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  1. Canonical has announced the release of Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine. The new version will be supported for nine months as is the case with all non-LTS releases and is the final version before the next LTS update in April 2020. With this update, Canonical has updated the core pieces of software including GNOME, which was bumped to version 3.34. Additionally, users can also use ZFS on the root file system as an experimental feature. While the standard Ubuntu release will be what most people flock to, the 19.10 update is also available for other Ubuntu flavours such as Ubuntu Budgie, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, and Xubuntu – each ships with a different desktop environment where one may be better than another for your particular needs. Aside from GNOME 3.34 and ZFS support, Ubuntu 19.10 also ships with Linux kernel 5.3 which includes support for new hardware. If you use the latest modern hardware and have had issues getting Ubuntu to recognise components, now could be a good time to have another look to see if everything is working. Installing Ubuntu isn’t too difficult a task, just head over to the Ubuntu website and download the ISO you’d like. Once that’s done you’ll want to write the ISO to a DVD or USB and begin the installation, you can find more information on this with Canonical’s tutorial. Source: Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine released with GNOME 3.34 and ZFS support (via Neowin)
  2. Newly revealed exploit gave anyone root access on Linux systems Canonical has issued an urgent security fix to the ‘sudo’ package in the Ubuntu archives following the discovery of a major security flaw. A critical fix has rolled out to all users of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, 18.04 LTS, 19.04 and 19.10 (and one assumes Ubuntu 14.04 ESR too) — just run a sudo apt upgrade to install it. But what about the flaw inquisition? Well, if you’re yet to hear about it I appreciate meditative disconnect from social media. The oft toxic waste pools of chatter were with wet with alarm — some manufactured, the rest well weighted — over CVE-2019-14287 when it was announced yesterday, October 14. The exploit, described by TheHackerNews, who also first reported the flaw, is thus: “The vulnerability in question is a sudo security policy bypass issue that could allow a malicious user or a program to execute arbitrary commands as root on a targeted Linux system even when the “sudoers configuration” explicitly disallows the root access.” In other words: anyone could gain root access to a Linux system just by specifying the user ID “-1” . Now, I am not a security expert by any stretch — I use automatic login on everything — but I have to say this specific flaw is rather novel in that it’s so…basic. Like many, I’m used to headline exploits being obtuse and complicated, requiring a highly targeted and unconventional attack vector or unique deployment method. But this one? It could, in theory, be triggered on an affected system — which in this instance is almost anything running Linux — by a single command… Although the implications of the issue is mildly terrifying, it is mercifully redundant now that a security patch is available. So if you haven’t installed it, stop reading and go do it! Source
  3. A detailed look at Ubuntu’s new experimental ZFS installer Let's take a sneak ZFS peek under the hood of Ubuntu Eoan Ermine's latest build. Yesterday brought exciting news on the ZFS and Ubuntu fronts—experimental ZFS root support in the installer for Ubuntu's upcoming interim release, Eoan Ermine. The feature appeared in the 2019-10-09 daily build of Eoan—it's not in the regular beta release and, in fact, wasn't even in the "current daily" when we first went to download it. It's that new! (Readers wanting to play with the new functionality can find it in today's daily build, available here.) First image of article image gallery. Please visit the source link to see all images. For the ZFS newbies If you're new to the ZFS hype train, you might wonder why a new filesystem option in an OS installer is a big deal. So here's a quick explanation: ZFS is a copy-on-write filesystem, which can take atomic snapshots of entire filesystems. This looks like sheer magic if you're not used to it—a snapshot of a 10TB filesystem can be taken instantly without interrupting any system process in the slightest. Once the snapshot is taken, it's an immutable record of the exact, block-for-block condition of the filesystem at the moment in time the snapshot was taken. When a snapshot is first taken, it consumes no additional disk space. As time goes by and changes are made to the filesystem, the space required to keep the snapshot grows by the amount of data that has been deleted or altered. So let's say you snapshot a 10TB filesystem: the snapshot completes instantly, requiring no additional room. Then you delete a 5MB JPEG file—now the snapshot consumes 5MB of disk space, because it still has the JPEG you deleted. Then you change 5MB of data in a database, and the snapshot takes 10MB—5MB for the JPEG you deleted and another 5MB for the data that you altered in the database. That's just one awesome ZFS feature. There's also the ability to manage multiple disks in a native RAID-like system, inline compression with selectable algorithms, rapid asynchronous incremental replication, and more. But we're going to focus mostly on the snapshots here, because one other thing you can do with a snapshot is roll it back. First image of article image gallery. Please visit the source link to see all images. Although there isn't any support built into Eoan's apt package manager for automatically taking snapshots yet, we can demonstrate a snapshot—oops—rollback moment manually. In the above gallery, first we take a ZFS snapshot. Eoan has split our root filesystem into tons of little datasets (more on that later), so we use the -r option for zfs snapshot to recursively take snapshots throughout the entire tree. Now that we've insured ourselves against mistakes, we do something we're going to regret. For the purposes of this demo, we're just removing Firefox—but we could really recover from anything up to and including an rm -rf --no-preserve-root / this way with a little extra legwork. After removing Firefox, we need to roll back our snapshots to restore the system to its original condition. Since the root filesystem is scattered through a bunch of individual datasets, we need to roll them all back individually. Although this is a pain for the casual user without additional tooling, it does make it possible to do more granular restore operations if we're feeling picky—like rolling back the root filesystem without rolling back /home. Ubuntu will undoubtedly eventually have tooling to make this easier, but for the moment, we do a bit of sysadmin-fu and pipe zfs list to grep to awk to xargs, oh my. The command line acrobatics might have been obnoxious, but the rollback itself was instantaneous, and Firefox has returned. It still doesn't work quite right, though, due to orphaned filehandles—we rolled back a live mounted root filesystem, which is kind of a cowboy thing to do. To make things entirely right, a reboot is necessary—but after the reboot, everything's the way it once was, and without the need to wait through any lengthy Windows Restore Point-style groveling over the filesystem. For the ZFS enthusiasts In this section, we're going to take a detailed look at just how Ubuntu is carving up the filesystems in Eoan's experimental installer. The version in our daily build is 0.8.1, so this is great news for the ZFS fans among us, even without the experimental root installer—assuming the final version of Eoan follows this one, we'll get native encryption, TRIM, device removal, and zpool checkpoints. These features have been in the ZFS on Linux master since 0.8, but this is the first time they've shown up in Ubuntu's native ZFS. First image of article image gallery. Please visit the source link to see all images. So far—remember, this is alpha software in a daily build—the installer doesn't give you any control over how it carves up the disk when you select a ZFS install; it just does what it wants to do. The Eoan VM I created has a single 20GB virtual disk. Eoan's installer carved this into one primary partition and two logical—a small UEFI boot partition and partitions for two separate ZFS storage pools, named bpool and rpool. Bpool is pretty boring; it's just where the system's /boot directory gets mounted. Eoan made this pool 2GB, which is twice what a conservative /boot is normally provisioned to; this is probably to allow headroom to maintain a fairly deep archive of snapshots in the future. rpool gets all the remaining disk space after the UEFI and bpool partitions are created; it's where all the fun stuff goes, including your root filesystem, home directory, and so forth. Beneath rpool, you'll find a pretty bewildering array of small datasets, all of which correspond to particular vital areas in what would normally be a single root filesystem. This appears to us to be an inherited BSD-ism—most Linux distributions left the concept of heavily partitioned disks with multiple filesystems behind twenty years ago, but FreeBSD—which has had root ZFS options in its installer for many years now—was a lot more stubborn about it. The good thing about carving up the root filesystem into so many separate datasets is that you can snapshot and roll them back individually. In some cases, this is great—there's an obvious, clear, and useful distinction between rolling back the root filesystem as a whole and rolling back your own home directory, for example. Most users—even pretty competent sysadmin types—will be a lot more confused about how and why you might want to roll back /usr without rolling back, say, /var/lib/AccountServices, though. It's nice that you can if you really want to, but we're not so sure the capability outweighs the utility of a simpler approach. First image of article image gallery. Please visit the source link to see all images. Peeking a little deeper, we can see that Eoan isn't setting any significant per-dataset properties on all these separate datasets. It is setting compression=lz4 on across the entire pool, though. This is a good thing—many people worry that compressed filesystems are slow filesystems, but LZ4 stream compression is so lightweight that it's effectively "free." We've done extensive testing across years of ZFS experience and have never seen a situation where LZ4 wasn't a good idea. Even a $50 tinkertoy APU from several years ago can compress and decompress LZ4 faster than a pair of fast SSDs can keep up, with no significant CPU utilization. We did spot a bug pretty quickly while looking over the pools and datasets. Both bpool itself and bpool/BOOT/ubuntu_oalrlu (we think the string of random-seeming characters is intended to be a unique system identifier) have /boot set as their mountpoint. This clearly isn't causing any significant problems right now, and we're sure it will get ironed out well before Eoan goes live. (Edit: a Canonical core admin clarified that this is not a bug; bpool is set canmount=no. The reason for bpool's unmountable mountpoint is so that any new datasets created under bpool will automatically mount at /boot/newdataset, not at /bpool/newdataset.) Although Eoan created datasets automatically for both my real user account homedir and root's, the adduser command didn't create one for a new test user. This is something we also expect to get ironed out reasonably quickly—even if adduser itself never takes those steps, the GUI for adding new users likely will, if it doesn't already. This is also pretty simple to do manually; in the above example, where new user test is not logged in, we could upgrade test to a zfs dataset homedir like this: [email protected]:~$ zfs create rpool/ROOT/ubuntu_oal4lu/test_twm547 [email protected]:~$ rsync -ha /home/test/ /rpool/ROOT/ubuntu_oal4lu/test_twm547/ [email protected]:~$ rm -r /home/test [email protected]:~$ chown test.test /rpool/ROOT/ubuntu_oal4lu/test_twm547 [email protected]:~$ zfs set mountpoint=/home/test rpool/ROOT/ubuntu_oal4lu/test_twm547 [email protected]:~$ zfs mount rpool/ROOT/ubuntu_oal4lu/test_twm547 ... and that would be that. The next big thing we looked for was a mechanism for automatically taking snapshots. You can't roll back to a snapshot you never took, so a safe ZFS system should automatically take snapshots pretty regularly. There's nothing in Eoan to take snapshots for you yet—the only cron job is the standard one that scrubs the pool once per month—but there are a few general purpose ZFS snapshot orchestration tools readily available; these include zfs-auto-snapshot and my own sanoid. Alpha software is alpha! In conclusion, we want to remind readers that while ZFS itself is very stable, Ubuntu's ZFS-enabled installer and use of it as a root filesystem are still alpha quality. We do not recommend that you attempt to use the new ZFS installer on systems you care deeply about until the installer makes it past alpha, past beta, and all the way to full release quality. This also means you should be kind about any bugs you find playing with it in the meantime—again, this is alpha software and bugs are not only possible, they're to be expected. With all that said, we're extremely excited about ZFS on root making visible progress in Ubuntu—and we hope these features and more will make it into Eoan Ermine's expected end-of-the-month release. Listing image by Jim Salter Source: A detailed look at Ubuntu’s new experimental ZFS installer (Ars Technica) (To view the article's image galleries, please visit the above link)
  4. brolly

    Any Linux Users Here?

    Hi guys I know there are lot of windows users in this forum. Are there any Linux users around. I use a linux distro as a host machine and i run windows in guest machines. It would be nice to have a linux chat and share views and ideas here
  5. The modern Linux desktop is one where "everything just works," and "you're able to use the applications that you've come to rely on in your day-to-day life," says Canonical's Will Cooke. Following Canonical's pivot away from its internally-developed Unity user interface and Mir display server, Ubuntu has enjoyed two relatively low-drama years, as the Linux Desktop market homogenized during its transition back to a customized GNOME desktop. In a review of the most recent release, TechRepublic's Jack Wallen declared that "Ubuntu 19.04 should seriously impress anyone looking for a fast and reliable Linux desktop platform." Largely, it's been a slow-and-steady pace for Ubuntu since the pivot from Unity to GNOME, though the distribution made headlines for plans to end support for 32-bit support. This prompted Valve, operators of games marketplace Steam, to re-think its approach toward Ubuntu, which it previously characterized as "as the best-supported path for desktop users." TechRepublic's James Sanders interviewed Will Cooke, director of engineering for Ubuntu Desktop at Canonical, about the distribution's long-term plans for legacy 32-bit support, shipping a desktop in a post-Unity-era Ubuntu, and why Linux should be the first choice for users migrating from Windows 7 prior to the end of support. (This interview was lightly edited for clarity.) How support for 32-bit programs will be handled in Ubuntu In June, Canonical announced plans to stop providing new 32-bit x86 packages starting with Ubuntu 19.10, sparking a firestorm of controversy among users of WINE and the Steam games platform, among others. Following public outcry, the company announced that a subset of 32-bit x86 packages will be maintained to support legacy software. For comparison, the first x86-64 processors will be 16 years old when Ubuntu 19.10 is released. Fedora is likely to drop the 32-bit kernel with the release of Fedora 31, though continue to provide packages for application compatibility. MacOS 10.15 (Catalina), expected this fall, is dropping support for 32-bit applications outright. Eventually, the amount of engineering time needed to protract legacy support will approaching the negative end of a cost-benefit analysis, making this a difficult decision for Linux distribution maintainers. TechRepublic: Canonical—like any other company—has constraints on resources. You have to budget your development time. What's the decision-making process like for balancing legacy compatibility with maintainability over the lifespan of a release? Will Cooke: The decision-making process is the same as any other decision-making process in Ubuntu. It's led by engineers who are doing the work, and have to keep this thing going. Generally speaking, Ubuntu is a community project. It happens that Canonical is the commercial entity behind it, and we put the vast majority of the manpower behind it. But, we are built of a community of people who happen to work for Canonical, and people who don't work for Canonical but are still very interested in shaping the Ubuntu product. We congregate in mailing lists, on IRC, and increasingly now on more modern communications schemes like Discourse, for example. And that's where we raised these ideas. People are free to come along with their ideas, speak to other engineers about those ideas, and then discuss it, engineer to engineer. If a decision is reached, then move ahead with that plan. In the case of the 32-bit stuff, this is something that we've been talking about for a long, long time. We started gathering some more information about hardware with a bunch of reports in [Ubuntu] 18.04 and that told us very clearly that—statistically—nobody is running 32-bit anymore. So the conversation was, we could save a significant amount of time and energy if we were to not do this anymore… we had a few discussions around it, but there were no objections raised. And so that's what happened... we made the announcement and lots of people said, "I've got my specific use case—be that gaming, or legacy applications, or printer drivers—what can we do about that?" We foresaw some of these problems. The solution we had was around containerization, or packaging things as Snaps, and that—technically speaking—would have been, and still is, a very viable option. People have, for example, Steam running in that container, and they can run their games just fine. The feedback we heard from the community was that this container system is not what they wanted. So it was relatively easy for us to change our plans there, so that's what we've done. We've committed to maintain those 32-bit libraries, so that people don't have to concern themselves with containerizing their apps, or finding 64-bit equivalents. So, 32-bit will continue to work, and we will speak again about it in probably a couple of years. By then, the state of containerization will have moved on, and the plan will be—if we do go down the containerization route—then it will be entirely transparent to the user, and everything will still work. We've got some really good feedback from people about things that are important to them—Steam, legacy games, legacy software—we know the sorts of things that people are using 32-bit for now, and we can make sure that we focus our efforts on a really solid solution for those use cases. TR: How different, in engineering terms, is maintaining the plumbing to compile a subset of 32-bit packages to maintain compatibility, as opposed to packaging 32-bit binaries from Ubuntu 18.04 in Snap, for software compatibility? Cooke: Generally speaking, there's not a whole lot of difference. Either we build those 32-bit libraries, or we don't. They're already built on 64-bit hardware and compiled in 32-bit mode, so we don't have to maintain extra hardware going forward. The problem with 32-bit is that a lot of important security fixes… are only available for 64-bit software. It's not really about how technically difficult it is, it's that the 32-bit software doesn't get the same exposure. Nobody—statistically speaking—is running it, and a lot of the security fixes simply don't exist for those architectures. So, it's not that it's necessarily more complex or more difficult. It's that the quality is not there and can't be there. Keeping Ubuntu's identity while shipping the GNOME desktop TR: Ubuntu is just over two years into its transition away from the Unity desktop environment to GNOME 3. How has that transition worked, in terms of balancing GNOME 3's design choices with your requirements for Ubuntu with things like keeping desktop icons? Cooke: It's been pretty straight forward. We work with GNOME, we have people who are GNOME members who work in the GNOME community. We have a good relationship with decision makers and with engineers in GNOME. Of course, sometimes we have differences of opinion about the way that we think things should work. We're a distribution and we distribute GNOME. But we also are Ubuntu, we're a recognized brand. We want to… ensure that what we provide our users is what they want. When we did the switch to GNOME Shell from Unity, we did a survey [asking] people straightforward questions like, "What sort of features do you want to see continue in Ubuntu Desktop?" The answer came through very, very clearly that people liked having the launcher on the left, and they wanted to keep that feature there. They liked having desktop icons and they wanted to keep that feature there. We've made decisions based on data from our user base, from our community. They have provided that feedback and we've done what the majority of people want. Sometimes that doesn't go with the ideals of GNOME design, but we're comfortable with delivering what we see as value on top of GNOME. That's delivering a product which gives people consistency between the old days of Unity 7, and the new days of GNOME Shell. That transition was as easy as possible, everybody had a chance to have a say in it, and the answers were pretty clear. What the future holds for the Linux desktop The first stable release of GTK4 is anticipated later this year. Naturally, future versions of the GTK-powered GNOME desktop environment will utilize this major version update. Concurrently, low-level changes are coming for multimedia handling, while Wayland is primed to replace X11 across major distributions—including Ubuntu. When fully realized, these changes will make for rich media applications more performant. TR: What's the biggest thing you're looking forward to in GTK4, and how will that impact Ubuntu on the Desktop? Cooke: There's a lot of lower-level architecture changes going on, and there are things like PipeWire being developed which will give us the next generation of audio routing, which will be very exciting. I think this will give us options for professional audio production, low-latency audio, all sorts of clever routing of audio devices and handling of audio devices. When things like PulseAudio were originally designed, [these] were never foreseen. Having that sort of architectural low-level rework of significant pieces of the desktop stack is very important and it's going to be really cool. The other thing that I'm really looking forward to is the potential change in architecture such that, when the shell itself crashes, it won't take your entire session down with it. This was a big sticking point for us, in the move to Wayland… we took the decision that we weren't going to risk having users lose work in that way, especially when they've been used to, for example, Unity 7 crashing, and then coming back with all of your applications still loaded. We wanted to maintain that feature, if you like. We fixed a lot of those bugs upstream and… generally speaking the Wayland session is extremely stable now. We are looking forward to being able to move over to Wayland as soon as we can, and I think that [the release of] GNOME 4 could be the right time to do that. TR: What release of Ubuntu would you forecast shipping Wayland as the default? Cooke: I can tell you it won't be for 20.04. We're too close to the release now. We're only one cycle away from the release. The cycle before the LTS release is a final fit-and-finish. We should be going into that cycle, which starts in October this year, with these decisions already made. So we haven't got time, in six months, to debug and fully test a change to the display server. In order to try and get it in for the next LTS—Ubuntu 22.04—we will be moving pretty quickly to get Wayland as the default again and shake the rest of the bugs out. So I think we'll see it move in 20.10, and then we'll have to see how that goes, and then we'll make a decision from there. Why Linux is compelling for users switching from Windows 7 Support for Windows 7 is coming to an end in just half a year, though Windows 7 still holds a 36% market share. Considering the relatively high price tag associated with Microsoft's extended support subscriptions for Windows 7, many organizations—including potentially the South Korean government—are turning toward Linux in an effort to prolong the lifespan of relatively modern hardware. TR: What would you want people with not particularly old hardware who are looking at migrating away from Windows 7 to know about Ubuntu? Cooke: I would be interested to learn what it is that they're doing with their computer, because I would hazard a guess that the majority of them are web browsing. If that is where you spend 90% of your computer time, is in front of a web browser using… Gmail or Office 365, those sorts of products, then you need to know that Linux is there for you and will allow you to do exactly the same stuff that you're doing in your web browser. You won't be plagued with continual updates and you will be protected from web-based vulnerabilities on Windows. So, you need to know that Linux is a secure place, that you can get your work done in just the same way that you're currently doing it. But with all of the added protection that comes from having Linux. TR: Over the last five years, what is the biggest innovation that eased a pain point for using Linux on the desktop? Cooke: There's millions of things, really. I don't think I could put my finger on a single one. I think the summary would be that you don't have to drop down into a text editor and fiddle with config files anymore. The auto-detection that happens in Linux now—it could be from USB devices being hotplugged, it could be external monitors, it could be all of the hardware, the sound card, the network card, all of that stuff that's inside the computer. All of that now gets detected automatically. Whereas, five years ago—maybe a little bit more than five years ago—you would have a relatively new piece of hardware, and then you'd have to be compiling kernel drivers yourself, or editing code to try and work around bugs in things that didn't quite work yet. So that maturity, and the fact that Linux is now taken so seriously by the likes of Intel—which means that drivers come along very, very early in the development process for that hardware—means that the overall desktop experience these days is painless by comparison. Things do just work these days. Then you couple that with the likes of Skype, Spotify, and Google with Chrome, for example, who have been bringing these very critical applications. Critical because that's what users want. So you combine those two things, and you've got a very powerful story—not only will you be able to install Linux onto your hardware and there's a very good chance that everything will just work, but when you do install it and it just works, you're able to use the applications that you've come to rely on in your day-to-day life. Source
  6. Canonical’s Ubuntu operating system is one of the biggest names in desktop GNU/Linux. But if you plan to play PC games on Linux, you might want to start looking around for a different Linux distro. Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek announced last week that starting with Ubuntu 19:10, which comes out in October, Canonical would no longer provide 32-bit builds of applications and libraries. This being Linux, there will be workarounds — but many existing apps may not work out of the box anymore. Case in point: a number of games from GOG cannot be installed on a pre-release version of Ubuntu 19:10. So it’s not all that surprising that a developer for Valve says that now that Canonical is dropping support for 32-bit software, Valve’s Steam game client is dropping support for Ubuntu. That doesn’t necessarily mean Linux gamers need to switch right away: Valve will continue to support Ubuntu 18:04 LTS, for example, which is a year-old operating system that still has another four years of official “long term” support. And Valve plans to “evaluate ways to minimize breakage for exiting users” moving forward. But the company also plans to shift its focus from Ubuntu to a different GNU/Linux distribution at some point. Source
  7. Microsoft has been working hard on making sure developers have all the tools they need for development. The company allowed users to install different flavours of Linux using Windows Subsystem for Linux. Now the company has made another change which should help developers install Ubuntu which is one of the most popular OS based on Linux. Now Windows 10 users can use Hyper-V manager to install Ubuntu easily on their Windows 10 device. Microsoft is now offering users an easy way to install Ubuntu 18.04 LTS or 19.04. To install, head to Start and search for Hyper-V Manager. Once you open it, look for your device name on the left side and right click on it. Now, click on Quick Create and you will get an option to select the Ubuntu version. Just follow the steps to install it on your system. If you’re not seeing Hyper-V Manager then search for “Turn Windows features on or off” and open it. Once done, search for Hyper-V and Windows Subsystem for Linux and check both of them. Now click on Okay and let Windows download necessary files. Reboot the PC once done and follow the steps above to install Ubuntu on your system. Source
  8. ubuntu made easy: Introduction to Linux, Ubuntu brings Linux to the masses, but it can still be intimidating for newbies, neophytes, and geeks-in-training. With Ubuntu Made Easy by your side you'll be ready to face any challenge, and you'll discover just how fun Linux can be. Packed with tips, tricks, and helpful pointers, Ubuntu Made Easy will get you up and running with the world's most popular free operating system. Authors Rickford Grant and Phil Bull walk you through common tasks like installing and playing games, accessing your favorite social networks, troubleshooting hardware and software problems, interacting with your Windows installation, and more. With the help of the book's straightforward explanations and step-by-step projects, you'll also learn how to: Set up printers, scanners, USB flash drives, and other hardware Install and play free games like Frets on Fire and Frozen Bubble as well as commercial hits like Braid and World of Goo Watch DVDs, listen to music, and sync your mobile devices Edit and share digital photos and videos Create documents, spreadsheets, and presentations Work with the command line (or avoid it altogether!) Product details PDF: 480 pages Language: English ISBN-10: 1593274254 ISBN-13: 978-1593274252 Download: Site: https://www.upload.ee Sharecode: /files/9538062/_LINUX_for_0xF7C2_Whi_.rar.html ALSO: Site: https://drop.me Sharecode: /BZ3Lx4
  9. By Joey Sneddon Wondering what Mark Shuttleworth thinks about IBM buying Red Hat? Well, wonder no more. The Ubuntu founder has shared his thoughts on IBM’s game-changing purchase in a short but pointed blog post. And, few of you will be surprised to learn, the space-faring free-software fan thinks the deal marks a “significant moment in the progression of open source to the mainstream”. And rightly so: there was a time when open source was viewed as the outside option. Now, thanks to companies like Red Hat and Canonical, it’s the de-facto option. Naturally Shuttleworth is also feeling bullish about Ubuntu’s position as a Red Hat rival, particularly in the area of cloud computing (the main market motivator behind IBM’s $34 billion buy). And, he adds, the world has moved on — even from Red Hat. “The decline in RHEL growth contrasted with the acceleration in Linux more broadly is a strong market indicator of the next wave of open source,” he writes. “Public cloud workloads have largely avoided RHEL. Container workloads even more so. Moving at the speed of developers means embracing open source in ways that have led the world’s largest companies, the world’s fastest moving startups, and those who believe that security and velocity are best solved together, to Ubuntu.” Shuttleworth says theres an ‘accelerated momentum’ behind Ubuntu within the enterprise space, in all areas, from IoT, public cloud and Kubernetes to machine learning and AI — all sectors IBM and Red Hat will be hoping its combined clout can carve more marketshare from. Companies aren’t just using Ubuntu. They’re choosing Ubuntu. It’s a confidence that won’t be knocked by IBM’s deal: “We are determined that Ubuntu is judged as the world’s most secure, most cost-effective and most faithful vehicle for open source initiatives. We look forward to helping [companies…] deliver the innovation on which their future growth depends.” While Mark Shuttleworth’s statement doesn’t strictly relate to desktop matters (the primary focus of this site) his take is worth hearing all the same. It’s reassuring to know that far from being intimated or downbeat about the biggest deal in open-source history, they feel Ubuntu still has plenty to offer. In a game of who can be the biggest, best and most bountiful open-source software company, can the wider FOSS community ever lose? Source
  10. Microsoft PowerShell is a cross-platform automation and configuration tool/framework that works well with your existing tools and is optimized for dealing with structured data (e.g. JSON, CSV, XML, etc.), REST APIs, and object models. Microsoft PowerShell features 130 plus "commandlets" (cmdlets) with commands to handle numerous jobs, whether it is service or process administration, registry, object manipulation, and more. Management can be done locally or remotely. An icon will be created in your start menu. Additional documentation is available at the Author link above Whats New: Build and Packaging Improvements Aggregate native components into a single NuGet package "Microsoft.PowerShell.Native". Update the version of NuGet packages referenced by PowerShell. Fix release build for macOS. Test Fix xUnit tests. Add new tests for hosting PowerShell SDK NuGet packages. Home: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/ Changelog: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/blob/master/CHANGELOG.md Downloads Page: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/releases/tag/v6.0.4 Downloads: 49.7 MB powershell-6.0.4-1.rhel.7.x86_64.rpm 24.8 MB powershell-6.0.4-linux-arm32.tar.gz 50.1 MB powershell-6.0.4-linux-x64.tar.gz 48.7 MB powershell-6.0.4-osx-x64.tar.gz 49 MB powershell-6.0.4-osx.10.12-x64.pkg 31.9 MB PowerShell-6.0.4-win-arm32.zip 31.8 MB PowerShell-6.0.4-win-arm64.zip 49.3 MB PowerShell-6.0.4-win-x64.msi 50.5 MB PowerShell-6.0.4-win-x64.zip 45.4 MB PowerShell-6.0.4-win-x86.msi 46.5 MB PowerShell-6.0.4-win-x86.zip 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.4-1.debian.8_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.4-1.debian.9_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.4-1.ubuntu.14.04_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.4-1.ubuntu.16.04_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.4-1.ubuntu.17.04_amd64.deb Source code (zip) Source code (tar.gz)
  11. Microsoft PowerShell is a cross-platform automation and configuration tool/framework that works well with your existing tools and is optimized for dealing with structured data (e.g. JSON, CSV, XML, etc.), REST APIs, and object models. Microsoft PowerShell features 130 plus "commandlets" (cmdlets) with commands to handle numerous jobs, whether it is service or process administration, registry, object manipulation, and more. Management can be done locally or remotely. An icon will be created in your start menu. Additional documentation is available at the Author link above Whats New: Build and Packaging Improvements Remove PackageManagement installed by PowerShellGet and pin PackageManagement to 1.1.7.0 to maintain the ability to patch Pin PowerShellGet to 1.6.0 to maintain the ability to patch MSI installs Update NuGet package references to the latest and get fix for CVE-2018-8356 Enable NuGet Package Registration for compliance (#7053) Restore when building test projects Update to DotNet Runtime Framework 2.0.8 Specify the runtime when running 'dotnet restore' in 'Start-PSBuild' (#6345) Update version of fpm to resolve issues installing MSI: Update path with proper value (#6441) MSI: Remove the version from the product name (#6415) Migrate the macOS official binary build to VSTS mac hosted preview (#6363) Home: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/ Changelog: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/blob/master/CHANGELOG.md Downloads Page: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/releases/tag/v6.0.3 Downloads: 49.7 MB powershell-6.0.3-1.rhel.7.x86_64.rpm 24.8 MB powershell-6.0.3-linux-arm32.tar.gz 50.1 MB powershell-6.0.3-linux-x64.tar.gz 48.7 MB powershell-6.0.3-osx-x64.tar.gz 49 MB powershell-6.0.3-osx.10.12-x64.pkg 31.8 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-arm32.zip 31.8 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-arm64.zip 49.1 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-x64.msi 1.85 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-x64.wixpdb 50.4 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-x64.zip 45.4 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-x86.msi 1.84 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-x86.wixpdb 46.4 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-x86.zip 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.3-1.debian.8_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.3-1.debian.9_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.3-1.ubuntu.14.04_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.3-1.ubuntu.16.04_amd64.deb Source code (zip) Source code (tar.gz)
  12. Karamjit

    Ubuntu Bionic Beaver 18.04

    Get the latest LTS version of Ubuntu, for desktop PCs and laptops. LTS stands for long-term support — which means five years, until April 2023, of free security and maintenance updates, guaranteed. Recommended system requirements: 2 GHz dual core processor or better 2 GB system memory 25 GB of free hard drive space Either a DVD drive or a USB port for the installer media Internet access is helpful Homepage: https://www.ubuntu.com Release Notes: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/BionicBeaver/ReleaseNotes Download Page: http://releases.ubuntu.com/18.04/ubuntu-18.04-desktop-amd64.iso Download With Torrent: http://releases.ubuntu.com/18.04/ubuntu-18.04-desktop-amd64.iso.torrent
  13. There are now two versions of Ubuntu available to download from the Microsoft Store. Adding to the existing Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04 has also now arrived. The addition comes just weeks after the official launch of Ubuntu 18.04, and it gives Windows 10 users the option of working with the new LTS (long term support) build of Ubuntu. The older version remains supported for the time being as well. See also: Canonical finally comments on Ubuntu Linux Snap Store security failure Ubuntu Snap Store app contained cryptocurrency miner Ubuntu Linux 18.04 Bionic Beaver is here -- download it now! Weighing in at a little over 210MB, Ubuntu 18.04 provides access to the Ubuntu Terminal, as well as the latest version of command line utilities such as bash, ssh, git, apt and so on. In order to install the software, you'll need to enable Windows Subsystem for Linux, and you will find that 16.04 and 18.04 will install happily alongside each other if you would like to have access to both of them. In a blog post over on MSDN, Microsoft's Tara Raj says: We're happy to announce that Ubuntu 18.04 is now available in the Microsoft store. You might be asking why there are a couple different Ubuntu apps and what we plan to do with those. The Ubuntu apps you see in the Store are published by Canonical. We partner with them to release the apps and test them on WSL. As per Canonical's LTS schedule, both Ubuntu 16.04 and 18.04 are supported for 3 years. Keeping this overlap in support in mind, "Ubuntu" is still 16.04 and "Ubuntu 18.04" is as named. We will be Updating the Store descriptions and such shortly. You can download Ubuntu 18.04 from the Microsoft Store Source: betanews
  14. If you regularly use Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps on Windows 10, you have some good news coming your way. Microsoft has announced that starting with Windows 10 version 1803, developers can opt-in to support multiple instances of their UWP app. In previous versions of Windows 10, users could only run one instance of a UWP app at one time. However, with version 1803, an app with multiple-instance capability will be able to run a new process if an activation request comes through. Microsoft has detailed several code samples and templates that explain how developers can add the capability to their UWP apps. New or existing instances of a UWP app can be launched and customized separately using these implementations. The company explains that: Interestingly, multi-view has been available in the default Calculator app for quite a long time. However, this is slightly different than multi-instancing because there is only one Calculator.exe process running. The firm notes that multiple-instancing has been available in the Insider Preview since build 17074 and the accompanying Windows SDK 17069, but the project templates are being made available now. In its latest Windows Community Standup episode, Microsoft has explained that some apps will only need minimal changes in the code to support multiple-instancing while complex apps will require relatively larger modifications. Furthermore, there will be no limit on the number of active instances of an app, and if one instance crashes, the others will keep operating. While multi-instancing in UWP apps is certainly an exciting prospect, Microsoft has noted a few considerations that developers need to keep in mind. For example: background audio apps do not support multi-instancing, and the feature is only supported in desktop and Internet of Things (IoT) projects. You can check out the complete details in Microsoft's documentation here. Source
  15. GNOME 3.26 will be the default desktop environment Work on the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system continues, and Canonical's Will Cooke is back with more information on the Ubuntu Desktop team bakes for the final release, which will land on October 19, 2017. Last week, we told you that Ubuntu 17.10 will support all known driverless printing standards and that captive portal detection is now enabled by default. Also, Ubuntu 17.10 received initial support for PolicyKit authentication in the Snapd Snappy daemon, to finally allow users to install and remove Snaps from the Snappy Store without having to create an Ubuntu One account. And now, it looks like Ubuntu Dock is getting support for indicators and notification badges. This is great news for those using apps that support libappindicators, as the soon-to-be-released GNOME 3.26 desktop environment won't ship with support for indicators. On top of that, enabling notification badge support in Ubuntu Dock is a must for ex-Unity users. "We’re adding notification badge support to the Dock extension. This branch has been proposed to the upstream project and is awaiting review," reveals Will Cooke, Ubuntu Desktop Director, Canonical. "We’ve packaged the KStatusNotifier extension to provide support for indicators. This will provide support for apps which use libappindicators which was removed from GNOME 3.26." Wayland session won't work on PCs with non-hybrid Nvidia GPUs As you are aware, Ubuntu 17.10 will be using the next-generation Wayland display server by default instead of X11 (X.Org Server), which is available as an alternative from the GNOME Display Manager (GDM). But, Will Cooke warns users that the Wayland session won't work on PCs with non-hybrid Nvidia GPUs, unless they enable the experimental KMS support, which will break X11. As such, people with this kind of systems won't see the X11 session to not end up with a broken Ubuntu installation if they feel adventurous to enable Kernel Mode Setting (KMS) for the Wayland session. Meanwhile, the Ubuntu Desktop team still works to improve the video playback performance in Ubuntu 17.10 to reduce CPU usage, and hardware-accelerated video support on Intel GPUs. Other than that, the Ubuntu Desktop team worked to sync the mobile broadband provider info from Debian Sid. On the other hand, it looks like the Ubuntu Kernel team still works on rebasing Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) on the recently released Linux 4.13 kernel. The Final Beta is expected later this month, on September 28, and it will give us a glimpse of what's coming to Ubuntu Linux this fall. Source
  16. BookCase

    Happy 13th Birthday, Ubuntu!

    I know you guys probably don't care much for Linux but, yesterday ubuntu turned 13 years and released their newest OS v17.10 Codenamed "Artful Ardvark". FULL ARTICLE
  17. Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) - Stable - Final - Direct Download & Alternate Downloads: Ubuntu is distributed on two types of images described below. Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There is one image available: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Server install image The server install image allows you to install Ubuntu permanently on a computer for use as a server. It will not install a graphical user interface. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) server install image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) server install image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. A full list of available files, including BitTorrent files, can be found below. If you need help burning these images to disk, see the Create a bootable USB stick on Windows or the Image Burning Guide or the USB Image Writing Guide. Download Pen Drive Linux's USB Installer Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavours: For Ubutnu Flavours downloads, you can view here. Ubuntu Flavour - Lubuntu - 17.10 Lubuntu is distributed on two types of images described below. Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Lubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Alternate install image The alternate install image allows you to perform certain specialist installations of Lubuntu. It provides for the following situations: setting up automated deployments; upgrading from older installations without network access; LVM and/or RAID partitioning; installs on systems with less than about 384MiB of RAM (although note that low-memory systems may not be able to run a full desktop environment reasonably). In the event that you encounter a bug using the alternate installer, please file a bug on the debian-installer package. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) alternate install image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) alternate install image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Kubuntu - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Kubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Xubuntu - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Xubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 192MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Kylin - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-Kylin without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu MATE - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-MATE without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Budgie - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-Budgie without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Studio - 17.10 Install/live DVD The combined install/live DVD allows you either to install Ubuntu-Studio permanently on a computer, or (by entering 'live' at the boot prompt) to try Ubuntu-Studio without changing your computer at all. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) install/live DVD Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) install/live DVD For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg
  18. Canonical announced the latest version of Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark, along with other flavors. It features Linux kernel 4.13, Gnome desktop is the default desktop instead of Unity, GDM has replaced LightDM as the default display manager, GTK 3.26 & Gnome 3.26. Python 2 is no longer installed by default. Python 3 has been updated to 3.6. On supported systems, Wayland is now the default display server. The older display server is still available: just choose Ubuntu on Xorg from the cog on the log in screen.: "Codenamed "Artful Aardvark", Ubuntu 17.10 continues Ubuntu's proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technology into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. As always, the team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs. Under the hood, there have been updates to many core packages, including a new 4.13-based kernel, glibc 2.26, gcc 7.2, and much more. Ubuntu Desktop has had a major overhaul, with the switch from Unity as our default desktop to GNOME3 and gnome-shell. Along with that, there are the usual incremental improvements, with newer versions of GTK and Qt, and updates to major packages like Firefox and LibreOffice..." You can checkout complete release announcement and release notes. Highlights: Linux Kernel 4.13 Gnome Desktop replaced the Unity Gnome 3.26 Stack GTK 3.26 Support On supported systems, Wayland is now the default display server. Default applications of Ubuntu updated GDM has replaced LightDM as the default display manager. Window control buttons are back on the right for the first time since 2010. Driverless printing support. Python 2 is no longer installed by default. Python 3 has been updated to 3.6. The Settings app has been redesigned. Many changes and bug fixes under the hood DOWNLOAD Ubuntu 17.10 Artful PC 64bit - (1.4GB, torrent) Ubuntu Server 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (743MB, torrent) PC 64bit - (745MB, torrent) Ubuntu 17.10 (NetBoot) Ubuntu Cloud 17.10 Kubuntu 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) Ubuntu Mate 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) PowerPC (For Apple Macintosh G3, G4, and G5 computers, including iBooks and PowerBooks as well as older IBM OpenPower 7xx machines.) - (1.6GB, torrent) Lubuntu 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) Ubuntu Studio 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) Xubuntu 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) Ubuntu Budgie 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) (If this is in the wrong section, I apologize.)
  19. The first step towards an all-Snap Ubuntu OS Ubuntu MATE leader Martin Wimpress is pioneering pre-installed Snap support in his Ubuntu distro by shipping the forthcoming Ubuntu MATE 17.10 release as the first distro with a Snap app installed by default. The Snap app in question is for the pulsemixer curses-based command-line sound mixer for the popular PulseAudio sound server, which is installed by default in Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) and other opt-in flavors, such as Ubuntu MATE. Pulsemixer will only be available as a Snap package in Ubuntu MATE 17.10, as the first step towards an all-Snap Ubuntu system. "Pre-installing Snaps by default in the desktop images was an outcome of the Ubuntu Rally that took place in New York a couple of weeks ago," said Martin Wimpress. "Installing the pulsemixer Snap by default in Ubuntu MATE 17.10 is being used a pilot and what we learn will help the Ubuntu Desktop team with their efforts to ship Snaps by default in Ubuntu 18.04." Call for testing for Ubuntu MATE 17.10 with pre-installed Snap According to Martin Wimpress, the size of the Ubuntu MATE 17.10 ISO images hasn't been affected significantly due to the installation of the pulsemixer Snap by the default, which was selected because of its smaller size and usefulness for Ubuntu MATE users, but also because it's not available for installation from the official Ubuntu repositories, nor the Debian ones. A call for testing has been put out if you want to help the Ubuntu MATE developers test the upcoming release with the pulsemixer Snap installed by default. To do that, you need to download the latest Ubuntu MATE 17.10 daily builds for either 64-bit or 32-bit computers, write the ISO image to a USB flash drive, boot it in live mode or install it on your PC, and test the pulsemixer Snap. Ubuntu MATE 17.10 will launch next week on October 19 with the latest MATE 1.18 desktop environment by default, the Linux 4.13 kernel, and numerous other new features and improvements, especially to the in-house build apps like MATE Tweak. Ubuntu MATE 17.10 won't be dropping support for 32-bit installations, yet it will inherit many of the features of Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark). Source
  20. CentOS developers Karanbir Singh and Jim Perrin announced the release of the CentOS 7.4 operating system for supported architectures, a release that brings all the latest updates and security patches. Derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 operating system, the CentOS 7.4 (1708) release is available for 64-bit x86 compatible machines, as well as ARM64 (AArch64), ARMhfp, PPC64 (PowerPC 64-bit), and PPC64le (PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian) hardware architectures. CentOS 7.4 comes with new packages, among which we can mention Qt5, Pidgin, python-netifaces, python-gssapi, and mod_auth_openidc, ALPN and DTLS (TLS via UDP) support for OpenSSL, as well as NVMe Over Fabric support in the NVM-Express kernel driver. The release also deprecates the use of the SSH1 cryptographic protocol from the OpenSSH server. "There have been various changes/enhancements to cryptographic abilities of various packages. i.e. sendmail now supports ECDHE, OpenSSH now using SHA2 for public key signatures," reads the release notes. Several packages were rebased, Amazon ENA drivers added to kernel Among other changes incorporated in the CentOS 7.4 (1708) release, we can mention that a bunch of packages were rebased, Amazon ENA drivers have been added to the kernel, which was also rebased to Linux 4.11, the NSS and ca-certificates packages now meet the recommendations of the latest Mozilla Firefox ESR browser. A few experimental features are available as well in CentOS 7.4, such as nested virtualization with KVM, Cisco VIC and usNIC kernel drivers, Ansible support, multi-threaded XZ compression with rpm-builds, support for System Roles, a CephFS kernel client, as well as Btrfs and OverlayFS support. Installation images of CentOS 7.4 (1708) are now available to download for supported architectures from the official website, but existing users need only to apply all the updates that are present in the operating system's repositories by running "sudo yum update" command in a terminal emulator. Source: Newsoftpedia
  21. Ubuntu 17.10 Final Beta is expected on September 28, 2017 Canonical is still working on polishing its upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, due for release next month on October 19, and today we'd like to offer you a first look at the new control center that'll be implemented in this release. You probably already know that Ubuntu 17.10 will be the first release of the popular OS in years to ship with the GNOME desktop environment by default, though Canonical's engineers are working day and night to customize the default Ubuntu session to make it easier for Unity users the next time they upgrade their PCs. Therefore, Ubuntu 17.10's default GNOME session won't be a vanilla one, like that of the Fedora Linux operating system, but one that tries to resemble the look and feel of the deprecated Unity user interface, which was used by default since Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) and was based on the GNOME Stack. A GNOME vanilla session will be available for installation as well, if you don't like what Canonical did to the GNOME desktop environment, but you probably won't have any trouble using the default one. We already showed you the new Ubuntu Dock, and today we're giving you a first look at the new control center. Here's what Ubuntu 17.10 Control Center looks like As of yesterday, those using Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds on their computers have probably noticed that there's a completely revamped control center when they clicked on the wheel icon in the system menu in the system tray area. And it's nothing like the old Ubuntu Control Center used in previous releases. The new Ubuntu Control Center is a slightly revamped version of the GNOME Control Center of the forthcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment launching tomorrow, September 13, 2017, and it features an all-new navigation system with all sections listed on the left side of the window at a glance. While most of the settings sections offer single pages, there are a couple of sections that opens another list of sections, such as Devices and Details, which feature multiple entries. The settings of the new Ubuntu Dock are also available in the new Ubuntu Control Center, which comes with built-in search functionality. Check out the screenshot tour below to see the new Ubuntu Control Center in action, and you can download the latest daily build ISO image of Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) if you want to take it for a test drive. We think that it's cool, modern, and very handy, and it was about time to get a face lift. More Images[22] Source
  22. The new release also adds dynamic filesystem updates Canonical announced the release of Snapd 2.27 Snappy daemon for Ubuntu Linux and other supported GNU/Linux distributions. This is a major release that adds significant improvements and new features. The biggest new feature implemented in the Snapd 2.27 release is Android boot support, which should bring the Ubuntu Snappy technologies to a wide range of devices that are powered by Google's Linux-based Android mobile operating system, implementing support for transactional updates. "The snapd boot sequence can now handle Android-style boot management. We’re especially happy about this as it opens up a new range of devices for snapd that will support transactional updates of the OS and the kernel with automatic reverts on boot failures," said Gustavo Niemeyer. Another interesting feature introduces in the Snapd 2.27 release is the snap-update-ns tool, which has been in development for a very long time. The tool promises to allow for changes to be performed dynamically in the file system inside the Snap mount namespace, which wasn't possible until now. Additionally, Snapd 2.27 comes with new "install" and "remove" hooks that let Snaps to implement a logic that's enabled only when it's removed from the system or installed for the first time, and adds support for the snapctl tool, which opens up a communication line between any Snap and the Snapd daemon. New and updated interfaces, new aliases and commands Among other improvements implemented in Snapd 2.27, we can mention a new "title" field designed to hold a high-level, normally uppercased name for the Snap app, new "--unaliased" parameter to the "snap install" command for installing Snaps that don't have any aliases enabled, and new "--last=" parameter to the "snap abort" and "watch" commands, allowing them to operate on the last change. The seccomp argument filtering was re-enabled in this release of Snapd, which renames the "snap change" command to "snap tasks," adds new "search" alias for the "snap find" command, adds support for displaying snap types under the Notes column via the "snap list" command, as well as suppor for the "snap info" command to display more information. Lastly, Snapd 2.27 introduces the broadcom-asic-control, greengrass-support, and password-manager-service interfaces, and updates numerous others, including alsa, browser-support, log-observe, mir, mount-observe, network-control, optical-drive, optical-observe, pulseaudio, screen-inhibit-control, system-observe, timezone-control, unity7, and x11. Source
  23. It's based on the Dash to Dock GNOME extension Ubuntu 17.10, the next major release of the widely-used Ubuntu Linux OS, will be transitioning to the GNOME Shell user interface by default instead of the Unity desktop environment that was used until now. As some of you may already know, Canonical plans to create a modified GNOME Shell experience for the main Ubuntu 17.10 flavor, along with a vanilla one, and they recently revealed the fact that there will be an always visible dock by default, based, of course, on the very popular Dash to Dock extension for GNOME Shell. To keep you guys up-to-date with the development of Ubuntu, we're running the operating system on a daily basis, continuously monitoring incoming packages and other changes. As of August 16, 2017, Canonical's Didier Roche uploaded a package called gnome-shell-extension-ubuntu-dock in Ubuntu 17.10 repositories. It's no brainer that's the package to enable Canonical's modified Dash to Dock extension on the GNOME Shell, and, once installed, it can be easily enabled from the Extensions section of the GNOME Tweaks utility. As of now, the dock won't be automatically enabled after it's been installed, not even after logging out the session. It piggybacks on Dash to Dock Canonical said in one of their recent reports that they have no plans to make major modifications to the Dash to Dock extension, so their modified dock piggybacks on Dash to Dock, using its settings. As we see it, you'll need to have Dash to Dock installed as well to change the look and functionality of the Ubuntu Dock. In terms of design, there aren't any major differences between Dash to Dock and Ubuntu Dock, except for the fact that there's an orange color used for the windows counter indicators, but that can be easily changed from the settings, as well as the position of the dock to anywhere on the screen (left, right, bottom, top), it's size, behavior, appearance, etc. When Ubuntu Dock is enabled by default in the Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds, which should happen in the coming weeks, we believe that Canonical will choose to place the dock on the left side of the screen to recreate the Unity desktop experience. It remains to be seen if Ubuntu Dock will have additional features, but one thing is for sure, you'll be able to disable Ubuntu Dock and use Dash to Dock instead, or any other dock for that matter. Source
  24. The new sound settings are now ready for public testing After getting back from GNOME's GUADEC 2017 developer conference, Canonical's Didier Roche has started a daily blog series about the Unity to GNOME Shell transition for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) release. One of the key features of Ubuntu's Unity desktop environment was to allow users to raise the volume over the 100% limit using the multimedia keys of their laptops. The setting wasn't available in other popular desktop environments, such as GNOME, to which Canonical wants to transition for Ubuntu 17.10. Last month, the Ubuntu Desktop team shared their plans to implement the same functionality in their modified GNOME Shell user interface for Ubuntu 17.10, and Didier Roche reports today that the feature is ready for public testing, though it still needs a bit of work until it's ready to land in the stable repository. "Some devices have very low volume even when pushed at their maximum. One example for this is the x220 when most of videos on YouTube, or listening to music in Rhythmbox doesn’t give great results even at maximum volume," said Didier Roche. "PulseAudio can amplify some of those sound devices." Here's how to test the new sound amplification on Ubuntu 17.10 If you're running Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) on your personal computer and you're willing to test the new sound amplification implementation, go ahead and add Canonical's official Ubuntu Desktop Team Transitions PPA to your repositories, and do a full update using the commands below. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-desktop/transitions sudo apt update && sudo apt dist-upgrade Once you've installed the PPA and updated your Ubuntu 17.10 operating system, you should be able to raise the volume over the 100% limit using the media keys on your laptop or a physical, dedicated volume button, if available. Please note that you'll have to enable the "Allow louder than 100%" option in the Sound panel in GNOME Control Center. Check out the video below to see it in action!
  25. Ubuntu 17.10 to Improve Secure Boot for Booting Windows from GRUB, Enable PIE Ubuntu 17.10 will be supporting the Python 3.6 series The first Alpha builds of Ubuntu 17.10 are almost here, due for release next week on June 29, 2017, for opt-in flavors, so the Ubuntu developers are working around the clock to add various new features, such as PIE (Position Independent Executables) support enabled by default for better security, as well as some other improvements in many areas of interest like Secure Boot. "PIE is now enabled across all architectures by default in Artful. Targeted rebuilds have been done of packages which would break reverse-build-dependencies due to not being compiled with PIE," says Steve Langasek. "The rest of the archive will now pick up PIE support on i386, armhf, and arm64 over the development cycle with rebuilds." PIE support is good news for Ubuntu Linux users as all PIE-enabled binaries will now be automatically loaded into random locations within the virtual memory, along with all of their dependencies, each time the respective applications are being executed. This makes Return Oriented Programming (ROP) attacks harder to execute properly. Netplan to land in Ubuntu Cloud 17.10, Secure Boot improvements Among other noteworthy enhancements that are coming to the Ubuntu 17.10 operating system later this year, we can mention the implementation of Netplan, Canonical's consolidated YAML network configuration across Ubuntu, in the Ubuntu Cloud images. Netplan is also being used by default to configure networks when installing an Ubuntu Server via the Debian Installer. Other than that, there's good news for those who want to boot Ubuntu Linux alongside a Windows OS, as the Ubuntu developers are working on improving Secure Boot chainloading so you'll be able to properly boot Windows from the GRUB bootloader. Some patches were also added so that users will no longer be prompted to disable Secure Boot when using DKMS modules. Lastly, it looks like Ubuntu 17.10 will be supporting the Python 3.6 series, which is now in the artful-proposed repository, and it looks like the transition to Python 3.6 for Artful Aardvark has begun. In related news, the Ubuntu Kernel team recently announced that they are targeting Linux 4.13 as the default kernel for Ubuntu 17.10, due for release on October 19, 2017. Source
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