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  1. Moscow is developing a ‘sovereign’ web that critics say will enhance official power to silence dissent Thousands of protesters had gathered outside government headquarters in Magas, the capital of the heavily Muslim republic of Ingushetia in Russia’s north Caucasus. They were there to oppose concessions in a years’-long bitter border dispute with neighbouring Chechnya, but when they tried to share information about the protest on WhatsApp they found the internet was down on all three major Russian mobile providers across Ingushetia. The October outage began late at night before the protest was scheduled to start, and lasted until it died down more than two weeks later. When protests sparked up again, the internet suddenly went out of action once more. It amounted to a virtual blackout: locals’ fondness for voice messages has made WhatsApp the main form of communication in the north Caucasus. No official explanation was given until spring, when the FSB security service — the successor to the KGB — admitted in court that it had shut down the internet because of “terrorist threats”. All but one of the supposed threats coincided with the dates of the protests, says Andrei Sabinin, who filed a lawsuit against the FSB and the interior ministry over the outages. “They want to take down platforms for spreading information online,” the human rights lawyer says. “No WhatsApp means no communication in the Caucasus. As soon as you go into Ingushetia, it’s a black hole.” Protests in Ingushetia over land swaps with Chechnya in October 2018, when WhatsApp was shut down in the republic to curb discussion about the issue Activists fear Ingushetia’s blackouts could be repeated across Russia thanks to a law signed by President Vladimir Putin in May. The measure ostensibly aims to create a “sovereign internet” — effectively a parallel web run entirely on Russian servers — that would allow Moscow to keep the internet operating in the event of a foreign cyber attack aimed at disabling it. To do so, internet providers will be required to install equipment which Russia could use to separate itself from the worldwide web at the flick of a “kill” switch. The technology is meant to reroute all external traffic through Russian-controlled nodes while creating a back-up domain name system to help the country’s internet function independently. Russia’s dependence on foreign systems would be vastly reduced, hastening a global Balkanisation of the internet where the west’s influence is fragmented. It also uses a technique known as deep packet inspection, or DPI, to centralise filtration powers in the hands of Russian censors, who have previously relied on internet providers to block access to banned content. “It’s framed as a precaution, but it’s actually a means of control,” says Sergey Sanovich, a political scientist at Stanford University who specialises in Russian online censorship. “For the most part this is about making sure the Russian government can, when necessary, have more direct access to control of information space.” Russia let its internet grow largely untrammeled until 2012, when Mr Putin’s return to the presidency met with mass street protests organised via social media. The Kremlin responded with an aggressive crackdown on online dissent: opposition pages were put on a list of banned websites, dozens of people went to prison for “liking” and reposting material, and independent news websites were brought to heel. But this ad hoc system was seen as inefficient. In 2014, Mr Putin declared the internet a “CIA project” able to weaken Russia’s sovereignty. Officials blamed the US for using it to start the Arab spring and Ukraine’s Maidan revolution in 2013-14. Some pro-Kremlin figures spoke of emulating China’s Great Firewall — a mix of technologies and laws designed to regulate the internet domestically, whose architects were invited to Moscow to share advice. The crackdown intensified after 2017, when opposition leader Alexei Navalny aired a video of an anti-corruption investigation — which racked up more than 20m views on YouTube — to help spark the largest nationwide protests since the Soviet Union collapsed. In 2018, Russia restricted access to almost 650,000 websites— a nearly fivefold increase on the year before, according to human rights group Agora. Yet Russia’s late start meant it lacked both the infrastructure and the human resources to control the internet as effectively as Beijing. China boasts its own hugely popular messaging services, such as WeChat, and has a reported 2m people who police public opinion online. By contrast, Roskomnadzor — the communications ministry’s watchdog — has just over 3,000 employees. “The Chinese have been blocking things since day one,” says a person close to Russia’s communications ministry. “We can’t do that.” Roskomnadzor made its most ambitious effort to ban Telegram, the messaging service, last year, accusing it of failing to comply with FSB requests to share user data. The attempt to block the app was a disastrous failure. Pavel Durov, Telegram’s Russian founder, rerouted its traffic through cloud hosting services, forcing censors into a game of whack-a-mole that saw them temporarily take down more than 16m IP addresses, including their own website, while having little effect on Telegram. The ban became a running joke among officials. At a ministry party last year, Roskomnadzor chief Alexander Zharov was taking photographs of a picturesque sunset on his phone when guests joked that he should share them on the app, prompting a foul-mouthed tirade, according to one guest. The crackdown intensified after 2017 when opposition leader Alexei Navalny posted a video of an anti-corruption investigation, garnering over 20m views © AP “He’s a hostage to the situation,” says the person close to the ministry. “He knows you can’t block it. We have no control over the process. The guys with epaulettes [in the FSB] bring bills to [lawmakers] and we have to implement them, [but] we look like idiots.” Part of the problem, experts say, is that Russia’s security bureaucracy rarely takes its own technical limitations into account. “Attempts to implement Russia’s notion of information security on the internet have been distinguished by mishaps because they don’t really understand how the internet works,” says Keir Giles, a senior fellow of the Russia and Eurasia programme at Chatham House. “If you prevent free flow of information across national borders you’ll break the internet.” Advocates for greater controls frame it as a way to ensure Russia’s independence from hostile powers. “A great deal of sectors of the real economy — power stations, transport infrastructure — depend very closely on the internet. It’s an issue of state security,” says Andrei Klishas, a member of the upper house of parliament, who co-authored the law. Mr Klishas cites the latest US cyber security strategy, with its emphasis on making countries like Russia pay “costs likely to deter future cyber aggression,” as the impetus for Moscow to act. President Donald Trump added to those fears last month, when he admitted that the US carried out a cyber attack against a Kremlin-backed “troll farm” in St Petersburg during the 2018 US midterm elections in apparent retaliation for Russia’s online meddling in the 2016 presidential campaign. Experts say Russia’s justifications for shutting the country off from the global internet are too vague to support such sweeping action. These scenarios include: a threat to network “integrity” that would prevent it from securing user communications; anything that would affect its ability to function such as a natural disaster; and “deliberate destabilising informational pressure from outside or within”. Russian president Vladimir Putin aims to create a 'sovereign internet' — effectively a parallel web run entirely on domestic servers © AP “There needs to be a way to react to the threats,” says Irina Levova, head of a government working group on internet issues. “[But] you can’t just say let’s go to Mars tomorrow and have everyone go without having the technology to do so.” Officials successfully tested the DPI system in a “fairly large region with a population of several thousand” — not Ingushetia — several months ago, says Mr Klishas, and plan to do a nationwide test later this year. But serious doubts remain about whether the law’s aims are even realisable. According to Ms Levova, maintaining the DPI equipment alone may cost as much as Rbs134bn ($2bn) a year— seven times Mr Klishas’ estimate — while many of the law’s technical provisions have yet to be clarified. Roskomnadzor reportedly hired RDP.RU, a company partly owned by state-run Rostelecom, to supply the DPI equipment before the bill was even passed. There is scepticism in the industry on whether Russia can produce the required technology. It has yet to undergo a full-scale test. And attempts to separate Russia from global technology value chains have failed: 96 per cent of state institutions still use unapproved foreign software despite an attempt to move them on to domestically produced alternatives, according to the audit chamber, which monitors the spending of government departments. Russia’s government bought Rbs82bn in foreign hardware last year, compared with just Rbs18bn of domestically-produced equipment, according to state defence conglomerate Rostec. “Right now it’s totally impossible,” says a senior executive at a major Russian tech company. “There’s no capacity to produce really productive, powerful chips. It would take years to develop that industry and in that time Apple will have gone much further. We could buy everything from China, they’ve done it all themselves, but that would raise national security questions.” The Russian web Centralising control over Russia’s internet — in a bid to make it more secure — could actually make it more vulnerable to foreign attacks, says Artem Kozlyuk, head of privacy rights group Roskomsvoboda. “Where the internet is more centralised and there is one state provider, then there is more risk of external meddling,” he says. Russia might also be trying to safeguard itself from the consequences of its own cyber operations, Mr Giles says. The WannaCry and NotPetya attacks — which ravaged businesses globally with ransomware and were blamed on Moscow — did considerable damage in Russia, taking some state-owned companies’ systems offline. “Massive disruption has blowback,” he says. “[These measures] make sure that you don’t suffer damage by cutting yourself off.” When Russian troops seized Crimea in 2014, they quickly took over the peninsula’s main internet exchange point and cable connections to the mainland. “That was the gold standard to achieve total information dominance — the only things the target population is receiving are yours,” says Mr Giles. Activists fear the internet isolation plan will do the same to Russian citizens. “It’ll be a totally different internet. It won’t be as quick or secure as it is now,” Mr Kozlyuk says. “Blocking will be totally non-transparent. It might take months until someone finds out there was some sort of internal order [to block a site].” Mr Klishas says the system will simply help Roskomnadzor enforce existing law, which is ostensibly aimed at preventing terrorism and child pornography but is often redirected to suppress dissent. “When states started fighting money laundering, the system was ineffective for a long time, especially [against] problems like drug trafficking and international terrorism. People always found ways to finance this unlawful activity. Then new procedures appeared to close these legal loopholes,” he says. Undeterred by the Telegram ban, the FSB recently made a similar demand to Yandex, Russia’s largest tech company. Yandex, which already shares some data with authorities, said on Tuesday it would push back against the FSB’s requests to decrypt all user communications. Despite sweeping requirements on data storage and censorship compliance — which saw LinkedIn banned in 2016 — Roskomnadzor has made little progress in bending Facebook and Google to its demands. In December Russia fined Google Rbs500,000 for failing to sign up to a government system for sharing information with the security services. Google continues to defy the law, but there has been an escalation in Moscow’s attempts to pressure western companies, Mr Sanovich says. “The irony is that Putin, who is conducting all these information operations abroad, also makes Google or Facebook enforce censorship at home,” he adds. “If they comply they risk making the regime stronger and compromising the integrity of their platform, but it’s much more significant if they are blocked. The media environment in Russia is now so heavily government-controlled that these providers play a vital role in giving Russians access to unfiltered information.” Roskomnadzor is doubling down on that by making it more difficult to avoid its bans. Though virtual private networks remain widely accessible, several have recently abandoned their Russian servers after the watchdog ordered them to share user traffic information with the Kremlin. Mr Kozlyuk expects it to use DPI to enforce the ban by filtering individual VPN traffic and fining those using them. “It’s the logical extension,” he says, “first you control the content, then the infrastructure, then the users.” Source
  2. part 1 (YET ANOTHER) WARNING .... Your online activities are now being tracked and recorded by various government and corporate entities around the world. This information can be used against you at any time and there is no real way to “opt out”. In the past decade, we have seen the systematic advancement of the surveillance apparatus throughout the world. The United States, United Kingdom, Australia, and Canada have all passed laws allowing, and in some cases forcing, telecom companies to bulk-collect your data: United States – In March 2017 the US Congress passed legislation that allows internet service providers to collect, store, and sell your private browsing history, app usage data, location information and more – without your consent. This essentially allows Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and other providers to monetize and sell their customers to the highest bidders (usually for targeted advertising). United Kingdom – In November 2016 the UK Parliament passed the infamous Snoopers Charter (Investigatory Powers Act) which forces internet providers and phone companies to bulk-collect customer data. This includes private browsing history, social media posts, phone calls, text messages, and more. This information is stored for 12 months in a giant database that is accessible to 48 different government agencies. The erosion of free speech is also rapidly underway as various laws allow UK authorities to lock up anyone they deem to be “offensive” (1984 is already here). Australia – In April 2017 the Australian government passed a massive data retention law that forces telecoms to collect and store text messages, phone calls, location information, and internet connection data for a full two years, with the data being accessible to authorities without a warrant. Canada, Europe, and other parts of the world have similar laws and policies already in place. What you are witnessing is the rapid expansion of the global surveillance state, whereby corporate and government entities work together to monitor and record everything you do. What the hell is going on here? Perhaps you are wondering why all this is happening. There is a simple answer to that question. Control Just like we have seen throughout history, government surveillance is simply a tool used for control. This could be for maintaining control of power, controlling a population, or controlling the flow of information in a society. You will notice that the violation of your right to privacy will always be justified by various excuses – from “terrorism” to tax evasion – but never forget, it’s really about control. Along the same lines, corporate surveillance is also about control. Collecting your data helps private entities control your buying decisions, habits, and desires. The tools for doing this are all around you: apps on your devices, social networks, tracking ads, and many free products which simply bulk-collect your data (when something is free, you are the product). This is why the biggest collectors of private data – Google and Facebook – are also the two businesses that completely dominate the online advertising industry. So to sum this up, advertising today is all about the buying and selling of individuals. But it gets even worse… Now we have the full-scale cooperation between government and corporate entities to monitor your every move. In other words, governments are now enlisting private corporations to carry out bulk data collection on entire populations. Your internet service provider is your adversary working on behalf of the surveillance state. This basic trend is happening in much of the world, but it has been well documented in the United States with the PRISM Program. So why should you care? Everything that’s being collected could be used against you today, or at any time in the future, in ways you may not be able to imagine. In many parts of the world, particularly in the UK, thought crime laws are already in place. If you do something that is deemed to be “offensive”, you could end up rotting away in a jail cell for years. Again, we have seen this tactic used throughout history for locking up dissidents – and it is alive and well in the Western world today. From a commercial standpoint, corporate surveillance is already being used to steal your data and hit you with targeted ads, thereby monetizing your private life. Reality check Many talking heads in the media will attempt to confuse you by pretending this is a problem with a certain politician or perhaps a political party. But that’s a bunch of garbage to distract you from the bigger truth. For decades, politicians from all sides (left and right) have worked hard to advance the surveillance agenda around the world. Again, it’s all about control, regardless of which puppet is in office. So contrary to what various groups are saying, you are not going to solve this problem by writing a letter to another politician or signing some online petition. Forget about it. Instead, you can take concrete steps right now to secure your data and protect your privacy. Restore Privacy is all about giving you the tools and information to do that. If you feel overwhelmed by all this, just relax. The privacy tools you need are easy to use no matter what level of experience you have. Arguably the most important privacy tool is a good VPN (virtual private network). A VPN will encrypt and anonymize your online activity by creating a secured tunnel between your computer and a VPN server. This makes your data and online activities unreadable to government surveillance, your internet provider, hackers, and other third-party snoopers. A VPN will also allow you to spoof your location, hide your real IP address, and allow you to access blocked content from anywhere in the world. Check out the best VPN guide to get started. Stay safe! SOURCE
  3. Peel Universal Smart TV Remote Control v10.1.7.4 [Pro] Requirements: 4.1+ | 6.0+ Overview: Peel Smart Remote revolutionizes your home entertainment experience by combining universal remote control and live or streamed TV listings into one simple-to-use app. This is the only remote and TV guide you need. This Remote Changes Everything! Universal Remote Control Reliably control your TV, set-top box, DVD player, Blu-ray, Roku, Apple TV, audio system, and home appliances like air conditioners and heaters, using the built-in infrared IR blaster on your smartphone,including models from Xiaomi, Samsung, HTC, LG and more. Find Something Good to Watch Peel provides smart show recommendations and TV guide listings based on your preferences and past viewing behavior, all organized in an easy to navigate interface. Best of all, the more you “Peel-in”, the smarter it gets. Easy to Set Up. Easy to Use. Peel is super simple. No matter where you live, what brand of TV or set-top box you own, or who provides your service, it’s easy as 1, 2, 3. Confirm your location from 110 different countries, choose your TV provider, and then pair Peel Smart Remote with all your home electronics. It can replace your Samsung TV remote, LG TV remote, Sony TV remote, Vizio TV remote, Dish remote, DirectTV remote, Apple TV remote and more. Peel supports more than 400,000 devices. This is the only universal remote control you will ever need. Never Miss Your Favorite Shows With the Peel Smart Remote you can easily set a calendar reminder so you never again miss a favorite show, movie or sports event. Simply tap on the reminder notification to “Peel-in.” Peel-in to Your Favorites Customize your Peel Smart Remote by selecting your favorite channels and shows. Finding out when and where your favorite programs and movies are available to watch on TV has never been easier. Personalize Your TV Program Guide & Listings Unlike other universal remote controls, Peel Smart Remote allows you to easily personalize your TV channel listing to match your local over-the-air, dish or cable provider or streaming service. Easily Discover Streamed Content Peel Smart Remote allows you to discover your favorite shows and movies on your streaming video services. Whether you prefer Netflix, Hulu, Roku, Apple TV or dozens of other digital content providers, Peel will help you find something good to watch. The More You Use, the Smarter it Gets Peel is the world’s most popular smart remote with 140 million-plus registered users worldwide and more than 10 billion smart remote commands a month. No more worrying about what to watch on TV, how to find your favorite content, or where your remote is hiding. The more you tune-in with Peel, the smarter it gets. Help and Support is Close By Go to http://help.peel.com for FAQs or email [email protected] You can also visit http://peel.com, follow us on Twitter (http://twitter.com/peeltv) and Facebook (http://facebook.com/peeltv) for the latest app updates. You can also go to https://m.facebook.com/ads/ad_choices for Facebook Ad choices. This app has no advertisements More Info: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=tv.peel.app&hl=en Download Instructions: Paid content unlocked Hidden Content (for members only) For Android 4.1+ uploadocean turbobit depositfiles For Android 6.0+ uploadocean turbobit depositfiles
  4. Windows Firewall Control 5.0.0.0 Changelog: https://www.binisoft.org/changelog.txt Download: https://www.binisoft.org/download/wfc4setup.exe Changes: What's new in version 5.0.0.0 (04.10.2017) - New: Connections Log contains now an "Auto refresh on open" check box which will automatically trigger Refresh when the window is opened. - New: Connections Log contains now an "Auto receive updates" check box which will automatically add the newest entries on top of the list. More info can be found in the user manual. - New: Main Panel displays now the currently connected location of Windows Firewall. - New: Added "Open the website" functionality in the About tab. - Fixed: Duplicate notifications may be displayed if the location of Windows Firewall changes after WFC service start-up and there are rules defined for specific locations. - Fixed: Merge rules functionality from Rules Panel does create the merged rule, but does not remove anymore the old rules. - Fixed: Import policy displays a successful operation result, even if the import has failed due to a file access denied error. - Fixed: Refresh does not work anymore in Connections Log after using the search. The window must be closed and reopened to be able to refresh again the data grid. - Fixed: Some group names from Windows 10 are not recognized. - Fixed: 'mDNS' keyword is not valid in Properties dialog as local port when opening such an inbound rule for UDP protocol. - Updated: The user manual was updated with new screenshots and updated topics.
  5. Mozilla: The Internet Is Unhealthy And Urgently Needs Your Help Mozilla argues that the internet's decentralized design is under threat by a few key players, including Google, Facebook, Apple, Tencent, Alibaba and Amazon, monopolizing messaging, commerce, and search. Can the internet as we know it survive the many efforts to dominate and control it, asks Firefox maker Mozilla. Much of the internet is in a perilous state, and we, its citizens, all need to help save it, says Mark Surman, executive director of Firefox maker the Mozilla Foundation. We may be in awe of the web's rise over the past 30 years, but Surman highlights numerous signs that the internet is dangerously unhealthy, from last year's Mirai botnet attacks, to market concentration, government surveillance and censorship, data breaches, and policies that smother innovation. "I wonder whether this precious public resource can remain safe, secure and dependable. Can it survive?" Surman asks. "These questions are even more critical now that we move into an age where the internet starts to wrap around us, quite literally," he adds, pointing to the Internet of Things, autonomous systems, and artificial intelligence. In this world, we don't use a computer, "we live inside it", he adds. "How [the internet] works -- and whether it's healthy -- has a direct impact on our happiness, our privacy, our pocketbooks, our economies and democracies." Surman's call to action coincides with nonprofit Mozilla's first 'prototype' of the Internet Health Report, which looks at healthy and unhealthy trends that are shaping the internet. Its five key areas include open innovation, digital inclusion, decentralization, privacy and security, and web literacy. Mozilla will launch the first report after October, once it has incorporated feedback on the prototype. That there are over 1.1 billion websites today, running on mostly open-source software, is a positive sign for open innovation. However, Mozilla says the internet is "constantly dodging bullets" from bad policy, such as outdated copyright laws, secretly negotiated trade agreements, and restrictive digital-rights management. Similarly, while mobile has helped put more than three billion people online today, there were 56 internet shutdowns last year, up from 15 shutdowns in 2015, it notes. Mozilla fears the internet's decentralized design, while flourishing and protected by laws, is under threat by a few key players, including Facebook, Google, Apple, Tencent, Alibaba and Amazon, monopolizing messaging, commerce and search. "While these companies provide hugely valuable services to billions of people, they are also consolidating control over human communication and wealth at a level never before seen in history," it says. Mozilla approves of the wider adoption of encryption today on the web and in communications but highlights the emergence of new surveillance laws, such as the UK's so-called Snooper's Charter. It also cites as a concern the Mirai malware behind last year's DDoS attacks, which abused unsecured webcams and other IoT devices, and is calling for safety standards, rules and accountability measures. The report also draws attention to the policy focus on web literacy in the context of learning how to code or use a computer, which ignores other literacy skills, such as the ability to spot fake news, and separate ads from search results. Source Alternate Source - 1: Mozilla’s First Internet Health Report Tackles Security, Privacy Alternate Source - 2: Mozilla Wants Infosec Activism To Be The Next Green Movement
  6. A remote access trojan (RAT) is using Dropbox for command and control in a targeted attack against the Taiwanese Government, malware analyst Maersk Menrige says. The upgraded PlugX RAT is the first targeted attack to use Dropbox to update command and control settings, Menrige said, as distinct from other malware and ransomware which used the popular cloud storage platform to fling malicious files at victims. The trojan logs a victim's keystrokes, maps ports and opens remote shells to facilitate further data theft and exploitation. "The use of Dropbox aids in masking the malicious traffic in the network because this is a legitimate website for storing files and documents," Trend Micro's Menrige said. "[The May execution data] is probably done so that users won’t immediately suspect any malicious activities on their systems." Dropbox had been shown by researcher Jake Williams (DropSmack: Using Dropbox to steal files and deliver malware [pdf]) as a workable platform for malware command and control, but Menrige said it was the first time it had been exploited in malicious attacks. PlugX variant II messed with anti-virus systems, contained anti-forensics capabilities and hid behind a fake parked domain until the 5 May go live date. Attackers with command and control links established could migrate laterally within corporate networks using a variety of tools to avoid detection. The code includes tools such as password recovery, network utilities, port scanners and the common HTran reverse proxy tool used to hide command and control. The latter Chinese-built connection bouncer tool was first discovered in 2011 by Dell used in the high profile data breach of security company RSA. PlugX II bore sufficient similarity to version I that enterprise security bods could check for flags on their networks. The first iteration of the malware was detected in 2008 and had since been used in targeted attacks against a unnamed South Korean company and US engineering firm. In February Trend Micro senior security researcher Pavithra Hanchagaiah reportedPlugX was being foisted through a since fixed Adobe Flash exploit. More detail on PlugX could be found on the Trend Micro blog. Source
  7. Notebook Hardware Control 2.4.3 Professional Edition Portable Managing the components of a portable system and optimizing their usage to obtain the best performance with minimal power consumption is not an easy task, unless a specialized software is available. One such utility is Notebook Hardware Control (NHC), a program dedicated to power management and hardware monitoring. The well organized interface provides information about system components as well as quick access to all the functions of the application. Notebook Hardware Control helps you to: control the hardware and system power managementcustomize the notebook (open source ACPI Control System)prolong the battery lifetimecool down the system and reduce power consumptionmonitor the hardware to avoid system failuremake your notebook quietThus, you can view details like the CPU clock and current load, the processor and hard drive temperatures, CPU voltage and speed, as well as the available physical and virtual memory. Notebook Hardware Control (NHC) is able to detect for how long the system has been running (the power-on time) and read battery stats. The software features an Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) control system that can handle may power options, and set thresholds for critical CPU temperature that send a warning or shutdown the system, depending on the selected values. A neat thing about Notebook Hardware Control (NHC) is that it allows you to activate a set of tray icons for various parameters that you may want to monitor without having to bring up the program's interface every time. You can choose icons for processor clock, temperature, speed or load, as well as HDD temperature. Notebook Hardware Control (NHC) can also track the battery charge level and for certain laptops it provides a function called Notebook FAN Control which is useful for reducing the noise coming from the system cooler running at high speeds when it doesn't have to. To sum things up, it's safe to say that with the help of this application users can really benefit and adjust the power settings of their notebooks in such a manner that the system components are spared of unnecessary wear and tear. Here are some key features of "Notebook Hardware Control": prolong the battery lifetime and cool down the system with CPU Voltage Control and ATI Clock Control.full processor speed control with custom dynamic switching and CPU Speed Control (CPU policy)monitor the battery charge level and system temperature.control and monitor the Hard Drive with S.M.A.R.T management, acoustic & advanced power management and Hard Drive temperature monitoring.reduce noise with Notebook FAN ControlWebsite: http://www.pbus-167.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 (Only x32!) Language: ML Medicine: Serial Size: 4,38 Mb.
  8. Windows 8 changes it's ACL scheme.. although possible.. it's a bit tricky. obviously, you must be an administrator. - works for files and registry. Transcript Right click > select Propertieshighlight Administratorselect both checkboxes under "Allow"click "Advanced"click "Change"click "Advanced"click "Find Now"highlight Administrator w/out down arrowpress OKselect Checkbox for "Replace owner on subconotainers and objects"press OKpress OK Alternatively, you can use RegOwnit as mentioned by knowledge.
  9. Hi friends, I need a Software to Control LAN Computers like TeamViewer, and my Point is to Show my Predefined Message (Like Admin Work in Progress) or Black Screen on Client Side.. Teamviewer is Doing my Job Correctly But the Problem is Teamviewer updating its software on weekly basis :( So need a Alternative Remote control software with Our Message to Show on Client Side.. Suggest me :rolleyes: :wub: 2 :wub: Reena0307
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