little crowd, we had three zero-day patches – ones identified by Microsoft as being “Exploited” when issued – and, as best I can tell, none of those have found their way into mainstream attacks. Same old story. As a perplexing sidenote, many reports included a fourth zero-day patch, CVE-2020-0968, which was issued with an indication of “Exploited: Yes” but is now listed as “Exploited: No.” Long story, but the divergent reports on the web have largely been updated. (Thx, @campuscodi, @dangoodin001) I’m not aware of any widespread attacks based on any of the three (or four) “Exploited” patches. As usual, the exploits at this point are limited to extremely targeted attacks. VBA libraries get blocked with the Office Click-to-Run patches If you use one of the recent Click-to-Run versions of Office and you start getting “Compile error: / Can’t find project or library” error messages (see screenshot), there’s a reason why. You’re running a VBA command – whether you realize it or not – that’s trying to open something out on the wild, wild web. Microsoft Patch Lady Susan Bradley explains in her Patch Watch column (paywall, donation required): “Microsoft is doing you a favor; it’s pointing out that an application you’re using is breaking security by pulling links or references directly from the Web rather than from your computer…. Microsoft recommends that you move your VBA object libraries to an intranet (i.e., local network) location. You can then use a Group Policy object setting to remove the blocking.” The old 'missing' data new profile bug is still there I’ve been talking about this bug for months, and it doesn’t seem to be getting any better. It’s not clear to me why or how, but in some cases, the Win10 Cumulative Update installer hits a “race condition” on reboot, with the user coming back up to a temporary profile. In plain English, the user runs the update, reboots, and returns to a clean desktop, without their desktop customizations, while files in their customary folders (such as Documents) have disappeared. I don’t know what causes the race conditions, but I do know lots of people have complained about deleted data files when, in all likelihood, they’re sitting at the bottom of an obscure backup profile. I’ve even heard from someone who upgraded from Win10 1903 to version 1909 and hit the same problem. The right people at Microsoft know all about the problem, but nobody has acknowledged it or confirmed it. The best solution is to re-boot all the way through log in four or five times and, if that doesn’t work, try to retrieve your wayward profile using an enormously complex series of steps outlined by Shawn Brink on Tenforums. Installation problems and blue screens Every month we see Win10 cumulative update installation problems – the installer runs for a while, hiccups, then rolls back the cumulative update. This month there have been more than the usual number of reports, at least in my experience. We also frequently see one-off bluescreens after installing the latest cumulative update. It’s hard to tell whether the bluescreen is actually caused by the patch, or if it’s just serendipity in reverse. Usually, sooner or later, a pattern emerges – a specific hardware combination, or driver, or other software conflict – and it becomes clear who should avoid trying to install the cumulative update. This month, though, I’ll be hanged if I can see a pattern. Microsoft really wants to know about the bugs you hit Surprisingly, uniquely, and much to its credit, Microsoft issued a call for help with the latest outstanding bugs: “We have seen social media reports related to KB4549951 [the April Win10 version 1903 and 1909 cumulative update] that mention Bluetooth, stop error with blue screen and other related issues… To date, we have not seen these issues reflected in telemetry, support data or customer feedback channels. We continuously investigate all customer feedback and are closely monitoring this situation. Note If you experience any issues we'd like to know. Please provide feedback using the keyboard shortcut Windows + F or go to the Start menu and select Feedback Hub so that we can investigate.” Of course, reports of the problems have peppered the Microsoft Answers Forum, the Windows Feedback Hub, the official Windows 10 cumulative update thread on Reddit, and in dozens (or more) online articles and blogs. Still, it’s nice of them to ask. Microsoft I was recently informed that, if you want to report a cumulative update bug in the Feedback Hub, you should NOT necessarily put it in the Install and Update category (screenshot). The Install and Update category is reserved for problems with the update installer itself. For example, install failures would go in the Install and Update category – but “missing” data and bogus temporary profiles would, presumably, go under Desktop Environment, even if the problem’s clearly linked to a specific update. Likewise, presumably, cumulative update-induced reboot bluescreens would go in… some other category. You get to choose which one. Sporadic problems connecting to v4 printers Susan Bradley is following a handful of complaints about the latest Win10 version 1903 and 1909 cumulative update breaking access to shared printers. It appears that the cumulative update knocks out some shared printers using the v4 Printer Driver. We still don’t know whether the problem lies with the cumulative update, the driver, Group Policy settings, or the phase of the moon. Two official Microsoft support cases have yielded zero useful results. Not looking forward to May I’m dreading May. Microsoft seems hell-bent on releasing Win10 version 2004 in May. Computerworld’s Gregg Keizer and I have both strongly recommended that it hold off until we aren’t in the middle of coping with a massive shift to Work-from-Home. I’m seeing more and more reports of problems with the version of Win10 2004 that’s currently available to Windows Insiders. Gene Morgan, for example, wrote to tell me: “I’m an Insider and installed the Pre-Release offering which is usually equal to what will soon be unleashed into the wild and previous such updates worked with no issues. After the installation and the numerous reboots involved, the desktop appeared and all seemed well until I went to open Outlook 365. Click on It and nothing happens. Try to open Word 365, frame comes up but nothing you can work with. Try to open Adobe Acrobat DC, won’t open. Try to open the new Edge Browser, ditto. Open Google Chrome, the frame and tabs come up but after 45 minutes, there was nothing in any of the tabs. Hard Drive light is on continuously – not even flashing, solid on. I rebooted, thinking something may not have loaded properly. Nothing resolved. Hard Drive light on continuously as before. Thinking “well maybe there’s just a lot of cleanup that needs to be done after the install” I left the machine to its own devices overnight. Next morning, no programs will open as before. Annoyed, restored my PC to v. 1903 and everything works like lightning.” For every botched upgrade I’m sure there will be dozens of clean ones. But why kick the dog? The list of new features in Win10 version 2004 seems even less compelling than any Windows version upgrade, ever. That’s quite an accomplishment. Microsoft should re-examine its motives, in light of the current state of computing. Keep us stable, folks. We’ll keep pushing on AskWoody.com. Source: Microsoft Patch Alert: April 2020, another 'wacky' month (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  14. Microsoft releases Windows 10 builds 18363.815, 18362.815 with a ton of fixes Patch Tuesday was only a week ago, but it's now time for this month's round of optional updates. Typically, Microsoft does this in several installments, offering updates to different versions at different times. But today, Windows 10 version 1909, 1903, 1809, 1803, and 1607 are all getting updates. The reason that they're all getting patched today is likely because this is going to be one of the last times to do it. Starting in May, Microsoft won't be releasing optional cumulative updates anymore, only Patch Tuesday updates. This is to focus on stability for those working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic. For those on Windows 10 versions 1909 and 1903, you'll get KB4550945, bringing the build number to 18363.815 and 18362.815, respectively. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Updates an issue that prevents certain apps from opening after you upgrade from a previous version of Windows, and a Bad Image error message appears. Updates in an issue that turns off notifications for devices that use a virtual private network (VPN) on a cellular network. Updates an issue that prevents you from resuming a Microsoft Xbox game on a Windows device after upgrading from a previous version of Windows. Updates an issue that causes a text box that contains multiple lines of text to stop responding in certain scenarios. Updates an issue that generates unexpected notifications when you change the default application settings. Updates an issue that causes Windows Update to stop responding when you check for updates. Updates an issue that fails to print content that is outside of the margins of a document. Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses an issue that prevents certain apps from opening after you upgrade from a previous version of Windows, and a Bad Image exception dialog box appears. Addresses in an issue that turns off notifications for devices that use a virtual private network (VPN) on a cellular network. Addresses an issue that prevents you from resuming a Microsoft Xbox game on a Windows device after upgrading from a previous version of Windows. Addresses an issue that causes a box that contains multiple lines of text to stop responding in certain scenarios. Addresses an issue that prevents the touch keyboard from appearing during sign in when the user is prompted for the password. Addresses an issue that prevents the touch keyboard from opening in Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps when USB devices are connected. Addresses an issue that displays incorrect folder properties in File Explorer when the path is longer than MAX_PATH. Addresses an issue that prevents the correct lock screen from appearing when all of the following are true: The Group Policy Object (GPO) policy "Computer Configuration\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Local Policies\Security Options\Interactive Logon: Do not require Ctrl+Alt+Del Computer" is disabled. The GPO policy “Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\System\Logon\Turn off app notifications on the lock screen” is enabled. The registry key HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System\DisableLogonBackgroundImage is set to 1. Addresses an issue that generates unexpected notifications related to changing the default application settings. Addresses an issue that causes the sign in screen to be blurry. Addresses an issue that causes Windows Update to stop responding when you check for updates. Addresses an issue that prevents the Sign in options page from opening using the ms-settings:signinoptions-launchfingerprintenrollment Uniform Resource Identifier (URI). Addresses an issue with Bluetooth group policy settings on Microsoft Surface Pro X devices. Addresses an issue that causes a KERNEL_SECURITY_CHECK_FAILURE (139) stop error when Windows resumes from Sleep and turns on certain Bluetooth headsets. Addresses a reliability issue in WDF01000.sys. Addresses an issue that causes an error in logman.exe. The error is, "A user account is required in order to commit the current Data collector Set properties." Addresses an issue that prevents users from setting the REG_EXPAND_SZ keys in some automated scenarios. Addresses an issue that causes a memory leak in the LsaIso.exe process when the server is under a heavy authentication load and Credential Guard is enabled. Addresses an issue that causes the Trusted Platform Module (TPM) initialization to fail with system event error 14 and prevents Windows from accessing the TPM. Addresses an issue that causes communication with the TPM to time out and fail. Addresses an issue that prevents hash signing using the Microsoft Platform Crypto Provider for TPMs from working correctly. This issue might also affect networking software, such as VPN applications. Addresses an issue that prevents applications running in an Azure Active Directory environment from receiving account change notifications. This occurs when using the Web Account Manager (WAM) and the WebAccountMonitor API. Addresses an issue that causes systems to stop working with a 0x3B stop code when running a binary that is signed by a revoked certificate. Addresses an issue with merging Windows Defender Application Control policies that sometimes generates a duplicate rule ID error and causes the Merge-CIPolicy PowerShell command to fail. Addresses an issue that prevents a user’s PIN from being changed after connecting the device to Microsoft Workplace Join. Addresses an issue that fails to print content that is outside of the margins of a document. Addresses an issue that prevents Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) management tools, such as IIS Manager, from managing an ASP.NET application that has configured SameSite cookie settings in web.config. Addresses an issue that causes Microsoft Edge to stop working if you attempt to use paste functionality on webpages when cut-and-paste functionality has been disabled using a policy and Windows Defender Application Guard is active. Addresses an issue that causes the Clipboard service to unexpectedly stop working. Windows 10 version 1809 just had its support extended, and those users will get KB4550969, bringing the build number to 17763.1192. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Updates an issue with pasting mixed content of images and text from Microsoft Word into Internet Explorer. Updates an issue that causes a text box that contains multiple lines of text to stop responding in certain scenarios. Updates an issue that fails to print content that is outside of the margins of a document. Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses an issue that occurs when a third-party application loads hidden tabs into Internet Options. Addresses an issue with pasting mixed content of images and text from Microsoft Word into Internet Explorer. Addresses an issue that causes a box that contains multiple lines of text to stop responding in certain scenarios. Addresses an issue that prevents the first key stroke from being recognized correctly in the DataGridView cell. Addresses an issue that causes an application that uses msctf.dll to stop working, and the 0xc0000005 (Access violation) exception appears. Addresses an issue that prevents the correct lock screen from appearing when all of the following are true: The Group Policy Object (GPO) policy "Computer Configuration\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Local Policies\Security Options\Interactive Logon: Do not require Ctrl+Alt+Del Computer" is disabled. The GPO policy “Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\System\Logon\Turn off app notifications on the lock screen” is enabled. The registry key HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System\DisableLogonBackgroundImage is set to 1. Addresses a reliability issue in WDF01000.sys. Addresses an issue that causes a KERNEL_SECURITY_CHECK_FAILURE (139) stop error when Windows resumes from Sleep and turns on certain Bluetooth headsets. Addresses an issue that causes the Event Viewer Microsoft Management Console (MMC) to stop working when the secondary monitor is above the primary monitor. An out of bounds exception appears. Addresses an issue that causes an error in logman.exe. The error is, "A user account is required in order to commit the current Data collector Set properties." Addresses an issue that prevents users from setting the REG_EXPAND_SZ keys in some automated scenarios. Addresses an issue that causes a memory leak in the LsaIso.exe process when the server is under a heavy authentication load and Credential Guard is enabled. Addresses an issue that prevents hash signing using the Microsoft Platform Crypto Provider for TPMs from working correctly. This issue might also affect networking software, such as VPN applications. Addresses an issue with merging Windows Defender Application Control policies that sometimes generates a duplicate rule ID error and causes the Merge-CIPolicy PowerShell command to fail. Addresses an issue that prevents a user’s PIN from being changed after connecting the device to Microsoft Workplace Join. Addresses an issue that prevents applications running in an Azure Active Directory environment from receiving account change notifications. This occurs when using the Web Account Manager (WAM) and the WebAccountMonitor API. Addresses an issue that fails to print content that is outside of the margins of a document. Addresses an issue that prevents Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) management tools, such as IIS Manager, from managing an ASP.NET application that has configured SameSite cookie settings in web.config. Addresses an issue that causes high CPU usage on Active Directory (AD) domain controllers when migrating to Windows Server 2019. This increases latency in Microsoft Exchange operations, causes Managed Store contention, and severely impacts index creation in Active Directory and the Global Catalog’s performance. Addresses an issue that logs incorrect Internet Protocol (IP) addresses in the audit logs because of missing or old data for active requests coming from "windowstransport/usernamemixed/certificatemixed" endpoints. Addresses an issue that causes devices that are provisioned for Windows Hello for Business (WHfB) to fail. Registration occasionally fails, which leads to a delay in WHfB enrollment and, in some instances, creates Conflicting Objects (CNF) in the Active Directory “Registered Device” container. Addresses an issue that might cause a deadlock in the Remote Desktop Gateway service. Addresses an issue that might cause the Remote Desktop Gateway service to stop working. Addresses an issue that causes systems to stop working with a 0x3B stop code when running a binary that is signed by a revoked certificate. Addresses an issue that prevents the Notification State registries from being deleted for certain apps even after the user profile is deleted. Addresses an issue that causes stop error 0x18 (REFERENCE_BY_POINTER) when Remote Desktop sessions redirect devices that are not input devices. This one does have one known issue to be aware of: Symptom Workaround After installing KB4493509, devices with some Asian language packs installed may receive the error, "0x800f0982 - PSFX_E_MATCHING_ COMPONENT_NOT_FOUND." Uninstall and reinstall any recently added language packs. For instructions, see Manage the input and display language settings in Windows 10. Select Check for Updates and install the April 2019 Cumulative Update. For instructions, see Update Windows 10. Note If reinstalling the language pack does not mitigate the issue, reset your PC as follows: Go to the Settings app > Recovery. Select Get Started under the Reset this PC recovery option. Select Keep my Files. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. For those running Windows 10 version 1803, which is only supported for Enterprise and Education SKUs, you'll get KB4550944, bringing the build number to 17134.1456. You can manually download it here, and there's one highlight: Updates an issue with pasting mixed content of images and text from Microsoft Word into Internet Explorer. Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses an issue that occurs when a third-party application loads hidden tabs into Internet Options. Addresses an issue with pasting mixed content of images and text from Microsoft Word into Internet Explorer. Addresses an issue that prevents the first key stroke from being recognized correctly in the DataGridView cell. Addresses an issue that causes an error in logman.exe. The error is, "A user account is required in order to commit the current Data collector Set properties." Addresses an issue that prevents users from setting the REG_EXPAND_SZ keys in some automated scenarios. Addresses an issue that causes a memory leak in the LsaIso.exe process when the server is under a heavy authentication load and Credential Guard is enabled. Addresses an issue with running klist.exe that causes lsass.exe to stop working and generates an access violation error (0xC0000005). Addresses an issue with merging Windows Defender Application Control policies that sometimes generates a duplicate rule ID error and causes the Merge-CIPolicy PowerShell command to fail. Addresses an issue that prevents applications running in an Azure Active Directory environment from receiving account change notifications. This occurs when using the Web Account Manager (WAM) and the WebAccountMonitor API. Addresses a Task Manager CPU frequency display issue that locks to the base frequency on devices equipped with certain CPUs. Addresses an issue that prevents Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) management tools, such as IIS Manager, from managing an ASP.NET application that has configured SameSite cookie settings in web.config. Addresses an issue that occurs when you try to sign in to Windows during recovery mode. The error, "No administrator accounts are available on this machine", appears. Addresses an issue that prevents you from removing some local users from local built-in groups. For example, you cannot remove "Guest" from the "Guests" local group. Addresses an issue that prevents certain apps from installing if they are published using a Group Policy Object. Addresses an issue that causes Microsoft Edge to stop working if you attempt to use paste functionality on webpages when cut-and-paste functionality has been disabled using a policy and Windows Defender Application Guard is active. Finally, Windows 10 version 1607 is still supported for LTSB and Windows Server 2016 customers, and they'll get KB4550947, bringing the build number to 14393.3659. You can manually download it here, and it has the same one highlight: Updates an issue with pasting mixed content of images and text from Microsoft Word into Internet Explorer. Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses an issue with pasting mixed content of images and text from Microsoft Word into Internet Explorer. Addresses an issue with Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) that causes a memory leak when multiple clients connect to the same server. Addresses an issue that causes new child windows to flicker and appear as white squares on server devices that are configured for stark visual contrast. Addresses an issue that causes an error in logman.exe. The error is, "A user account is required in order to commit the current Data collector Set properties." Addresses an issue that causes a memory leak in the LsaIso.exe process when the server is under a heavy authentication load and Credential Guard is enabled. Addresses an issue that might cause a delay of up to two minutes when signing in or unlocking a session on Hybrid Azure Active Directory-joined machines. Addresses an issue with running klist.exe that causes lsass.exe to stop working and generates an access violation error (0xC0000005). Addresses an issue with merging Windows Defender Application Control policies that sometimes generates a duplicate rule ID error and causes the Merge-CIPolicy PowerShell command to fail. Addresses an issue that might prevent Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) servers from providing the right options to clients when a reservation exists. Addresses an issue that prevents Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) management tools, such as IIS Manager, from managing an ASP.NET application that has configured SameSite cookie settings in web.config. Addresses an issue that causes devices that are provisioned for Windows Hello for Business (WHfB) to fail. Registration occasionally fails, which leads to a delay in WHfB enrollment and, in some instances, creates Conflicting Objects (CNF) in the Active Directory “Registered Device” container. Addresses an issue that occurs when you try to sign in to Windows during recovery mode. The error, "No administrator accounts are available on this machine", appears. Addresses an issue that prevents you from removing some local users from local built-in groups. For example, you cannot remove "Guest" from the "Guests" local group. Addresses an issue that logs incorrect Internet Protocol (IP) addresses in the audit logs because of missing or old data for active requests coming from "windowstransport/usernamemixed/certificatemixed" endpoints. Addresses an issue that might cause a deadlock in the Remote Desktop Gateway service. Addresses an issue in Srv2.sys that might cause 0x18, 0xC2, and 0x19 errors. Addresses an issue that prevents the Notification State registries from being deleted for certain apps even after the user profile is deleted. This one also has one known issue: Symptom Workaround After installing KB4467684, the cluster service may fail to start with the error “2245 (NERR_PasswordTooShort)” if the group policy “Minimum Password Length” is configured with greater than 14 characters. Set the domain default "Minimum Password Length" policy to less than or equal to 14 characters. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. As mentioned earlier, these updates are optional. That means that you can get it through Windows Update if you opt into it, or you can install it manually. If you choose to not take the update, these fixes will be bundled into next month's Patch Tuesday updates. Source: Microsoft releases Windows 10 builds 18363.815, 18362.815 with a ton of fixes (Neowin)
  15. Google resumes Chrome updates with Chrome 81 coming the week of April 7 Last week, Google announced that it's temporarily pausing updates for its Chrome browser and Chrome OS. Due to the COVID-19 coronavirus, many people are working from home and relying on their browser more for day-to-day work, so the company wanted to focus on stability and security. Today, the firm announced that it's resuming updates, but on a new schedule. Here's how it's going to work. In the stable channel, Chrome 81 will arrive the week of April 7 (two weeks from now), and Chrome 83 will arrive in mid-May, which is actually earlier than originally planned. Chrome 82 is canceled completely. Canary, Dev, and Beta channel updates are all arriving this week. The Beta channel is going to be bumped up to Chrome 81, while Canary and Dev will both get Chrome 83. Google says that it will provide timing for Chrome 84 in a future update. Presumably, these changes will be reflected across the board with other Chromium-based browsers. That includes Microsoft's Edge, Brave, Vivaldi, and more. You can expect to see announcements from those companies soon. Source: Google resumes Chrome updates with Chrome 81 coming the week of April 7 (Neowin)
  16. Microsoft is pausing optional Windows 10 updates in May Every second Tuesday of the month, Microsoft releases new cumulative updates for Windows 10. These updates are mandatory, and they'll install automatically if you don't do it yourself. In the following weeks, there are typically optional updates that you can choose to install. In fact, Windows 10 version 1903 and 1909 got one today. Microsoft is putting a hold on these optional updates, referred to as C and D updates (the letter corresponds to the week of the month, where the first week is A, the second is B, etc.), beginning in May. This applies to all supported versions of Windows client and server, but it's just about optional updates. Patch Tuesday updates and security updates will still happen. The aim is to "prioritize security and keep customers protected and productive", and it's not really a surprise. A few days ago, the company announced that it's putting a hold on Edge updates, following a similar announcement from Google about Chrome. Because of the COVID-19 coronavirus, a lot of people are working from home. That also means that those same people are relying on their PC even more than they already do. Windows 10 is their lifeline to the outside world, to the co-workers that they need to interact with for their daily productivity. Note that this doesn't affect the optional updates that are already in place, like the one released today. We should also see new C and D updates next month, with this going into place in May. Source: Microsoft is pausing optional Windows 10 updates in May (Neowin)
  17. Microsoft releases Windows 10 builds 17763.1131, 17134.1399 - here's what's new Patch Tuesday was just a week ago, and even those cumulative updates got replaced two days later. Now, it's time for the first round of mid-stream optional cumulative updates. Today's builds are available for Windows 10 versions 1809, 1803, 1709, and 1607. In other words, it's all supported versions except for the newest and the oldest. If you're on version 1809, you'll get KB4541331, bringing the build number to 17763.1131. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Updates an issue that causes an error when printing to a document share. Updates an issue that prevents the touch keyboard from appearing during sign in when the user is prompted for the password. Updates an issue that causes calendar dates to appear on the wrong day of the week in the clock and date region of the notification area when you select the Samoa time zone. Improves application and device compatibility with Windows updates. Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses an issue that causes an error when printing to a document repository. Addresses a drawing issue with the Microsoft Foundation Class (MFC) toolbar that occurs when dragging in a multi-monitor environment. Addresses an issue that prevents the touch keyboard from appearing during sign in when the user is prompted for the password. Addresses an issue that causes new child windows to flicker and appear as white squares on server devices that are configured for stark visual contrast. Addresses an issue that displays incorrect folder properties in File Explorer when the path is longer than MAX_PATH. Addresses an issue that causes calendar dates to appear on the wrong day of the week in the clock and date region of the notification area when you select the Samoa time zone. Addresses an issue with reading logs using the OpenEventLogA() function. Addresses an issue that prevents machines that have enabled Credential Guard from joining a domain. The error message is "The server's clock is not synchronized with the primary domain controller's clock." Addresses an issue that might cause a delay of up to two minutes when signing in or unlocking a session on Hybrid Azure Active Directory-joined machines. Addresses an issue that causes authentication to fail when using Azure Active Directory and the user’s security identifier (SID) has changed. Addresses an issue that might cause domain controllers (DC) to register a lowercase and a mixed or all uppercase Domain Name System (DNS) service (SRV) record in the _MSDCS. DNS zone. This occurs when DC computer names contain one or more uppercase characters. Addresses an issue that causes authentication in an Azure Active Directory environment to fail and no error appears. Addresses an issue that causes high CPU utilization when retrieving a session object. Addresses high latency in Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) response times for globally distributed datacenters in which SQL might be on a remote datacenter. Improves the performance for all token requests coming to AD FS, including OAuth, Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML), WS-Federation, and WS-Trust. Addresses a high latency issue in acquiring OAuth tokens when AD FS front-end servers and back-end SQL servers are in different datacenters. Restores the constructed attribute in Active Directory and Active Directory Lightweight Directory Services (AD LDS) for msDS-parentdistname. Addresses an issue to prevent SAML errors and the loss of access to third-party apps for users who do not have multi-factor authentication (MFA) enabled. Addresses an issue with evaluating the compatibility status of the Windows ecosystem to help ensure application and device compatibility for all updates to Windows. Addresses an issue that prevents Microsoft User Experience Virtualization (UE-V) settings from roaming to enable the signature files that are used for new messages, forwarded messages, and replies. Addresses an issue with high CPU usage on AD FS servers that occurs when the backgroundCacheRefreshEnabled feature is enabled. Addresses an issue that creates the Storage Replica administrator group with the incorrect SAM-Account-Type and Group-Type. This makes the Storage Replica administrator group unusable when moving the primary domain controller (PDC) emulator. Addresses an issue that prevents some machines from automatically going into Sleep mode under certain circumstances because of Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) Auto Incident Response (IR). Addresses an issue that prevents some machines from running Microsoft Defender ATP Threat & Vulnerability Management successfully. Improves support for non-ASCII file paths for Microsoft Defender ATP Auto IR. Addresses an issue that, in some scenarios, causes stop error 0xEF while upgrading to Windows 10, version 1809. There's also one known issue: Symptom Workaround After installing KB4493509, devices with some Asian language packs installed may receive the error, "0x800f0982 - PSFX_E_MATCHING_COMPONENT_NOT_FOUND." Uninstall and reinstall any recently added language packs. For instructions, see Manage the input and display language settings in Windows 10. Select Check for Updates and install the April 2019 Cumulative Update. For instructions, see Update Windows 10. Note If reinstalling the language pack does not mitigate the issue, reset your PC as follows: Go to the Settings app > Recovery. Select Get Started under the Reset this PC recovery option. Select Keep my Files. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. Windows 10 version 1803 is only supported for Enterprise and Education SKUs, but those users will get KB4541333, bringing the build number to 17134.1399. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Updates an issue that causes an error when printing to a document share. Updates an issue that causes a stop error when Windows resumes from Sleep and turns on certain Bluetooth headsets. Improves application and device compatibility with Windows updates. Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses an issue that causes an error when printing to a document repository. Addresses an issue that causes a KERNEL_SECURITY_CHECK_FAILURE (139) stop error when Windows resumes from Sleep and turns on certain Bluetooth headsets. Addresses an issue that might cause a delay of up to two minutes when signing in or unlocking a session on Hybrid Azure Active Directory-joined machines. Addresses an issue that causes authentication in an Azure Active Directory environment to fail and no error appears. Addresses an issue that prevents machines that have enabled Credential Guard from joining a domain. The error message is "The server's clock is not synchronized with the primary domain controller's clock." Addresses an issue with evaluating the compatibility status of the Windows ecosystem to help ensure application and device compatibility for all updates to Windows. Addresses an issue that prevents Microsoft User Experience Virtualization (UE-V) settings from roaming to enable the signature files that are used for new messages, forwarded messages, and replies. Addresses an issue that prevents some machines from automatically going into Sleep mode under certain circumstances because of Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) Auto Incident Response (IR). Addresses an issue that prevents some machines from running Microsoft Defender ATP Threat & Vulnerability Management successfully. Improves support for non-ASCII file paths for Microsoft Defender ATP Auto IR. There are no known issues with this update. Windows 10 version 1709 is also only supported for Enterprise and Education SKUs, and those users will get KB4541330, bringing the build number to 16299.1775. You can manually download it here, and there's only one highlight: Improves application and device compatibility with Windows updates. Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses an issue that causes File Explorer to close unexpectedly when using roaming profiles between different versions of Windows 10. Addresses an issue that might cause a delay of up to two minutes when signing in or unlocking a session on Hybrid Azure Active Directory-joined machines. Addresses an issue that prevents machines that have enabled Credential Guard from joining a domain. The error message is "The server's clock is not synchronized with the primary domain controller's clock." Addresses an issue with evaluating the compatibility status of the Windows ecosystem to help ensure application and device compatibility for all updates to Windows. Addresses an issue that prevents Microsoft User Experience Virtualization (UE-V) settings from roaming to enable the signature files that are used for new messages, forwarded messages, and replies. Addresses an issue that prevents some machines from running Microsoft Defender ATP Threat & Vulnerability Management successfully. There are no known issues with this update. Finally, Windows 10 version 1607 is only supported on the Long Term Servicing Channel and for Windows Server 2016, but those users will get KB4541329, bringing the build number to 14393.3595. You can manually download it here, and there's one highlight: Improves application and device compatibility with Windows updates. Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses an issue that might cause domain controllers (DC) to register a lowercase and a mixed or all uppercase Domain Name System (DNS) service (SRV) record in the _MSDCS. DNS zone. This occurs when DC computer names contain one or more uppercase characters. Addresses an issue that prevents machines that have enabled Credential Guard from joining a domain. The error message is "The server's clock is not synchronized with the primary domain controller's clock." Addresses an issue with running an application in RemoteApp that might cause the application window to flicker and DWM.exe might stop working on the session host. Addresses an issue with evaluating the compatibility status of the Windows ecosystem to help ensure application and device compatibility for all updates to Windows. Addresses an issue that prevents Microsoft User Experience Virtualization (UE-V) settings from roaming to enable the signature files that are used for new messages, forwarded messages, and replies. Addresses an issue with high CPU usage on Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) servers that occurs when the backgroundCacheRefreshEnabled feature is enabled. There's also one known issue: Symptom Workaround After installing KB4467684, the cluster service may fail to start with the error “2245 (NERR_PasswordTooShort)” if the group policy “Minimum Password Length” is configured with greater than 14 characters. Set the domain default "Minimum Password Length" policy to less than or equal to 14 characters. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. As usual, these updates are optional, meaning that you can either install them manually or you can opt into installing them via Windows Update. If you don't, these fixes will be bundled into next month's Patch Tuesday update. Source: Microsoft releases Windows 10 builds 17763.1131, 17134.1399 - here's what's new (Neowin)
  18. Microsoft releases Windows 10 builds 18363.719, 17763.1098 - here's what's new Today is Patch Tuesday, the second Tuesday of the month, in which Microsoft releases new updates for all supported versions of Windows. For Windows 10, that actually includes all versions except for version 1511. Of course, other old versions of the OS are only supported under certain circumstances, and most consumers are on version 1903 or 1909. If you're on version 1903 or 1909, you're going to get KB4540673, which brings the build number to 18362.719 and 18363.719, respectively. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer. Updates for verifying user names and passwords. Updates to improve security when using external devices (such as game controllers, printers, and web cameras). Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses an issue that prevents certain users from upgrading the OS because of corrupted third-party assemblies. Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Media, Windows Silicon Platform, Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Authentication, Windows Peripherals, Windows Update Stack, and Windows Server. Note that while the lists of fixes seems small, these updates do include all of the fixes from last month's optional updates. There's also one known issue to be aware of: Symptom Workaround When using Windows Server containers with the March 10, 2020 updates, you might encounter issues with 32-bit applications and processes. For important guidance on updating Windows containers, please see Windows container version compatibility. For those on Windows 10 version 1809, you'll see KB4538461, bringing the build number to 17763.1098. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer. Updates for verifying user names and passwords. Updates to improve security when Windows performs basic operations. Updates for storing and managing files. Updates to improve security when using external devices (such as game controllers, printers, and web cameras). Here are the fixes: Security updates to Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Media, Windows Silicon Platform, Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Authentication, Windows Kernel, Windows Core Networking, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Peripherals, Windows Update Stack, and Windows Server. Finally, this one has two known issues: Symptom Workaround After installing KB4493509, devices with some Asian language packs installed may receive the error, "0x800f0982 - PSFX_E_MATCHING_COMPONENT_NOT_FOUND." Uninstall and reinstall any recently added language packs. For instructions, see Manage the input and display language settings in Windows 10. Select Check for Updates and install the April 2019 Cumulative Update. For instructions, see Update Windows 10. Note If reinstalling the language pack does not mitigate the issue, reset your PC as follows: Go to the Settings app > Recovery. Select Get Started under the Reset this PC recovery option. Select Keep my Files. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. When using Windows Server containers with the March 10, 2020 updates, you might encounter issues with 32-bit applications and processes. For important guidance on updating Windows containers, please see Windows container version compatibility. Windows 10 version 1803 is only supported for Enterprise and Education SKUs, but those users will get KB4540689, bringing the build number to 17134.1365. You can manually download it here, and it has the same changelog as the update for version 1809, except that there are no known issues. Windows 10 version 1709 is also only supported for Enterprise and Education, and those users will get KB4540681, bringing the build number to 16299.1747. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Office products. Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer. Updates for verifying user names and passwords. Updates to improve security when Windows performs basic operations. Updates for storing and managing files. Updates to improve security when using external devices (such as game controllers, printers, and web cameras). Updates an issue that might prevent icons and cursors from appearing as expected. Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses an issue that might prevent icons and cursors from appearing as expected. Security updates to Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Media, Windows Silicon Platform, Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Authentication, Windows Cryptography, Windows Kernel, Windows Core Networking, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Peripherals, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Update Stack, and Windows Server. Next up is Windows 10 version 1703, which is actually only supported for the original Surface Hub. Those users will get KB4540705, which brings the build number to 15063.2313. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Updates an issue that might prevent icons and cursors from appearing as expected. Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Office products. Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer. Updates for verifying user names and passwords. Updates to improve security when Windows performs basic operations. Updates for storing and managing files. Updates to improve security when using external devices (such as game controllers, printers, and web cameras). Here's the full list of fixes: Addresses an issue that might cause Microsoft browsers to bypass proxy servers. Addresses an issue that might prevent icons and cursors from appearing as expected. Addresses an issue that prevents machines that have Credential Guard enabled from joining a domain. The error message is "The server's clock is not synchronized with the primary domain controller's clock." Addresses an issue with evaluating the compatibility status of the Windows ecosystem to help ensure application and device compatibility for all updates to Windows. Security updates to Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Media, Windows Silicon Platform, Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Authentication, Windows Cryptography, Windows Kernel, Windows Core Networking, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Peripherals, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Update Stack, and Windows Server. Windows 10 version 1607 is only supported in the Long-Term Servicing Channel and for Windows Server 2016 customers. Those users will get KB4540670, bringing the build number to 14393.3564. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Office products. Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer. Updates for verifying user names and passwords. Updates to improve security when Windows performs basic operations. Updates for storing and managing files. Updates to improve security when using external devices (such as game controllers, printers, and web cameras). Here's the list of fixes: Addresses an issue that might prevent icons and cursors from appearing as expected. Security updates to Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Media, Windows Silicon Platform, Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Authentication, Windows Cryptography, Windows Kernel, Windows Core Networking, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Peripherals, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Update Stack, and Windows Server. This one has a couple of known issues: Symptom Workaround After installing KB4467684, the cluster service may fail to start with the error “2245 (NERR_PasswordTooShort)” if the group policy “Minimum Password Length” is configured with greater than 14 characters. Set the domain default "Minimum Password Length" policy to less than or equal to 14 characters. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. When using Windows Server containers with the March 10, 2020 updates, you might encounter issues with 32-bit applications and processes. For important guidance on updating Windows containers, please see Windows container version compatibility. Finally, the original version of Windows 10 is still supported in the LTSC, and those users will get KB4540693, bringing the build number to 10240.18519. You can manually download it here, and these are the highlights: Updates an issue that might prevent icons and cursors from appearing as expected. Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Office products. Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer. Updates for verifying user names and passwords. Updates for storing and managing files. Updates to improve security when Windows performs basic operations. Updates to improve security when using external devices (such as game controllers, printers, and web cameras). These are the fixes: Addresses an issue that might cause Microsoft browsers to bypass proxy servers. Addresses an issue that might prevent icons and cursors from appearing as expected. Security updates to the Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Media, Windows Silicon Platform, Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Authentication, Windows Cryptography, Windows Kernel, Windows Core Networking, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Peripherals, Windows Network Security and Containers, and Windows Server. As usual, these updates are mandatory. You can install them via Windows Update, or they'll be installed automatically in the next few days. Source: Microsoft releases Windows 10 builds 18363.719, 17763.1098 - here's what's new (Neowin)
  19. Microsoft releases Windows 10 build 18363.657, 17763.1039 - here's what's new Today is the second Tuesday of the month, which means that it is Patch Tuesday. All supported versions of Windows 10 are receiving a cumulative update, which makes it all versions other than Windows 10 version 1511. If you are running version 1909 or 1903, you will receive KB4532693 that brings build 18362.657 or 18363.657 respectively, which you can manually download from here. Here are the highlights for this update: Improves the installation experience when updating to Windows 10, version 1903. Updates to improve security when using Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge. Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Office products. Updates to improve security when using input devices such as a mouse, keyboard, or stylus. Here are the fixes that come from this update: Addresses an issue that occurs when migrating cloud printers during an upgrade. Improves the installation experience when updating to Windows 10, version 1903. Security updates to Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Cryptography, Windows Virtualization, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Server, Windows Management, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, and Windows Shell. The cumulative updates for both, version 1909 and 1903 are similar. The fixes apply to both versions of the OS. There are no known issues with this update. If you are running Windows 10 version 1809, you will receive KB4532691 that brings build 17763.1039. That update can also be downloaded manually from here. Here are the highlights from this build: Updates to improve security when using Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge. Updates for storing and managing files. Updates to improve security when using external devices (such as game controllers, printers, and web cameras) and input devices such as a mouse, keyboard, or stylus. Updates to improve security when using Microsoft Office products. Below is what is fixed for this update for version 1809: Security updates to Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Shell, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Management, Windows Cryptography, Windows Virtualization, Windows Hyper-V, Windows Core Networking, Windows Peripherals, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Storage and Filesystems, and Windows Server. There are a few known updates in this issue that involve renaming issues for files or folders on a Cluster Shared Volume (CSV). Here are the known issues: Symptom Workaround Certain operations, such as rename, that you perform on files or folders that are on a Cluster Shared Volume (CSV) may fail with the error, “STATUS_BAD_IMPERSONATION_LEVEL (0xC00000A5)”. This occurs when you perform the operation on a CSV owner node from a process that doesn’t have administrator privilege. Do one of the following: Perform the operation from a process that has administrator privilege. Perform the operation from a node that doesn’t have CSV ownership. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. After installing KB4493509, devices with some Asian language packs installed may receive the error, "0x800f0982 - PSFX_E_MATCHING_COMPONENT_NOT_FOUND." Uninstall and reinstall any recently added language packs. For instructions, see Manage the input and display language settings in Windows 10. Select Check for Updates and install the April 2019 Cumulative Update. For instructions, see Update Windows 10. Note If reinstalling the language pack does not mitigate the issue, reset your PC as follows: Go to the Settings app > Recovery. Select Get Started under the Reset this PC recovery option. Select Keep my Files. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. Next up in Windows 10 version 1803. This version is no longer supported for Home and Pro users, so this update goes out to those running the Enterprise and Education SKUs and Windows Server 2016. KB4537762 brings with it build 17134.1304, which can also be manually downloaded from here. The highlights and fixes for this version are similar to that of version 1809. However, it shares just one known issue with that update: Symptom Workaround Certain operations, such as rename, that you perform on files or folders that are on a Cluster Shared Volume (CSV) may fail with the error, “STATUS_BAD_IMPERSONATION_LEVEL (0xC00000A5)”. This occurs when you perform the operation on a CSV owner node from a process that doesn’t have administrator privilege. Do one of the following: Perform the operation from a process that has administrator privilege. Perform the operation from a node that doesn’t have CSV ownership. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. The fixes that this update brings also is almost like that of those versions: Security updates to Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Shell, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Management, Windows Cryptography, Windows Core Networking, Windows Peripherals, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Storage and Filesystems, and Windows Server. The issue that prevents the renaming of files on folders on a Cluster Shared Volume (CSV) is also present for this version. Windows 10 version 1703 that is only supported on the Surface Hub is receiving build 15063.2284 via KB4537765. The update can be manually downloaded from the Update Catalog here. While the highlights are identical to the other versions of the OS and there are no known issues with this update, there are a few additional fixes: Addresses an issue that might cause the Application Virtualization (App-V) Streaming Driver (appvstr.sys) to leak memory when you enable Shared Content Store (SCS) mode. Security updates to Internet Explorer, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Shell, Microsoft Edge, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Management, Windows Cryptography, Windows Hyper-V, Windows Core Networking, Windows Peripherals, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Storage and Filesystems, and Windows Server. Long Term Servicing Branch (LTSB) customers running Windows 10 version 1607 are receiving build 14393.3504 through KB4537764. This version is also supported for Windows Server 2016 and can be downloaded manually from here. The highlights and fixes are the same as that of versions 1709 and 1803. However, there are two known issues with this update: Symptom Workaround After installing KB4467684, the cluster service may fail to start with the error “2245 (NERR_PasswordTooShort)” if the group policy “Minimum Password Length” is configured with greater than 14 characters. Set the domain default "Minimum Password Length" policy to less than or equal to 14 characters. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. Certain operations, such as rename, that you perform on files or folders that are on a Cluster Shared Volume (CSV) may fail with the error, “STATUS_BAD_IMPERSONATION_LEVEL (0xC00000A5)”. This occurs when you perform the operation on a CSV owner node from a process that doesn’t have administrator privilege. Do one of the following: Perform the operation from a process that has administrator privilege. Perform the operation from a node that doesn’t have CSV ownership. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. Windows 10 version 1511 is no longer supported for any customers. Lastly, the first-ever version of Windows 10 (released in July 2015 – also known as version 1507), which is only supported for LTSB customers, is receiving build 10240.18486 through KB4537776. The update can also be downloaded manually from here. The highlights and fixes for this build are identical to the other versions released today. The file rename issue exists for this release, which also affects many other versions of the OS that are being patched today. Users do not specifically need to go and download these updates, as these patches will also be installed via Windows Update. Source: Microsoft releases Windows 10 build 18363.657, 17763.1039 - here's what's new (Neowin)
  20. Microsoft advisory shows whether Edge keeps up with Chrome's patching The advisory will be updated when Microsoft releases a new version of Edge that includes publicly disclosed security updates from the Chromium project. Microsoft Microsoft has posted a security advisory that will record all updates to its new Chromium-based Edge browser, giving customers a way to monitor whether the company keeps up with Google's patching of Chrome. "This advisory will be updated whenever Microsoft releases a version of Microsoft Edge which incorporates publicly disclosed security updates from the Chromium project," the Redmond, Wash. firm wrote on the support document. As of mid-day Wednesday, only one listing populated the advisory. The item, dated Jan. 17, called out four CVE-identified vulnerabilities. (CVE, for "Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures," is the most-used bug-naming standard.) The advisory also noted the Edge version number that included the patches and the corresponding version of Chromium that also quashed the bugs. Because Chrome assumes Chromium's version numbers without change - for some reason, Edge does not - the advisory was the first way Computerworld found to link a specific version of Edge to one of Chrome. Microsoft This security advisory is supposed to list all Edge security updates. Comparing the version number of Edge to that of Chrome lets customers monitor whether Microsoft has kept up with Chromium's/Chrome's fixes. Google released Chrome 79.0.3945.130 - the Chromium version listed in the advisory - on Jan. 16, saying here that the interim update included patches for 11 vulnerabilities. As usual, Google only identified four of the 11 by CVE. The quartet matched the four CVEs that Microsoft said were addressed in Edge. Meanwhile, the Edge update, which Microsoft released Jan. 17 - one day after Chrome's - was marked as version 79.0.309.68. (That's not the most current Edge; Microsoft updated the browser again on Jan. 23 to 79.0.309.71. However, there was no sign that that version patched any vulnerabilities. For a complete listing of Edge updates, users can steer to the Microsoft Update Catalog; Computerworld has pre-filtered the results to show only those for the Stable build of the browser.) Edge 79.0.309.68 thus equals Chrome 79.0.3945.130. Microsoft patched Edge just a day after Google refreshed Chrome, indicating that the former browser will not substantially lag behind the latter. If it had, attackers might have been able to use the interval to reverse engineer a patch, uncover the vulnerability and craft an exploit. Still unknown is the size of the gap between Google promoting a new version of Chrome to the Stable branch and Microsoft following suit with Edge. On Tuesday, Google released Chrome 80 - specifically, version 80.0.3987.87 - with new features as well as 56 security fixes. Google listed 37 of the 56 with CVE identifiers. Ten of the 37 were marked "High," the second-most-serious ranking in Chrome's four-step rating system. As of 2 p.m. ET Wednesday, Microsoft had not updated Edge to reflect the Chrome's shift to version 80. Computerworld will continue to monitor Edge and how, or even if, it keeps pace with Chrome. Source: Microsoft advisory shows whether Edge keeps up with Chrome's patching (Computerworld - Gregg Keizer)
  21. The Windows 10 November 2019 Update is now fully available to seekers The Windows 10 November 2019 Update has been out for a couple of months now, and now that it's been tested by the public for some time, Microsoft is making it available to everyone. In a new update to the release information page for Windows 10, the company says that any user on a recent version of Windows 10 will now see the update when they click the "Check for Updates" button on Windows Update. This should mean any upgrade blocks have been lifted, since the update has technically been available to seekers since its initial release. In addition to being available for everyone who searches for updates, the update is now being pushed to more devices automatically, specifically those that are on Windows 10 version 1809, which is set to reach the end of support in a few months. As part of Microsoft's lifecycle policy for Windows 10, feature updates aren't automatically installed unless the user is running a version that's nearing the end of support, which is the case here. The company had already started to automatically update some users, but it seems like it's expanding the pool of targeted PCs. The Windows 10 November 2019 Update is the smallest feature update Windows 10 has received so far, and in fact, it shares all the same servicing content with the previous version, the May 2019 Update. The only difference is the build number and a few extra features that are enabled in the new version, but technically still present in the previous release. If you're interested, you can check our guide to the November 2019 Update here to know everything that's new, or head here to learn about which features have been deprecated or removed. Source: The Windows 10 November 2019 Update is now fully available to seekers (Neowin)
  22. Microsoft is back to its regular schedule with Edge Dev builds, after a late release last week, and today's update brings the browser version up to number 80.0.334.2. As with most builds based on Chromium 80 so far, this one is light on new additions, and it mostly brings fixes and smaller improvements to the experience. It also still doesn't include support for ARM64, which debuted in the Canary channel last week. With that being said, there are a couple of new features, which include a setting to force tracking prevention to be set to Strict when the user is browsing in an InPrivate window: Added a right-click option to sort individual favorites folders by name from the Favorites management page. Added a new setting to always use Strict Tracking Prevention inside InPrivate windows. Aside from those additions, this release is all about fixes, and there's a lot of them. As usual, the list is split into fixes for reliability and for behavior. Here's what's new for reliability: Fixed a crash on launch. Fixed an issue where searching from the address bar sometimes crashes the browser. Fixed a SmartScreen crash when downloading certain items. Fixed an issue where selecting context menu items on certain favorites entries causes a browser crash. Fixed an issue where renaming a Collection sometimes crashes the Collections pane. Fixed an issue where Application Guard windows sometimes crash upon startup. Fixed an issue where navigation fails in Application Guard windows. Fixed an issue where closing tabs that contain websites that are blocked by SmartScreen sometimes causes a browser crash. Fixed an issue where deleted or edited favorites aren’t synced properly, causing the edit to be undone when it syncs back down. Fixed an issue where syncing gets stuck in the “Setting up sync” state on browser startup. Fixed an issue where processes that grow too large and stop working aren’t automatically fixed. Fixed an issue where sync sometimes fails after restoring tabs after a browser crash. Fixed an issue where large Collections aren’t properly exported to Word. Fixed an issue where exporting a Collection to Excel sometimes fails. Reduced the number of times a user needs to sign out and sign back into the browser in order to fix sync. There are also a number of behavior changes and fixes, including a change that will prevent macOS users from exporting Collections to Word or Excel. Here's the full list: Temporarily disabled the ability to export Collections to Word and Excel on Mac. Temporarily disabled one form of DRM support on ARM64, which may impact the ability to play certain DRM-protected videos. Fixed an issue where windows that are minimized when the browser is restarted aren’t restored properly. Fixed an issue where Netflix playback fails with error D7356. Fixed an issue where the space bar doesn’t work when typing in the address bar. Fixed an issue where the enter key doesn’t work when typing in the address bar. Fixed an issue where the Windows Hello prompt to log into a website with the user’s OS credentials sometimes shows in an infinite loop. Fixed an issue for users of work and school accounts where websites that try and fail to use the browser profile’s credentials to log in don’t subsequently allow the user to fall back and try the user’s OS credentials. Improved the way Collections export images to Word documents. Fixed an issue where items sometimes fail to be added to Collections. Fixed an issue where webpage contents sometimes render all black if Collections is enabled. Fixed an issue where adding certain images to Collections results in a card with a broken image. Fixed an issue where PWAs installed for one user on a machine sometimes can’t be launched by other users on the machine. Fixed an issue on Mac where feedback screenshots can’t be included when submitting feedback. Fixed an issue where link context menus don’t show all the options if they’re opened via the keyboard instead of the mouse. Fixed an issue where some websites that are pinned to the Task Bar launch new tabs instead of activating existing tabs when tabs with those websites already exist. Fixed an issue where open tabs aren’t properly imported from Chrome. Fixed an issue where the wrong icon appears on web notifications. Recently, Microsoft has started including a list of known issues with its release notes, and there's a few in this release, despite the lengthy lists of fixes. Here's what you need to be aware of: There are some issues where users with multiple audio output devices sometimes don’t get any sound from Edge. In one case, Edge becomes muted in the Windows Volume Mixer and unmuting it fixes it. In another, restarting the browser fixes it. At certain zoom levels, there is a noticeable line between the browser UI and the web contents. Last month, some users got a “Work” account automatically added to the browser that wasn’t removable. Although we recently enabled the ability for some users to remove this account, there’s still an issue where users who are signed into Windows with a work or school account may not be able to remove that account from the browser. Clicking a link on one virtual desktop currently opens a new tab in a window on a different virtual desktop if there’s no window open on the current desktop but there is on another. This is a regression from past behavior, which opened a new window on the current desktop. Jumplist entries are not consistent between the Start Menu and the Task Bar for some users. We believe this is due to the shortcut on the Start Menu not getting migrated properly after an Edge update and are working on a fix. Additionally, after getting the update for the new icon, there are still places on the Start Menu, for example when searching, that still show the old icon. Other places like the Task Bar may be able to be fixed by un-pinning and then re-pinning any Edge shortcuts that already exist there. Sometimes the browser will appear to not respond to any user input (clicking or scrolling in webpages doesn’t do anything, hovering over UI doesn’t make it change), but clicking on certain buttons still works (like the … menu). The cause of this is due to an error in the GPU process, and opening the browser task manager (right-click near the window minimize/maximize/close buttons or hit shift+esc on the keyboard) will open a window that will allow you to end the GPU process, which will fix the issue. This issue was inherited from upstream Chromium, and a fix for it just went in upstream, so the next Dev update should have it. The latest build should now be showing up if you check for updates from within Edge Dev, and these improvements should help make the Beta channel more stable when the update makes its way there. That should happen shortly before the current Beta release is promoted to the stable channel on January 15, marking the official launch of the new Chromium-based Edge. Source: This week's Edge Dev build is 80.0.334.2 and it focuses on fixes (via Neowin)
  23. How to block Steam from updating games automatically Valve's Steam platform client will update any installed game or application automatically by default. If there is a network connection when you start Steam or Steam is running, updates will be installed if available. While that is the desirable option for most users, as game updates may introduce bug fixes, new features, performance improvements, and other beneficial changes, some Steam users may prefer to be in control of the updating process. There are several reasons for wanting to be in control: To avoid that bandwidth is wasted when games are updated that you don't plan to play in the near future. When game updates are known to introduce issues or unwanted changes. When the bandwidth is required for other operations. When the device is connected to a fast or unlimited Internet connection only sometimes. Recent versions of Steam block automatic downloads of updates or game files when a game is started. It is possible to disable that in the Steam settings so that downloads continue while games are being played. There is one caveat to blocking automatic Steam game updates as some games may not work properly or at all if they are not up to date; this is the case for most multiplayer games but some single player games may also not work correctly, especially if they require an online connection. Tip: find out how to change Steam privacy settings. How to control Steam Auto Updates First the bad news: the Steam client offers no setting to turn of automatic updates for all games. While that sounds bad, especially if you have hundreds of games in your library, it is not really that problematic as you may want to change auto-update behavior for installed games only anyway. Still, there is an option to limit automatic updates to a specific time of the day. Option 1: Limit automatic updates on Steam globally The first option enables download restrictions for automatic updates. To access the option, select View > Settings > Downloads in the Steam client. There you find an option to limit auto-updates of games to a specific time. Just check "Only auto-update games between" and select a 1 hour interval, preferably at night. Steam will update games only in the selected period and not otherwise. The "limit bandwidth to" option may sound useful as well but it impacts all downloads on Steam, not just automatic game updates. Option 2: Disable automatic updates for individual Steam games A right-click on any game in the Steam library and the selection of properties opens the game's configuration page. Switch to the Updates tab in the interface that opens. The first option on the page, automatic updates, controls the updating behavior of that game. The default is "always keep this game up to date". A click on the menu displays the two additional states "Only update this game when I launch it" and "high priority - always auto-update this game before others". Selecting the "only update.." option blocks automatic game updates unless you launch the game. The downside to this is that you may need to wait for an available update to download if you plan to play the game. Option 3: the console, temporarily disable updates The following option disables automatic updates for any installed game during a particular session. It requires that you open the console on Steam and run a command on it, and Steam should be offline while you run the commands. Type steam://open/console in any web browser on your system and accept the redirection to the Steam app; this should open the console on Steam. Type @AllowSkipGameUpdate 0 Type @AllowSkipGameUpdate 1 Alternatively, go to your Steam program folder, e.g. c:\program files (x86)\Steam\steamapps\ and edit each acf file you find there (one for each installed game). Use Notepad or another plain text editor for that and edit the AllowSkipGameUpdate variable to 1 to block automatic updates. Source: How to block Steam from updating games automatically (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  24. One of Android’s key issues is fragmentation. The vast array of available phones means manufacturers have to work extra hard to keep every one up to date and many aren't very keen to do so. With the launch of Android 8.0 Oreo, Google aimed to improve things with the introduction of Project Treble, which brought a modular base for Android and made it much easier for companies to update their devices in a timely manner. In a new blog post, Google detailed the progress on Android adoption rates which shows that Android 9 Pie has the highest adoption rate in its first year and now holds a 22.6% share of the entire Android ecosystem. This was in large due to Google’s efforts with Project Treble and the close collaboration with major manufacturers. Google claims the average time to upgrade between Oreo and Pie was cut down by 3 months and expects upgrades to Android 10 to happen even quicker. Inline with companies like Essential, Xiaomi and OnePlus which have Android 10 on their devices, Google expects more manufacturers to jump on board and offer a stable build of Android 10 before the end of the year. This is a major breakthrough in the Android fragmentation issue and will hopefully carry on with future iterations of the OS. Having popular manufacturers like Samsung who haven't had the best track record with Android update speeds in the past, in particular, is definitely a welcome addition. Source: 1. Google lists manufacturers that will ship Android 10 updates this year (via GSMArena) - main article 2. All About Updates: More Treble (via Android Developers Blog) - reference to the main article
  25. We're just five days away from Patch Tuesday, the day that Microsoft will release new updates for all supported versions of Windows. Apparently, the company just couldn't wait, as it released a whole round of updates today. Unlike most non-Patch Tuesday updates, these are actually mandatory. That means that your PC will install it automatically at some point. The updates are billed as security updates, fixing an issue where print jobs might fail. Here's the highlight: Here's the full list of fixes: As is always the case with cumulative updates, these include the fixes from previous ones, including the optional updates that were released later on in September. Here's the list of updates: Version 1903 - KB4524147 (build 18362.388 / download) Version 1809 - KB4524148 (build 17763.775 / download) Version 1803 - KB4524149 (build 17134.1040 / download) Version 1709 - KB4524150 (build 16299.1421 / download) Version 1703 - KB4524151 (build 15063.2079 / download) Version 1607 - KB4524152 (build 14393.3243 / download) Version 1507 - KB4524153 (build 10240.18335 / download) As always, you have the option of installing it manually, or letting it install automatically through Windows Update. Source: Microsoft releases required security updates for all versions of Windows 10 (Neowin)
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