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  1. Incredible vinyl-like super SSDs could make hard disk drives obsolete Wafer-level SSD could offer major improvements all round (Image credit: MS Mikel / Shutterstock) Modern hyperscale datacenters have infinite appetite for storage performance, capacity, and density, which is why multiple new SSD form-factors designed to maximize performance and capacity were introduced in the recent years. But Kioxia believes that there is a faster and cheaper way to deliver desired solid-state storage solutions to cloud customers: wafer-level SSDs. With capacities starting at around 50 TBs using current 3D QLC NAND, such devices could offer unbeatable performance. Wafer-level SSDs In a nutshell, Kioxia proposes to skip dicing, assembly, chip packaging, and SSD drive assembly, but use a whole wafer with 3D NAND instead. The wafer is to be probed using Kioxia’s ‘super multi-probing technology’ to discover as well as disable faulty 3D NAND dies and then attached to a pad with I/O and power connectors. The whole thing should be operated in parallel to extract maximum sequential and random IOPS performance. The current capacity of SSDs is limited by form-factors and chip packaging technologies, whereas performance boundaries are defined by controllers (i.e., by the number of their NAND channels as well as their ability to effectively perform ECC and other necessary operations quickly) and the PCI Express interface. On a wafer level, one can get an extreme number of NAND channels (think well beyond Microsemi’s 32 channels common on enterprise-grade SSDs), whereas a PCIe 6.0 x16 interface would deliver up to 128 GB/s of bandwidth. As for IOPS, we are talking about a multi-channel monstrous SSDs, so think of millions of IOPS. (Image credit: Blocks & Files) Shigeo Oshima, Kioxia’s chief engineer, described the concept of wafer-level SSDs in a presentation at VLSI Symposium 2020, meaning this is not a product from the company’s roadmap, but hopefully something to come soon. However Kioxia currently produces 1.33 Tb 96-layer 3D QLC NAND chips that measure 158.4 mm2 and deliver up to a 132 MB/s write performance due to a quad-plane architecture. Approximately 355 of such dies fit on a 300-mm wafer, so assuming a yield rate of approximately 90%, Toshiba gets around 320 good dies, or 53 TB of raw 3D QLC NAND. With future iterations, Toshiba will have even more raw 3D NAND per wafer. A solid-state storage solution based on 300-mm 3D NAND wafer(s) would look like a standard rack server with its own logic, PSU, cooling system, and other components like network interfaces. From storage density point of view, such a server is not going to be a champion (not in a world where you can pack 100 TB into a 3.5-inch form-factor), but if you need extreme performance at a relatively low price, a device of such kind could make sense. Via Blocks & Files Incredible vinyl-like super SSDs could make hard disk drives obsolete
  2. Samsung announces the QVO 870 SSD with double the capacity of its predecessor Samsung today announced the QVO 870 consumer SSD, its second-generation SSDs using quad-level cell (QLC) technology. The company debuted QLC SSDs in late 2018 with the QVO 860 SSD, which came in sizes up to 4TB. The new model doubles the maximum capacity, with an "industry-leading" 8TB of storage space. In addition to a significant bump in storage capacity, the new model also promises enhanced performance and reliability. The drive uses a single-level cell (SLC) buffer to help maintain its peak performance for longer, since QLC storage tends to be slower in exchange for the higher capacity in a smaller physical package. The SLC buffer is variable, with up to 42GB on the 1TB model and up to 78GB on the larger models. It promises slightly higher sequential read and write speeds, plus up to 13% better random read speeds. However, despite the promised improvements, the spec sheet doesn't look all that different between the new model and the previous one. Here's a quick comparison between the two: QVO 860 QVO 870 Interface SATA 6 Gbps SATA 6 Gbps Form factor 2.5-inch 2.5-inch Storage memory Samsung V-NAND 4-bit MLC (QLC) Samsung V-NAND 4-bit MLC (QLC) Controller Samsung MJX Controller Samsung MKX Controller DRAM 4GB LPDDR4 for 4TB 2GB LPDDR4 for 2TB 1GB LPDDR4 for 1TB 8GB LPDDR4 (8TB) 4GB LPDDR4 (4TB) 2GB LPDDR4 (2TB) 1GB LPDDR4 (1TB) Capacity 1TB, 2TB, and 4TB 1TB, 2TB, 4TB, and 8TB Sequential Read/Write Speed Up to 550/520 MB/s Up to 560/530 MB/s Random Read/Write Speed Up to 97K/89K IOPS Up to 98K/88K IOPS Total Bytes Written 1,440TB (4TB) 720TB (2TB) 360TB (1TB) 2,880TB (8TB) 1,440TB (4TB) 720TB (2TB) 360TB (1TB) The new QVO 870 SSD is available for pre-order starting today on Samsung's website, with a shipping date of July 17, though the 8TB model doesn't seem to be available yet (Tom's Hardware reports that variant will launch in August). It starts with a 1TB option at $129.99, and the 4TB costs $499.99. Samsung didn't say how much the 8TB model will go for. Samsung announces the QVO 870 SSD with double the capacity of its predecessor
  3. This 30.72TB SSD brings something exciting to the table Ever heard of SAS? No, not that SAS (Image credit: Kioxia) In the race to build the largest SSD, Kioxia (formerly known as Toshiba Memory) is playing catch up with Samsung Semiconductor as it brings the CM6 and PM6 to market. Both are 2.5-inch 15mm drives, with the former sporting a PCIe 4.0 x4 interface and the latter a dual-port 24G SAS (Serial-Attached SCSI) - a popular connector usually found in data centers and servers that delivers a staggering 24Gbps. As expected, they use Kioxia’s proprietary 96-layer 3D TLC BiCS Flash and firmware and will be available in capacities up to 30.72TB. Write endurance stands at a beefy 1 DWPD (that’s a staggering 11.22 Exabytes), with sequential reads hitting 4.3 GBps and 6.9Gbps for the SAS and PCIe versions respectively. Random IOPS reaches up to 1.4M IOPS, which is slower than Samsung’s monstrous PM1733. According to a statement from Kioxia, the drives will be “priced to compete with SAS, however, OEMs determine final pricing to customers”. Whatever that means in practice remains to be seen, but we can expect the PM6 to be priced competitively against the only other SAS drive of this capacity, the Samsung PM1643. Kioxia also claims to be the only SSD supplier to offer failure recovery if two dies were to fail at the same time, offering “multi stream write support” to reduce write amplification and extend endurance, as well as four different enterprise security options. Note, this particular SKU (the 30.72TB) will be available to purchase in August 2020. This 30.72TB SSD brings something exciting to the table
  4. PS5-like SSD speeds could be coming to PCs in August thanks to Samsung 980 Pro Showcasing the benefits of PCIe 4.0 (Image credit: Anandtech / Samsung) Samsung’s 980 Pro SSD, the manufacturer’s first SSD to use PCIe 4.0, should be out before the end of August, according to a fresh rumor. This comes courtesy of Ice Universe (as spotted by HWBattle), who is a fairly prolific leaker on Twitter, although they mainly deal in smartphone rumors (but seems to have expanded into the PC arena more, of late, having floated a Ryzen 4000 rumor recently). Within the next two months, the ‘super performing’ SSD will apparently showcase the benefits of moving to PCIe 4.0, for those who have purchased a motherboard which supports the standard (like AMD’s X570 boards, or B550). Of course, there are already PCIe 4.0 solid-state drives out there, like the Sabrent Rocket, a well-liked drive which hits a 5,000MB/s read speed. But the Samsung 980 Pro (which was unveiled at CES back at the start of the year) boasts a sequential read speed of 6,500MB/s, and a write speed of 5,000MB/s. Seriously nippy That’s very nippy in layman’s terms, even if you compare it to what we’ve heard about the much-talked-of PS5’s SSD, Sony’s drive will hit 5,500MB/s (5.5GB/s) of bandwidth – though admittedly with clever compression it could hit more like around 8 to 9GB/s in certain cases. As you may have seen recently, Samsung is pushing hard in other areas with solid-state drives, and certainly when it comes to capacity with the incoming Samsung 870 QVO. That SSD will be one of the cheapest you can get in terms of price per TB, and the 870 QVO will top out at an 8TB model according to a recent leak – and it will retail at $900, which doesn’t work out much more expensive than the very cheapest 1TB SSDs (in terms of cost per TB, that is). Samsung’s 980 Pro will naturally come in more modest capacities ranging between 250GB to 1TB. PS5-like SSD speeds could be coming to PCs in August thanks to Samsung 980 Pro
  5. This 8TB SSD is the biggest you can fit in a (normal) laptop Largest SSD capacity for an NVMe PCIe M.2 2280 consumer drive (Image credit: Sabrent) An up-and-coming storage challenger has managed to do what the likes of Samsung and Micron have yet to achieve; launch a consumer 8TB NVMe PCIe M.2 2280 SSD. Sabrent quietly unveiled the Rocket Q (SB-RKTQ-8TB) to the unsuspecting masses, doubling the capacity of its previous chart topper. This is not the largest solid state drive out there - the ExaDrive DC100 from Nimbus Data holds that crown at 100TB - but it is the largest you can plug into a normal laptop with an M.2 slot. 8TB SSD The rest of the specification sheet is rather predictable; this is a PCIe Gen3 (rather than Gen4) model, with support for TRIM and SMART commands. It also features advanced wear leveling, bad block management and over-provision features, which should improve the drive's useful shelf life and general performance. As with other Sabrent drives, this one also comes with a free Acronis True Image software for easy cloning. Read/write speeds are not yet available, but given the 4TB version delivered 3.4GBps/3GBps on read/write and 0.49/0.68 MIOPS on random 4K QD32 read/write, we’d expect the 8TB model to perform at least as well. It's worth noting the Rocket Q uses Micron QLC chips, rather than TLC technology, and a Phison E12S controller. Sabrent is yet to confirm how much the drive will cost, but since the 4TB version was 2.5 times the price of the 2TB model, we expect the 8TB drive to retail for at least $1900, if not more. Source: This 8TB SSD is the biggest you can fit in a (normal) laptop (TechRadar)
  6. Hi all Yesterday I mounted a SSD drive on my mobo to accelerate my computer. And a strange thing happened : - I switched off my computer, put the SSD in its slot, screwed it and rebooted. - The pc booted fine. I entered the bios to verify that my new disk was there and... no, it was not. The M2.1 slot - where i put the SSD - was marked "empty". Argg... Never mind, I launched Windows 10. The OS found a new drive and asked me to initialize it for future use, what I did. I then ran the samsung utility (Samsung Magician). All worked fine. The speed is ok as you can see on the picture. I rebooted, re-entered the Bios, to see if i missed something... The M2.1 slot was still empty but, strange thing, the SSD was found in the boot order section. I quit the bios ,pressed F8 to access the Boot menu : and, yes, my new drive was there. So, i do not worry about that, but i would like to know if anybody had encountered this situation. And if someone has an explanation.... it would be great too Thank you for reading Config : Asus Prime X470-pro with an AMD Ryzen 5 2600 (2019) Samsung EvoPlus NVMe M2 (250 Go) Windows 10 x64
  7. Seagate backs up a truckload of flash, and introduces a gaming dock, too. Seagate is blazing up a firestorm with the release of two new storage products for gamers, a new gaming dock, and a PCIe 4.0 x4 FireCuda SSD. The company is also refreshing a few of the other SSDs in its lineup, too. FireCuda Gaming Dock Seagate’s FireCuda Gaming Dock is a high-end gaming hub that integrates a docking station and external storage into one device. It’s meant to be a perfect fit for laptop gamers who aren’t ready to jump on the desktop gaming PC bandwagon yet. As many laptops are constrained by storage, Seagate is launching the unit with 4TB 7200RPM HDD inside for those growing game libraries. The company also threw in a PCIe 3.0 x4 M.2 expansion slot just in case you’re looking to add some high-speed NVMe storage, too. The dock features one-cord plug-and-play connectivity over a single Thunderbolt 3 input. There are also 10 connections to the docking station to connect your other peripherals. • 1x TB3 port for accessory devices • 1x DisplayPort 1.4 • 4x USB 3.1 Gen 2 ports • 1x USB 3.1 Gen 2 battery charge port • 1x RJ45 Ethernet network port • 1x 3.5mm audio-in / mic port • 1x 3.5mm audio-out port Unfortunately, there is no charging support for laptops, so you will have to use your power brick when you're connected to the dock. But it offers a slick industrial design with LED illumination. It comes to market with an MSRP of $349.99 and a three-year warranty. FireCuda 520 SSD If the gaming dock wasn’t enough to spark your interest, Seagate’s new PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2 NVMe SSD just might. It’s Seagate's top-of-the-line SSD, and a solid choice to add some more speed to your new AMD Ryzen 3000 build. Like a few other PCIe 4.0 SSDs in the market, Seagate’s FireCuda 520 features a Phison E16 SSD controller that has been validated by the company. Paired with Kioxia’s 96L BiCS4 TLC NAND flash, Seagate says this combo enables incredible performance with up to 5,000/4,400 MBps of sequential read/write throughput and up to 760,000/700,000 random read/write IOPS. The drive comes with a black PCB and has an MTBF rating of 1.8M hours. It also comes with a five-year warranty with endurance figures of up to 3,600 TB to match. Available now, Seagate’s FireCuda 520 comes in three capacities: 500GB, 1TB, and 2TB. MSRPs are $124.99 (500GB), $249.99 (1TB), and $429.99 (2TB). FireCuda 510 SSD Refresh While the FireCuda 520 launch steals the spotlight, Seagate’s FireCuda 510 PCIe 3.0 x4 M.2 NVMe SSD gets some love, too. Today, Seagate told us that it is refreshing the FireCuda 510 with new hardware. First, Seagate added in a black PCB to appeal for those concerned about aesthetics. Who likes ugly blue and green PCBs distracting from your blacked-out or red accented gaming build, anyways? Seagate also swapped out the NAND from 64L BiCS3 to the latest Kioxia 96L BiCS4 flash. They have also added in a 500GB capacity point because high-capacity models are a hot seller. Barracuda 510 SSD Refresh Just as the FireCuda is expanding to smaller capacities, the company’s mainstream PCIe 3.0 x4 M.2 NVMe SSD, the BarraCuda 510, is getting a 1TB model. Like the FireCuda, the BarraCuda features a Seagate-validated Phison E12 SSD controller and the latest Kioxia 96L BiCS4 flash, but not the fancy black PCB. The main difference between the BarraCuda 510 and FireCuda 510, other than aesthetics and capacity points, is that the BarraCuda is a single-sided M.2 SSD optimized for flexible compatibility, while FireCuda is a double-sided M.2 solution optimized for enhanced performance and greater endurance. BarraCuda 120 SSD Refresh To conclude the refresh list, we finally have the BarraCuda 120 SSD. Seagate’s BarraCuda 120 is a 2.5 in × 7mm SATA 6Gb/s SSD that replaces the previous BarraCuda SSD. Seagate replaced the internals with new and up-to-date hardware. The company also swapped out the aging S10 SSD controller and replaced it with a Phison S12 SATA controller to ready it for 3D NAND. Seagate will have two sources of NAND for this SSD. Depending on inventory, the BarraCuda 120 will come with either Kioxia 96L BiCS4 TLC or Micron 64L TLC to ensure consistent supply. Source: Seagate Announces Thunderbolt 3 Gaming Dock and New FireCuda SSDs (via Tom's Hardware)
  8. Micron and Intel co-developed 3D XPoint memory as a high-performance alternative to flash, but so far only Intel has brought products to market, under their Optane brand. Despite owning the fab where 3D XPoint memory is produced, the closest Micron has come to commercializing that tech for themselves was their announcement in 2016 that upcoming Micron products using 3D XPoint memory would be branded as Micron QuantX, their counterpart to Intel's Optane brand. Years later, we finally have a concrete product announcement, and they seem to have abandoned the QuantX name. The new Micron X100 is a high-end enterprise NVMe SSD to compete against Intel's upcoming second-generation Optane SSDs and any specialized low-latency SLC NAND their competitors can come up with (eg. Samsung Z-NAND, Toshiba XL-FLASH). Micron has not yet released full specs for the X100, but the top line performance numbers are 2.5M IOPS for 4kB random reads and around 10GB/s for sequential transfers—both likely to be new records for a single SSD if they can ship it soon enough. A preview video posted by Micron includes a graph that labels the 2.5M IOPS figure as being tested at QD1, which sounds too good to be true: almost 5x the performance of Intel's current Optane SSDs. Micron says the X100 should be good for at least 9GB/s for reads, writes, or mixed workloads, reflecting how much closer 3D XPoint is to symmetrical read/write performance than any flash memory. (And also suggesting that the controller may be the bottleneck for sequential transfers more than the 3D XPoint memory itself.) For QoS, Micron is listing both read and write latencies of 8µs or less, slightly better than the 10µs that Intel's current Optane SSDs promise. The card Micron is showing off today is a full-height half-length PCIe x16 add-in card, so it should be able to reach full throughput even on PCIe 3.0 systems. Micron says the X100 will be in limited sampling to select customers sometime this quarter, so it's not going to be shaking up the storage market much in the immediate future but it is far enough past the vaporware stage that Micron should be able to deliver the rest of the specs soon—including the range of available capacities. Since Micron hasn't said anything about a second generation of 3D XPoint memory being ready, the density and costs of the X100 shouldn't be drastically different from Intel's Optane offerings. Source: Micron Finally Announces A 3D XPoint Product: Micron X100 NVMe SSD (via AnandTech)
  9. SSDs are on track to get bigger and cheaper thanks to PLC technology Storage of five bits in every NAND cell is coming, courtesy of Intel and Toshiba. Enlarge / This listing image is honestly a bit of a bait-and-switch: Optane isn't a NAND technology at all, and is about as far away from PLC as you can get. Intel Corporation Wednesday, Intel announced it's joining Toshiba in the PLC (Penta-Level Cell, meaning 5 bits stored per individual NAND cell) club. Intel has not yet commercialized the technology, so you can't go and buy a PLC SSD yet—but we can expect the technology will lead eventually to higher-capacity and cheaper solid state drives. To understand how and why this works, we need to go over a little bit of SSD design history. One of the most basic architectural features of a solid state disk is how many bits can be stored in each individual NAND cell. The simplest and most robust design is SLC—Single Layer Cell—in which each floating-gate NAND cell is either charged or not, representing a 1 or a 0. SLC flash can be written at very high speed and typically survives several times more write cycles than more complex designs can. (Endurance levels are specified per drive, but National Instruments uses 100K, 20K, and 3K as sample program/erase cycle endurance levels for SLC, eMLC, and MLC drives here.) Although SLC flash is high performance, high endurance, and high reliability, it's also extremely expensive to manufacture. SSDs didn't hit the consumer market until MLC—Multi-Layer Cell—flash became widely available. Naturally, the storage industry being what it is, they confused things from here. These are the industry terms for the various NAND storage levels: SLC—Single Layer Cell. One bit stored per cell. Typically only found in small cache layers, or extremely high-performance enterprise SSDs. MLC—Multi Layer Cell. In the real world, this refers specifically to two bits per cell. Examples include early consumer drives such as Intel X-25M and modern high-performance drives such as Samsung 860 Pro. eMLC—enterprise Multi Layer Cell. This is, effectively, just MLC with write speeds throttled in order to reduce error rates. Still only two bits stored per cell. TLC—Triple Layer Cell. Three bits stored per cell. Most modern consumer drives, such as Samsung 860 EVO and Western Digital Blue, are TLC drives. QLC—Quadruple Layer Cell. Four bits stored per cell. Used by a few high-capacity, low-cost consumer SSDs such as Samsung's 860 QVO and Intel's 660P. PLC—Penta Layer Cell, because an acronym for "quintuple" would have collided with 4-bit QLC. Five bits stored per cell. This is new technology that Intel and Toshiba have debuted this quarter. First image of article image gallery. Please visit the source link to see all images. Intel also differentiates itself from competitors by sticking with the floating-gate cell design used in early SLC devices, instead of the less expensive charge-trap design the rest of the industry has shifted to. It's unclear to casual researchers which technology is actually better from a technical perspective, but Intel argues that the floating gates can be manufactured at a higher density, meaning it can pack more cells into the same physical area. Unfortunately, while PLC SSDs will likely be bigger and cheaper, they'll probably also be slower. Modern SSDs mostly use TLC storage with a small layer of SLC write cache. As long as you don't write too much data too fast, your SSD writes will seem as blazingly fast as your reads—for example, Samsung's consumer drives are rated for up to 520MB/sec. But that's only as long as you keep inside the relatively small SLC cache layer; once you've filled that and must write directly to the main media in real time, things slow down enormously. Samsung makes widely-available consumer and prosumer drives with MLC, TLC, and QLC cell densities, so it's helpful to see their rated speeds to get some idea of how this plays out. It's worth noting that these published specifications are for the drive as a whole, not for individual NAND cells. Larger SSDs can use more parallelism and operate with higher throughput than smaller ones. There is no Samsung QVO at a lower capacity than 1TB, presumably in part because it would have to be even slower. SSD model Cell level SLC cache sequential write speed Media sequential write speed Samsung 860 Pro 512GB MLC n/a 530MB/sec Samsung 860 EVO 512GB TLC 520MB/sec 300MB/sec Samsung 860 QVO 1TB QLC 520MB/sec 80MB/sec We can't tell you exactly how fast PLC media will (or won't) be, but the progression we see here doesn't make it look great. As the number of distinct voltage levels per cell that must be reliably detected increases, the time it takes to accurately and reliably read or write to those cells increases along with it. We can see this reflected especially well in Samsung's published specs for the three SSD models shown above: the Pro series drive doesn't use an SLC cache at all, and therefore maximum write speeds are consistent no matter how hard you push it. By contrast, the EVO and QVO fall off a cliff once you exhaust the cache. With sequential write speeds to QLC media already decreasing to or below that of conventional hard drives, PLC seems likely to be a niche player that will compete far more with NAS and datacenter drives than it does with laptop and desktop SSDs aimed at high performance. Sequential throughput isn't everything, of course—and PLC media should still offer much higher IOPS in challenging random-access workloads than conventional disks can. But it's probably not going to be a good solution in anything but truly massive-capacity drives, which can use higher parallelism (think "invisible RAID0") to offset the invididually-slow characteristics of PLC cells. Source: SSDs are on track to get bigger and cheaper thanks to PLC technology (Ars Technica) (To view the article's image gallery, please visit the above link)
  10. Hello guys, I need a solution to clone my entire HDD of an old computer which has installed Windows XP Professional SP3 in it to a SSD. I tried Macrium Reflect 7.2 to clone it, but the whole process ended up with an Error code "0". Thanks.
  11. The Retina MacBook Air was refreshed last week with a new price and the addition of a True Tone display. The refresh was minor, with the same CPUs as 2018, but a $100 cheaper price point: the 2019 MacBook Air starts at $1099 from Apple, with $999 student pricing. It turns out that one downside to this latest revision is that the laptop actually features slower solid state storage than the 2018 model. As tested by Consomac using the Blackmagic Disk Speed Test, the 2019 MacBook Air can attain read speeds of 1.3 GB/s read and 1 GB/s write performance. The equivalent 256 GB SSD 2018 MacBook Air could top 2 GB/s read and around 0.9 GB/s write speeds. Therefore, the new SSD component in use has marginally superior write speeds but 35% slower read speeds, falling from 2 GB/s to 1.3 GB/s. (The 128 GB SSD option has slower 0.5 GB/s write speeds, but this drop-off was also observed in the 128 GB 2018 Air.) Benchmark via Consomac. Presumably, the slower SSD is a cheaper component for Apple to pack into the machine and helped the company achieve the $100 price drop, and even more aggressive education pricing for students. In truth, this compromise was probably the right tradeoff to make. The lower price will make the machine appeal to dramatically more people, and disproportionally few MacBook Air users will notice the slower SSD read speeds in normal usage. A 35% slower SSD does not automatically translate into an overall performance loss of 35%. A 1.3 GB/s SSD is still sufficiently fast enough that most heavy computing tasks performed on the Air will be primarily pegged by the CPU or GPU or RAM constraints, making the additional SSD speed overhead a little superfluous. Of course, it will be slower. But for typical laptop needs, it should be just fine. Source
  12. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.18.3

    HDDExpert + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip
  13. source Flaws in Popular SSD Drives Bypass Hardware Disk Encryption By Lawrence Abrams November 5, 2018 01:56 PM 8 Researchers have found flaws that can be exploited to bypass hardware decryption without a password in well known and popular SSD drives. In a new report titled "Self-encrypting deception: weaknesses in the encryption of solid state drives (SSDs)", researchers Carlo Meijer and Bernard van Gastel from Radboud University explain how they were able to to modify the firmware or use a debugging interface to modify the password validation routine in SSD drives to decrypt hardware encrypted data without a password. The researchers tested these methods against well known and popular SSD drives such as the Crucial MX100, Crucial MX200, Crucial MX300, Samsung 840 EVO, Samsung 850 EVO, Samsung T3 Portable, and Samsung T5 Portable and were able to illustrate methods to access the encrypted drive's data. "We have analyzed the hardware full-disk encryption of several SSDs by reverse engineering their firmware," stated the report. "In theory, the security guarantees offered by hardware encryption are similar to or better than software implementations. In reality, we found that many hardware implementations have critical security weaknesses, for many models allowing for complete recovery of the data without knowledge of any secret." To make matters worse, as Windows' BitLocker software encryption will default to hard drive encryption if supported, it can be bypassed using the same discovered flaws. Accessing encrypted files without knowing the password To bypass decryption passwords, the researchers utilized a variety of techniques depending on whether debug ports were available, the ATA Security self-encrypting drive (SED) standard was being used, or if the newer TCG Opal SED specification was being used. These flaws were responsibly disclosed to Crucial and Samsung to give them time to prepare firmware updates. New firmware is availble for Crucial SSD drives, while Samsung has only released new firmwarefor their T3 and T5 Portable SSD drives. For their non-portable drives (EVO), they recommend that users utilize software encryption instead. Crucial MX 100, Crucial MX 200, & Samsung T3 Portable For the Crucial MX 100, Crucial MX 200, and Samsung T3 Portable SSD drives, the researchers were able to connect to the drive's JTAG debugging interfaces and modify the password validation routine so that it always validates as successful regardless of the password that is entered. This allows them to enter any password and have the drive unlocked. JTAG Interface Crucial MX300 SSD Drive The Crucial MX300 also has a JTAG debugging port, but it is disabled on the drive. Therefore, the researchers had to rely on a more complicated routine of flashing the device with a modified firmware that allows them to perform various routines, which ultimately allow them to either decrypt the password or authenticate to the device using an empty password. Samsung 840 EVO and Samsung 850 EVO SSD Drives Depending on which SED specification is used, the researchers were able to access the encrypted data by either connecting to the JTAG debug port and modifying the password validation routine or by using a wear-level issue that allows that them to recover the cryptographic secrets needed to unlock the drive from a previous unlocked instance. The Samsung 850 EVO does not have the wear-level issue, so would need to rely on the modification of the password-validation routine through the debug port. BitLocker fails by defaulting to hardware encryption Most modern operating systems provide software encryption that allows a user to perform whole disk encryption. While software decryption offered by Linux, macOS, Android, and iOS offer strong software encryption, BitLocker on Windows falls prey to the SSD flaw by defaulting to hardware encryption when available. When using BitLocker to encrypt a disk in Windows, if the operating system detects a SSD drive with hardware encryption, it will automatically default to using it. This allows drives encrypted by BitLocker using hardware encryption to be decrypted by the same flaws discussed above. BitLocker software encryption on the other hand has no known and verifiable flaws that allow users to bypass password authentication. In order to prevent the use of SSD hardware encryption, the researchers suggest that users disable its use using a Windows Group Policy at "Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\BitLocker Drive Encryption\Operating System Drives" called "Configure use of hardware-based encryption for operating system drives". Windows Policy to disable Hardware Encryption This policy is also available for removable and fixed data drives and should be disabled for them as well to enforce software encryption. Before software encryption will be used, after you change these policies you must first completely decrypt the drive and then enable BitLocker again to use software encryption. Update 11/6/18: Microsoft has issued an advisory related to BitLocker and discovered flaws in SSD hardware encryption. This advisory contains mitigation information "Microsoft is aware of reports of vulnerabilities in the hardware encryption of certain self-encrypting drives (SEDs). Customers concerned about this issue should consider using the software only encryption provided by BitLocker Drive Encryption™. On Windows computers with self-encrypting drives, BitLocker Drive Encryption™ manages encryption and will use hardware encryption by default. Administrators who want to force software encryption on computers with self-encrypting drives can accomplish this by deploying a Group Policy to override the default behavior. Windows will consult Group Policy to enforce software encryption only at the time of enabling BitLocker."
  14. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.18.2

    HDDExpert + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip
  15. straycat19

    SanDisk Extreme Portable SSD

    I was lucky enough to have our IT department give me a couple of these devices that they received for testing but that they didn't want. I took one and used WintoUSB to create a portable windows drive using a virtual machine vhd file of Windows 10 LTSC as the source. I was surprised when I booted the drive how fast it was compared to actual windows to go devices. The device is small enough to be carried in a pocket and lightweight. I would consider buying several, but larger than the 250GB I was given, if they continue to perform as they have initially performed. Here is the data from SanDisk on them. The rugged SanDisk® Extreme Portable SSD delivers high-speed transfers with up to 550MB/s read speeds.** This makes it perfect for saving and editing hi-res photos and videos. With an IP55 rating, it also stands up to rain, splashes, spills and dust. Capacities of 250GB, 500GB, 1TB, 2TB With up to 2TB of high-speed storage for high-res photos, videos and sound files, the SanDisk Extreme® Portable SSD is perfect for all your creative pursuits. Works with Windows and Mac, USB-C or USB-A Designed to work with both Windows and Mac, the SanDisk Extreme® Portable SSD is equipped with a USB 3.1 Type-C connector and also includes a USB Type-C to Type-C cable and a Type-C to Type-A adapter, meaning it will work with the PCs and Macs of today, tomorrow and yesterday. Compact, Pocket-Sized Design Good things come in small sizes! The SanDisk Extreme® Portable SSD delivers high-performance and capacity in a drive that’s smaller than a smartphone. 0.348 x 1.951 x 3.787 in. (8.850 x 49.550 x 96.200 mm) Built by a technology leader More than 25 years ago the SanDisk® brand created the world’s first flash-based solid state drive and that was just the beginning. As a technology leader, we ensure that our products continue to deliver superior performance that you can rely on.
  16. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.18.1

    HDDExpert + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip
  17. Claims years-in-dev tech doubles speed Toshiba has claimed its new consumer NVMe SSD blasts the performance cobwebs off SATA SSDs. The RC100 is an M.2 card format SSD and was previewed at CES in January. Toshiba has positioned it as a budget drive and hopes it will spread NVMe adoption outwards from the enterprise market to the consumer one. Comparing it with Toshiba's two-year-old Q300 Pro shows what a difference two years can make in storage tech. The Q300 Pro came in 256GB, 512GB and 1TB capacity points. It used 15nm MLC (2bits/cell) flash with a 6Gbit/s SATA interface, and was positioned as an SSD for gamers and workstations. The RC100 is an M.2 (2242 card) format drive, using TLC (3bits/cell) 64-layer 3D NAND with a PCie gen 3 interface. It is classed as a budget NVMe SSD and comes in 120, 240 and 480GB capacities. The use of 3D NAND gets us more capacity in less space, while the NVMe interface seemingly blows SATA away, as evidenced by the table below: The RC100 is more than twice as fast on all these measures. It also costs less than the Q300 Pro. Newegg stocks the 480GB RC100 product at $154.99. The 512GB Q300 Pro cost around $210 in 2016. Not for nothing, but you can still buy a 512GB Q300 Pro on Amazon for $553.28. Source
  18. Finally, some good Windows 10 news A chink of light has appeared in the wall of Windows 10 update woes in the form of a patch that should address the SSD problems plaguing the OS. The patch, KB4100403, was emitted by the software giant yesterday and brings the version number of the troubled OS to 17134.81. Tucked away among minor tweaks for time zones and closed caption settings is a fix concerning power regression on systems with NVMe devices from "certain vendors". The Register has been banging on about SSD problems and the April 2018 Update in general for a while now, and is prepared to wager a delicious pint of beer that those "certain vendors" include Intel and Toshiba. While not spelled out in the fix list itself, the known issues table does indeed call out the Intel and Toshiba SSD problems. The workaround is, er, KB4100403. Users who have encountered the Intel 600p or Pro 6000p issue are unlikely to have even managed to get the Windows 10 update installed, and Microsoft suggests hanging fire until the new version is offered by Windows Update. Enthusiasts too keen to wait will be able to force the update from 25 May. Owners of affected Toshiba SSDs (the XG4, XG5 and BG3 series) are politely encouraged to wait until June's Patch Tuesday for their fix. In addition to Microsoft's advice, The Register would add that trying this stuff out on a non-production machine would make sense in light of recent events. And for goodness sake, check your backups are in order before letting Windows 10 do its thing. Source
  19. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.6.3

    HDDExpert + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip
  20. Hello everyone, I'm thinking about changing my laptop hard drive to SSD as this is the age of SSD now. Now, my concern is that, my laptop came pre-installed with Windows 10 Professional & I have an OS recovery DVD but it's older version. I'm stuck here with the activation process, as repository threads are removed now, which I'm not. And I don't wish to recover from the original DVD, because I've to update again my whole operating system, which will be a waste of both time & bandwidth. I have the latest ISO of Windows 10 & I'll be installing from it. My question is, will the OEM product key automatically slipstream to the OS if I install the latest version & activate itself over internet or I have to insert a product key separately & activate it? Please help.
  21. Samsung starts mass production of its 30TB SAS SSD Samsung today announced in a press release that it has officially begun mass production of its latest Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) SSD - the PM1643 - which is squarely aimed at the next-generation of enterprise storage systems. These drives are built using the company's latest 512Gb V-NAND technology - in a 64-layer array -, in addition to offering an industry-first 1TB NAND flash package and 40GB of DRAM. This means that not only will it be able to meet demanding storage needs but will outperform the previous 15.36TB SSD - introduced back in March of 2016 - by a factor of two. Samsung Executive Vice President of Memory Sales & Marketing, Jaesoo Han commented on the increased focus by the company on the enterprise market: “With our launch of the 30.72TB SSD, we are once again shattering the enterprise storage capacity barrier, and in the process, opening up new horizons for ultra-high capacity storage systems worldwide, Samsung will continue to move aggressively in meeting the shifting demand toward SSDs over 10TB and at the same time, accelerating adoption of our trail-blazing storage solutions in a new age of enterprise systems.” The company explains that this achivement was made possible "by combining 32 of the new 1TB NAND flash packages, each comprised of 16 stacked layers of 512Gb V-NAND chips." As an example, the company points out that 5,700 5GB full HD movie files can be stored on a single 2.5-inch drive using these chips. Samsung also boasts of the performance these drives can deliver, with the PM1643 capable of hitting "up to" 400,000 input/output operations per second (IOPS) in the company's own random read tests, and 50,000 IOPS in random write tests. Meanwhile, sequential speeds come in at 2,100MB/s for read and 1,700MB/s for write tests, per the company. According to Samsung, the new drive performs approximately four times better than a typical SATA SSD; as these drives are focussed on the enterprise, the company also noted that they offer a mean time between failures (MTBF) of two million hours. Although manufacturing already started on the 30.72TB SSDs back in January, this will be further expanded later this year to include capacities of 15.36TB, 7.68TB, 3.84TB, 1.92TB, 960GB, and 800GB; earlier this year the company also announced the SZ985 Z-SSD, which is tailor-made for high-performance computing (HPC) applications in the enterprise, with a capacity of 800GB. SOURCE
  22. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.16.2

    HDDExpert + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip
  23. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.16.1

    HDDExpert + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip
  24. Western Digital's Blue and SanDisk's Ultra SSDs have been updated with 3D BiCS FLASH and are shipping, according to online reseller B&H Photo. They're coming in capacities up to 1TB; the SanDisk Ultra 3D SSD shows a large 2TB model "coming soon," but no date is given for availability. The site also gave us a first look at initial pricing for these products. Newegg may have the Blue 3D SSDs, as well. If you search by the product number, there are results, but the product description and specifications show the older Blue SSD (2016) information. There are even user reviews dating back to last year. Using the same series name--Blue, Black, Red and other color hard disk drive series--has confused users. There's a good chance that will carry over to the new SSD product line; SanDisk released a consumer SSD under the "Ultra" name in 2013, "Ultra Plus" (also in 2013), and "Ultra II" in 2014. WD Blue 3D Technical Specifications Product Blue 3D 250GB Blue 3D 500GB Blue 3D 1TB Blue 3D 2TB Pricing $89.99 $149.99 $279.99 Unknown Capacity User / Raw 250GB / 256GB 500GB / 512GB 1,000GB / 1,024GB 2,000GB / 2,048GB Form Factor 2.5-Inch 7mm M.2 2280 Single-Sided 2.5-Inch 7mm M.2 2280 Single-Sided 2.5-Inch 7mm M.2 2280 Single-Sided 2.5-Inch 7mm M.2 2280 Single-Sided Interface / Protocol SATA 6Gbps / AHCI SATA 6Gbps / AHCI SATA 6Gbps / AHCI SATA 6Gbps / AHCI Controller Marvell 88SS1074 Marvell 88SS1074 Marvell 88SS1074 Marvell 88SS1074 DRAM Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown NAND SanDisk BiCS FLASH 64-Layer TLC SanDisk BiCS FLASH 64-Layer TLC SanDisk BiCS FLASH 64-Layer TLC SanDisk BiCS FLASH 64-Layer TLC Sequential Read 550 MB/s 560 MB/s 560 MB/s 560 MB/s Sequential Write 525 MB/s 530 MB/s 530 MB/s 530 MB/s Random Read 95,000 IOPS 95,000 IOPS 95,000 IOPS 95,000 IOPS Random Write 81,000 IOPS 84,000 IOPS 84,000 IOPS 84,000 IOPS Encryption No No No No Endurance 100 TBW 200 TBW 400 TBW 500 TBW Product Number 2.5-Inch: WDS250G2B0A M.2 2280: WDS250G2B0B 2.5-Inch: WDS500G2B0A M.2 2280: WDS500G2B0B 2.5-Inch: WDS100T2B0A M.2 2280: WDS100T2B0A 2.5-Inch: WDS200T2B0A M.2 2280: WDS200T2B0A Warranty 3-Year Limited 3-Year Limited 3-Year Limited 3-Year Limited SanDisk Ultra 3D SSD Technical Specifications Product Ultra 3D 250GB Ultra 3D 500GB Ultra 3D 1TB Ultra 3D 2TB Pricing $99.99 $164.99 $279.99 $549.99 (Unavailable) Capacity User / Raw 250GB / 256GB 500GB / 512GB 1000GB / 1024GB 2000GB / 2048GB Form Factor 2.5-Inch 2.5-Inch 2.5-Inch 2.5-Inch Interface / Protocol SATA 6Gbps / AHCI SATA 6Gbps / AHCI SATA 6Gbps / AHCI SATA 6Gbps / AHCI Controller Marvell 88SS1074 Marvell 88SS1074 Marvell 88SS1074 Marvell 88SS1074 DRAM Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown NAND SanDisk BiCS FLASH 64-Layer TLC SanDisk BiCS FLASH 64-Layer TLC SanDisk BiCS FLASH 64-Layer TLC SanDisk BiCS FLASH 64-Layer TLC Sequential Read 550 MB/s 560 MB/s 560 MB/s 560 MB/s Sequential Write 525 MB/s 530 MB/s 530 MB/s 530 MB/s Random Read 95,000 IOPS 95,000 IOPS 95,000 IOPS 95,000 IOPS Random Write 81,000 IOPS 84,000 IOPS 84,000 IOPS 84,000 IOPS Encryption No No No No Endurance 100 TBW 200 TBW 400 TBW 500 TBW Part Number SDSSDH3-250G-G25 SDSSDH3-500G-G25 SDSSDH3-1T00-G25 SDSSDH3-2T00-G25 Warranty 3-Year Limited 3-Year Limited 3-Year Limited 3-Year Limited Both drives use identical hardware but target different markets. Given the performance we achieved with Toshiba's XG5 OEM-focused NVMe SSD using the same 256Gbit BiCS FLASH, these two products could very well match the real-world performance of Samsung's 850 EVO. When we first found the listing at B&H, the pricing was much higher for the four SanDisk Ultra 3D products. In the last 24 hours, though, B&H reduced pricing for all four Ultra products. The 2TB drive went from $709.99 to $549.99, which was the largest change, and the 250GB went from $109.99 to $99.99. Even though both drives use the same hardware, at this time it looks like shoppers will pay a little more for the Ultra over the Blue in 250GB and 500GB capacity sizes. That may change over the coming week as more news emerges. Article source
  25. LC Technology Solid State Doctor 3.1.1.7 + Portable The SSD (Solid State Drive) Utility Suite is an essential tool to provide performance enhancement, optimization, cloning capability, data security and firmware management for Solid State drives. More importantly, the SSD utility suite is a proactive support tool, giving you the ability to make informed decisions regarding your data – whether to back it up, erase it securely or optimize the drive using the TRIM command. This suite is designed to enable faster performance, as well as predict end of life by monitoring the lifespan of your Solid State Drive on Microsoft® Operating Systems. The SSD Utility Suite gives you access to some of the unique features built into today’s Solid State Drives. Features Drive information ToolThis will show you the basic information of every drive in your system. The information displayed will include the drive model number, serial number, firmware version, port number, drive size, ATA version, supported features, drive temperature, lifetime drive usage. Overprovision Tool The overprovision tool will allow the user to allocate a portion of the free space on the SSD to be used by the controller in the SSD within certain guidelines. This overprovisioned space created on the drive will allow the controller to better manage and maintain the performance and longevity of the SSD drive. Disk Clone ToolThe disk cloning tool copies the contents of the selected source drive to the selected destination drive. Optimize TRIM Tool The Optimize Tool issues a TRIM command to the SSD which tells the SSD which data blocks are no longer in use, such as those left by deleted files. Regular use of the TRIM command will help the SSD maintain maximum performance. We include support for Microsoft AHCI and Intel Matrix Storage Manager on all MS OS’s*. S.M.A.R.T Status ToolThis will display the current S.M.A.R.T. (Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology) status of the drive overall as well as the status of individual attributes of the drive. Secure Drive Wipe The Secure Wipe Tool will allow the user to securely delete the entire contents of the drive. This feature will place the drive in its original unformatted RAW state without any file system. The data on your drive cannot be recovered after running a secure wipe. As a safety feature, the Secure Wipe Tool will NOT allow the user to erase the contents of their boot drive. Website: http://www.lc-tech.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: ML Medicine: Keygen Size: 5,61 / 9,10 Mb.
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