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  1. Nokia report warns of rising cyberattacks on IoT devices Nokia’s latest Threat Intelligence Report has warned that cyberattacks on internet-connected devices are continuing to rise at an “alarming rate” due to poor security protections. The report found that IoT devices now make up 33% of infected devices, up from 16% in 2019. According to the report, the most affected IoT devices are those that are routinely assigned public-facing internet IP addresses. It highlighted that networks that use carrier-grade Network Address Translation see the infect
  2. Pi-Hole on Raspberry Pi Zero: As more and more things become IoT and stay online and do who knows what about user data, it is right time to back control. This simple program can block ads at DNS level. Meaning you don't need an adblock anymore as ads never reach to you in the first place. This is truly a blackhole for ads! Minimum Requirements: Raspberry Pi Zero Wi-Fi (or new), MicroSD Card 8 GB, USB Drive, Micro USB Charger, Computer (You can use different ISO based on your preference. This looks complex but can be done in minutes! Steps: 1.
  3. A Legion of Bugs Puts Hundreds of Millions of IoT Devices at Risk The so-called Ripple20 vulnerabilities affect equipment found in data centers, power grids, and more. Illustration: WIRED Staff Security experts have warned for years that the drive to connect every device imaginable to the internet would offer a bonanza for hackers. Now researchers have found that one chunk of software designed to enable those internet connections is itself ri
  4. Privacy, keeping things separate, and IoT, connecting everything, may never be truly compatible. Nonetheless, manufacturers, developers, and end-users must still try to ensure privacy in an increasingly interconnected world. We call it the Internet of Things (IoT), but what we often really mean is the Internet of Personal Data. If data is the new oil, then personal data is the lubricant of IoT. Internet-connected devices are awash with sensitive information. And in the age of hyper-connectivity, we are feeling the brunt of the inexorable connection between data a
  5. Hackers utilise Thingbots to launch IoT attacks Internet of Things (IoT) devices are now cybercriminals' top attack target and have managed to surpass web, application services and email servers according to new research from F5 Labs. The fifth volume of the security firm's The Hunt for IoT report that thirteen Thingbots, IoT devices that have become part of a botnet, were discovered during the first half of 2018. During the past 18 months, Spain was the top country under attack an
  6. When your IoT goes dark: Why every device must be open source and multicloud The open sourcing of a device stack, the cloud APIs, and cloud services "glue" needs to happen during the entire lifecycle of an IoT product -- not at the end of its life. Earlier this month, owners of the Jibo personal social robot -- a servomotor animated smart speaker with a friendly circular display "face" that underwent $73 million of venture capital funding -- saw their product's clou
  7. ‘Satori’ IoT Botnet Operator Pleads Guilty A 21-year-old man from Vancouver, Wash. has pleaded guilty to federal hacking charges tied to his role in operating the “Satori” botnet, a crime machine powered by hacked Internet of Things (IoT) devices that was built to conduct massive denial-of-service attacks targeting Internet service providers, online gaming platforms and Web hosting companies. Kenneth “Nexus-Zeta” Schuchman, in an undated photo. Kenneth Currin Schuchman pleaded guilty to one count of aiding and abetting computer intrusions. Between Jul
  8. By Mary Jo Foley for All About Microsoft Microsoft's Azure Sphere, which got its start as Microsoft Research's 'Project Sopris,' will be generally available starting next year. Microsoft officials said the company's Azure Sphere microcontroller (MCU) and associated cloud security service will be generally available in February 2020. Officials made the announcement on October 28 at the IoT Solutions World Congress. Microsoft also introduced new branding today for the ThreadX RTOS technology it acquired when it bought Express Logic in April 2019. G
  9. Gafgyt has been updated with new capabilities, and it spreads by killing rival malware. Tens of thousands of Wi-Fi routers are potentially vulnerable to an updated form of malware which takes advantage of known vulnerabilities to rope these devices into a botnet for the purposes of selling distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack capabilities to cyber criminals. A new variant of Gafgyt malware – which first emerged in 2014 – targets small office and home routers from well known brands, gaining access to the devices via known vulnerabilities. Now th
  10. Microsoft might be building an IoT version of Windows 10X It's been a while since there's been a significant feature update for Windows 10 IoT Core. The most recent one is the October 2018 Update, so it's well over a year old. As it turns out, Microsoft might be working on something new. According to a job listing on LinkedIn (spotted by Windows Latest), Microsoft is looking for an engineer to help build its new IoT OS, which will be based on Windows 10X. Specifically, the listing reads, "You will build the next generation IoT operating system bas
  11. The WIRED Guide to the Internet of Things What you need to know about the promise (and peril) of networked lightbulbs, ovens, cameras, speakers and, well … everything. How many engineers does it take to change a lightbulb? Depends on whether or not that lightbulb is connected to Wi-Fi. Lightbulbs, along with refrigerators, coffee makers, microwave ovens, baby monitors, security cameras, speakers, televisions, and thermostats have, in the past few decades, transformed from ordinary objects into conduits for the future. Embedded with sensors
  12. ARM’s new edge AI chips promise IoT devices that won’t need the cloud The smart devices of the future might not need servers to enable AI Edge AI is one of the biggest trends in chip technology. These are chips that run AI processing on the edge — or, in other words, on a device without a cloud connection. Apple recently bought a company that specializes in it, Google’s Coral initiative is meant to make it easier, and chipmaker ARM has already been working on it for years. Now, ARM is expanding its efforts in the field with two new chip desig
  13. IoT Devices At Major Manufacturers Infected With Crypto-Miner Security experts from TrapX reported that some IoT devices running Windows 7 have been infected with a piece of malware, is it a supply chain attack? The experts reported that several IoT devices at some major manufacturers have been infected with a cryptocurrency miner in October 2019. The list of infected devices includes automatic guided vehicles, a printer, and a smart TV. “The malware sample intercepted and analyzed by TrapX® is part of the Lemon_Duck sample family running on a double-click a
  14. Samsung launches IoT processor Exynos i T100 The Internet of Things processor is optimised for data communications shorter than 100 metres, Samsung said. Samsung's Exynos i T100 is an IoT processor aimed at short-distance communications. ( Image: Samsung) Samsung has launched an Internet of Things (IoT) processor aimed at providing short-distance data communications, the company announced. The Exynos i T100 can be used in small IoT devices such as gas detectors, temperature controlle
  15. A peer-to-peer (P2P) communications technology built into millions of security cameras and other consumer electronics includes several critical security flaws that expose the devices to eavesdropping, credential theft and remote compromise, new research has found. A map showing the distribution of some 2 million iLinkP2P-enabled devices that are vulnerable to eavesdropping, password theft and possibly remote compromise, according to new research. The security flaws involve iLnkP2P, software developed by China-based Shenzhen Yunni Technology. iLnkP2p is bundled with mil
  16. The fourth Industrial revolution emerges from AI and the Internet of Things IoT has arrived on the factory floor with the force of Kool-Aid Man exploding through walls. Enlarge / Robots making things! Getty / Ekkasit Keatsirikul / EyeEm Big data, analytics, and machine learning are starting to feel like anonymous business words, but they're not just overused abstract concepts—those buzzwords represent huge changes in much of the technology we deal with in our daily lives. Some of those
  17. The Internet of Things promises synergy between devices, but convenience comes at a cost: security. Users are (rightfully) wary to trust major tech companies with their information. A Google Survey poll found 48 percent of respondents distrust Facebook's involvement in IoT. In the wake of Prime Day, Amazon's yearly mega sale, millions of homes just got smarter. Smart devices, such as Wi-Fi-enabled thermostats and digital assistants, are the day's hottest tech—and many of them were discounted. The average home has five connected devices, a number pro
  18. Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are, so to say, a computer manufacturer’s “Lego bricks”: electronic components that can be employed in a more flexible way than other computer chips. Even large data centers that are dedicated to cloud services, such as those provided by some big technology companies, often resort to FPGAs. To date, the use of such services has been considered as relatively secure. Recently, however, scientists at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) uncovered potential gateways for cyber criminals, as they explain in a report published
  19. This week, security experts observed a surge in port 8000 scan activity, researchers at Qihoo 360 Netlab determined that the unusual activity was associated with Satori IoT botnet Experts from Qihoo 360 Netlab discovered that the author of the Satori botnet have integrated a the proof-of-concept (PoC) code for the XionMai web server software package after it was published on June 8. The code recently included in the Satori botnet exploits a buffer overflow vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2018-10088, in XionMai uc-httpd 1.0.0. The exploit could be used by remote attackers
  20. Z-Wave, a company that manufactures IoT chips present in millions of devices worldwide, has a serious security problem: Its chips can have their pairing security downgraded to give attackers near immediate access to all Z-Wave devices on a network. The exploit is called Z-Shave, and it has been known of, and supposedly fixed, since 2013. The flaw rests in Z-Wave's pairing protocol, which in 2013 was called S0. S0 transmitted network keys to network notes using all zeroes, which allowed it to be sniffed by attackers within radio frequency (RF) range. Z-Wave f
  21. Lots of government people are focused on IoT security, such as this recent effort. They are usually wrong. It's a typical cybersecurity policy effort which knows the answer without paying attention to the question. Government efforts focus on vulns and patching, ignoring more important issues. Patching has little to do with IoT security. For one thing, consumers will not patch vulns, because unlike your phone/laptop computer which is all "in your face", IoT devices, once installed, are quickly forgotten. For another thing, the average lifespan of a device on your networ
  22. Siemens, Airbus and Others Ink Charter on Critical Infrastructure, IoT A group of nine industrial giants have signed a charter on cybersecurity, focused on developing binding rules and standards around critical infrastructure and the internet of things (IoT). Siemens, Airbus, Allianz, Daimler Group, IBM, the Munich Security Conference, NXP, SGS and Deutsche Telekom have signed the Charter of Trust. The group outlines 10 action areas, and it has agreed to pioneer independent certification for infrastructure. It’s also calling for dedicated government ministries and C
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