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  1. The ultimate guide to mastering the Ubuntu OS! Of the many versions of Linux available, Ubuntu is regarded as the ideal starting point for the new user. Not only is this a friendly environment to start your Linux adventures in, it’s also one made up of a community of like- minded contributors, users and developers. Ubuntu offers you a complete desktop package out-of-the-box, consisting of a productivity suite compatible with Microsoft Office, media playback, programming and app development, as well as security and stability. BDM’s Series: The Complete Ubuntu Manual, Vol 10 2018 | English | 194 pages | PDF | 53 MB Download: Site: https://drop.me Sharecode: /aLVjOp
  2. By Joey Sneddon Wondering what Mark Shuttleworth thinks about IBM buying Red Hat? Well, wonder no more. The Ubuntu founder has shared his thoughts on IBM’s game-changing purchase in a short but pointed blog post. And, few of you will be surprised to learn, the space-faring free-software fan thinks the deal marks a “significant moment in the progression of open source to the mainstream”. And rightly so: there was a time when open source was viewed as the outside option. Now, thanks to companies like Red Hat and Canonical, it’s the de-facto option. Naturally Shuttleworth is also feeling bullish about Ubuntu’s position as a Red Hat rival, particularly in the area of cloud computing (the main market motivator behind IBM’s $34 billion buy). And, he adds, the world has moved on — even from Red Hat. “The decline in RHEL growth contrasted with the acceleration in Linux more broadly is a strong market indicator of the next wave of open source,” he writes. “Public cloud workloads have largely avoided RHEL. Container workloads even more so. Moving at the speed of developers means embracing open source in ways that have led the world’s largest companies, the world’s fastest moving startups, and those who believe that security and velocity are best solved together, to Ubuntu.” Shuttleworth says theres an ‘accelerated momentum’ behind Ubuntu within the enterprise space, in all areas, from IoT, public cloud and Kubernetes to machine learning and AI — all sectors IBM and Red Hat will be hoping its combined clout can carve more marketshare from. Companies aren’t just using Ubuntu. They’re choosing Ubuntu. It’s a confidence that won’t be knocked by IBM’s deal: “We are determined that Ubuntu is judged as the world’s most secure, most cost-effective and most faithful vehicle for open source initiatives. We look forward to helping [companies…] deliver the innovation on which their future growth depends.” While Mark Shuttleworth’s statement doesn’t strictly relate to desktop matters (the primary focus of this site) his take is worth hearing all the same. It’s reassuring to know that far from being intimated or downbeat about the biggest deal in open-source history, they feel Ubuntu still has plenty to offer. In a game of who can be the biggest, best and most bountiful open-source software company, can the wider FOSS community ever lose? Source
  3. Microsoft PowerShell is a cross-platform automation and configuration tool/framework that works well with your existing tools and is optimized for dealing with structured data (e.g. JSON, CSV, XML, etc.), REST APIs, and object models. Microsoft PowerShell features 130 plus "commandlets" (cmdlets) with commands to handle numerous jobs, whether it is service or process administration, registry, object manipulation, and more. Management can be done locally or remotely. An icon will be created in your start menu. Additional documentation is available at the Author link above Whats New: Build and Packaging Improvements Aggregate native components into a single NuGet package "Microsoft.PowerShell.Native". Update the version of NuGet packages referenced by PowerShell. Fix release build for macOS. Test Fix xUnit tests. Add new tests for hosting PowerShell SDK NuGet packages. Home: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/ Changelog: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/blob/master/CHANGELOG.md Downloads Page: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/releases/tag/v6.0.4 Downloads: 49.7 MB powershell-6.0.4-1.rhel.7.x86_64.rpm 24.8 MB powershell-6.0.4-linux-arm32.tar.gz 50.1 MB powershell-6.0.4-linux-x64.tar.gz 48.7 MB powershell-6.0.4-osx-x64.tar.gz 49 MB powershell-6.0.4-osx.10.12-x64.pkg 31.9 MB PowerShell-6.0.4-win-arm32.zip 31.8 MB PowerShell-6.0.4-win-arm64.zip 49.3 MB PowerShell-6.0.4-win-x64.msi 50.5 MB PowerShell-6.0.4-win-x64.zip 45.4 MB PowerShell-6.0.4-win-x86.msi 46.5 MB PowerShell-6.0.4-win-x86.zip 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.4-1.debian.8_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.4-1.debian.9_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.4-1.ubuntu.14.04_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.4-1.ubuntu.16.04_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.4-1.ubuntu.17.04_amd64.deb Source code (zip) Source code (tar.gz)
  4. Microsoft PowerShell is a cross-platform automation and configuration tool/framework that works well with your existing tools and is optimized for dealing with structured data (e.g. JSON, CSV, XML, etc.), REST APIs, and object models. Microsoft PowerShell features 130 plus "commandlets" (cmdlets) with commands to handle numerous jobs, whether it is service or process administration, registry, object manipulation, and more. Management can be done locally or remotely. An icon will be created in your start menu. Additional documentation is available at the Author link above Whats New: Build and Packaging Improvements Remove PackageManagement installed by PowerShellGet and pin PackageManagement to 1.1.7.0 to maintain the ability to patch Pin PowerShellGet to 1.6.0 to maintain the ability to patch MSI installs Update NuGet package references to the latest and get fix for CVE-2018-8356 Enable NuGet Package Registration for compliance (#7053) Restore when building test projects Update to DotNet Runtime Framework 2.0.8 Specify the runtime when running 'dotnet restore' in 'Start-PSBuild' (#6345) Update version of fpm to resolve issues installing MSI: Update path with proper value (#6441) MSI: Remove the version from the product name (#6415) Migrate the macOS official binary build to VSTS mac hosted preview (#6363) Home: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/ Changelog: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/blob/master/CHANGELOG.md Downloads Page: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/releases/tag/v6.0.3 Downloads: 49.7 MB powershell-6.0.3-1.rhel.7.x86_64.rpm 24.8 MB powershell-6.0.3-linux-arm32.tar.gz 50.1 MB powershell-6.0.3-linux-x64.tar.gz 48.7 MB powershell-6.0.3-osx-x64.tar.gz 49 MB powershell-6.0.3-osx.10.12-x64.pkg 31.8 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-arm32.zip 31.8 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-arm64.zip 49.1 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-x64.msi 1.85 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-x64.wixpdb 50.4 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-x64.zip 45.4 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-x86.msi 1.84 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-x86.wixpdb 46.4 MB PowerShell-6.0.3-win-x86.zip 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.3-1.debian.8_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.3-1.debian.9_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.3-1.ubuntu.14.04_amd64.deb 50.1 MB powershell_6.0.3-1.ubuntu.16.04_amd64.deb Source code (zip) Source code (tar.gz)
  5. Karamjit

    Ubuntu Bionic Beaver 18.04

    Get the latest LTS version of Ubuntu, for desktop PCs and laptops. LTS stands for long-term support — which means five years, until April 2023, of free security and maintenance updates, guaranteed. Recommended system requirements: 2 GHz dual core processor or better 2 GB system memory 25 GB of free hard drive space Either a DVD drive or a USB port for the installer media Internet access is helpful Homepage: https://www.ubuntu.com Release Notes: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/BionicBeaver/ReleaseNotes Download Page: http://releases.ubuntu.com/18.04/ubuntu-18.04-desktop-amd64.iso Download With Torrent: http://releases.ubuntu.com/18.04/ubuntu-18.04-desktop-amd64.iso.torrent
  6. There are now two versions of Ubuntu available to download from the Microsoft Store. Adding to the existing Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04 has also now arrived. The addition comes just weeks after the official launch of Ubuntu 18.04, and it gives Windows 10 users the option of working with the new LTS (long term support) build of Ubuntu. The older version remains supported for the time being as well. See also: Canonical finally comments on Ubuntu Linux Snap Store security failure Ubuntu Snap Store app contained cryptocurrency miner Ubuntu Linux 18.04 Bionic Beaver is here -- download it now! Weighing in at a little over 210MB, Ubuntu 18.04 provides access to the Ubuntu Terminal, as well as the latest version of command line utilities such as bash, ssh, git, apt and so on. In order to install the software, you'll need to enable Windows Subsystem for Linux, and you will find that 16.04 and 18.04 will install happily alongside each other if you would like to have access to both of them. In a blog post over on MSDN, Microsoft's Tara Raj says: We're happy to announce that Ubuntu 18.04 is now available in the Microsoft store. You might be asking why there are a couple different Ubuntu apps and what we plan to do with those. The Ubuntu apps you see in the Store are published by Canonical. We partner with them to release the apps and test them on WSL. As per Canonical's LTS schedule, both Ubuntu 16.04 and 18.04 are supported for 3 years. Keeping this overlap in support in mind, "Ubuntu" is still 16.04 and "Ubuntu 18.04" is as named. We will be Updating the Store descriptions and such shortly. You can download Ubuntu 18.04 from the Microsoft Store Source: betanews
  7. If you regularly use Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps on Windows 10, you have some good news coming your way. Microsoft has announced that starting with Windows 10 version 1803, developers can opt-in to support multiple instances of their UWP app. In previous versions of Windows 10, users could only run one instance of a UWP app at one time. However, with version 1803, an app with multiple-instance capability will be able to run a new process if an activation request comes through. Microsoft has detailed several code samples and templates that explain how developers can add the capability to their UWP apps. New or existing instances of a UWP app can be launched and customized separately using these implementations. The company explains that: Interestingly, multi-view has been available in the default Calculator app for quite a long time. However, this is slightly different than multi-instancing because there is only one Calculator.exe process running. The firm notes that multiple-instancing has been available in the Insider Preview since build 17074 and the accompanying Windows SDK 17069, but the project templates are being made available now. In its latest Windows Community Standup episode, Microsoft has explained that some apps will only need minimal changes in the code to support multiple-instancing while complex apps will require relatively larger modifications. Furthermore, there will be no limit on the number of active instances of an app, and if one instance crashes, the others will keep operating. While multi-instancing in UWP apps is certainly an exciting prospect, Microsoft has noted a few considerations that developers need to keep in mind. For example: background audio apps do not support multi-instancing, and the feature is only supported in desktop and Internet of Things (IoT) projects. You can check out the complete details in Microsoft's documentation here. Source
  8. GNOME 3.26 will be the default desktop environment Work on the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system continues, and Canonical's Will Cooke is back with more information on the Ubuntu Desktop team bakes for the final release, which will land on October 19, 2017. Last week, we told you that Ubuntu 17.10 will support all known driverless printing standards and that captive portal detection is now enabled by default. Also, Ubuntu 17.10 received initial support for PolicyKit authentication in the Snapd Snappy daemon, to finally allow users to install and remove Snaps from the Snappy Store without having to create an Ubuntu One account. And now, it looks like Ubuntu Dock is getting support for indicators and notification badges. This is great news for those using apps that support libappindicators, as the soon-to-be-released GNOME 3.26 desktop environment won't ship with support for indicators. On top of that, enabling notification badge support in Ubuntu Dock is a must for ex-Unity users. "We’re adding notification badge support to the Dock extension. This branch has been proposed to the upstream project and is awaiting review," reveals Will Cooke, Ubuntu Desktop Director, Canonical. "We’ve packaged the KStatusNotifier extension to provide support for indicators. This will provide support for apps which use libappindicators which was removed from GNOME 3.26." Wayland session won't work on PCs with non-hybrid Nvidia GPUs As you are aware, Ubuntu 17.10 will be using the next-generation Wayland display server by default instead of X11 (X.Org Server), which is available as an alternative from the GNOME Display Manager (GDM). But, Will Cooke warns users that the Wayland session won't work on PCs with non-hybrid Nvidia GPUs, unless they enable the experimental KMS support, which will break X11. As such, people with this kind of systems won't see the X11 session to not end up with a broken Ubuntu installation if they feel adventurous to enable Kernel Mode Setting (KMS) for the Wayland session. Meanwhile, the Ubuntu Desktop team still works to improve the video playback performance in Ubuntu 17.10 to reduce CPU usage, and hardware-accelerated video support on Intel GPUs. Other than that, the Ubuntu Desktop team worked to sync the mobile broadband provider info from Debian Sid. On the other hand, it looks like the Ubuntu Kernel team still works on rebasing Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) on the recently released Linux 4.13 kernel. The Final Beta is expected later this month, on September 28, and it will give us a glimpse of what's coming to Ubuntu Linux this fall. Source
  9. BookCase

    Happy 13th Birthday, Ubuntu!

    I know you guys probably don't care much for Linux but, yesterday ubuntu turned 13 years and released their newest OS v17.10 Codenamed "Artful Ardvark". FULL ARTICLE
  10. Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) - Stable - Final - Direct Download & Alternate Downloads: Ubuntu is distributed on two types of images described below. Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There is one image available: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Server install image The server install image allows you to install Ubuntu permanently on a computer for use as a server. It will not install a graphical user interface. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) server install image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) server install image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. A full list of available files, including BitTorrent files, can be found below. If you need help burning these images to disk, see the Create a bootable USB stick on Windows or the Image Burning Guide or the USB Image Writing Guide. Download Pen Drive Linux's USB Installer Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavours: For Ubutnu Flavours downloads, you can view here. Ubuntu Flavour - Lubuntu - 17.10 Lubuntu is distributed on two types of images described below. Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Lubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Alternate install image The alternate install image allows you to perform certain specialist installations of Lubuntu. It provides for the following situations: setting up automated deployments; upgrading from older installations without network access; LVM and/or RAID partitioning; installs on systems with less than about 384MiB of RAM (although note that low-memory systems may not be able to run a full desktop environment reasonably). In the event that you encounter a bug using the alternate installer, please file a bug on the debian-installer package. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) alternate install image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) alternate install image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Kubuntu - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Kubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Xubuntu - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Xubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 192MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Kylin - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-Kylin without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu MATE - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-MATE without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Budgie - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-Budgie without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Studio - 17.10 Install/live DVD The combined install/live DVD allows you either to install Ubuntu-Studio permanently on a computer, or (by entering 'live' at the boot prompt) to try Ubuntu-Studio without changing your computer at all. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) install/live DVD Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) install/live DVD For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg
  11. Canonical announced the latest version of Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark, along with other flavors. It features Linux kernel 4.13, Gnome desktop is the default desktop instead of Unity, GDM has replaced LightDM as the default display manager, GTK 3.26 & Gnome 3.26. Python 2 is no longer installed by default. Python 3 has been updated to 3.6. On supported systems, Wayland is now the default display server. The older display server is still available: just choose Ubuntu on Xorg from the cog on the log in screen.: "Codenamed "Artful Aardvark", Ubuntu 17.10 continues Ubuntu's proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technology into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. As always, the team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs. Under the hood, there have been updates to many core packages, including a new 4.13-based kernel, glibc 2.26, gcc 7.2, and much more. Ubuntu Desktop has had a major overhaul, with the switch from Unity as our default desktop to GNOME3 and gnome-shell. Along with that, there are the usual incremental improvements, with newer versions of GTK and Qt, and updates to major packages like Firefox and LibreOffice..." You can checkout complete release announcement and release notes. Highlights: Linux Kernel 4.13 Gnome Desktop replaced the Unity Gnome 3.26 Stack GTK 3.26 Support On supported systems, Wayland is now the default display server. Default applications of Ubuntu updated GDM has replaced LightDM as the default display manager. Window control buttons are back on the right for the first time since 2010. Driverless printing support. Python 2 is no longer installed by default. Python 3 has been updated to 3.6. The Settings app has been redesigned. Many changes and bug fixes under the hood DOWNLOAD Ubuntu 17.10 Artful PC 64bit - (1.4GB, torrent) Ubuntu Server 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (743MB, torrent) PC 64bit - (745MB, torrent) Ubuntu 17.10 (NetBoot) Ubuntu Cloud 17.10 Kubuntu 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) Ubuntu Mate 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) PowerPC (For Apple Macintosh G3, G4, and G5 computers, including iBooks and PowerBooks as well as older IBM OpenPower 7xx machines.) - (1.6GB, torrent) Lubuntu 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) Ubuntu Studio 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) Xubuntu 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) Ubuntu Budgie 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 Artful PC 32bit - (torrent) PC 64bit - (torrent) (If this is in the wrong section, I apologize.)
  12. The first step towards an all-Snap Ubuntu OS Ubuntu MATE leader Martin Wimpress is pioneering pre-installed Snap support in his Ubuntu distro by shipping the forthcoming Ubuntu MATE 17.10 release as the first distro with a Snap app installed by default. The Snap app in question is for the pulsemixer curses-based command-line sound mixer for the popular PulseAudio sound server, which is installed by default in Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) and other opt-in flavors, such as Ubuntu MATE. Pulsemixer will only be available as a Snap package in Ubuntu MATE 17.10, as the first step towards an all-Snap Ubuntu system. "Pre-installing Snaps by default in the desktop images was an outcome of the Ubuntu Rally that took place in New York a couple of weeks ago," said Martin Wimpress. "Installing the pulsemixer Snap by default in Ubuntu MATE 17.10 is being used a pilot and what we learn will help the Ubuntu Desktop team with their efforts to ship Snaps by default in Ubuntu 18.04." Call for testing for Ubuntu MATE 17.10 with pre-installed Snap According to Martin Wimpress, the size of the Ubuntu MATE 17.10 ISO images hasn't been affected significantly due to the installation of the pulsemixer Snap by the default, which was selected because of its smaller size and usefulness for Ubuntu MATE users, but also because it's not available for installation from the official Ubuntu repositories, nor the Debian ones. A call for testing has been put out if you want to help the Ubuntu MATE developers test the upcoming release with the pulsemixer Snap installed by default. To do that, you need to download the latest Ubuntu MATE 17.10 daily builds for either 64-bit or 32-bit computers, write the ISO image to a USB flash drive, boot it in live mode or install it on your PC, and test the pulsemixer Snap. Ubuntu MATE 17.10 will launch next week on October 19 with the latest MATE 1.18 desktop environment by default, the Linux 4.13 kernel, and numerous other new features and improvements, especially to the in-house build apps like MATE Tweak. Ubuntu MATE 17.10 won't be dropping support for 32-bit installations, yet it will inherit many of the features of Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark). Source
  13. CentOS developers Karanbir Singh and Jim Perrin announced the release of the CentOS 7.4 operating system for supported architectures, a release that brings all the latest updates and security patches. Derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 operating system, the CentOS 7.4 (1708) release is available for 64-bit x86 compatible machines, as well as ARM64 (AArch64), ARMhfp, PPC64 (PowerPC 64-bit), and PPC64le (PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian) hardware architectures. CentOS 7.4 comes with new packages, among which we can mention Qt5, Pidgin, python-netifaces, python-gssapi, and mod_auth_openidc, ALPN and DTLS (TLS via UDP) support for OpenSSL, as well as NVMe Over Fabric support in the NVM-Express kernel driver. The release also deprecates the use of the SSH1 cryptographic protocol from the OpenSSH server. "There have been various changes/enhancements to cryptographic abilities of various packages. i.e. sendmail now supports ECDHE, OpenSSH now using SHA2 for public key signatures," reads the release notes. Several packages were rebased, Amazon ENA drivers added to kernel Among other changes incorporated in the CentOS 7.4 (1708) release, we can mention that a bunch of packages were rebased, Amazon ENA drivers have been added to the kernel, which was also rebased to Linux 4.11, the NSS and ca-certificates packages now meet the recommendations of the latest Mozilla Firefox ESR browser. A few experimental features are available as well in CentOS 7.4, such as nested virtualization with KVM, Cisco VIC and usNIC kernel drivers, Ansible support, multi-threaded XZ compression with rpm-builds, support for System Roles, a CephFS kernel client, as well as Btrfs and OverlayFS support. Installation images of CentOS 7.4 (1708) are now available to download for supported architectures from the official website, but existing users need only to apply all the updates that are present in the operating system's repositories by running "sudo yum update" command in a terminal emulator. Source: Newsoftpedia
  14. Ubuntu 17.10 Final Beta is expected on September 28, 2017 Canonical is still working on polishing its upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, due for release next month on October 19, and today we'd like to offer you a first look at the new control center that'll be implemented in this release. You probably already know that Ubuntu 17.10 will be the first release of the popular OS in years to ship with the GNOME desktop environment by default, though Canonical's engineers are working day and night to customize the default Ubuntu session to make it easier for Unity users the next time they upgrade their PCs. Therefore, Ubuntu 17.10's default GNOME session won't be a vanilla one, like that of the Fedora Linux operating system, but one that tries to resemble the look and feel of the deprecated Unity user interface, which was used by default since Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) and was based on the GNOME Stack. A GNOME vanilla session will be available for installation as well, if you don't like what Canonical did to the GNOME desktop environment, but you probably won't have any trouble using the default one. We already showed you the new Ubuntu Dock, and today we're giving you a first look at the new control center. Here's what Ubuntu 17.10 Control Center looks like As of yesterday, those using Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds on their computers have probably noticed that there's a completely revamped control center when they clicked on the wheel icon in the system menu in the system tray area. And it's nothing like the old Ubuntu Control Center used in previous releases. The new Ubuntu Control Center is a slightly revamped version of the GNOME Control Center of the forthcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment launching tomorrow, September 13, 2017, and it features an all-new navigation system with all sections listed on the left side of the window at a glance. While most of the settings sections offer single pages, there are a couple of sections that opens another list of sections, such as Devices and Details, which feature multiple entries. The settings of the new Ubuntu Dock are also available in the new Ubuntu Control Center, which comes with built-in search functionality. Check out the screenshot tour below to see the new Ubuntu Control Center in action, and you can download the latest daily build ISO image of Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) if you want to take it for a test drive. We think that it's cool, modern, and very handy, and it was about time to get a face lift. More Images[22] Source
  15. The new release also adds dynamic filesystem updates Canonical announced the release of Snapd 2.27 Snappy daemon for Ubuntu Linux and other supported GNU/Linux distributions. This is a major release that adds significant improvements and new features. The biggest new feature implemented in the Snapd 2.27 release is Android boot support, which should bring the Ubuntu Snappy technologies to a wide range of devices that are powered by Google's Linux-based Android mobile operating system, implementing support for transactional updates. "The snapd boot sequence can now handle Android-style boot management. We’re especially happy about this as it opens up a new range of devices for snapd that will support transactional updates of the OS and the kernel with automatic reverts on boot failures," said Gustavo Niemeyer. Another interesting feature introduces in the Snapd 2.27 release is the snap-update-ns tool, which has been in development for a very long time. The tool promises to allow for changes to be performed dynamically in the file system inside the Snap mount namespace, which wasn't possible until now. Additionally, Snapd 2.27 comes with new "install" and "remove" hooks that let Snaps to implement a logic that's enabled only when it's removed from the system or installed for the first time, and adds support for the snapctl tool, which opens up a communication line between any Snap and the Snapd daemon. New and updated interfaces, new aliases and commands Among other improvements implemented in Snapd 2.27, we can mention a new "title" field designed to hold a high-level, normally uppercased name for the Snap app, new "--unaliased" parameter to the "snap install" command for installing Snaps that don't have any aliases enabled, and new "--last=" parameter to the "snap abort" and "watch" commands, allowing them to operate on the last change. The seccomp argument filtering was re-enabled in this release of Snapd, which renames the "snap change" command to "snap tasks," adds new "search" alias for the "snap find" command, adds support for displaying snap types under the Notes column via the "snap list" command, as well as suppor for the "snap info" command to display more information. Lastly, Snapd 2.27 introduces the broadcom-asic-control, greengrass-support, and password-manager-service interfaces, and updates numerous others, including alsa, browser-support, log-observe, mir, mount-observe, network-control, optical-drive, optical-observe, pulseaudio, screen-inhibit-control, system-observe, timezone-control, unity7, and x11. Source
  16. It's based on the Dash to Dock GNOME extension Ubuntu 17.10, the next major release of the widely-used Ubuntu Linux OS, will be transitioning to the GNOME Shell user interface by default instead of the Unity desktop environment that was used until now. As some of you may already know, Canonical plans to create a modified GNOME Shell experience for the main Ubuntu 17.10 flavor, along with a vanilla one, and they recently revealed the fact that there will be an always visible dock by default, based, of course, on the very popular Dash to Dock extension for GNOME Shell. To keep you guys up-to-date with the development of Ubuntu, we're running the operating system on a daily basis, continuously monitoring incoming packages and other changes. As of August 16, 2017, Canonical's Didier Roche uploaded a package called gnome-shell-extension-ubuntu-dock in Ubuntu 17.10 repositories. It's no brainer that's the package to enable Canonical's modified Dash to Dock extension on the GNOME Shell, and, once installed, it can be easily enabled from the Extensions section of the GNOME Tweaks utility. As of now, the dock won't be automatically enabled after it's been installed, not even after logging out the session. It piggybacks on Dash to Dock Canonical said in one of their recent reports that they have no plans to make major modifications to the Dash to Dock extension, so their modified dock piggybacks on Dash to Dock, using its settings. As we see it, you'll need to have Dash to Dock installed as well to change the look and functionality of the Ubuntu Dock. In terms of design, there aren't any major differences between Dash to Dock and Ubuntu Dock, except for the fact that there's an orange color used for the windows counter indicators, but that can be easily changed from the settings, as well as the position of the dock to anywhere on the screen (left, right, bottom, top), it's size, behavior, appearance, etc. When Ubuntu Dock is enabled by default in the Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds, which should happen in the coming weeks, we believe that Canonical will choose to place the dock on the left side of the screen to recreate the Unity desktop experience. It remains to be seen if Ubuntu Dock will have additional features, but one thing is for sure, you'll be able to disable Ubuntu Dock and use Dash to Dock instead, or any other dock for that matter. Source
  17. The new sound settings are now ready for public testing After getting back from GNOME's GUADEC 2017 developer conference, Canonical's Didier Roche has started a daily blog series about the Unity to GNOME Shell transition for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) release. One of the key features of Ubuntu's Unity desktop environment was to allow users to raise the volume over the 100% limit using the multimedia keys of their laptops. The setting wasn't available in other popular desktop environments, such as GNOME, to which Canonical wants to transition for Ubuntu 17.10. Last month, the Ubuntu Desktop team shared their plans to implement the same functionality in their modified GNOME Shell user interface for Ubuntu 17.10, and Didier Roche reports today that the feature is ready for public testing, though it still needs a bit of work until it's ready to land in the stable repository. "Some devices have very low volume even when pushed at their maximum. One example for this is the x220 when most of videos on YouTube, or listening to music in Rhythmbox doesn’t give great results even at maximum volume," said Didier Roche. "PulseAudio can amplify some of those sound devices." Here's how to test the new sound amplification on Ubuntu 17.10 If you're running Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) on your personal computer and you're willing to test the new sound amplification implementation, go ahead and add Canonical's official Ubuntu Desktop Team Transitions PPA to your repositories, and do a full update using the commands below. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-desktop/transitions sudo apt update && sudo apt dist-upgrade Once you've installed the PPA and updated your Ubuntu 17.10 operating system, you should be able to raise the volume over the 100% limit using the media keys on your laptop or a physical, dedicated volume button, if available. Please note that you'll have to enable the "Allow louder than 100%" option in the Sound panel in GNOME Control Center. Check out the video below to see it in action!
  18. Ubuntu 17.10 to Improve Secure Boot for Booting Windows from GRUB, Enable PIE Ubuntu 17.10 will be supporting the Python 3.6 series The first Alpha builds of Ubuntu 17.10 are almost here, due for release next week on June 29, 2017, for opt-in flavors, so the Ubuntu developers are working around the clock to add various new features, such as PIE (Position Independent Executables) support enabled by default for better security, as well as some other improvements in many areas of interest like Secure Boot. "PIE is now enabled across all architectures by default in Artful. Targeted rebuilds have been done of packages which would break reverse-build-dependencies due to not being compiled with PIE," says Steve Langasek. "The rest of the archive will now pick up PIE support on i386, armhf, and arm64 over the development cycle with rebuilds." PIE support is good news for Ubuntu Linux users as all PIE-enabled binaries will now be automatically loaded into random locations within the virtual memory, along with all of their dependencies, each time the respective applications are being executed. This makes Return Oriented Programming (ROP) attacks harder to execute properly. Netplan to land in Ubuntu Cloud 17.10, Secure Boot improvements Among other noteworthy enhancements that are coming to the Ubuntu 17.10 operating system later this year, we can mention the implementation of Netplan, Canonical's consolidated YAML network configuration across Ubuntu, in the Ubuntu Cloud images. Netplan is also being used by default to configure networks when installing an Ubuntu Server via the Debian Installer. Other than that, there's good news for those who want to boot Ubuntu Linux alongside a Windows OS, as the Ubuntu developers are working on improving Secure Boot chainloading so you'll be able to properly boot Windows from the GRUB bootloader. Some patches were also added so that users will no longer be prompted to disable Secure Boot when using DKMS modules. Lastly, it looks like Ubuntu 17.10 will be supporting the Python 3.6 series, which is now in the artful-proposed repository, and it looks like the transition to Python 3.6 for Artful Aardvark has begun. In related news, the Ubuntu Kernel team recently announced that they are targeting Linux 4.13 as the default kernel for Ubuntu 17.10, due for release on October 19, 2017. Source
  19. Canonical Launches Its Linux Kernel Livepatch Service for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Users You won't have to reboot your PC when installing new kernels Until today, Canonical's Kernel Livepatch service was available only for those running the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series, providing them with rebootless kernel upgrades. Starting today, you can use the Canonical Kernel Livepatch service on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS too. As usual, Canonical lets users to install its Kernel Livepatch service on up to three (3) computers for free, but only on systems running 64-bit Intel or AMD processors. Those who want to enable Canonical Kernel Livepatch on more than 3 machines will have to purchase the Ubuntu Advantage support package. "We are pleased to announce that we have extended our Canonical Kernel Livepatch Service to users running Ubuntu 14.04 LTS," reads the announcement. "The Canonical Kernel Livepatch Service enables runtime correction of critical security vulnerabilities in the kernel without the need to reboot." Here's how to enable Canonical Kernel Livepatch on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Installing the Canonical Kernel Livepatch service on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating systems is possible because the Snapd 2.20 release announced in December 2016 brought support for this long-term supported version of Ubuntu Linux. And it's super easy to install both Snapd and Canonical Kernel Livepatch. First, you'll have to make sure that you're running the Linux 4.4 kernel. Then, open the Terminal app and paste the command listed below to install the Snapd daemon, which enables installation of Snap packages on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Access https://ubuntu.com/livepatch and get your free kernel livepatch token. sudo apt update && sudo apt install snapd The token should look like this [d3b07384d213edec49eaa6238ad5ff00] so make sure you keep it safe somewhere. To install and enable the Canonical Kernel Livepatch service, run the following commands in the Terminal app, but replace the token in the second command with your own. sudo snap install canonical-livepatch sudo canonical-livepatch enable d3b07384d113edec49eaa6238ad5ff00 That’s it. You can check to see if you're running the Canonical Kernel Livepatch service on your Ubuntu 14.04 LTS machine at any time with the following command. If it says "true" under the fully-patched entry, then it means you're running the latest available kernel for your system. canonical-livepatch status Source
  20. Visual Studio Code running on Ubuntu Linux as a Snap After informing Ubuntu Linux users about the fact that it's possible to install GitHub's Atom hackable text editor as a Snap, Canonical's David Callé is now announcing the availability of Microsoft's Visual Studio Code IDE as a Snap. At the request of many users, the Visual Studio Code source code editor can now finally be installed on any of the supported Ubuntu Linux distributions as a Snap package directly from Canonical's Snappy Store, with a simple command that you need to execute in the Terminal app. "Launched in 2015 by Microsoft, Visual Studio Code has imposed itself as one of the preferred code editors in the developer community. Cross-platform (powered by Electron), it features a marketplace of more than 3000 extensions where any language can find its linters, debuggers and test runners," said David Callé in the announcement. Here's how to install Visual Studio Code as a Snap in Ubuntu Visual Studio Code is known as a very powerful tool for developers, offering them embedded Git control, intelligent code completion, syntax highlighting, snippets, code refactoring, and support for debugging. The IDE is already available for Linux platforms, but on Ubuntu you can now install it just by running the following command. sudo snap install --classic vscode That's it! Easy enough, right? Actually, it couldn't be more easily thanks to Canonical's latest Snappy technologies, and it looks like you'll be able to use the above command to install Visual Studio Code on the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), and Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) releases. Once Visual Studio Code was downloaded and installed, you can run it straight from the command line or via the application menu of the desktop environment you're currently using, be it either Unity, GNOME, KDE, Xfce, or LXDE. The best part of this install method is that when new versions of Visual Studio Code are made available upstream, you'll always have the latest release installed. Git integration in Visual Studio Code features delightful commit (and reverts!) management. Source
  21. Ubuntu in the Windows Store Microsoft took everyone by surprise today when it announced at the Build developer conference that Apple is bringing iTunes in the Windows Store, but it now appears that the company has more unexpected news to share. Ubuntu is also launching in the Windows Store, while both Fedora and Suse are coming to the Windows Subsystem for Linux. Basically, the debut of the new Linux distros in the Windows Store make it possible for users to install them as apps on their Windows 10 devices, which means they will be able to run Windows and Linux applications side by side without having to create a dual-boot configuration. “Windows 10 is the first system that allows you to do that,” Microsoft said today at the build developer conference. Ubuntu in the Windows Store This functionality will become available with the Windows 10 Fall Creators Update in September, but Ubuntu is already available in the Windows Store, while Suse and Fedora will be released at a later date. The WSL update will also go live at a later time. Microsoft has once again reiterated that it loves Linux, leaving behind all the criticism that even its leaders threw at the open-source world. Steve Ballmer, the former Microsoft CEO, once called Linux a cancer, but with today’s announcement, it becomes more than obvious that the Redmond-based software giant is now all-in on Linux and open source. “Windows 10 will be the most productive working environment ever,” Microsoft said at the show. As you can see in the screenshot below, the Ubuntu Windows Store listing looks similar to any other app that is available in the Store, and everyone will be available to download and install it free of charge. Since the new Linux distros are published in the Windows Store, it means they will also run on Windows 10 S, Microsoft’s Windows 10 version limited to Store apps and specifically aimed at the education sector. Source
  22. Ubuntu 17.10 Canonical's Adam Conrad has announced that Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) is officially open for development, and it looks like the first daily build ISO images are already available for download. Now that the release schedule of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 operating system is published, the time has come to monitor its development cycle more closely because Ubuntu is going through some though times these days with the move from the Unity user interface to GNOME as default desktop environment after six years. Announced on April 28, 2011, Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) was the first release of the popular operating system to introduce the controversial, yet modern at that moment in time Unity UI, which relied on various components of the GNOME Stack. And now, Ubuntu 17.10, due for release on October 19, 2017, is returning to GNOME 3. First daily builds still use the Unity 7 desktop As expected, the first daily build ISO images of Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) are based on the current stable release of the operating system, Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), which means that the Unity 7 desktop environment is still there. But it will be replaced in the coming months when the Alpha 2 milestone hits the streets. Ubuntu 17.10 will be yet another standard version, which Canonical will support for nine months with security updates, until July 2018, so it's the perfect testbed for the GNOME 3 migration. Most probably, Canonical will concentrate on offering users the best GNOME desktop experience ever. If you want to be the first to try Ubuntu 17.10, you can download either the 32-bit or 64-bit Live ISO images right now from our website. Kubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Xubuntu also have daily build ISOs available to download on the official FTP server. Please note that these builds are not recommended for daily use. Ubuntu 17.10 Daily Build Source
  23. Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 The world works in mysterious ways, and, sometimes, things will turn out in your favor. It's no secret anymore that Ubuntu GNOME, the official flavor of Ubuntu featuring the GNOME desktop environment, will become the main Ubuntu edition. We reported earlier this week that Ubuntu GNOME is becoming the main Ubuntu flavor, but, today, the Ubuntu GNOME team also confirmed the change in the release announcement for Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), saying that their project will no longer be a separate flavor starting with the release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS next year. "Next year, if you are using either Ubuntu 16.04 LTS or Ubuntu GNOME 16.04 LTS, you will be prompted to upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS," said the devs. "The development teams from both Ubuntu GNOME and Ubuntu Desktop will be merging resources and focusing on a single combined release, which provides the best of both GNOME and Ubuntu." Existing Ubuntu GNOME users will be upgraded to Ubuntu Yes, you're reading it right, if you install or already use the Ubuntu GNOME flavor on your personal computer, be it either Ubuntu GNOME 16.04 LTS next year on April you'll have no choice but to upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, as there won't be a separate Ubuntu GNOME edition. And, if you'll be using the Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 release announced today, you'll be upgraded to Ubuntu 17.10 later this year. In other words, Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 looks to be the last release of Ubuntu GNOME as a separate flavor. More details on this major change as Ubuntu will be switching to the GNOME desktop environment by default instead of Unity should be revealed in the coming weeks. Until then, you can download Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 right now from our website and enjoy a great release by Jeremy Bicha and Tim Lunn. Source
  24. Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Officially Released, Available to Download Now Will be supported for nine months, until January 2018 If you've been using Ubuntu 16.10 on your personal computer(s) until today, the time has come to upgrade to Ubuntu 17.04, which is a powerful release, both inside and outside. It's powered by the latest stable Linux 4.10 kernel series, and ships with an up-to-date graphics stack based on X.Org Server 1.19.3 and Mesa 17.0.3. Only these three new technologies mentioned above are the only reason some of you out there gaming with AMD Radeon graphics cards need to upgrade to Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) right now. But the operating system ships only with up-to-date components and applications. The default desktop environment remains Unity 7, so your beloved Ubuntu desktop environment is not going anyway at the moment. It will also be available in the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 release, whose development will start next month. After that, starting with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, the GNOME desktop will be used by default. Driverless printing, swap files, 32-bit PowerPC support dropped Among other interesting features shipping with the final release of Ubuntu 17.04, we can mention the implementation of swap files, which are used instead of a swap partition only for new installations of the operating system. So this change is the only one that won't apply if you're upgrading from a previous Ubuntu release. Moreover, the default DNS resolver was switched to systemd-resolved, IPP Everywhere and Apple AirPrint printers are now supported out of the box for a driverless printing experience, and most of the packages from the GNOME Stack were upgraded to GNOME 3.24, though Nautilus remains at version 3.20.4. The gconf utility is no longer installed by default because it is now superseded by gsettings, and among the latest apps installed, we can mention the LibreOffice 5.3 office suite, Mozilla Firefox 52.0.1 web browser, as well as Mozilla Thunderbird 45.8.0 email and news client. Support for 32-bit PowerPC (PPC) architectures has been officially dropped from this release and won't make a comeback. However, PPC64el (PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian) support continues. Ubuntu 17.04 is available for download right now and comes with both 64-bit (amd64) and 32-bit ISO (i386) images. The rest of the official flavors are starting to appear as well today. These include Ubuntu GNOME 17.04, Ubuntu MATE 17.04, Kubuntu 17.04, Xubuntu 17.04, Lubuntu 17.04, Ubuntu Kylin 17.04, Ubuntu Studio 17.04, as well as Ubuntu Budgie 17.04, which makes its debut as an official Ubuntu flavor built around the Budgie desktop. As usual, we'll have separate articles on the website for most of them, so stay tuned right here on Softpedia Linux for the latest Ubuntu news. Please note that the Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) release is a short-lived branch supported with security updates for only nine months, from today until mid-January 2018. Screenshots: http://news.softpedia.com/news/ubuntu-17-04-zesty-zapus-officially-released-available-to-download-now-514853.shtml#sgal_1 Source
  25. Snapd 2.24 released Canonical's Michael Vogt is pleased to announce today, April 11, 2017, the release and immediate availability for download of the Snapd 2.24 Snappy daemon for Ubuntu Linux and other supported GNU/Linux distributions. Snapd 2.24 comes five weeks after the release of the 2.23 stable series of the Snappy daemon, which provides support for installing Snap packages in a Linux-based operating system. It doesn't appear to be a major release, despite the new version number, but it focuses mainly on new features than bug fixes. "The Snappy team is happy to announce the availability of snapd 2.24. After some maintenance releases during the 2.23 series we focused in 2.24 on new features again," reveals Michael Vogt, Software Engineer at Canonical, in today's GitHub announcement. What's new in Snapd 2.24 Among the new features and improvements implemented in the Snapd 2.24 release, we can mention lots of cross-distro enhancements, especially for the Fedora Linux operating system, better internal interfaces code, the ability to allow chroot in base templates, and the addition of the maliit, joystick, and autopilot new interfaces. Talking about interfaces, Snapd 2.24 comes with improvements for the unity8, unity7, mir, browser-support, opengl, framebuffer, location-control, and location-observe ones, along with more improvements for tests and aliases. It also makes it possible to detect devmode by inspecting the AppArmor support in Linux kernel. As for the bugs fixed in the Snapd 2.24 release, we can mention an issue that could have occurred when attempting to transition from ubuntu-core to core, the pi-config.* core settings, and GNOME Software support. More pi-config.* core settings have been added as well. Snapd 2.24 is available for download right now as a source tarball if you want to compile it on your favorite GNU/Linux distirbution, but it should land in the coming days in the stable software repositories of various supported Ubuntu releases, as well as other operating systems, so update when it's available. Source
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