Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'research'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Site Related
    • News & Updates
    • Site / Forum Feedback
    • Member Introduction
  • News
    • General News
    • FileSharing News
    • Mobile News
    • Software News
    • Security & Privacy News
    • Technology News
  • Downloads
    • nsane.down
  • General Discussions & Support
    • Filesharing Chat
    • Security & Privacy Center
    • Software Chat
    • Mobile Mania
    • Technology Talk
    • Entertainment Exchange
    • Guides & Tutorials
  • Off-Topic Chat
    • The Chat Bar
    • Jokes & Funny Stuff
    • Polling Station

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Found 10 results

  1. New research published by the European Union Intellectual Property Office shows that, in the EU, people more frequently pay to access online content. There is still a group of stubborn pirates who remain, however, but these often pay for legal services too. Affordable options appear to be the key to lowering piracy rates. The European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) regularly conducts studies to see how piracy develops over time. When compared to earlier years, the findings help to signal trends which can be useful as input for fu
  2. New research into the effects of the French anti-piracy law Hadopi shows that its introduction failed to significantly increase box-office revenue. It did, however, cause a shift in people's movie preferences. The interest of moviegoers in U.S. films increased, at the expense of other content, including French productions. France has been fighting on the anti-piracy enforcement frontline for more than a decade now. The country was the first to introduce a graduated response system, Hadopi, where Internet subscribers risked losing their Inter
  3. A new report published by PRS for Music reveals that UK traffic to stream-ripper sites has skyrocketed over the past three years. The findings reveal a massive 1390% traffic boost. Intrigued by these findings, we decided to take a closer look at the methodology, with some surprising results that cast doubt on the overall conclusions. Every year, dozens of piracy studies and surveys appear online. These can help to signal new trends and changes in user behavior. When done right, research can be a valuable tool to shape future law or to direct
  4. Researchers from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, conducted a study to find out which piracy warnings are seen as most effective by the general public. As it turns out, more explicit variants tend to be favored. "STOP. This is illegal. You may be monitored and you may be fined," paired with an appropriate warning icon, is seen as relatively most effective. Over the past decades, the entertainment industries have tried out numerous anti-piracy campaigns. From “don’t copy that floppy,” “copyright alerts,” to “get it right,” and everything in between, it has been tri
  5. A new study on the effects of the IPRED anti-piracy law in Sweden shows that the legislation increased music sales by 36 percent. At the same time, Internet traffic in the country dropped significantly. The results suggest that the law initially had the desired effect, but the researchers also note this didn't last long. It’s been five years since Sweden implemented the controversial anti-piracy legislation, IPRED. The law, which gives rights holders the authority to request the personal details of alleged copyright infringers, was met with fierce resistance from ISPs and the public at large.
  6. New research by economist Koleman Strumpf shows that there is no significant effect of movie piracy on box office revenues. This conclusion is based on data from 150 blockbuster movies that were released over a period of six years, using the popular Hollywood exchange as an indication for the revenue impact. Research into online piracy comes in all shapes and sizes, often with equally mixed results. Often the main question is whether piracy is hurting sales. A new study conducted by economist Koleman Strumpf is one of the most comprehensive on the subject so far. Drawing on data from a popu
  7. Piracy is Ethically Acceptable For Many Harvard Lawyers, Research Finds In most countries the law strictly forbids people from sharing copyrighted material without permission. However, not everyone necessarily agrees with this position. New research reveals that many lawyers studying at Harvard view casual forms of piracy as ethically acceptable. Does this mean that the law should change? Most people know all too well that it’s against the law to share a pirated copy of a movie or TV-show. However, law and ethics are not always
  8. New research from Carnegie Mellon University reveals that more time spent on pirate sites increases the risk of running into malware. The same effect was not found for other categories, such as social networks, shopping or gambling sites. While the results show an increased threat, it's doubtful that the absolute numbers will impress hardened pirates. In recent years copyright holders have been rather concerned with the health of pirates’ computers. They regularly highlight reports which show that pirate sites are rife with malware and even alert pote
  9. Early results from birth-cohort have public-health implications, as other groups use the data to investigate the microbiome and mental health. An ambitious Chinese study tracking tens of thousands of babies and their mothers has begun to bear fruit — just six years after the study’s leaders recruited their first sets of mothers and babies. Researchers have already published results based on the cohort study, which collects biological, environmental and social data, some with important public-health implications. And many more investigations are under way. One, in parti
  10. A new paper published in the Virginia Journal of Law and Technology shows that the number of DMCA notices received by Google increased 711,887 percent in four years. The increase can be credited to a few copyright holders and industry groups such as the RIAA, who started an avalanche of takedown requests after the SOPA and PIPA bills died in Congress. Signed into law by President Bill Clinton in 1998, the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA) aimed to ready copyright law for the digital age. The law heightened punishment for copyright infringement over the Internet and criminalized circumv
×
×
  • Create New...