Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'uk'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Site Related
    • News & Updates
    • Site / Forum Feedback
    • Member Introduction
  • News
    • General News
    • FileSharing News
    • Mobile News
    • Software News
    • Security & Privacy News
    • Technology News
  • Downloads
    • nsane.down
  • General Discussions & Support
    • Filesharing Chat
    • Security & Privacy Center
    • Software Chat
    • Mobile Mania
    • Technology Talk
    • Entertainment Exchange
    • Guides & Tutorials
  • Off-Topic Chat
    • The Chat Bar
    • Jokes & Funny Stuff
    • Polling Station

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. Facebook is being sued for failing to protect users' personal data in the Cambridge Analytica breach. The scandal involved harvested Facebook data of 87 million people being used for advertising during elections. Mass legal action is being launched against Facebook for misuse of information from almost one million users in England and Wales. Facebook said it has not received any documents regarding this claim. The group taking action - Facebook You Ow
  2. In other countries, the UK is often used as a prime example of how pirate site-blocking injunctions can function effectively. However, over the past several years, movie and music companies haven't requested any new blocks. As a result, new pirate sites can flourish, for now. Website blocking is without a doubt one of the favorite anti-piracy tools of the entertainment industries. The UK has been a leader on this front. Since 2011, the High Court has ordered ISPs to block access to many popular pirate sites. While official
  3. A new report published by PRS for Music reveals that UK traffic to stream-ripper sites has skyrocketed over the past three years. The findings reveal a massive 1390% traffic boost. Intrigued by these findings, we decided to take a closer look at the methodology, with some surprising results that cast doubt on the overall conclusions. Every year, dozens of piracy studies and surveys appear online. These can help to signal new trends and changes in user behavior. When done right, research can be a valuable tool to shape future law or to direct
  4. In 2019, the High Court of England and Wales ruled that by offering an index of non UK-based or unlicensed radio stations to UK residents, radio aggregator service TuneIn breached copyright. In response the service has now geo-blocked thousands of stations leaving UK customers without their favorite sounds. Unless they use a VPN, then it's business as usual. TuneIn is one of the most prominent providers of radio content in the world. Available for free or on a premium basis, its site and associated app provide access to more than 100,000 sta
  5. Following the arrest of a 24-year-old man in the UK late June, police used his pirate IPTV service to display a warning message to subscribers. To further press home the message that viewing pirate streams is illegal, police are now serving thousands of GE Hosting's subscribers with cease-and-desist notices, referencing theoretical prosecutions under the Fraud Act. Late June, officers from Norfolk and Suffolk Constabulary’s Cyber and Serious Organised Crime Unit arrested a 24-year-old man in the UK under suspicion of operating a pirate IPTV service. F
  6. The latest IP Crime and Enforcement Report, published by the UK Government, signals a wide variety of ongoing and emerging piracy threats. Pirate IPTV services remain a growing problem that could become worse with the rollout of 5G, it reads. There are also concerns about the use of cryptocurrencies and the growth of stream-rippers. Last week the UK Government’s Intellectual Property Office published its annual IP Crime and Enforcement Report. The report provides an overview of the latest anti-piracy achievements of copyright holders and als
  7. The new Premier League season will begin without crowds due to the coronavirus yet 160 games will not be televised in the UK, a gap that pirate IPTV providers will fill using broadcasts from abroad. The Premier League has recently obtained a new ISP blocking injunction but the Football Supporters' Association is begging for the obvious: Don't give fans no other option than to turn to illegal services. While there’s no doubt that humans have been kicking objects around for fun for thousands of years, organized football as we know it today has existed in th
  8. Samsung could build UK 5G if Huawei is banned Samsung says it can provide mobile operators with 5G kit (Image credit: focustech) Samsung says it could provide the kit necessary for UK operators to build 5G networks should they be banned from procuring Huawei equipment. The Korean electronics giant has a limited presence in the mobile equipment market but has big ambitions for 5G, hoping to secure 20 per cent of the market by 2020. It has seen strong demand in its native South Korea as well as from US operators who are ba
  9. A man and woman arrested over the Gatwick Airport drone chaos have been released without charge. Sussex Police say the 47-year-old man and 54-year-old woman, both from Crawley, are "no longer suspects" in the incident. Some 1,000 aircraft were cancelled or disrupted during the chaos, which began on Wednesday evening, affecting around 140,000 passengers. Detective Chief Superintendent Jason Tingley said: “Both people have fully co-operated with our enquiries and I am satisfied that they are no longer suspects in the drone incidents at Gatwick. “It
  10. Stay-at-home Bond types set off the loudest irony klaxon Maybe don't snoop on a charity that makes privacy its priority... UK SPOOKS HAVE FESSED-UP to unlawfully snooping on and sifting through the private data of Privacy International, all thanks to bulk data collection. As part of the MI5's Bulk Communications Data and Bulk Personal Data programmes, supposedly used to detect criminal and terrorist activity, Britain's domestic intelligence agency ended up gathering and perusing Privacy International's private data. And it wasn't the only on
  11. Slams Home Office's lack of engagement with privacy fears The UK Home Office's alleged indifference towards civil rights groups' concerns over the creation of a mammoth policing database has caused Liberty to ditch the government-run consultation group on the project. The Home Office is planning to replace the creaky Police National Computer (PNC) and Police National Database (PND) with a Law Enforcement Data Service (LEDS) as part of its National Law Enforcement Data Programme. Once this is complete, the PNC and PND will be switched off. Eventua
  12. sweet_17

    ClipCache Pro 3.6.1

    ClipCache Pro 3.6.1 Clipcache Pro is a powerful information gathering tool. ClipCache Pro's rich features have turned it into a tool for gathering and organizing information that is powerful enough for everything from home web-surfing to journalism to academic and commercial research. It is the best utility of its type available - and used by major corporations including IBM, AT&T, Bosch, Cuna Mutual, BankFirst Corp, The Oregonian, The New Haven Register, Basler Electric and the Short Line School. With a single keystroke, it monitors clipboard activity and saves everythi
  13. MPs in UK say ‘wild west’ cryptocurrency industry is leaving investors vulnerable Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are “wild west” assets that expose investors to a litany of risks and are in urgent need of regulation, MPs on the Treasury select committee have said. The committee said in a report that consumers were left unprotected from an unregulated industry that aided money laundering, while the government and regulators “bumble along” and fail to take action. The Conservative MP Nicky Morgan, the chair of the committee, said the current situation
  14. Facebook said it has appealed a fine from a U.K. data protection watchdog for the equivalent of $640,000 over allegations that the company failed to protect British users' data. The fine originally came in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, but the watchdog group recently concluded an investigation that found no evidence British users' data was shared with the firm. As of Wednesday, the watchdog group has not yet been notified that an appeal was received, according to a spokesperson.
  15. US tech companies monopolize mapping data, locking out new services, says report Tech companies like Google, Apple, and Uber should be forced to share mapping data with rivals firms and the public sector, the UK government has been advised by a data advocacy group. In a report published today, the Open Data Institute (ODI) said that “data monopolies” were stifling innovation in the UK. These companies duplicate one another’s efforts, said the report, while using their large financial clout to gain insurmountable leads over would-be rivals. If they shared da
  16. Advertisers should boycott tech giants like Google and Facebook to force them to effectively address the "scandal" of online terrorist content, members of UK's Parliament said, according to The Times of London. The big picture: Social networks and web companies are under pressure around the world to police extremist content on their sites that facilitate the spread of radicalized material. Despite hiring thousands of people to identify and quickly take down such content, staying ahead of malicious actors online has proven to be very difficult. Show less The backdrop: Salman Abed
  17. Sadiq Khan, who is facing pressure following an increase in such crimes this year, said the police response also played a role, and that the rise in murders should also be seen in the context of cuts to policing and public services. The Home Office minister Victoria Atkins denied that police cuts could be blamed, saying a government study had found no apparent connection between police numbers and earlier rises in violent crime. Mr Khan recently launched an initiative based on the public health approach pioneered in Glasgow. But, sp
  18. The UK government has announced an investigation into personalized pricing practices in online retail following growing concerns that vulnerable consumers are at risk of price discrimination through the use of ecommerce technologies that vary prices for products such as cars, holidays and household goods via the use of personal data points. The Competition Markets Authority (CMA) will also be involved in the research, which was announced yesterday. The government-commissioned research is intended to investigate how widespread the practice of personalized onl
  19. QUITO (Reuters) - - Ecuador does not plan to intervene with the British government on behalf of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in talks over his situation as an asylee in the South American country’s London embassy, Ecuador’s foreign minister said on Tuesday. Foreign Minister José Valencia said in an interview with Reuters that Ecuador’s only responsibility was looking after Assange’s wellbeing, after the Australian national sued the country over new conditions placed on his asylum in the London embassy. “Ecuador has no responsibility to take any further
  20. Businesses are becoming exasperated at the lack of progress in Brexit talks and are pausing or cancelling investment in the UK. Nicole Sykes, head of EU negotiations at the CBI Businesses are becoming exasperated at the lack of progress in Brexit talks and are pausing or cancelling investment in the UK. A week that many had hoped would bring progress in the talks has now come and gone without a breakthrough. Employers group the CBI says 80% of surveyed members feel Brexit uncertainty has already had a negative impact on investment decisions.
  21. Tributes paid to Sheiku Adams: 'a great guy who never had a bad word to say' Tributes have been paid to a man who died in a fall from a third floor flat after knife-wielding burglars broke into his home. Sheiku Adams plunged to his death in Highgate Road, in Camden, north London, on Thursday night. Police discovered the 49-year-old on the floor outside after responding to a call he was being burgled. Officers believe it was a targeted break-in but they have not said how they suspect Mr Adams came to fall. Neighbours have since express
  22. Green campaigners have lined up to attack chancellor Philip Hammond for announcing a multi-billion-pound boost for building and upgrading roads – days after world scientists urgently warned that greenhouse gas emissions must be cut. In Monday’s budget, Mr Hammond is due to champion £30bn of funding for new roads and road repairs, hailing it “the biggest-ever cash injection for England’s largest roads”. Yet the chancellor is recycling an old Conservative party announcement, The Independent can reveal – and environmental experts including Greenpeace’s chief sc
  23. The Leicester City owner's helicopter has crashed in a car park outside the club's ground shortly after taking off following a match. It is not known if Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha was in the helicopter at the time. Leicester City had been playing West Ham United in the Premier League at their King Power stadium. One witness said he saw Leicester's goalkeeper Kasper Schmeichel run out towards the crashed helicopter. The game, which ended 1-1, kicked off at 17:30 BST and finished about one hour before the helicopter took off. Mr Srivaddhanaprabha was at the game and spoke
  24. Football will continue to be a force in the United Kingdom. The NFL on Tuesday confirmed that London will host four regular-season games in 2019 at Wembley Stadium and the new stadium being built for Tottenham Hotspur. The league did not specify which teams will make the trip overseas or when the games will take place. "The games in the past few weeks have once again demonstrated the incredible passion of NFL fans in the UK," NFL executive vice president Mark Waller said in a statement. "The support of our stadium partners, the Mayor o
  25. Chancellor Phillip Hammond targets tax avoidance by large tech firms in the Budget. Technology giants will have to pay more tax in the UK under new regulations unveiled by the Government today. In his Budget statement this afternoon, Chancellor Phillip Hammond revealed a two percent "digital services tax" on large tech firms such as Amazon, Facebook and Google. From April 2020, large social media platforms, search engines and online marketplaces will pay a 2 percent tax on the revenues they earn which are linked to UK users. The tax f
×
×
  • Create New...