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  1. Canonical, the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution, today announced the launch of Anbox Cloud, a new platform that allows enterprises to run Android in the cloud. On Anbox Cloud, Android becomes the guest operating system that runs containerized applications. This opens up a range of use cases, ranging from bespoke enterprise apps to cloud gaming solutions. The result is similar to what Google does with Android apps on Chrome OS, though the implementation is quite different and is based on the LXD container manager, as well as a number of Canonical projects like Juju and MAAS for provisioning the containers and automating the deployment. “LXD containers are lightweight, resulting in at least twice the container density compared to Android emulation in virtual machines – depending on streaming quality and/or workload complexity,” the company points out in its announcements. Anbox itself, it’s worth noting, is an open-source project that came out of Canonical and the wider Ubuntu ecosystem. Launched by Canonical engineer Simon Fels in 2017, Anbox runs the full Android system in a container, which in turn allows you to run Android application on any Linux-based platform. What’s the point of all of this? Canonical argues that it allows enterprises to offload mobile workloads to the cloud and then stream those applications to their employees’ mobile devices. But Canonical is also betting on 5G to enable more use cases, less because of the available bandwidth but more because of the low latencies it enables. “Driven by emerging 5G networks and edge computing, millions of users will benefit from access to ultra-rich, on-demand Android applications on a platform of their choice,” said Stephan Fabel, director of Product at Canonical, in today’s announcement. “Enterprises are now empowered to deliver high performance, high density computing to any device remotely, with reduced power consumption and in an economical manner.” Outside of the enterprise, one of the use cases that Canonical seems to be focusing on is gaming and game streaming. A server in the cloud is generally more powerful than a smartphone, after all, though that gap is closing. Canonical also cites app testing as another use case, given that the platform would allow developers to test apps on thousands of Android devices in parallel. Most developers, though, prefer to test their apps in real — not emulated — devices, given the fragmentation of the Android ecosystem. Anbox Cloud can run in the public cloud, though Canonical is specifically partnering with edge computing specialist Packet to host it on the edge or on-premise. Silicon partners for the project are Ampere and Intel Source
  2. All Linux users are the same, right? Oh, hell no! Linux users are a diverse bunch, with differing opinions, tastes, and personalities. In fact, that is probably a contributing factor to the fragmentation of the Linux community. Linux users have lots of options between distributions, desktop environments, and more -- they are not stuck in a box like Windows 10 users. To highlight how different Linux users can be, Canonical has released some data about the installation of snaps, categorized by distro. It chose six of the most popular Linux-based operating systems for its analysis -- Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, CentOS, Arch Linux, and Manjaro. It then shared the top five most popular snaps for each distribution. "From a distance, Linux is one big, confusing ball of passionate users and hardcore technical jargon. But as you zoom in, you can start seeing patterns -- and differences. Indeed, the individual and vastly varied choice of a favorite distribution has played a major part in shaping the community conversation in the Linux space. But does this also reflect on the application usage patterns? We wanted to have a look at how users on different distributions consume snaps. So we crunched some numbers and checked the top five snaps for Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, CentOS, Arch Linux, and Manjaro users," says Igor Ljubuncic, Canonical. Ljubuncic further says, "As we can see from the data, the diversity that exists in the Linux distro world also propagates into how people use their software. Snaps offer an interesting insight into the specific needs across distributions. We do see that there are some common, universal cases, but also specific, custom things that are tied into the distribution choice." Canonical shares the chart below. While the chart does show that Linux users are very different, it also shows their similarities. With the exception of CentOS, the top snap is media related -- VLC or Spotify. I am a bit surprised that Spotify has so many installations, as the web interface is more than fine. Microsoft should be very happy to see its popular Skype showing up in the top five for three of the distributions. Source
  3. Hi All, Just wondering if Nokia with Canonical makes Ubuntu Touch Devices, does people love it and buy to help support Ubuntu Touch development? My wish is that Nokia should join hands with Canonical to make Ubuntu Devices. If that happens, all lazy s/w app giants will create apps supporting Ubuntu Touch platform. I'm calling s/w app giants as lazy bcoz if they would've supported Ubuntu Touch earlier, the OS could've been overtaking Android & Windows Phones(or Windows 10 Mobile) by now. All Nokia & Ubuntu/Linux fans(incl. myself) or devs out there, please suggest Nokia to create Ubuntu Devices in future ASAP. Please vote and provide feedback in comments(if any). Members please note that I'm referring to the future and not now. I'm not a fool to ask for/suggest a change in the first year of re-emerged Nokia. @steven36 & @teodz1984: Please read the desc carefully before providing comments.
  4. Canonical Releases New Linux Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Canonical released a new Linux kernel security patch for its long-term supported Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series to address several security vulnerabilities. The Linux kernel security update addresses three vulnerabilities, including a race condition (CVE-2019-6133) in Linux kernel's fork() system call, which could allow a local attacker to gain access to services were authorizations are cached, and a flaw (CVE-2018-18397) in the userfaultd implementation, which could allow a local attacker to modify files. Both issues were discovered by Jann Horn. Furthermore, the kernel security patch addresses a vulnerability (CVE-2018-19854) in Linux kernel's crypto subsystem, which leads to leaked uninitialized memory to user space under certain situations. This would allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information (kernel memory). These security vulnerabilities affect Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and all of its official or unofficial derivatives.Users are urged to update their systems as soon as possibleCanonical urges all Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) users, as well as users of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating systems who are using the Linux 4.15 kernel from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, to update their installations as soon as possible. The new kernel versions users have to update their machines to are linux-image 4.15.0-46.49 for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS systems, linux-image 4.15.0-46.49~16.04.1 for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS systems, and linux-image 4.15.0-1040.44~14.04.1 for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS systems on Azure. The updated Linux kernels are available for 64-bit and 32-bit systems, as well as for Raspberry Pi 2 devices, OEM processors, cloud environments, Amazon Web Services (AWS) systems, Google Cloud Platform (GCP) systems, and Oracle Cloud systems. To update your installations, follow the instructions provided by Canonical at https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Security/Upgrades. Source
  5. BERLIN — In a keynote at the OpenStack Summit here, Mark Shuttleworth, founder and CEO of Canonical Inc and Ubuntu, detailed the progress made by his Linux distribution in the cloud and announced new extended support. The Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Long Term Support) debuted back on April 26, providing new server and cloud capabilities. An LTS release comes with five year of support, but during his keynote Shuttleworth announced that 18.04 would have support that is available for up to 10 years. "I'm delighted to announce that Ubuntu 18.04 will be supported for a full 10 years," Shuttleworth said. "In part because of the very long time horizons in some of industries like financial services and telecommunications but also from IOT where manufacturing lines for example are being deployed that will be in production for at least a decade ." OpenStack The long term, stable support for the OpenStack cloud is something that Shuttleworth has committed for some time. In April 2014, the OpenStack Icehouse release came out and it is still being supported by Canonical. "The OpenStack community is an amazing community and it attracts amazing technology, but that won't be meaningful if it doesn't deliver for everyday businesses," Shuttleworth said. "We actually manage more OpenStack clouds for more different industries, more different architectures than any other company." Shuttleworth said that when Icehouse was released, he committed to supporting it for five years, because long term support matters. "What matters isn't day two, what matters is day 1,500," Shuttleworth said. "Living with OpenStack scaling it, upgrading it, growing it, that is important to master to really get the value for your business." IBM Red Hat Shuttleworth also provided some color about his views on the $34 billion acquisition of Red Hat by IBM, which was announced on Oct. 28. "I wasn't surprised to see Red Hat sell," Shuttleworth said. "But I was surprised at the amount of debt that IBM took on to close the deal." He added that he would be worried for IBM, except for the fact that the public cloud is a huge opportunity. "I guess it makes sense if you think of IBM being able to steer a large amount of on prem RHEL workloads to the cloud, then that deal might make sense," he said. Source
  6. Ubuntu founder and Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth recently talked to me about his plans for his company, operating system, clouds, and containers. Mark Shuttleworth looked good at OpenStack Summit in Vancouver. Not only were his company Canonical and operating system Ubuntu Linux doing well, but thanks to his microfasting diet, he's lost 40 pounds. Energized and feeling good, he's looking forward to taking Canonical to its initial public offering (IPO) in 2019 and making the company more powerful than ever. It's taken him longer than expected to IPO Canonical. Shuttleworth explained, "We will do the right thing at the right time. That's not this year, though. There's a process that you have to go through and that takes time. We know what we need to hit in terms of revenue and growth and we're on track." In the meantime, besides his own wealth -- according to the BBC, his personal wealth jumped by £340 million last year -- he's turned to private equity to help fuel Canonical's growth. And, where is that growth coming from? Well, it's not the desktop. Found as users -- and Shuttleworth himself -- of the Linux desktop, Canonical's real money comes in from the cloud. Ubuntu remains the dominant cloud operating system. According to the May 8, 2018 Cloud Market statistics, on the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud, Ubuntu dominates the cloud with 209,000 instances, well ahead of its competitors Amazon Linux AMI, 88,500; Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and CentOS's 31,400, and Windows Server's 29,200. As another data point, the executives at the OpenStack cloud company Rackspace told me that although their company had started with RHEL, today it's 60/40 Ubuntu. OpenStack has been very, very good for Canonical, which is more than you can say for many companies that tried to make it as OpenStack providers or distributors. "With OpenStack it's important to deliver on the underlying promise of more cost-effective infrastructure," Shuttleworth said. Sure, "You can love technology and you can have new projects and it can all be kumbaya and open source, but what really matters is computers, virtual machines, virtual disks, virtual networks. So we ruthlessly focus on delivering that and then also solving all the problems around that." So it is, Shuttleworth claims, that "Canonical can deliver an OpenStack platform to an enterprise in two weeks with everything in place." What's driving Canonical growth on both the public and OpenStack-based cloud is "machine learning and container operations. The economics of automating the data center brings people to Ubuntu." That said, "The Internet of Things (IoT) is still an area of investment for us. We have the right set of primitives [Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu for IoT and Snap contanizeried applications] to bring IoT all over the planet." But, it's "not profitable yet". Shuttleworth thinks Ubuntu will end up leading IoT, as it has the cloud, "because a developer can transfer their programs from a workstation to the cloud to a gateway to the IoT. I want to make sure we build the right set of technologies so you can operate a billion things with Ubuntu on it." To make this happen, Shuttleworth said Canonical currently has just short of 600 full-time developers. As for the desktop, Shuttleworth finds it a "fascinating study of human nature that Unity [Ubuntu's former desktop] became a complete exercise in torches and pitchforks. I'm now convinced a lot of the people who demanded its demise never used it." That's because, while "I think GNOME is a nicely done desktop," many Ubuntu users are now objecting to GNOME. Shuttleworth also had kind words about the KDE Neon, MATE, and LXDE desktops. Still, "I do miss Unity, but I use GNOME." Shuttleworth would like to see the open-source community become "safer to put new ideas out into it." Too often, "it's obnoxious to someone else's labor of love." That said, in business competition, Shuttleworth said, after people criticized him for calling out Red Hat and VMware by name in his OpenStack keynote speech, "I don't think it was offsides to talk about money and competition. OpenStack has to be in the room where public clouds are discussed and Ubuntu has to be in the conversation when it comes to cloud operating systems. No one has questioned the facts." In a way, though, having given up on innovating on the desktop and on the smartphone market has been a blessing. "I can work with more focus on cloud and the edge and IoT. We're moving faster. Our security and performance story can be tighter because we can put more time on both them." One thing that Shuttleworth believes Canonical does better than his competition is delivering the best from upstream to its customers. "Take OpenStack, we didn't invent a bunch of pieces. We take care of stuff people need by trusting the upstream community. People find this refreshing." Canonical also succeeds, he thinks, because they eat their own dog food. "We learn stuff by operating it ourselves and not just developing it. We experience what it's like to operate many OpenStack and Kubernetes stacks. We then offer these complex solutions as a managed service, and that reduces the cost for users." The result is a company that Shuttleworth is sure will lead the way in the cloud and container-driven world of IT. Source
  7. GNOME 3.26 will be the default desktop environment Work on the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system continues, and Canonical's Will Cooke is back with more information on the Ubuntu Desktop team bakes for the final release, which will land on October 19, 2017. Last week, we told you that Ubuntu 17.10 will support all known driverless printing standards and that captive portal detection is now enabled by default. Also, Ubuntu 17.10 received initial support for PolicyKit authentication in the Snapd Snappy daemon, to finally allow users to install and remove Snaps from the Snappy Store without having to create an Ubuntu One account. And now, it looks like Ubuntu Dock is getting support for indicators and notification badges. This is great news for those using apps that support libappindicators, as the soon-to-be-released GNOME 3.26 desktop environment won't ship with support for indicators. On top of that, enabling notification badge support in Ubuntu Dock is a must for ex-Unity users. "We’re adding notification badge support to the Dock extension. This branch has been proposed to the upstream project and is awaiting review," reveals Will Cooke, Ubuntu Desktop Director, Canonical. "We’ve packaged the KStatusNotifier extension to provide support for indicators. This will provide support for apps which use libappindicators which was removed from GNOME 3.26." Wayland session won't work on PCs with non-hybrid Nvidia GPUs As you are aware, Ubuntu 17.10 will be using the next-generation Wayland display server by default instead of X11 (X.Org Server), which is available as an alternative from the GNOME Display Manager (GDM). But, Will Cooke warns users that the Wayland session won't work on PCs with non-hybrid Nvidia GPUs, unless they enable the experimental KMS support, which will break X11. As such, people with this kind of systems won't see the X11 session to not end up with a broken Ubuntu installation if they feel adventurous to enable Kernel Mode Setting (KMS) for the Wayland session. Meanwhile, the Ubuntu Desktop team still works to improve the video playback performance in Ubuntu 17.10 to reduce CPU usage, and hardware-accelerated video support on Intel GPUs. Other than that, the Ubuntu Desktop team worked to sync the mobile broadband provider info from Debian Sid. On the other hand, it looks like the Ubuntu Kernel team still works on rebasing Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) on the recently released Linux 4.13 kernel. The Final Beta is expected later this month, on September 28, and it will give us a glimpse of what's coming to Ubuntu Linux this fall. Source
  8. Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) - Stable - Final - Direct Download & Alternate Downloads: Ubuntu is distributed on two types of images described below. Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There is one image available: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Server install image The server install image allows you to install Ubuntu permanently on a computer for use as a server. It will not install a graphical user interface. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) server install image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) server install image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. A full list of available files, including BitTorrent files, can be found below. If you need help burning these images to disk, see the Create a bootable USB stick on Windows or the Image Burning Guide or the USB Image Writing Guide. Download Pen Drive Linux's USB Installer Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavours: For Ubutnu Flavours downloads, you can view here. Ubuntu Flavour - Lubuntu - 17.10 Lubuntu is distributed on two types of images described below. Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Lubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Alternate install image The alternate install image allows you to perform certain specialist installations of Lubuntu. It provides for the following situations: setting up automated deployments; upgrading from older installations without network access; LVM and/or RAID partitioning; installs on systems with less than about 384MiB of RAM (although note that low-memory systems may not be able to run a full desktop environment reasonably). In the event that you encounter a bug using the alternate installer, please file a bug on the debian-installer package. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) alternate install image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) alternate install image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Kubuntu - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Kubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Xubuntu - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Xubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 192MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Kylin - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-Kylin without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu MATE - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-MATE without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Budgie - 17.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-Budgie without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Studio - 17.10 Install/live DVD The combined install/live DVD allows you either to install Ubuntu-Studio permanently on a computer, or (by entering 'live' at the boot prompt) to try Ubuntu-Studio without changing your computer at all. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) install/live DVD Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) install/live DVD For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg
  9. The first step towards an all-Snap Ubuntu OS Ubuntu MATE leader Martin Wimpress is pioneering pre-installed Snap support in his Ubuntu distro by shipping the forthcoming Ubuntu MATE 17.10 release as the first distro with a Snap app installed by default. The Snap app in question is for the pulsemixer curses-based command-line sound mixer for the popular PulseAudio sound server, which is installed by default in Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) and other opt-in flavors, such as Ubuntu MATE. Pulsemixer will only be available as a Snap package in Ubuntu MATE 17.10, as the first step towards an all-Snap Ubuntu system. "Pre-installing Snaps by default in the desktop images was an outcome of the Ubuntu Rally that took place in New York a couple of weeks ago," said Martin Wimpress. "Installing the pulsemixer Snap by default in Ubuntu MATE 17.10 is being used a pilot and what we learn will help the Ubuntu Desktop team with their efforts to ship Snaps by default in Ubuntu 18.04." Call for testing for Ubuntu MATE 17.10 with pre-installed Snap According to Martin Wimpress, the size of the Ubuntu MATE 17.10 ISO images hasn't been affected significantly due to the installation of the pulsemixer Snap by the default, which was selected because of its smaller size and usefulness for Ubuntu MATE users, but also because it's not available for installation from the official Ubuntu repositories, nor the Debian ones. A call for testing has been put out if you want to help the Ubuntu MATE developers test the upcoming release with the pulsemixer Snap installed by default. To do that, you need to download the latest Ubuntu MATE 17.10 daily builds for either 64-bit or 32-bit computers, write the ISO image to a USB flash drive, boot it in live mode or install it on your PC, and test the pulsemixer Snap. Ubuntu MATE 17.10 will launch next week on October 19 with the latest MATE 1.18 desktop environment by default, the Linux 4.13 kernel, and numerous other new features and improvements, especially to the in-house build apps like MATE Tweak. Ubuntu MATE 17.10 won't be dropping support for 32-bit installations, yet it will inherit many of the features of Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark). Source
  10. Ubuntu 17.10 Final Beta is expected on September 28, 2017 Canonical is still working on polishing its upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, due for release next month on October 19, and today we'd like to offer you a first look at the new control center that'll be implemented in this release. You probably already know that Ubuntu 17.10 will be the first release of the popular OS in years to ship with the GNOME desktop environment by default, though Canonical's engineers are working day and night to customize the default Ubuntu session to make it easier for Unity users the next time they upgrade their PCs. Therefore, Ubuntu 17.10's default GNOME session won't be a vanilla one, like that of the Fedora Linux operating system, but one that tries to resemble the look and feel of the deprecated Unity user interface, which was used by default since Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) and was based on the GNOME Stack. A GNOME vanilla session will be available for installation as well, if you don't like what Canonical did to the GNOME desktop environment, but you probably won't have any trouble using the default one. We already showed you the new Ubuntu Dock, and today we're giving you a first look at the new control center. Here's what Ubuntu 17.10 Control Center looks like As of yesterday, those using Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds on their computers have probably noticed that there's a completely revamped control center when they clicked on the wheel icon in the system menu in the system tray area. And it's nothing like the old Ubuntu Control Center used in previous releases. The new Ubuntu Control Center is a slightly revamped version of the GNOME Control Center of the forthcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment launching tomorrow, September 13, 2017, and it features an all-new navigation system with all sections listed on the left side of the window at a glance. While most of the settings sections offer single pages, there are a couple of sections that opens another list of sections, such as Devices and Details, which feature multiple entries. The settings of the new Ubuntu Dock are also available in the new Ubuntu Control Center, which comes with built-in search functionality. Check out the screenshot tour below to see the new Ubuntu Control Center in action, and you can download the latest daily build ISO image of Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) if you want to take it for a test drive. We think that it's cool, modern, and very handy, and it was about time to get a face lift. More Images[22] Source
  11. The new release also adds dynamic filesystem updates Canonical announced the release of Snapd 2.27 Snappy daemon for Ubuntu Linux and other supported GNU/Linux distributions. This is a major release that adds significant improvements and new features. The biggest new feature implemented in the Snapd 2.27 release is Android boot support, which should bring the Ubuntu Snappy technologies to a wide range of devices that are powered by Google's Linux-based Android mobile operating system, implementing support for transactional updates. "The snapd boot sequence can now handle Android-style boot management. We’re especially happy about this as it opens up a new range of devices for snapd that will support transactional updates of the OS and the kernel with automatic reverts on boot failures," said Gustavo Niemeyer. Another interesting feature introduces in the Snapd 2.27 release is the snap-update-ns tool, which has been in development for a very long time. The tool promises to allow for changes to be performed dynamically in the file system inside the Snap mount namespace, which wasn't possible until now. Additionally, Snapd 2.27 comes with new "install" and "remove" hooks that let Snaps to implement a logic that's enabled only when it's removed from the system or installed for the first time, and adds support for the snapctl tool, which opens up a communication line between any Snap and the Snapd daemon. New and updated interfaces, new aliases and commands Among other improvements implemented in Snapd 2.27, we can mention a new "title" field designed to hold a high-level, normally uppercased name for the Snap app, new "--unaliased" parameter to the "snap install" command for installing Snaps that don't have any aliases enabled, and new "--last=" parameter to the "snap abort" and "watch" commands, allowing them to operate on the last change. The seccomp argument filtering was re-enabled in this release of Snapd, which renames the "snap change" command to "snap tasks," adds new "search" alias for the "snap find" command, adds support for displaying snap types under the Notes column via the "snap list" command, as well as suppor for the "snap info" command to display more information. Lastly, Snapd 2.27 introduces the broadcom-asic-control, greengrass-support, and password-manager-service interfaces, and updates numerous others, including alsa, browser-support, log-observe, mir, mount-observe, network-control, optical-drive, optical-observe, pulseaudio, screen-inhibit-control, system-observe, timezone-control, unity7, and x11. Source
  12. It's based on the Dash to Dock GNOME extension Ubuntu 17.10, the next major release of the widely-used Ubuntu Linux OS, will be transitioning to the GNOME Shell user interface by default instead of the Unity desktop environment that was used until now. As some of you may already know, Canonical plans to create a modified GNOME Shell experience for the main Ubuntu 17.10 flavor, along with a vanilla one, and they recently revealed the fact that there will be an always visible dock by default, based, of course, on the very popular Dash to Dock extension for GNOME Shell. To keep you guys up-to-date with the development of Ubuntu, we're running the operating system on a daily basis, continuously monitoring incoming packages and other changes. As of August 16, 2017, Canonical's Didier Roche uploaded a package called gnome-shell-extension-ubuntu-dock in Ubuntu 17.10 repositories. It's no brainer that's the package to enable Canonical's modified Dash to Dock extension on the GNOME Shell, and, once installed, it can be easily enabled from the Extensions section of the GNOME Tweaks utility. As of now, the dock won't be automatically enabled after it's been installed, not even after logging out the session. It piggybacks on Dash to Dock Canonical said in one of their recent reports that they have no plans to make major modifications to the Dash to Dock extension, so their modified dock piggybacks on Dash to Dock, using its settings. As we see it, you'll need to have Dash to Dock installed as well to change the look and functionality of the Ubuntu Dock. In terms of design, there aren't any major differences between Dash to Dock and Ubuntu Dock, except for the fact that there's an orange color used for the windows counter indicators, but that can be easily changed from the settings, as well as the position of the dock to anywhere on the screen (left, right, bottom, top), it's size, behavior, appearance, etc. When Ubuntu Dock is enabled by default in the Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds, which should happen in the coming weeks, we believe that Canonical will choose to place the dock on the left side of the screen to recreate the Unity desktop experience. It remains to be seen if Ubuntu Dock will have additional features, but one thing is for sure, you'll be able to disable Ubuntu Dock and use Dash to Dock instead, or any other dock for that matter. Source
  13. The new sound settings are now ready for public testing After getting back from GNOME's GUADEC 2017 developer conference, Canonical's Didier Roche has started a daily blog series about the Unity to GNOME Shell transition for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) release. One of the key features of Ubuntu's Unity desktop environment was to allow users to raise the volume over the 100% limit using the multimedia keys of their laptops. The setting wasn't available in other popular desktop environments, such as GNOME, to which Canonical wants to transition for Ubuntu 17.10. Last month, the Ubuntu Desktop team shared their plans to implement the same functionality in their modified GNOME Shell user interface for Ubuntu 17.10, and Didier Roche reports today that the feature is ready for public testing, though it still needs a bit of work until it's ready to land in the stable repository. "Some devices have very low volume even when pushed at their maximum. One example for this is the x220 when most of videos on YouTube, or listening to music in Rhythmbox doesn’t give great results even at maximum volume," said Didier Roche. "PulseAudio can amplify some of those sound devices." Here's how to test the new sound amplification on Ubuntu 17.10 If you're running Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) on your personal computer and you're willing to test the new sound amplification implementation, go ahead and add Canonical's official Ubuntu Desktop Team Transitions PPA to your repositories, and do a full update using the commands below. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-desktop/transitions sudo apt update && sudo apt dist-upgrade Once you've installed the PPA and updated your Ubuntu 17.10 operating system, you should be able to raise the volume over the 100% limit using the media keys on your laptop or a physical, dedicated volume button, if available. Please note that you'll have to enable the "Allow louder than 100%" option in the Sound panel in GNOME Control Center. Check out the video below to see it in action!
  14. The Ubuntu developers have announced that they continue to provide support for the Linux kernel 3.13.x that has just reached end of life. Greg Kroah-Hartman, the maintainer of the 3.13.x branch of the Linux kernel, has revealed that this particular version has reached end of life and that users should upgrade as soon as possible. This might be a problem if you are on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), the Linux distribution developed by Canonical that was just released a week ago. The Ubuntu developers integrated Linux kernel 3.13.x and it will remain at that version until the first point release is made available. The Ubuntu kernel team had only one choice, to pick the Linux kernel 3.13.x development and to convince kernel developers to continue to send patches. They will be using the same system, which means that nothing will basically change, with the exception of two things. The numbering of the kernel will be a little different and it won't be listed on the kernel's official website. “The Ubuntu kernel team will pick up stable maintenance where Greg KH left off with v3.13.11 (thanks, Greg!)... The Ubuntu kernel team is pleased to announce that we will be providing extended stable support for the Linux 3.13 kernel until April 2016 as a third party effort maintained on our infrastructure.” “Our linux-3.13.y{-queue,-review} stable branches will fork from v3.13.11 and will be published here:git://kernel.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/linux.git.” “We will use the same stable request/review workflow and follow the standard upstream stable kernel rules. We welcome any feedback and contribution to this effort. We will be posting the first review cycle patch set in a week or two,” reads the announcement from Canonical. This is not something new for Canonical and its developers. They had to do the same in the past when they released an operating system and the kernel developers pulled the plug on the same version of the kernel that they were using. The fact that the support for Linux kernel 3.13 will be extended until April 2016 means that there are two more years of support for a kernel that reached end of life just yesterday, with its last official version. Besides Ubuntu, which will greatly benefit from the continued support for the kernel, there are also a few other distributions out there that are using the Ubuntu version of the kernel. The most prominent is Manjaro and it's likely that it will continue to do so. Source
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