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  1. Mohomad Samindika

    NORD VPN Premium Accounts

    If anyone required NORD VPN Premium Accounts, leave a massage. Thank you. If you have successfully activated, Please Press the Thanks button in this post
  2. NordVPN launches password management solution NordPass VPN provider NordVPN launched its password management solution NordPass recently after a prolonged early access test. The solution is available for iOS and Android, and the browsers Chrome, Firefox, Opera and Microsoft Edge at the time of writing. Browser extensions require a companion app, called NordPass Background App that needs to be downloaded and installed on desktop devices. You may only use the extensions on desktop devices if the background application is running. A free version is available that is limited to a single device. Users who need access to their data on multiple devices need to upgrade their account to a paid plan. Paid plans start at $2.49 for a 2-year subscription. NordVPN promises that "all encryption and decryption" happens on the user's device. The service uses AES-256-GCM with Argon2 and zero-knowledge encryption. Any data that leaves the system is encrypted before it does so. Users are asked to pick a master password during setup after they have entered their NordPass email address and verified the email. Access appears to be limited to NordPass customers at the time of writing or users who sign-up for a paid plan. A recovery code is displayed that may be used to recover access if the master password is lost. Options to import passwords from various browsers and password management solutions is provided. NordPass supports imports from Chrome, Opera and Firefox, and numerous password managers such as KeePass, LastPass, 1Password, Dashlane, or BitWarden. Options to import data from CSV files are also available. Customers may enable two-factor authentication in the account settings to add another layer of protection to the account; this is highly recommended for users of the service as a breach provides access to all saved passwords. NordPass' two-factor authentication solution works with popular authentication apps like Authy, Google Authenticator or Duo Mobile. The password manager displays icons next to login fields; activation displays available logins and options to select these to sign-in to the service in question. The service does not indicate to the user if logins are available for the particular site; neither the icon in the browser's address bar nor the icons in the password fields highlight that. You find out only after you click on the icon in the field. Sign-ins are semi-automated. The service does not seem to support auto-logins into sites which means that you need to select an account manually and hit the log-in button each time you want to sign in. Some users prefer it that way because of added security, others will probably miss the auto-login option as it makes the process more convenient. The service may be used to pick passwords for new accounts and password changes for existing accounts. Options to modify the parameters for generated passwords are not provided. New accounts and changes are picked up by the service automatically and are saved on user request. Other features that NordPass supports: NordPass users may save notes and credit card information as well using the service. Password sharing. Closing Words If you look at NordPass and compare it to other password management solutions, you may come to the conclusion that the service is too expensive for what it offers. Even if you compare the free version, you may notice that it lacks in comparison to other applications. My main gripes with the service are that it requires a background app if you use a browser extension, that it lacks critical settings, e.g. to change password generation parameters, and needs more polishing as well, e.g. an indicator that a login was found for the active site. I can see this do well as part of a bundle with NordVPN but the service will have a hard time getting traction on its own because of the better, and often times cheaper, solutions that are out there. Source: NordVPN launches password management solution NordPass (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  3. The company has also enlisted VerSprite to run penetration testing, threat and vulnerability management, compliance management and assessment services on its infrastructure. NordVPN has announced a series of initiatives that it says will significantly improve the security of its infrastructure after an attacker gained access to one of its servers. The company, known for its widely used virtual private network (VPN) service, confirmed last week that a server it was renting from a data center in Finland was exploited by an attacker via an insecure remote management system left by the data center provider. According to NordVPN, the server did not contain any user activity logs, usernames or passwords. Nonetheless, the company said that it has enlisted the cybersecurity consulting firm VerSprite to run penetration testing, threat and vulnerability management, compliance management and assessment services on its infrastructure. VerSprite will also work with the company to form an independent cybersecurity advisory committee, which will oversee NordVPN's security practices. Additionally, NordVPN said it plans to introduce a bug bounty program to catch potential vulnerabilities. Cybersecurity experts who find and report the vulnerabilities will receive a payout. NordVPN is also planning to a full-scale independent security audit for 2020. The audit will cover the infrastructure hardware, VPN software, backend architecture, backend source code, and internal procedures, the company said. In a move away from third party server providers, NordVPN is planning to build out a network of wholly owned collocated servers and is currently reviewing its infrastructure to ensure there are no other existing, exploitable vulnerabilities. NordVPN is also planning to upgrade its more than 5,100 servers to RAM servers. The move will create a centrally controlled network where nothing is stored locally, including the operating system, and ensure that if a server is seized by an attacker, they'll find blank hardware with no data or configuration files on it. "Every part of NordVPN will become faster, stronger, and more secure, from our infrastructure and code to our teams and our partners," said NordVPN's head of PR Laura Tyrell. Source: NordVPN introduces bug bounty program as part of security overhaul (via ZDNet)
  4. NordVPN, a virtual private network provider that promises to “protect your privacy online,” has confirmed it was hacked. The admission comes following rumors that the company had been breached. It first emerged that NordVPN had an expired internal private key exposed, potentially allowing anyone to spin out their own servers imitating NordVPN. VPN providers are increasingly popular as they ostensibly provide privacy from your internet provider and visiting sites about your internet browsing traffic. That’s why journalists and activists often use these services, particularly when they’re working in hostile states. These providers channel all of your internet traffic through one encrypted pipe, making it more difficult for anyone on the internet to see which sites you are visiting or which apps you are using. But often that means displacing your browsing history from your internet provider to your VPN provider. That’s left many providers open to scrutiny, as often it’s not clear if each provider is logging every site a user visits. For its part, NordVPN has claimed a “zero logs” policy. “We don’t track, collect, or share your private data,” the company says. But the breach is likely to cause alarm that hackers may have been in a position to access some user data. NordVPN told TechCrunch that one of its data centers was accessed in March 2018. “One of the data centers in Finland we are renting our servers from was accessed with no authorization,” said NordVPN spokesperson Laura Tyrell. The attacker gained access to the server — which had been active for about a month — by exploiting an insecure remote management system left by the data center provider, which NordVPN said it was unaware that such a system existed. NordVPN did not name the data center provider. “The server itself did not contain any user activity logs; none of our applications send user-created credentials for authentication, so usernames and passwords couldn’t have been intercepted either,” said the spokesperson. “On the same note, the only possible way to abuse the website traffic was by performing a personalized and complicated man-in-the-middle attack to intercept a single connection that tried to access NordVPN.” According to the spokesperson, the expired private key could not have been used to decrypt the VPN traffic on any other server. NordVPN said it found out about the breach a “few months ago,” but the spokesperson said the breach was not disclosed until today because the company wanted to be “100% sure that each component within our infrastructure is secure.” A senior security researcher we spoke to who reviewed the statement and other evidence of the breach, but asked not to be named as they work for a company that requires authorization to speak to the press, called these findings “troubling.” “While this is unconfirmed and we await further forensic evidence, this is an indication of a full remote compromise of this provider’s systems,” the security researcher said. “That should be deeply concerning to anyone who uses or promotes these particular services.” NordVPN said “no other server on our network has been affected.” But the security researcher warned that NordVPN was ignoring the larger issue of the attacker’s possible access across the network. “Your car was just stolen and taken on a joy ride and you’re quibbling about which buttons were pushed on the radio?” the researcher said. The company confirmed it had installed intrusion detection systems, a popular technology that companies use to detect early breaches, but “no-one could know about an undisclosed remote management system left by the [data center] provider,” said the spokesperson. “They spent millions on ads, but apparently nothing on effective defensive security,” the researcher said. NordVPN was recently recommended by TechRadar and PCMag. CNET described it as its “favorite” VPN provider. It’s also believed several other VPN providers may have been breached around the same time. Similar records posted online — and seen by TechCrunch — suggest that TorGuard and VikingVPN may have also been compromised. A spokesperson for TorGuard told TechCrunch that a “single server” was compromised in 2017 but denied that any VPN traffic was accessed. TorGuard also put out an extensive statement following a May blog post, which first revealed the breach. Source
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  6. Alex42

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  7. NordVPN has announced the latest app in their VPN arsenal for Linux systems. Linux is massively under-resourced when it comes to dedicated VPN support. With their new app release, NordVPN’s Linux VPN app aims to plug a gap in the market. While many VPN providers offer apps for more mainstream platforms such as Windows and Mac plus apps for mobile devices running Android or iOS many lack on supporting Linux systems. What’s new in the Linux app Linux is often thought of as a system intended solely for ‘geeks’ or those ‘who know what they’re doing’. While in some respects this is true there are less able users who enjoy the security and benefits of Linux. NordVPN intends to tap into this market and has removed the complicated set-up process required to use their VPN service on the Linux platform. The new app is as plug-in-and-play as it can be on a Linux system. After initial set-up users can simply issue the “nordvpn connect” command to get connected instantly. CMO of NordVPN, Marty P. Kamden said: “We have a strong belief that online privacy and security should be accessible to everyone with a connected device, no matter what operating system they are using”. Going on to say “Most VPN providers offer Linux connectivity without the app support, and that is not always the easiest way, especially for beginners. That’s why we did our best to create a simple app with minimum setup, dedicated especially for Linux users” Linux App features Most importantly, NordVPN has ported some of their most critical features from their other apps. This includes their CyberSec service and Kill Switch function. CyberSec is a dedicated mode that stops malware, phishing, adverts and other types of trackers from infiltrating your connection. Alongside this the built-in ‘Kill Switch’ ensures that should the VPN connection drop for any reason the internet connection is cut retaining your privacy. Previously features like these were unavailable easily and would need to be manually configured along with actual connection on Linux systems. The new NordVPN Linux app does away with that need. The Linux client has no graphical interface and so retains the command-line type structure that most Linux users will be accustomed to. Alongside the Linux specific features users gain access to all the regular service features. This includes the ability to use one account on up to 6 devices at the same time and an option to switch between UDP and TCP protocols. Furthermore, users will be able to connect to one of 4,901 VPN servers at the time of writing in 62 different countries across the world. Apps, apps and more apps Alongside the new Linux client, NordVPN offers dedicated apps for Windows and Mac OS computer systems and mobile or tablet devices running Android or Apple iOS such as the iPhone and iPad. Source
  8. Over the past several weeks there have been repeated efforts to place NordVPN is a bad light. The company is being linked to Tesonet, one of Lithuania's largest tech companies, which runs data mining and residential proxy services. NordVPN says that these activities have nothing to do with their company and have retained a large auditing firm to back this up. The VPN industry is highly competitive. Combined with a userbase which tends to be more suspicious than the average Internet user, this is a volatile mix. In recent weeks there have been a series of allegations lodged against NordVPN. The company is being linked to Lithuanian tech company Tesonet, which offers a wide range of services and products. According to the allegations, Tesonet owns NordVPN, a claim the latter denies. This turns out to be problematic for some, as Tesonet is involved in data mining practices, and the company also runs a residential proxy network. While there is no evidence that NordVPN is involved in any of that, it’s enough to feed conspiracies. The situation didn’t improve when Tesonet was sued by Luminati, the company behind the “not so private” VPN service Hola. The complaint accuses Tesonet of infringing Luminati’s proxy patents and NordVPN is listed is the suit as well, with the claim that it had a business relationship with Hola. NordVPN initially opted not to comment publicly but that changed when a new storm of mostly ‘fake’ Twitter accounts (many of which were created years ago but have only tweeted on this particular issue) made themselves heard over the past days. “We realized that remaining silent is no longer an option and we must respond for the sake of our reputation,” NordVPN wrote in a recent blog post. NordVPN responds to several claims including that they are operating the same way as Hola, by selling users’ bandwidth. This is something anyone can verify independently, they say, by monitoring their traffic via a network monitoring application. “Anyone with Wireshark (or any other similar app) and some networking knowledge can perform a network scan, check all requests made by the NordVPN application, and verify their destinations. The results will prove that the web scraping accusations are false,” the company writes. Article Source: TorrentFreak.com NordVPN Blog
  9. NordVPN, a popular virtual private network provider, has launched CyberSec, a new security feature as part of the NordVPN 6.4.5.0 client update. CyberSec is a new security component of the official NordVPN client designed to block malware, intrusive advertisement, and other threats. Customers of NordVPN who upgrade the client to the latest version will receive a popup when they run the client after update installation that informs them about the new CyberSec feature. Introducing CyberSec! From now on, NordVPN gives comprehensive protection from intrusive ads, malware, phishing attempts, DDoS attacks and other threats. NordVPN CyberSec CyberSec can best be described as a mechanism to control traffic. It resembles a content blocker but with the difference that it runs on the system level, and not as a browser extension. It is not the first feature of its kind; Private Internet Access' client for instance ships with a similar feature called MACE for some time now. So what does it do? Blocks advertisement -- This part of CyberSec blocks known advertisement sources from being loaded. Defends against malware -- It blocks known malware domains by using a blacklist approach. Blocks botnet abuse -- Promises to prevent that devices are used for DDoS attacks, even if they are already infected. NordVPN users can toggle the status of the feature in the client interface under Settings > General. It is listed as the first option on the general settings page and highlighted with a new tag right now on top of that. All you need to do to enable or disable it is to click on the slider next to it. The feature works automatically when you enable it, and all applications that you run on your system benefit from its functionality. Closing Words CyberSec looks on first glance like a great feature; it blocks advertisement and malicious content after all automatically on a system wide level. The feature suffers from the same usability issue however that Private Internet Access' MACE feature suffers from: lack of control. While you can enable and disable the feature, you have no say in what gets blocked and what does not get blocked. If there is a false positive, there is nothing you can do about it other than turn off CyberSec to access the resource. There is no whitelisting for sites that you value and trust, so that advertisement is displayed, and no option to check the blocklists to verify what gets blocked and what does not get blocked. Additionally, there is also no option to put resources on the blocklist to block them permanently when you are connected to NordVPN. So, should you enable CyberSec then if you are a NordVPN customer? It depends. The hands-free approach has its advantages, as anyone may use it without knowing anything about blocking content on the Internet. The downside is the lack of control, especially no option to verify what gets blocked, or add or remove resources from the blocklists. A better approach would be in my opinion to separate the protective options, e.g. let users decide if they want to block malware, ads or DDoS abuse separately, and provide control and whitelisting / blacklisting functionality on top of that. Article source Introducing CyberSec: New Security Upgrade From NordVPN
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