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Found 39 results

  1. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.18.1

    HDDExpert + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip
  2. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.6.3

    HDDExpert + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip
  3. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.16.2

    HDDExpert + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip
  4. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.16.1

    HDDExpert + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip
  5. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.16

    HDDExpert + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: https://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip HDDExpert - 1.16 (Released 2018-01-28) ====================================== https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde
  6. Over the past few years, the rate of hard drive density improvements has dropped significantly. While Seagate and Western Digital have both pushed ahead with larger hard drives (often thanks to more platters and the use of helium), the actual rate of areal density increase has slowed these last few years. As Seagate and Western Digital push towards 20TB, glass substrates could be a critical component of that effort. Right now, only laptop drives use glass substrates, which have several advantages over aluminum. First, glass is more rigid than aluminum, which allows the platters to be thinner (and lighter). Glass substrates are smoother and flatter than aluminum, which allows them to be packed together more tightly, and they expand less than aluminum under heat, which makes it easier to cope with thermal expansion. The amount of energy required to spin a glass platter at a given spindle speed will also be at least slightly lower than if the same platter was made of aluminum, due to the latter’s higher weight. Mock-ups incorporating Hoya’s glass substrate. The right and left mock-ups use 10 0.5mm-thick glass substrates and nine 0.635mm-thick glass substrates, respectively. A Japanese company, Hoya, believes that current HDD manufacturers will adopt its glass disks for 3.5-inch drives (glass is already used for 2.5-inch laptop drives). Hoya has prototyped glass platters that are 0.5mm and 0.381mm thick, compared with the 0.635mm platters currently in use. While each drive platter must have a gap between itself and the next platter, cutting the platter size by 40 percent means you can pack more platters into the same drive capacity. Glass substrates are also useful for HAMR (Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording), which uses a laser to heat the part of the disk being written to. Seagate wants to introduce HAMR-equipped HDDs by 2018 and hit 20TB of available storage by 2020. Banking on Capacity One reason I suspect Nikkei is right about glass substrates being more widely adopted in 3.5-inch drives is because the hard drive industry really only has one card to play against SSDs — sheer storage capacity. The explosion in cloud services and the advent of so many comprehensive backup solutions means enterprise demand for back-end storage is going to continue to grow. Companies may use SSDs and NAND to cache data; we’ve even seen some interesting proposals for using NAND as a replacement for DRAM in cache servers. But while companies like Samsung sometimes make headlines for creating enormous NAND drives that dwarf anything hard drives can offer, they don’t bring those products to market for good reason: Nobody could afford them at the price they’d have to charge. The last two blue dots show consumer capacity in 2011 and 2014. The red dot shows the density growth rate at 20TB in 2020, Seagate’s stated goal for its own HAMR introduction. As the cost gap between hard drives and SSDs has fallen, we’ve seen SSDs muscling into what was traditionally the turf of higher capacity hard drives. The consumer market is clearly moving to NAND flash in the long run, with enthusiasts still buying some hard drives for local backups and archival purposes. Long-term, however, HDDs are going to be seen as cold (or at least cool) storage options. That means driving up capacities is the most important way to expand their appeal, and the businesses that adopt them won’t be put off, even if glass platters require a higher cost. SSDs aren’t going to be cost-effective if you need 100 to 500TB of storage in the near-term. With the total amount of data created worldwide continuing to grow, there’s no sign of slowing the world demand for data any time soon. View: Original Article
  7. The SEM Model 0101 has been "evaluated by the NSA/CSS and meets NSA and DoD compliance guidelines for the physical damage of media" with a durability rating of 204 drives/hour. This hard drive crusher destroys all hard drives regardless of size, format or type up to 1.85" high including desktop, laptop and server drives. It is ideal to meet the destroy mandate as part of the DoD's Degauss and Destroy specification. At the touch of a button, the SEM Model 0101 Hard Drive Crusher delivers 12,000 pounds (or 490K PSI) of force to a conical punch causing catastrophic trauma to the hard drive chassis while destroying the internal platter. The unit is quiet, smooth and virtually vibration free. Destruction takes only 8 seconds (Note: System can destroy up to 4 standard laptop drives or 6 ultra-thin laptop drives in one 8 second cycle). A safety interlock prevents operation of the hard drive crusher while door is open and an emergency e-stop immediately halts operation when pressed. The SEM Model 0101 Hard Drive Crusher is the only unit with a chamber large enough to fit hard drives mounted with rails or handles from hot-swap trays. Webpage
  8. batcaveman

    QILING Disk Master Professional v4.3

    QILING Disk Master Professional is an all-in-one data protection program for your computer: QILING Disk Master Professional offers a variety of features — including drive/partition/system backup & restore, drive/partition/system copy/move/resize, hard drive health monitoring, virtual disk, secure disk, and RAM disk — that help you with different aspects of data backup, protection, and security. The biggest nightmare for a computer user is data loss and system crash, once happened, reliable and up-to-date backups are extremely necessary and important. QILING Disk Master covers all the needs to recover your lost data and restore crashed systems in minutes. It’s advanced and reliable data backup & system disaster recovery software for home office and business desktops and laptops. It enables users to perform self-service backup operation with comprehensive full/differential/incremental backup. Key Features System backup and protection (imaging) Full, incremental, and differential backup AES 256 bit encryption, compression, and password One-click system backup Daily, weekly or monthly backup scheduler Perfect Defrag Bare-metal system restore Backup Strategy(Quota management) Supports all sizes hard disks and SSDs (80GB to 4TB) Compression Deduplication Hot Clone Larger than 512-byte sector GPT & UEFI Boot Supported Giveaway: https://sharewareonsale.com/s/dayu-disk-master-giveaway-sale SOS Hub Download: https://downloads.sharewareonsale.com/files/hub/sharewareonsale.com/SharewareOnSale_Giveaway_QILING_Disk_Master_Professional_hub.exe Or download directly here (tested): http://www.idiskhome.com/download/vdisk/DiskMaster_Pro_Trial.exe SERIAL: Site: https://paste2.org Sharecode[?]: /k6Xe5As7 Ghetto GUI though,
  9. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.14.3

    HDDExpert + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: http://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: http://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: http://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : http://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : http://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip
  10. Hi Guys, I need your advice on this : Few weeks ago, I encountered a strange error when I rebooted the pc & I couldn't boot into it properly and instead of OS-Choice BS Screen; I was stuck on an error page, Hard Disk : S.M.A.R.T. Enable , Command Failed. Other than DEL or F11 & (Ctrl+Alt+Esc), no other keys were working & It was a confusing situation because whenever I rebooted my PC, I was going back to the same error page like I was in a loop.This Drive is barely 15 months old. However after looking up for it, I applied the fixes i.e. 1 .Disabled S.M.A.R.T feature in BIOS ( I knew it wasnt a perfect solution for long term.) 2 . Disconnected the power-cord and Bus to hard disk and reconnected after draining power from the PC . ( This one worked & after that, I enabled the SMART Feature.) But again, After few days the error started appearing sometimes while rebooting and sometimes not....so I looked on WD site for diagnostics utility to check the status of the drive cos I already did CHKDSK/r on it and it isnt fragmanted either cos Win10 has scheduled defragmentation on & like every other utility I tried to check the drive health status, it came GOOD and also on WD utility, it passed the test. So I'm asking is it possible tho that it still should be considered as sitting on the brink of failure or it can be replaced citing this strange error as a potential symptom of a brewing disease!!
  11. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.14.2

    HDDExpert + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: http://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: http://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: http://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : http://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : http://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip
  12. SnakeMasteR

    Macrorit Partition Extender Pro v1.0.0

    Macrorit Partition Extender Pro Safely Extend and Resize Partitions On Your Hard Drive You want to man age your partitions, but you’re afraid of messing up your data if you do it wrong. Exploring different commercial disk management platforms is even more intimidating. Fear not! Just pick up today’s discount software promotion, Macrorit Partition Extender Pro! Macrorit Partition Extender Pro lets you extend and resize partitions on your hard drive while protecting your data. With Macrorit Partition Extender Pro, you’ll be able to extend disk volumes, C: drives, system partitions, and primary partitions while enjoying support for both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows 10/8/7/Vista and Windows XP. Offering a revolutionary algorithm and unique data protection technology, Macrorit Partition Extender Pro guarantees that your data will remain 100% safe during the partition extension. Find out today just how much better performance can be achieved when you free up disk space by extending partitions! Features Extend and resize partitions on your hard drive Safeguard your data during partition resizing Enjoy support for Windows 10 going back to XP Improve performance by freeing up disk space Benefit from a revolutionary partition extension algorithm After you purchase you will receive a download link to install the software Download available for: Windows XP and above BitsDuJour's giveaway promotional discount gets you all this at no cost! Policy After you purchase Macrorit Partition Extender Pro it may be used indefinitely. Macrorit Partition Extender Pro is licensed per computer, and not per user. Each license allows installation on a single computer and a laptop. Transfer of a license to another owned computer is not allowed. Email license activation is required without a hardware footprint. what's this? This promotion cannot be used to upgrade or extend an existing license. You must install/register the software within 30 days, and cannot do so afterwards. License can be used for Commercial and Personal use. Upgrades to future versions of the software will be free for minor versions only. For versions after that, upgrades will require additional payment, which will be discounted. Support is provided up to when the next major version is released. 30 days return policy. Review the Full License details for downloading and installing this software. Prices do not necessarily include taxes, which will vary by country. Giveaway page http://www.bitsdujour.com/software/macrorit-partition-extender-pro Homepage http://extendpartition.com/magic-server/pro-edition.htm
  13. As a part of its cost-cutting efforts, Seagate has decided to shut down its HDD manufacturing plant in Suzhou, China. The factory is one of the company’s largest production assets and its closure will significantly reduce the company’s HDD output. Seagate intends to lay off ~2200 employees, but it is unclear what it intends to do with the facility, which it owns. The factory in Suzhou, China, assemblies hard drives and performs their final testing before shipping. The plant does not produce HDD subassemblies and thus is not vertically integrated, but at 1.1 million square feet (102 thousand square meters), this is one of Seagate’s largest manufacturing assets and the largest drive assembly facility. The company got the factory from Maxtor, when it acquired it in 2006. According to a media report, the plant no longer makes products and the last employees will be laid off on January 18, 2017. “As part of our continual optimization of operational efficiencies, Seagate has made the difficult decision to shut down its factory in Suzhou, China,” an alleged statement by Seagate reads. “We regret that our Suzhou employees will be affected by this action, which reflects our ongoing commitment to reduce Seagate’s global manufacturing footprint and better align the business with current and expected demand trends.” Last year Seagate announced intentions to optimize its manufacturing capacities from around 55-60 million drives per quarter to approximately 35-40 million drives per quarter. In 2016, the company already fired about 8,000 employees from different locations, but that was only a part of the strategy. With the plan to shut down the plant in Suzhou, the company actually reduces its ability to produce the drives. After Seagate shuts down its plant in Suzhou, China, it will have two vertically integrated HDD production facilities in Wuxi, China, and Korat, Thailand. Both factories product drive subassemblies and actual HDDs, hence, by using only these two plants the company optimizes logistics (as it no longer has to transport drive subassemblies to Suzhou) and cuts its per drive manufacturing costs. Meanwhile, it remains to be seen what happens to Seagate’s factories that only produce drive subassemblies (sliders and HGAs). Read more here...
  14. Kyle_Katarn

    HDDExpert 1.14.1.28

    HDDExpert 1.14.1.28 + Portable Multilingual HDDExpert gives you a crystal-clear vision of your Hard Drive (HDD or SSD) health and performance and translates S.M.A.R.T. attributes into readable indication. It then recommends maintenance (fans upgrade, spare purchase, backups and more) depending on the amount of failures detected on your hard drives. Features: Clear S.M.A.R.T. attribute decoding S.M.A.R.T. attribute classification : failures, health, performance, temperatures,.. Maintenance recommendations : Fans upgrade, Spare purchase, backups... depending on failures User-friendly interface Internationalization support. OS: Windows Changelog: http://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php Homepage: http://www.kcsoftwares.com/?hdde Changelog: http://www.kcsoftwares.com/bugs/changelog_page.php?project_id=16 Download Installer : http://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde_lite.exe Download Portable : http://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/hdde.zip
  15. Seagate has launched a new series of enterprise HDDs that spin at 15,000 rounds per minute (RPM). The 2.5″ drives will be available in capacities of 300, 600 and 900GB. Seagate is first with a 15K RPM drive with a capacity larger than 600GB. The drives use a 12Gbit SAS interface to connect to the rest of the system indicating the drives aren’t for consumer usage. The drives are targeted for data center usage and Seagate claims its 600GB 15K RPM drive is 27% faster in reading sequential data than it’s previous generation 600GB HDD. Seagate specifies a maximum of 315 MB/s sustained transfer rate. Utilizing Seagate’s FastFormat feature, the drives are available in both a 512 native and a single advanced format (512e and 4Kn) model. The larger sectors of the 4Kn model allow for better error correcting. It’s unclear when the drives become available, Seagate also hasn’t disclosed any pricing information. Article source
  16. How to Turn an Old Hard Drive Into an External Drive So you’ve upgraded the hard drive in your computer, and you’re left with this old, seemingly useless bare hard drive. Don’t throw it away! It takes surprisingly little effort to turn an old (or new) hard drive into an external drive perfect for stashing your extra files on. Let’s look at how you can blow the dust off those old drives and save money in the process. Why Roll Your Own External Drive? You can, if you wish, head down to your local big box electronics store or favorite e-retailers, like Amazon or Newegg, and pick up an external drive at a seemingly decent price. But what seems to be a value on the surface isn’t always so. Not only is there no good reason to pay the hard drive company a premium to slap their drive in an enclosure on your behalf, there’s actually more than a few benefits to rolling your own external hard drive setup. First, if you already have a drive on hand, it’s extremely cheap to use it as an external drive, since the biggest cost (the drive) is already sunk and the smallest cost (the enclosure) is trivial by comparison. Even if you don’t consider yourself much of a hardware geek, there’s a good chance you have a few (or more) hard drives sitting around (we’ve got bunches sitting in drawers). Second, you get control over the drive quality and specifications. It’s a not so hush-hush secret in the hardware industry that external hard drive units rarely get premium drives, and even if you like the company you’re purchasing your off-the-shelf external drive unit from, that doesn’t mean you’ll be getting the cream-of-the-crop drive design from them in the process. If you use an old hard drive of your own or even purchase a new bare internal drive for this project, you’ll know exactly what you’re getting. Third, if you have a drive with data on it that you wish to retrieve, you can easily use your external enclosure to mount the hard drive and retrieve it. Yes, you could mount the drive internally on your desktop computer, but it’s a bit more time consuming, and can be impossible on some machines. And, on most laptop computers, it’s impossible to add an additional internal drive. (Although, if you’re only interested in a one-and-done data pull from the hard drive and have no intention of using it as an external drive, you might find the cable and techniques we use in this article to be more helpful.) Lastly, you’ll get more long term value out of rolling your own external drive since any drive can be used within the enclosure. When you purchase an off-the-shelf external drive, the enclosure is mated to its drive (sometimes even literally soldered together). You can’t just crack open that Western Digital MyBook and throw any old drive in there, but with a third-party external drive enclosure, you can. So when you want to upgrade your external drive, all you have to do is swap out the drive inside–instead of buying a completely new product. With all that in mind, let’s look at drive selection considerations, enclosure selection considerations, and finally how it all comes together. Selecting Your Drive Whether you’re picking through a pile of old drives gathering dust on your office shelf or you’re considering buying a new one for the task, there are a few things to keep in mind. We’d suggest reading over this section twice. Once to help you decide which drive you’ll use, and then again to jot down the relevant specifications of that drive before moving onto the next section of the guide focused on purchasing your enclosure. Drive Health This is your primary consideration when reusing an old hard drive: drive health. Obviously if you pulled the old drive from a machine because it was having serious issues like a clicking drive head or other problem, then you shouldn’t even consider using it as an external hard drive. Even if your drive isn’t having problems, you should absolutely check the SMART settings–a process akin to checking the hard drive’s health history. If it turns out the drive has a a bunch of red flags, like thousands of bad sectors, you should consider using a different spare drive or purchasing a new one for the enclosure. Drive Form Factor Hard drives come in two sizes. Mechanical hard drives and mechanical/SSD hybrids meant for desktop computers have a 3.5″ form factor, and are about the size of a modest paperback novel. They’re bigger than laptop-sized drives, but they’re also cheaper for how much storage you can fit. They also require an external power source, which means you’ll need to plug your resulting external drive into the wall. Exercise caution when coming between the mother drive and cub drive. SSDs and laptop-sized mechanical drives come in a 2.5″ form factor. The benefit of using a 2.5″ drive, as you’d expect, is the size–2.5″ drives are about the size of a smartphone. Further, most 2.5″ enclosures do not require external power, so they just have one cable: the one that plugs into your computer. No wall outlet or bulky transformer plug required. The downside to using a laptop size drive is that 2.5″ form factor drives are usually lower capacity (or very much pricier if higher capacity), and unlike 3.5″ drives that have a set height, 2.5″ drives can be 7mm, 9.5mm, and 12.5mm tall. Drive Speed and Capacity Since you’ll probably be plugging your drive in via USB, the drive speed won’t make a huge difference in terms of performance. Technically higher RPM drives will have a slight advantage over USB 3.0 connections (especially for seeking and writing tons of small files) but for most people the difference is likely negligible when all real world factors are included–like variables introduced by file sizes, how many devices are hooked up to each USB root on your computer, and so on. Drive speed is certainly a factor in terms of wear and tear on the drive, however, since faster drives generate more heat. If you’re surveying your drive pile or doing some shopping, you’ll extend the life of your drive by opting for a hard drive with a slow rotational speed (like 5,400 RPM) and skipping over drives with higher rotational speeds (like 7,200 and 10,000 RPM). If the drive is used infrequently, like you just fire it up to backup files once a month, the drive speed distinction (and the subsequent heat) is a moot point. If you intend to use the drive continuously, opt for a slower drive. Now, on the matter of drive capacity, there’s only one real limitation to be aware of. Older USB 2.0 enclosures don’t have the hardware/firmware to support larger drives so be aware that it’s best to pair a large drive (2TB+) with a newer enclosure. Drive Interface We saved this consideration for last because, for most people, it’s not even much of a consideration at all anymore. Hard drives are connected to a computer’s internals via either a PATA or an SATA connection type. PATA connections (also known as IDE) dominated the hard drive market from the mid 1980s well until around 2005 or so, and had a wide connector type that resembled a printer cable, seen below in the image above–note the very large molex-style power adapter at the far right. SATA, introduced in 2003, is now the dominate connection type and features a very skinny L-shaped port, seen above the PATA hard drive above. The data is transferred in the larger L-shaped connection point and the power in transferred in the small L-shaped connection point. Chances are, you have a SATA drive unless it’s a very old drive (or a newer drive used in a very old computer). But check your drive and compare it to the above image before you go looking for an enclosure. Selecting Your Enclosure Once you’ve identified the relevant elements of your hard drive, it’s time to pick out a compatible enclosure. While external hard drive enclosures tend to be pretty simple, there are a handful of considerations we recommend you keep in mind while shopping. Although our goal is to educate you as a consumer so you can select just the right enclosure for your needs, we won’t leave you hanging–through this section we’re including links to specific enclosures we recommend. Internal Interface And Drive Size We left off in the last section talking about drive interfaces. When shopping for an external hard drive enclosure, the first consideration is that you pick an enclosure whose interface matches your drive’s interface and size. Have a 2.5″ laptop hard drive with a SATA interface? You want a 2.5″ SATA enclosure. Have an old 3.5″ desktop drive with a PATA interface? You’ll want a 3.5″ enclosure that supports PATA/IDE. Finally, those of you purchasing enclosures for a 2.5″ laptop drive should be extra aware of the aforementioned drive height issue. Check the fine print on your enclosure to see if the drive enclosure accommodates 12.5mm height drives, 9.5mm height drives, 7mm height drives, or all/some of the above. Fortunately, 12.5mm drives are pretty rare, and nearly every 2.5″ enclosure works with 9.5mm and 7mm height drives. External Interface Second in importance is matching the external interfaces. Do you want to connect your enclosure via USB 3.0? FireWire? An eSATA port (which is very fast, but not available on many computers)? In the photo above you can see a variety of common interface types: on the left we have a 2.5″ enclosure with a micro-B connector, in the center we have a beefy metal USB 2.0 case (that we totally bought to match our Wii and store our games) that has a USB 2.0 type-B connection, and finally a newer 3.5″ enclosure on the right that sports a USB 3.0 type-B connection. Note that both the 3.5 drives have a power port–as we noted above it takes extra juice to run desktop size drives. Above all else, carefully check the specs of the enclosure you’re purchasing to ensure you’re getting exactly what you need–that cheap enclosure might seem like a great deal until you realize it’s so cheap because it’s only USB 2.0. Enclosure Material Hard drive enclosures come in two materials: plastic and metal. For infrequent and short duration usage, the material the enclosure is made out of doesn’t really matter. But for external drives that will see a lot of use (especially if you intend to leave them on all day), a metal body construction that turns the enclosure into a big heatsink for the hard drive is a must have. Heat is the enemy of all electronics and any little bit you can do to keep your hard drive cool is worth it. The photo in the previous section highlights this decision making mentality. The big white enclosure we bought for our Wii is a giant hunk of aluminum that does a fantastic job dissipating heat during long gaming sessions. For short backup sessions, the plastic bodies of the other two enclosures doesn’t really matter much in terms of heat retention/dissipation. Finally, we’d encourage you to skip wasting the money on “ruggedized” hard drive enclosures. You end up paying a premium for a rubber bumper or a little extra protection inside the enclosure case. And in reality, what are the chances you’re going to throw your drive on the floor in the first place? Rather than pay extra for a ruggedized drive, just search Amazon for a padded drive case to put the drive in before you toss it in your backpack or briefcase. You can find hundreds of simple padded cases for all drive sizes for less than ten bucks, like this $8 padded case. The Alternative: Docks and Tethers There’s a special place in every geek’s hardware arsenal for a hard drive dock or tethering cable, and it would be remiss of us not to mention it. While a proper enclosure is great for long term use, sometimes you just want to pop drives in an out for a quick read or copy. Better yet, nice docks also support multiple hard drive sizes and often include features like one-touch copying if you want to clone the drive. In such cases, who wants to deal with taking apart the hard drive enclosure to replace the drive? With a cable tether you just plug it right in and with a dock you can stick the drive in like dropping a piece of toast into a toaster. What these solutions lack in drive protection (they generally don’t enclose the circuit board on the bottom or shield the drive in anyway) they make up for in speed of use and ease of drive changing. The Bottom Line At the end of the day, don’t be afraid to spend the extra few dollars for better features because time is money. The difference between one company’s old USB 2.0 model with outdated features and their newer improved model with a USB 3.0 connection, support for large disks, and more, is almost always $5-10 (if that). When in doubt, just buy the newest model and don’t fall into the trap of saying to yourself “Well these look identical but this one is $3 cheaper…” You’ll hate yourself for skimping on the $3 when dumping all your movie files to the external drive takes an extra three hours. Putting It All Together With the work of learning about the ins and outs of external hard drives and purchasing the right enclosure behind you, the rest is easy peasy. If you have a tool-free or toolless enclosure, you literally just have to snap the case open (like opening the battery compartment on an electronic device) and slide the hard drive in. In the photo above you can see two toolless enclosures–thanks to the compact design of the SATA data and power connections, you can literally snap these enclosures open, slide the drive in until it clicks into place, and then snap the cover back on. Boom. Done. If your enclosure has screws, there are typically two that hold the case together and–just like the hard drive cage in your computer–four screws to mount the drive. At most, you’ll need a Philips screw driver and an extra sixty seconds of time to install the drive. Finally, we’ll save you a bit of panic. If you purchased a new bare drive for this project, when you plug the enclosure into your computer for the first time, you’ll see… nothing. The drive isn’t formatted yet, so your OS will ignore it until you do something. In such cases you’ll need to allocate and format the disk with Windows Disk Manager, use the Disk Utility in OS X, or use a tool like Gparted in Linux. After that, the drive should show up just like any other drive. Now that old disk isn’t gathering dust, you saved more than a few bucks in the process, and you’ve got an enclosure that will outlive the hard drive you slapped in it. Source
  17. 10 Ways To Free Up Hard Drive Space On Windows The guide lists ten methods to free up disk space on Windows computers using various native and third-party programs. 10 Ways to free up hard drive space on Windows lists ten methods to analyze and clear used hard drive space on Windows computer systems. While you might say that such a guide is no longer necessary, as we are in the age of the Terabyte hard drive, I respectfully have to disagree. First, older computers running Windows may not use a Terabyte drive as the main hard drive of the system. Second, Solid State Drives, while slowly picking up pace in regards to storage, are mostly used as 512 Gigabyte or less drives. In some cases, computers may have a 120 Gigabyte SSD or even less than that as the main system drive. If you check out Microsoft's newest Surface device, the Surface Pro 4, you will notice that two models come with 128 Gigabyte of storage only. Last but not least, even if your computer has plenty of space, you may want to free up drive space anyway as most of it is dead weight. 10 Ways to free up hard drive space on Windows The following ten methods may be used in conjunction with each other, or individually. Analyze disk space The very first thing you may want to do is analyze the disk space. This gives you a pretty good picture of the biggest offenders space-wise. I like to use WizTree for that but there are plenty of alternatives such as TreeSize Free, the Disk Analyzer of CCleaner, or Xinorbis. WizTree offers two view modes that are both useful. Tree View displays a tree hierarchy of folders and files sorted from largest to smallest. File View on the other hand puts the focus on files only. Both are useful in determining which folders and files use a lot of space. You may want to jump to the methods below that are most lucrative when it comes to freeing up disk space. If you spot a 16 Gigabyte Page File for instance, you may want to start there by reducing it. Previous Windows installations / Updates Cleanup When you upgrade Windows to a new version, a copy of the old version is kept for a period of time. This is done to give you the option to restore the old version should you run into issues or are dissatisfied with the new version of Windows. This copy may take up more than ten Gigabyte of storage space. It is a bit different for updates. When you install updates, old updates or files may become useless as they are replaced by new files. Windows keeps these around as well and does not remove them. Updates cleanup refers to removing outdated update files that are no longer required. Note: if you remove old Windows installation files or old updates, you have no option to go back anymore. It is suggested to use the operating system for a time before running these clean up operations. Tap on the Windows-key, type Disk Cleanup and hit enter. Confirm the UAC prompt that is displayed. Select the main drive (c usually), and click ok. This comes up only if more than one drive letter is used by storage devices. Click on "clean up system files" when the Disk Cleanup window pops up. Select the main drive again, and click ok. Each entry is listed with the disk space it occupies currently. While you may check them all, it is suggested to only check the items that you know you don't need anymore. Select "previous Windows installation(s)" to clear up old Windows installation files, and "Windows Update Cleanup" to remove old files that are no longer required. You may also want to consider removing log files, system dumps, and temporary files. Patch Cleaner is a third-party program that you may use to remove old updates no longer needed. Pagefile The Pagefile, located at x:\pagefile.sys where x is the drive letter, may appear like a relic of the past to you, especially if you have plenty of memory installed. It is used for caching, and using a fixed or dynamic amount of disk space for that. It may be quite large, 8 or more Gigabytes by default which usually is not required. Use the keyboard shortcut Windows-Pause to open the System Control Panel applet. Select Advanced System Settings when it opens. Click on the settings button under Performance when the System Properties window opens. Switch to the advanced tab and click on the change button under Virtual Memory. This displays all hard drives connected to the PC and the paging file size for each drive. You may change the paging file size by selecting a drive, switching to custom size, and adding initial size and maximum size values. You may also consider disabling the page file for secondary hard drives as well. As an example: on a computer with 16 Gigabytes of RAM, I set the pagefile size on drive c to 2 Gigabyte, and disabled it on all other drives. This worked well and I did not notice any issues using the computer this way. The initial pagefile size was 8 Gigabyte on the computer, which means that I regained 6 Gigabytes of disk space. Hibernate Hibernate is a power state in which everything that is open at the time is saved to disk. The idea is to load the content again from disk when the PC is fired up the next time so that you can resume exactly where you left. The data is saved to the file hiberfil.sys. Obviously, it makes little sense for you to disable Hibernation if you make use of the feature. If you don't however, you will free up Gigabytes of disk space by disabling the feature. Tap on the Windows-key, type cmd.exe, hold down the Ctrl-key and Shift-key, and hit enter. Confirm the UAC prompt that appears. This opens an elevated command prompt. To disable Hibernate, run the command powercfg.exe -h off. To turn it on again, run the command powercfg.exe -h on. The hiberfil.sys file is removed from the system as soon as you disable Hibernation. System Restore System Restore is a backup feature of the Windows operating system that uses disk space to store system snapshots. These snapshots may be created automatically by Windows, for instance before updates are installed, or manually by the user. Basically, what System Restore allows you to do is roll back the system to a recent state. System Restore may reserve quite a big of hard drive space for its functionality, and one option that you have to free up disk space is to reduce the reserved space. This means fewer snapshots that System Restore maintains at any point in time though. Use the keyboard shortcut Windows-Pause to open the System Control Panel applet. Click on "System Protection". The window that opens lists all drives and their protection state. On indicates that System Restore is enabled for the drive, off that it is turned off. Locate the main drive letter (usually c) and click on the configure button. This opens a new window with two main options: 1) turn system protection on or off and 2) change the maximum disk space usage of System Restore. You may reduce System Restore's max usage a couple of percent. How much depends entirely on you and other backup strategies you may make use of. I have set it to 2% on the main drive, and turned it off on all other drives. Clear Temporary Files Programs and Windows may use temporary files. Web browsers use them to store website files locally to speed up future visits. Temporary files are never essential, but they may help speed things up and perform certain operations faster. While it is certainly possible to clean temporary files manually, or through the settings in individual programs, it is often better to use specialized software for that. You may use Windows' own Disk Cleanup -- referenced above -- for that to a degree, but third-party programs like CCleaner or PrivaZer do a better more thorough job when it comes to that. CCleaner separates between Windows and Applications. Windows covers native programs and features such as Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge or Windows Explorer. All you have to do is select the areas that you want analyzed for disk space usage and temporary files. Once done, hit the analyze button to check these locations and display the data they contain currently. You may then add or remove options or click on run cleaner to clear the temporary files. Note: If you select cookies under browsers, you will be logged out of services you are signed in at the time. You may also lose access to your browsing history if you select to clear the history. Tip: CCEhancer adds support for additional temporary file locations and programs to CCleaner. Move Temporary Files / Downloads Clearing temporary files is just a temporary solution to space issues you may experience. Programs and Windows continue to add temp files to the system as you use them. While you may run temporary file cleaners regularly to keep the data use in check, you may also want to consider moving folders to another drive if available. How that is done depends on the program you are using. Most web browsers for instance let you pick a download folder where all files get downloaded to. Some allow you to select temporary file locations as well, and the same is true for Windows. To move temporary file locations in Windows, do the following: Use the Windows-Pause shortcut to open the System Control Panel applet. Select Advanced System Settings when the window opens. Select Environment Variables when the next window opens. Locate the user and system variables TEMP and TMP. Note that they point to a directory on the hard drive, by default C: \Windows\TEMP for system variables and AppData\Local\Temp for user variables. Double-click on a TEMP or TMP entry, and change the drive letter and path to the temporary files folder to another drive. Check out these guides on how to change the IE and Edge download folder, or move the Firefox cache to another drive as examples on how to do that. Uninstall Programs Programs, and especially games, may take up a whole lot of disk space. Modern games are Gigabyte-sized, and it is uncommon that games use thirty or more Gigabyte on the hard drive when installed. One option to free up disk space is to remove programs and games that you don't require anymore. While you may use Windows' native tools to remove programs, it may not be the best of ideas for two reasons. First, Windows runs only the uninstaller but no cleanup operations afterwards. Second, third-party tools may provide you with size information on top of that which may help you during the selection process. Programs like Revo Uninstaller, or Geek Uninstaller offer that functionality. If you use Revo Uninstaller, switch to the details view mode after the program listing has been populated initially. Click on size then so sort the listing by file size. Move files / programs You cannot uninstall programs if you still require them. Moving may be an option in this case then, provided that you have another hard drive available. Please note that you may need to take hard drive performance into account as well. If you move a game from a fast Solid State Drive to a low spinning 5400 rpm platter-based drive, you will notice longer loading times. I have covered the process before, check out how to move large apps or games to another drive, for all the instructions you need. The basic idea is the following one: you move the app or game to another drive, and use symbolic links to make them point from the new location to the old one. All files are then accessible from the old and new location so that you don't lose any functionality. Duplicate files Duplicate files are another thing that you may want to look into. The gain depends largely on how the computer is used. If you like to download large bulk archives from the Internet for instance, or use different programs for the same purpose, thing file synchronization, then you may end up with duplicate files on the system that may take up a bit of disk space. The best way to handle this is to use third-party programs to find duplicate files on the system. There are numerous programs that provide you with that functionality: CloneSpy, DoubleKiller or Duplicate Commander are just three. The main difference between the programs may be the methods used to determine duplicates. Basic duplicate file finders compare file names and extensions only. More advanced programs may use hashes instead, or even use fuzzy logic to find nearly identical files (think a photo that is available in two different resolutions). Resources You may find the following resources useful. They may review programs that you may find useful, or provide additional information on certain clean up methods. Check if System Restore is enabled on Windows 10 Free disk space by cleaning up the Steam folder How I freed up 12 Gigabytes of disk space on Windows 7 Reduce the folder size of Thunderbird to free up disk space Remove old Chrome versions to save disk space Now You: Have another tip? Let us know in the comments. Source
  18. If you are thinking of buying a high capacity HDD it might be worth a look at this data. We haven't looked at the periodical Backblaze hard drive reliability stats for a while. As the cloud storage firm has recently added 8TB drives into its drive mix I thought it was worth a look over the latest reliability data tables. Backblaze stores over 250 petabytes of data across nearly 70,000 spinning hard drives. In the most recent quarter it added over 7,000 new drives to its storage arrays – so it has a lot of experience and data concerning the performance of these drives, especially with regard to the irksome statistic of failure rates. The firm likes to try lots of drives, looking for a sweet price, performance and reliability balance. In the Q2 2016 reliability table, below, it lists data-only drives (not used for OS) and the table doesn't include any drive model of which there are fewer than 45 units in use. The adoption of 8TB HDDs began with 45 HGST HUH728080ALE600 Helium filled drives, this appears to be a test batch as Backblaze says that buying any more "did not make economic sense". However, assessing them while waiting for the price/GB to become more acceptable must have been judged to be wise. With an admittedly small sample size of just 45 these HGST drives have been faultless thus far. During the most recent quarter Seagate's 8TB ST8000DM002 drives became available at an economically sensible price for Backblaze so it went and purchased 2,720 of these. You can see in the table that they have suffered a failure rate of just over 3 per cent. According to the Backblaze blog writer such a rate of failure is "more than acceptable" to the company so it will likely continue to increase density using the Seagate 8TB drives as they are cheaper than HGST's equivalent capacity HDDs. Please keep in mid that the HDD reliability data, while interesting, will likely not mirror general consumer failure rates of the same makes / models of drives. Backblaze uses these drives in its 45/60 device cloud data centre Storage Pods running 24/7. View: Original Article
  19. The above issue is continuously appearing on my friends desktop from last month, sometimes desktop getting automatically shutdown . Hence, last night re-partitioned HDD & installed Win10 . The error did not stop . . . Later applied following commands : ChkDsk /F /R sfc /scannow They detected no error . . . So, anyone have solution for this except suggesting for new HDD (since certainly that'd be the last choice if no solution arises) . .
  20. Togijak

    HDD Raw Copy Tool 1.10

    Developer: HDDGURU.COM License terms: Freeware Supported OS: MS Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, Server 2003, 2008, 2008R2 HDD Raw Copy Tool is a utility for low-level, sector-by-sector hard disk duplication and image creation. Supported interfaces: S-ATA (SATA), IDE (E-IDE), SCSI, SAS, USB, FIREWIRE. Big drives (LBA-48) are supported. Supported HDD/SSD Manufacturers: Intel, OCZ, Samsung, Kingston, Maxtor, Hitachi, Seagate, Samsung, Toshiba, Fujitsu, IBM, Quantum, Western Digital, and almost any other not listed here. The program also supports low-level duplication of FLASH cards (SD/MMC, MemoryStick, CompactFlash, SmartMedia, XD) using a card-reader. HDD Raw Copy tool makes an exact duplicate of a SATA, IDE, SAS, SCSI or SSD hard disk drive. Will also work with any USB and FIREWIRE external drive enclosures as well as SD, MMC, MemoryStick and CompactFlash media. The tool creates a sector-by-sector copy of all areas of the hard drive (MBR, boot records, all partitions as well as space in between). HDD Raw Copy does not care about the operating system on the drive – it could be Windows, Linux, Mac, or any other OS with any number of partitions (including hidden ones). Bad sectors are skipped by the tool. If your media has a supported interface then it can be copied with HDD Raw Copy! In addition, HDD Raw Copy can create an exact raw (dd) or compressed image of the entire media (including service data such as MBR, Boot records, etc). Again, all filesystems (even hidden) are supported. Examples of possible uses Data recovery: make a copy of the damaged drive to attempt recovery on the copy Data recovery: copy a damaged hard drive and skip bad sectors Migration: completely migrate from one hard drive to another Ultimate backup: Make an exact copy of the hard drive for future use Backup: create an image of a USB flash stick and copy/restore at any moment Software QA engineers: restore your OS hard drives at any moment from a compressed image Duplicate/Clone/Save full image of any type of media! Download Windows Installer (most people will want this option): HDD Raw Copy ver.1.10 setup Download Windows Executable (works without installation): HDD Raw Copy ver.1.10 portable
  21. WD today announced its 8TB HelioSeal consumer HDDs. To achieve such a large capacity the disks are filled with Helium in order to reduce internal resistance. The disks are available in both internal and external versions. The internal drives are the WD Red and WD Purple which rotate at 5400 RPM and have a cache of 128MB. The WD Purple drives are targeted for usage in surveillance systems while the WD Red drives are designed with NAS devices for home or small business in mind. The external drives are the My Book (for Mac) and My Cloud with both 8TB capacity. WD also has 16TB versions available which contain 2 drives. The high capacity is possible due to the usage of Helium. This gas has a lower density than air which has the benefit that platters and heads suffer from less friction. This in its turn reduces generation of heat which allows platters to be closer to each other. Because in Helium it takes less energy to rotate the platters, the Helium filled HDDs also consume less energy. To properly function the HDDs have to be air-tight. WD currently allows consumers to pre-order the drives. The WD Red and WD Purple are available at $345. The My Cloud and My Book can be pre-ordered at $299. Article source
  22. What are the these black circles for on WD HDDs? and some WD Black edition HDDs with exactly the same model as those having black circles, don't have these circles on them. is it something to be worried about?
  23. Video: How to destroy hard drives Erasing functioning hard drives is easy, but how do you prevent data from being recovered from dead or dying hard drives? Normally when making sure no one can recover the data off of a hard drive you use one of the three traditional approaches (a software eraser, hardware eraser, or make use whole disk encryption). But how do you prevent data from being recovered from dead or dying hard drives? In this video I show you the method I use, and try a couple of methods I've been told have worked for others in the past. Some of the methods worked, and others weren't so successful. Please view the source for the video. Source
  24. Self-Encrypting HDDs Not Really Encrypted, Store Passwords in Plain Text Researchers find encryption systems are really easy to crack And it's no wonder why: they are really affordable and they promise to protect all the data stored on them, so they seem to provide very good quality for the money. But that high-level encryption that they claim to offer is not as advanced as some might be tempted to believe. Security researchers who have looked into this self-encrypting method have posted a paper on the Full Disclosure email list to provide us with an in-depth look at a problem that affects this type of HDDs in general, and the ones manufactured by Western Digital in particular. As we told you earlier today, malicious firmware updates could compromise HDD encryption, but the issue doesn't stop here. Before stepping into more details, there's something that really needs to be taken into account: the Full Disclosure email list is the place where security researchers post their findings after contacting the parent company and not receiving an answer. In other words, Western Digital has been informed of the security problems found by these experts, but the company refused to cooperate and look into the matter. So they decided to go public with everything. Passwords stored in plain text locally According to Motherboard, who spoke with Matthew Green, assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University, one of the main issues, which is also impacting WD's My Passport drives, is that encryption keys are generated using the C rand() function, which means that it does nothing more than to choose a random number used to encrypt the drive. The time when the key was created is also attached in 32-bit format, which according to Green makes it easy to crack in a short time even with a single PC, so no super computer is needed. As if it wasn't easy enough to crack such a password, it doesn't stop here. Passwords are actually stored on the hard drive in plain text. WD: We're looking into the matter As far as Western Digital is concerned, the issue is not as worrying as we tend to believe. The company said in a statement for the aforementioned source that while they have already talked to security researchers regarding the encryption used on some HDD models, they are still “evaluating the observations.” “We highly value and encourage this kind of responsible community engagement because it ultimately benefits our customers by making our products better. We encourage all security researchers to responsibly report potential security vulnerabilities or concerns to WD Customer Service and Support,” a spokesperson said. The bottom line? Don't trust a self-encrypting HDD and make sure you don't copy critical data on such a drive. Any password can be cracked, but in Western Digital's case, it all becomes painfully easy. Source
  25. Western Digital My Passport Hard Drives Come with a Slew of Security Holes WD HDDs allow authentication and encryption bypassing For a couple of years, people who wanted privacy and security often chose Western Digital's My Passport portable hard drive. This HDD is not only quite small, good-looking, and very feature-packed, but also provides built-in security features for both its software and hardware parts. Some of its two most prominent features were the fact that users could protect the hard drive using a password, and that all data written to its disks was encrypted in real time. Hard drive encryption could be cracked using brute force attacks According to recent research that dug deep into the inner workings of various My Passport models, the hard drives seem to be affected by a series of security flaws that allow attackers to bypass both the built-in encryption and password-based authentication system. As the researchers explain, some of the models from the six they analyzed easily give up under the pressure of a simple brute-force attack, letting attackers break their encryption. Additionally, the password authentication could also be bypassed as easily, enabling any attacker to install fully functional backdoors on infected devices. Malicious firmware updates were possible as well To make things worse, all WD models analyzed allowed attackers to take over the firmware update mechanism via "evil maid" and "badUSB" attacks, and install their own malicious code instead. "The weakest hardware model in terms of security is the INIC-3 608 bridge," say the researchers. "The chip does not support hardware accelerated AES encryption. [...] One single command sent to the device will reveal the KEK [Key-Encrypting Key], even if the disk is in a locked state." A 36-page paper (PDF) about the researchers' findings and the various security holes detailed for each hard drive family is available on the International Association for Cryptologic Research website. Source
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