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  1. Avast, the multibillion-dollar Czech security company, doesn’t just make money from protecting its 400 million users’ information. It also profits in part because of sales of users’ Web browsing habits and has been doing so since at least 2013. Ondrej Vlcek, chief executive officer of Avast, has defended his company's sales of aggregated user data, though one critic has accused it of creating “spyware.” That’s led to some labeling its tools “spyware,” the very thing Avast is supposed to be protecting users from. Both Mozilla and Opera were concerned enough to remove some Avast tools from their add-on stores earlier this month. But recently appointed chief executive Ondrej Vlcek tells Forbes there’s no privacy scandal here. All that user information that it sells cannot be traced back to individual users, he asserts. Here’s how it works, according to Vlcek: Avast users have their Web activity harvested by the company’s browser extensions. But before it lands on Avast servers, the data is stripped of anything that might expose an individual’s identity, such as a name in the URL, as when a Facebook user is logged in. All that data is analysed by Jumpshot, a company that’s 65%-owned by Avast, before being sold on as “insights” to customers. Those customers might be investors or brand managers. What do those customers get? Vlcek says Jumpshot, which was initially acquired in 2013, provides “insights on how cohorts of users on the internet use the web.” For instance, it could show a percentage of visitors who went from one website to another. That could be useful to anyone monitoring an advertising campaign. “Typical customers would be, for example, investors, who would be interested in how online companies are doing in terms of their new campaigns,” the new Avast chief explains. Say Amazon launches a new product—Jumpshot could determine how much interest it’s getting online. Jumpshot's own website is a little more detailed, promising “incredibly detailed clickstream data from 100 million global online shoppers and 20 million global app users.” It’s possible to “track what users searched for, how they interacted with a particular brand or product, and what they bought. Look into any category, country, or domain.” That might be unnerving to privacy-predisposed folk, but Vlcek compares this kind of data trading to the kind seen in healthcare. In that market, anonymized data is used to create case studies, where by looking at data trends it could be determined who is more likely to get a disease. As a final assurance, Vlcek told Forbes he recognizes customers use Avast to protect their information and so it can’t do anything that might “circumvent the security of privacy of the data including targeting by advertisers.” “So we absolutely do not allow any advertisers or any third party ... to get any access through Avast or any data that would allow the third party to target that specific individual,” he adds. As for how much money this actually makes for Avast, it’s around 5% of overall revenue, says Vlcek. Given the first half of 2019 revenue stood at just under $430 million, that’s still more than $20 million. Avast’s user data sales have attracted concern as recently as last week, though. Adblock Plus founder Wladimir Palant has been tracking Avast’s Web browsing over 2019, and he reported the data slurping to Mozilla and Opera before they removed the add-ons from their stores just last week. Palant now wants Google to do the same for Chrome. “Google Chrome is where the overwhelming majority of these users are,” he warned in a blog post earlier this month. Source
  2. Mozilla removes all Avast Firefox extensions If you search for Avast or AVG on the official Mozilla Add-ons website, you may notice that no results by these companies are returned. Neither Avast Online Security or SafePrice, nor AVG Online Security or SafePrice, are returned by the Store currently even though these extensions exist. It appears that Mozilla removed these extensions from its Store. When you try to open one of the Store URLs of Avast or AVG extensions you get a "Oops! We can't find that page" error message. The extensions are not blacklisted by Mozilla. Blacklisted extensions are put on a blocklist -- which is publicly available here -- and removed from user browsers as a consequence. Avast and AVG extensions have been removed but are not blocked which means that the extensions remain installed in Firefox browsers for the time being. Mozilla added several dozen extensions for Firefox to the blocklist on December 2, 2019 which collected user data without disclosure or consent, but Avast's extensions are not on the list. What happened? Wladimir Palant, creator of AdBlock Plus, published an analysis of Avast extensions in late October 2018 on his personal site. He discovered that Avast's extension transmitted data to Avast that provided Avast with browsing history information. The data that the extension submits exceeded what is necessary to function according to Palant. The extensions include the full address of the page, the page title, referer, and other data in the request. Data is submitted when pages are opened but also when tabs are switched. On search pages, every single link on the page is submitted as well. The data collected here goes far beyond merely exposing the sites that you visit and your search history. Tracking tab and window identifiers as well as your actions allows Avast to create a nearly precise reconstruction of your browsing behavior: how many tabs do you have open, what websites do you visit and when, how much time do you spend reading/watching the contents, what do you click there and when do you switch to another tab. All that is connected to a number of attributes allowing Avast to recognize you reliably, even a unique user identifier. Palant concluded that the collecting of data was not an oversight. The company states in its privacy policy that it uses anonymized Clickstream Data for "cross-product direct marketing, cross-product development, and third-party trend analytics. Mozilla is in talks with Avast currently according to Wladimir Palant. Possible scenarios are that Mozilla will add the extensions to the blocklist that it maintains or will request that Avast makes changes to the extensions before they are reinstated. The extensions are still available for Google Chrome at the time of writing. Source: Mozilla removes all Avast Firefox extensions (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  3. Microsoft blocks Windows 10 v1909 update for PCs with old AVG and Avast antivirus About a week ago, Microsoft put a hold on v1909 update for users running old Realtek drivers because of compatibility issues. The hold was later lifted as the issue was resolved but now Microsoft has updated their v1909 status page (via Techdows) to confirm a hold on PCs with old AVG and Avast antivirus. According to the support article, Windows 10 users with old versions of AVG and Avast antivirus won’t be receiving v1909 update. Avast users can check out the support article to find instructions on how to update to a new version of the antivirus. AVG has also published a support article detailing the issue and how users can update to a new version of antivirus. Microsoft has also advised against forcing the update as that might break Windows and cause further complications. If you’re someone who’s using old Avast or AVG antivirus then make sure to check the support articles or uninstall the antivirus to get the new Windows update. Source: Microsoft blocks Windows 10 v1909 update for PCs with old AVG and Avast antivirus (MSPoweruser)
  4. Avast Cleanup is a highly effective cache and junk cleaner app for Android. Free up storage space Clean up space-wasting junk to make room for the things you want. • Clear out app cache and other unnecessary files from Android and your apps, such as caches, temporary files or leftover data • See which apps are taking up the most space • Identify and delete apps you no longer use Detox your photo library Automatically identify and remove bad photos to free up space. If Avast Cleanup isn’t 100% sure about a bad photo, you’ll get to review it. • Get rid of duplicate, similar, old, and poor quality photos • Optimize photo size and move originals to the cloud • Identify the ‘best photo’ out of a group NEW! Tune up performance Hibernation Mode stops hungry apps from consuming your resources. • Hibernate apps to extend battery life and speed up your phone • Stop CPU, battery, memory and traffic draining apps • Remove pre-installed bloatware and other apps you never use Boost battery life Get the most out of your phone’s battery so you can stay on the go longer. • Turn off phone functions you don’t use very often • Set profiles to auto-adjust battery usage depending on where you are (home, work, car) Unlock premium features Upgrading to Avast Cleanup Pro gives you access to powerful features that will take your app to the next level. Remove ads — Never see third-party ads in this app Pro Battery Life — Auto-adjust battery usage depending on your location Automatic cleaning — Schedule regular cleanings that won’t interrupt you Advanced Photo Optimizer — Control the size and quality of your photos Themes — Choose a color scheme that suits you Avast direct support — Get fast replies to all of your questions The Results Are In At Avast, we run lab tests to showcase the benefits of our products. We have run multiple benchmarks on various smartphones that have been in use daily, before and after running the Avast Cleanup optimization. + Up to 12 GB freed up + Up to 20% faster + Up to 70% more battery life Highlights: ✔ Junk Cleaner: Preinstalled Apps Remover deletes pre-installed bloatware apps you don't use, or prevents them from slowing down your phone. ✔ Device Manager — System Screen: view all important info about your device on one screen. ✔ Device Manager — App Hibernation temporarily suspends apps to prolong battery life, save mobile data, clean memory and improve device speed ✔ Junk Cleaner: Remove Junk: Avast Cleanup quickly analyzes your phone's storage space and clears all unnecessary data. ✔ The smart Safe Clean feature instantly cleans out unimportant data, system caches, gallery thumbnails, installation files, residual or unused files, and APKs. With a single tap, you can easily delete accumulated data that has no purpose. ✔ The Cleaning Adviser option gives you a detailed overview of all the data on your phone. ✔ Uninstall applications with one tap to free up space , speed up your device, and stop Android lags. ✔ The Phone Cleaner identifies and clears the largest files, media, apps, and junk on your device. ✔ Use the Ignore List to mark items on your device that you don't want to be listed. ✔ Master your storage space by optimizing your Android device and boosting its speed. What's New: New users: Let us guide you through your first cleaning. All users: We heard you and made Quick Clean feature the central part of the dashboard. Mod Info: PRO features Unlocked; No startup Promo Page; Promo Apps disabled; Ads Removed; Analytics disabled; All ads and services calls from Activity removed; Google play Info: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.avast.android.cleaner Download: Site: https://upload.st Sharecode: /lfbeNd75n6/Avast_Cleanup-Professional-v4.14.1_build_567101-Mod_apk
  5. Avast Cleanup is a highly effective cache and junk cleaner app for Android. Free up storage space Clean up space-wasting junk to make room for the things you want. • Clear out app cache and other unnecessary files from Android and your apps, such as caches, temporary files or leftover data • See which apps are taking up the most space • Identify and delete apps you no longer use NEW! Tune up performance Hibernation Mode stops hungry apps from consuming your resources. • Hibernate apps to extend battery life and speed up your phone • Stop CPU, battery, memory and traffic draining apps • Remove pre-installed bloatware and other apps you never use Unlock premium features Upgrading to Avast Cleanup Pro gives you access to powerful features that will take your app to the next level. Remove ads — Never see third-party ads in this app Pro Battery Life — Auto-adjust battery usage depending on your location Automatic cleaning — Schedule regular cleanings that won’t interrupt you Advanced Photo Optimizer — Control the size and quality of your photos Themes — Choose a color scheme that suits you Avast direct support — Get fast replies to all of your question Highlights: ✔ Junk Cleaner: Preinstalled Apps Remover deletes pre-installed bloatware apps you don't use, or prevents them from slowing down your phone. ✔ Device Manager — System Screen: view all important info about your device on one screen. ✔ Device Manager — App Hibernation temporarily suspends apps to prolong battery life, save mobile data, clean memory and improve device speed ✔ Junk Cleaner: Remove Junk: Avast Cleanup quickly analyzes your phone's storage space and clears all unnecessary data. ✔ The smart Safe Clean feature instantly cleans out unimportant data, system caches, gallery thumbnails, installation files, residual or unused files, and APKs. With a single tap, you can easily delete accumulated data that has no purpose. ✔ The Cleaning Adviser option gives you a detailed overview of all the data on your phone. ✔ Uninstall applications with one tap to free up space , speed up your device, and stop Android lags. ✔ The Phone Cleaner identifies and clears the largest files, media, apps, and junk on your device. ✔ Use the Ignore List to mark items on your device that you don't want to be listed. ✔ Master your storage space by optimizing your Android device and boosting its speed. What's New: New users: Let us guide you through your first cleaning. All users: We heard you and made Quick Clean feature the central part of the dashboard. Mod Info: PRO features Unlocked; No startup Promo Page; Promo Apps disabled; Ads Removed; Analytics disabled; All ads and services calls from Activity removed; Google play Info: CODE: SELECT ALLhttps://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.avast.android.cleaner Download: Site: https://anonfile.com Sharecode: /i7T9n567n9/Avast_Cleanup-Professional-v4.14.1_build_567101-Mod_apk
  6. The Czech Cyber Billionaire Who Built A Fortune On Free Software On the rooftop terrace of the five-star Hotel U Prince, Pavel Baudis surveys the city he’s lived in for most of his 59 years. Over his shoulder is Prague’s tourist-heavy town square and the grand gothic spires of the Church of Our Lady before Týn; in front of him stand serried ranks of ochre rooftops. The city has become considerably more colorful in his lifetime. Baudis lived through the dark days after Warsaw Pact troops crushed the Prague Spring, entrenching a communism so stringent in its ideals it would prevent his father from practising psychiatry and limited his own education. Then came liberalisation after the Velvet Revolution in 1989, creating opportunities for would be inventors like Baudis. Through it all, he’s persevered with a cool, thrifty attitude. It’s a mindset that has enabled him to transform a little cybersecurity company he co-founded during the waning days of the communist regime into an industry leader that is taking on, and in some ways outdoing, aggressive American rivals like McAfee and Symantec. It has also made him one of a handful of Czech billionaires. Baudis’ baby is Avast, the anti-virus software that sits on more than 400 million computers and smartphones around the world. Like the similar products McAfee and Norton also developed in the late 1980s, it’s designed to prevent cybercriminals and spies from installing data-pilfering tools on computers. The main difference is that Avast is free and only available online, not in retail stores. That “freemium” model has lifted Baudis’ company to giddy heights, culminating in its 2018 London Stock Exchange IPO, which set it on a course to become a $4 billion business and has taken Baudis’ net worth to $1.4 billion as of June 2019. Pavel Baudis is one of the Czech Republic's richest citizens. He remains in Prague today, where his anti-virus firm Avast continues to bring in big revenues. While Baudis’ swelling fortune has made him a member of the billionaire’s club, he epitomizes self-effacement. Wearing a plain navy waistcoat and a black fanny pack, his bristly white hair encircling a balding pate, Baudis displays no signs of his wealth. He’s taciturn throughout a two-hour conversation on the hotel’s chilly terrace, choosing his words carefully as he methodically sips from a hot chocolate and a single Staropramen beer. He professes to have “no expensive hobbies”; his most outré pastime is geocaching, a game in which participants hunt for treasures using GPS coordinates. His investments are small and sensible, the most recent a diaper manufacturer and a nearby hotel with a view of his city’s most imposing landmark, Prague Castle. “I’m not very good in hotel management. It’s a good education,” Baudis says of his latest side hustle. Among Baudis’ more profitable decisions was recruiting a headstrong American to turn Avast into a giant-killer. That man, sitting across from Baudis, talking over the cackles of tourists and the cooing of dating couples, is Vince Steckler, Avast’s CEO for the past decade. It’s the first time the two have been interviewed together by an English-language publication since the IPO. The former Symantec executive, who’s louder and brasher than the Czech and with his physical heft and bald head looks like a retired army general, is happy to brag about the company’s success where Baudis demurs. “I was just looking at Aston Martin earlier today. We were the second largest IPO [on the LSE] of the year. Aston was the largest. We’re now more valuable than Aston Martin,” Steckler says. He’s not wrong. Bond’s favorite car maker has seen its stock plummet and its valuation slump to just over $3 billion. Steckler was not an obvious choice. In 2005, when he was an executive at Logicon, Inc., the SEC handed him a $35,000 civil monetary penalty, saying Steckler had helped the Silicon Valley software company Legato inflate its revenue records by signing a $7 million contract with a cancellation clause. According to the SEC, Steckler knew that the cancellation allowance should have prevented Legato from counting the order as a sale and had advised Legato executives on how to hide the clause from their finance department. One former Avast employee said that staff used to joke about the “ex-con upstairs.” Steckler's record came under intense scrutiny from the British press around the time of the IPO. Usually loquacious on any subject, Steckler declined to provide a statement on the episode at the time and again recently when Forbes asked for comment. He wasn’t at the top of Baudis and cofounder Eduard Kucera’s list when they were hunting for a CEO in 2009. The founders initially wanted Steckler’s old boss, ex-Symantec VP Dieter Giesbrecht. “They found someone they really liked who wasn’t me,” Steckler jokes. Giesbrecht declined the offer but introduced Baudis and Kucera to Steckler, who jumped at the chance to move to Prague from Singapore and take the helm from the cofounders, who are now guiding the company as board directors. In August 1968, a Soviet tanks moves into Wenceslas Square in Prague. Pavel Baudis lived through the stifling years under communism, only to emerge an entrepreneur in the 1990s and become a billionaire this decade Despite Steckler’s blemishes, under his watch the company has doubled its user base and booked an operating profit of $248.3 million in 2018, according to the company results. Steckler says that when he joined in 2009, the company’s revenue was at just $20 million. After myriad acquisitions that massively boosted user numbers, some profitable partnerships and an aggressively global approach, revenue over the past 10 years has soared. But Steckler’s reign is almost over: Two weeks after our meeting, he announced he was to retire at the end of June. He’s to be replaced by right-hand man and one of Baudis’ earliest hires, Czech national Ondrej Vlcek. Steckler may have provided something akin to an adrenalin shot of American capitalism, but it was Baudis and Kucera’s unswerving belief in their product that put Avast on a trajectory to unicorn status and beyond. Baudis has taken actions you’d associate with modern tech tycoons like Mark Zuckerberg, but without the showiness. He ended his work on a chemistry degree in the late 1980s, admitting he wasn’t a natural scientist, and applied his hungry mind to computers. Under the Soviet regime, few consumer computers were available to Baudis, but he managed to get his hands on an Olivetti M24 while he was working at the severe sounding Research Institute for Mathematical Machines. He knew there was no market for the graphics software he was writing so stifling was the political and economic insularity of Czechoslovakia at the time. “It was frustrating that even if you were very good and do a very good job, you are just wasting your time and knowledge,” he says. This was at the tail end of the period of normalization, which had fostered the kind of environment you’d expect from a failed communist project. “A lot of people invite you to discuss your political beliefs and views, and so if they are not satisfied you are out of a job,” Baudis recalls. But then Baudis was sent a floppy disk that contained one of the original computer viruses, called Vienna. “None of my colleagues were actually interested in it. [They thought] it’s a toy. So I took it for myself and I started to explore it,” he says. Those colleagues must rue the day: His tool, which simply found and deleted the file-wiping malware, would become a key component of the first Avast anti-virus engine and the launchpad for the business. Though the American-Czech partnership would later do wonders for Avast, competition with U.S. industry giants in the 1990s and early 2000s nearly brought Baudis and Kucera to their knees. They parried repeated attempts by McAfee and Symantec to dominate the market. In 1997, McAfee tried to acquire the Czech business. The ever-steadfast Baudis recalls that instead of selling, he and Kucera offered to license the engine that powered their software. “And they say, ‘No, no way.’ But after two weeks they just came back and they licensed it,” Baudis says, grinning. Then, in the early 2000s, with Symantec pricing aggressively low in an attempt at global domination, the Avast chiefs had to try something radical. The plan was to go global too, but since they had no marketing budget, there was only one option: offer Avast for free. “We can either close the business or change something,” recalls Baudis. “We had nothing to lose.” AVG, a local rival, had done the same two years earlier but had made a major mistake by not offering the service in multiple languages, Baudis says. Avast wouldn’t make the same error. Two years after going free in 2001, Avast had one million users; by 2006, it had 20 million. Baudis puts some of the success down to good fortune but gives most of the credit to the open, geeky culture he’d fostered around Avast. “We were very lucky with the timing and very lucky that the program was not only free but it is based on word of mouth,” he recalls. Whereas the likes of Kaspersky, McAfee and Symantec’s Norton antivirus would make money from the one-off cost of their tools, sold at Best Buy and other retail stores, Avast brought in revenue by encouraging users to purchase and download the full-featured versions of the software, which became smarter over time as the freemium tools fed it with the vast amounts of threat data they were collecting. Marketing partnerships with other software makers provide another revenue stream; for instance, since 2009, in return for an unknown fee from Google, Avast has recommended new users download the Chrome browser. AVG had grown at a similar pace with the same approach. Not long after Steckler joined, Avast’s leadership decided AVG had to be taken out. After an abortive attempt to go public on the Nasdaq in 2012, Baudis, Kucera and Steckler developed a plan to swallow AVG. Short on funds, they enticed private equity firm CVC Capital Partners in 2014 to take a large stake in Avast. It gave the company a $1 billion valuation. Two years later, after multiple rejections, AVG caved, selling for $1.3 billion. That brought the number of computers and smartphones running Avast-owned software to over 400 million. Though it doesn’t make anything like its rivals’ billions in revenue, Avast had the highest number of Windows users in the antivirus game at the end of 2018, by 6% over second-place McAfee, according to industry tracker Opswat. With AVG aboard, Avast was on a path to go public. Less than a year before the London IPO, though, disaster struck. Avast learned that 2.3 million computers had been infected after hackers found a way to turn one of the company’s other acquisitions, the Piriform CCleaner, into a launchpad for cyberespionage. In September 2017, hackers infected downloads of CCleaner, which was supposed to help customers remove dangerous software. Anyone who updated or installed the tainted CCleaner during the period had a backdoor installed on their computer. According to cybersecurity analysts, the attacks had all the hallmarks of a Chinese government-backed attempt to infect major technology companies, including Cisco, Intel and Microsoft, though it is unclear how successful the attack was. Baudis’ response to the crisis today is typically straightforward: “We have learned our lessons that when we acquire such a company, we have to put our processes in place much sooner than we did.” Avast successfully managed the crisis by being open with law enforcement and the cybersecurity community, turning the narrative into that of a cybersecurity company being targeted by some of the most talented spies on the planet. The event was just a speed bump on the drive toward the London Stock Exchange, where Avast arrived on May 10, 2018, with a valuation of $3.4 billion. It put Avast amongst the top five largest tech IPOs to ever launch on the LSE. That’s far beyond what Baudis had dreamed was possible back in the 1980s; he says he only wanted a product that would be more popular than his graphics programs: “It’s huge, and it’s a good feeling.” In a bid to expand further, Avast plans to launch its first hardware product for the home this year, Steckler says. The little box will monitor all internet traffic in the home, flagging and potentially blocking incoming threats to Internet of Things (IoT) devices like your refrigerator or your Sonos speakers. “You could do a lot of damage with Alexa,” Baudis warns. The Avast Omni box will be bundled into a yearly subscription that covers computers and cellphones. No other anti-virus rival has gone as deep into the home, and Steckler admits it’s a risk. But according to Frost & Sullivan analyst Tony Massimini, if anyone’s positioned to do it, it’s Avast. “It’s been something people have been talking about, but let’s see if you can actually make it work. I’d think Avast has a pretty good shot at doing that.” Not that Steckler will have a hand in guiding Avast through future challenges. He officially retired at the end of June. He’s been replaced by Ondrej Vlcek, a long-time employee and a Czech native, who recently announced he’ll be taking a $1 yearly pay. He and the board are confident that equity-based incentives and his 2% share in the business will be adequate remuneration. Despite all the changes in strategy and leadership, the ever-shrewd Baudis held on to most of his shares as others around him sold, a significant reason he’s a billionaire and his colleagues aren’t. He owns a 27% stake, compared with Kucera’s 10.5% and Steckler’s 3.3%. People inside and outside Avast praise Baudis’ steady construction of a cyber behemoth over the 30 years since the Velvet Revolution freed Czechoslovakia from communist control. “I’ve known Pavel for 20 years. . . . I have a lot of respect for him as a person and for what he’s built,” says Kaspersky’s Costin Raui, one of the oldest hands in the cybersecurity business. Baudis has also preserved the geeky ethos that helped incubate Avast through all the mergers. “You have to change the whole company—how it works, how it operates—and you still need to keep up the company culture in some way.” That culture is why more than half of Avast’s 1,700 employees work in research and development labs in the Czech Republic and California. And why the original Olivetti that Baudis was hacking on in the late 1980s is kept at the Prague headquarters. As the sun goes down over Prague, Baudis recalls how much the city has changed. “It was all gray in 1990. A lot of buildings were in bad shape. Downtown has changed a lot. It’s really like a zoo or something,” he says, clearly not entirely enamored of the never-ending stream of Brits on bachelor parties. Just before he departs for his country house, Baudis plugs Avast’s foundation, which gives 2% of the company’s profits to worthy causes. One of its focuses is improving palliative care in the Czech Republic. It’s Baudis’ way of giving back to the country that, through the harsh years of communism and latter-day capitalism, helped make him the kind of billionaire he is today. Source
  7. (Reuters) - Cyber security company Avast Plc said on Tuesday its new Chief Executive Officer Ondrej Vlcek will indefinitely waive his annual salary and bonus, and instead receive a $1 for his yearly pay. Avast, which pioneered the “freemium” model in security software by giving away its basic product for free, said Vlcek would get annual equity grants, but will donate his board director’s fee of $100,000 a year to charity. Avast said the initial recipient of Vlcek’s director’s fee will be UK-based charity Demelza Hospice for Children. “The board ... is satisfied that he (Vlcek) continues to be appropriately incentivised through existing long term equity-based incentive arrangements and through his 2% shareholding in Avast,” Chairman of the Remuneration Committee Ulf Claesson said in a statement. Vlcek, a Czech national, started at Avast in 1995 as a developer and was part of the team that took the company public. He also led the integration of the consumer business after the company bought AVG in 2016. Vlcek took over this year from Vince Steckler, the former long-time chief executive of Avast, who helped to develop the cyber security company. The FTSE 250 company has diversified its revenue in recent years from its best known antivirus product to include services for e-commerce, browsing, advertising and analytics. Source
  8. Avast and Emsisoft release free decrypters for BigBobRoss ransomware BigBobRoss ransomware has been active since mid-January. By Catalin Cimpanu for Zero Day | March 10, 2019 -- 02:26 GMT (18:26 PST) | Topic: Security Image: ZDNet Avast and Emsisoft, two cyber-security firms known for their antivirus products, released today free decrypters that can help victims of the BigBobRoss ransomware recover their files without paying the ransom demand. The two decrypters are available for download from the Avast and Emsisoft sites, respectively. The ransomware is one of the smaller strains that has been silently infecting victims for the past two months while larger ransomware operations like GandCrab, Ryuk, BitPaymer, SamSam, or Matrix have been grabbing all the headlines. Emsisoft security researcher Michael Gillespie told ZDNet that the first sighting of BigBobRoss was on January 14, when some victims tried to identify the ransomware via ID-Ransomware, a service Gillespie built years ago to help victims determine the name of the ransomware that infected their systems. Gillespie said he received 35 submissions from users across six countries that were later identified as BigBobRoss victims. But not all victims know to use this service, so the number of infected victims could be much higher. It is unclear how the BigBobRoss crew operates to spread the ransomware or infect victims, at the time of writing. "At least one victim on BleepingComputer did mention a server was hacked, but I've not heard anything else from victims about the infection vector, unfortunately," Gillespie said. Besides using the ID-Ransomware service, victims can easily determine if they've been infected by the BigBobRoss ransomware based on some visual queues. First and foremost, once a victim is infected, most of its files will be encrypted and prepended with the ".obfuscated" file extension. For example, image.png will become image.png.obfuscated. The ransom note is stored in a file named "Read Me.txt," embedded below as a visual reference. Image: Emsisoft (supplied) The ransomware's name comes from the email address found in this ransom note that hackers tell victims to reach out for additional information [email protected] Despite using the .obfuscated file extension, the ransomware --written in C++ using QT-- doesn't actually obfuscate files, and actually encrypts them, with an AES-128 ECB algorithm. Nevertheless, the Avast and Emsisoft BigBobRoss decrypters work around this encryption to help victims recover their files. With news breaking this week that officials from Jackson County, Georgia paid $400,000 to recover from a Ryuk ransomware infection, it's good to remember the work some companies do to help ransomware victims, when possible. Also, this is probably the best time to set up some offline backups of your most important data, just in case. Source
  9. Online installers (recommended): http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup.exe Offline installers: http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup_offline.exe UNTESTED
  10. new stable version 18.8.2356 has just been released. - fixed critical vulnerability - last version for Windows XP/Vista https://forum.avast.com/index.php?topic=223244.0 Online installers (recommended): http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup.exe Offline installers: http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup_offline.exe
  11. CrackSoftUploader

    Avast Cleanup Premium 2018 18.1.5172

    Avast Cleanup Premium Avast Cleanup – a tool for the safe cleaning and optimization of the Windows system, which allows you to increase the speed of your computer. Safely remove unnecessary data and get rid of garbage tracks to free up space, and also configure the system registry and optimize the system to increase the speed of your computer. Without additional cleaning, which could remove the remnants, programs after removal leave a large amount of data in the registry, which can lead to a decrease in computer performance and increase the amount of space on the disk. Avast Cleanup can carefully remove unnecessary files and configure the system to speed up performance. Avast Cleanup Feature: Delete unnecessary files and tracking cookies The modern application interface displays all three functions of Avast Cleanup, designed to clean the computer, optimize and set the task schedule. After the analysis is completed, the cleanup tool will display the total number of detected files, the browser cache, add-ons, and the download history and visits. Cleanup shows obsolete programs and driver packages, shared DLLs, and performs system log analysis to free up as much disk space as possible. Avast Cleanup detects tracking cookies installed in browsers and determines if there are any objects with poor reputation among them. Depending on the test results, cleaning may take longer or shorter. Optimize systems and plan new scans Avast Cleanup can also detect potentially dangerous applications, erroneous system settings, outdated registry entries and startup items. Optimizing the system may require you to restart the computer. In addition, a reboot is required to complete the cleaning process. Thanks to the built-in scheduler, Avast Cleanup can monitor the computer in real time and detect the remaining files in the system. Additionally, the user can configure the start of cleaning at a certain time so that the process does not affect daily activities. A safe cleaning tool that needs to be improved After a while, each user is faced with the need to speed up the computer, and Avast Cleanup is just designed for this purpose. The product can optimize the registry and system settings, improve computer performance and speed up the download. Screenshot: Download Links: https://uplod.io/vr4pi6rrvv55
  12. Online installers (recommended): http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup.exe Offline installers: http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup_offline.exe 18.5.2342 - 2018-06-20 What's new: - Notification alerts! A blue dot now appears on our systray icon when you have a notification - Restore anywhere! Restore files from the Virus Chest to any location by clicking “Restore as” Fixed: - Improved our installation and update processes - Antivirus service now runs properly when you open the UI - Clicking “Subscription information” in our systray menu now opens the correct screen - Firewall status is now properly reported in Windows Security Center - Disabled shields now appear correctly in our systray menu - Fixed a few activation code bugs
  13. Only “a small subset of customers” affected, Avast says A bug in Windows 10 April 2018 Update rendered some computers completely useless when the upgrade was completed, and a compatibility issue with Avast antivirus was believed to be the culprit. And while Avast originally said that it found no evidence its antivirus was causing the issues, a company engineer now says that an in-depth analysis of this behavior that was performed in collaboration with Microsoft revealed a problem did exist. “In cooperation with Microsoft we have identified an element of the latest Windows 10 1803 update that is incompatible with the Avast Behavior Shield, causing the aforementioned update to fail in some instances (related to a timing issue, Internet connectivity issue, etc),” a post on the Avast forums reads. A fix has already been released to Windows 10 computers running Avast and which haven’t been upgraded to the April 2018 Update just yet, the same post reveals. “We have found a way to prevent the problem and are now automatically pushing a VPS update to all customers which makes sure that the problem doesn't happen. The VPS number is 180524-08; all users running this version (or later) should be 100% safe,” the Avast engineer adds. Only a few customers affected On the other hand, clients who have already attempted to upgrade their computers but instead ended up being unable to boot are recommended to try an in-place upgrade using a removable media drive. This shouldn’t cause any file loss and instead repair the Windows 10 installation. If possible, users can also try to roll back to the previous version of Windows 10, though in most cases this process failed because booting in Safe Mode wasn’t working either. Avast says that the bug “appears to affect only a small subset of our customers” and that it might hit some other applications as well, though no specifics are available right now. Yesterday, it was reported that Microsoft stopped offering Windows 10 April 2018 Update to systems running Avast, but it’s not clear if the process resumed after this fix was published. < Here >
  14. Avast says it has fixed the problem that triggered Win10 April 2018 Update installation blue screens and dysfunctional 'boot to another operating system' options. Paul Fenwick (CC BY-SA 2.0) Looks as if we have a solution for the Avast-related blue screens in Win10 1803 upgrades that I talked about earlier this week. Avast heavyweight Ondrej Vlcek chose his words carefully but threw lots of shade at Microsoft for the upgrade installer’s bug. Posting on the Avast forum, Vlcek says: In cooperation with Microsoft we have identified an element of the latest Windows 10 1803 update that is incompatible with the Avast Behavior Shield, causing the aforementioned update to fail in some instances (related to a timing issue, Internet connectivity issue, etc). “Fail in some instances” is polite shorthand for the symptoms originally described quite accurately by gcdrm on Reddit: Upon restarting, the computer boots to a blue screen asking the user to choose a keyboard language. After doing so, a few options are given, including to 'boot from another operating system'. Clicking here will take the user to another blue screen with three options to continue "booting" to: Windows Rollback Windows 10 on Volume [x] Windows 10 on Volume [x] The lower two options are identical. Running around to get ahead of the band, on May 23, “Microsoft Agent” Freddrick Pal posted on the Microsoft Answers forum: Windows 10 April 2018 Update may boot to a “Choose your keyboard layout” screen or to a blank screen with a Recycle Bin During the upgrade to Windows 10 version 1803, Windows automatically restarts and one of these two conditions might be experienced: The upgrade appears to complete, but after signing in, you observe a blank screen with only a Recycle Bin and a taskbar. The mouse cursor is present, but the Start menu may not function. Pressing Ctrl+Alt+Del runs the Task Manager, but the Task Manager may not be helpful. During the upgrade, Windows restarts to a screen that prompts you to “Choose your keyboard layout”. From there, troubleshooting options can be selected, but none of them appear to resolve the issue. For example, if Windows Rollback is selected, the entire process repeats. As is becoming increasingly common on the Answers forum, especially on posts by "Microsoft Agents," comments to the post are shut off. No discussion possible. It's not an answer, it's a diktat. Vlcek goes on to say: Luckily, we have found a way to prevent the problem and are now automatically pushing a VPS update to all customers which makes sure that the problem doesn't happen. The VPS number is 180524-08; all users running this version (or later) should be 100% safe. (A VPS is a full update of Avast Behavior Shield.) He then gives a complex 18-step procedure for manually getting your computer back if you got zapped by the bug. It’s not for the faint-hearted. And it’s not from Microsoft — Avast picked it up from The Computer Cellar. Worth noting: There’s no mention of this bug, or its possible solution, in the second May cumulative update for Win10 version 1803, released two days ago, KB 4100403. Vlcek ends with an interesting barb: In the meantime, we continue to investigate this issue which appears to affect only a small subset of our customers. BTW at this stage, we know it's not an Avast-specific issue as the problem affects other software as well. Based on the evidence I’ve seen, and some of Avast’s comments, I’d be willing to speculate that we’re seeing another timing-dependent bug in the Win10 1803 installer. Why this bug took out so many copies of Avast — and what “other software” mentioned by Vlcek may be affected — remains a mystery. Of course, Microsoft isn’t saying anything. Gcdrm on Reddit wraps up his coverage with this statement: In response to all the people who have written comments with their thanks and success, and all the people who have emailed my business with similar thanks, including those who have offered to donate to us or to charity in exchange for the free advice, and so on: <3 pay it forward support small and independent businesses Here, here. Thx to @Microfix, Günter Born and Martin Brinkmann. Got problems with 1803? Don’t we all. Join us on the AskWoody Lounge. Source: Avast blames Microsoft for Win10 1803 upgrade blue screens, nonsensical options (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  15. Apps already removed by Google, Avast says Some of the apps had several reviews revealing their malicious activity Security company Avast discovered no less than 26 apps on the Google Play Store that included adware forcing ads on compromised systems, using special behavior to make it harder for users to remove the infection. The apps were based on the Cordova development framework and used various developer names, most likely in an attempt to avoid having all of them removed at once by Google. They were published in a wide variety of categories, like cryptocurrency related, currency converters, weather, and fitness. Many recorded several thousand downloads. Once downloaded on an Android device and launched for the first time, the apps removed their icons from the home screen, probably to make it more difficult for users to remove then, but also to make it harder to figure out which app was pushing the malicious behavior. Ads on the lock screen They started showing ads, even on the home and lock screens, while also collecting information like unique identifier, app package name, and Android OS version. All information was sent to a remote server, and in some instances, Avast says that apps also waited for links from a second remote server, most likely to download additional apps. “Based on the information the apps send back to the server, we don’t think this information was being used to spy on the user, but rather to confirm the phone’s had the right configuration to send payloads to, or to make sure ads could be displayed properly,” Avast says. Many of the apps that were downloaded following the adware infection have relevant reviews posted by users whose devices were compromised and were forced to install additional payloads. Additionally, there were also 5-star reviews on some occasions, but Avast says these reviews were most likely fake. Google has already removed all these apps from the Google Play Store, and users who want to uninstall these apps need to do it from the Store since the icon on the home screen was already gone. Source
  16. Online installers (recommended): http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup.exe Offline installers: http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup_offline.exe Avast v18.4.2338 - 2018-05-10 - Detection dialogues for Anti-exploit and Anti-rootkit Shields - My Licenses section - Dropdown menu in top bar - Earn Rewards program - Wi-Fi Inspector redesign - GDPR compliance - Fixed a few crashes related to Firewall drivers - "Scanning in progress" is no longer reported in tray after install - Toaster from Game Mode is not shown when Silent Mode is enabled - UI not responding when shields are disabled - Behavior Shield crashes
  17. Online installers (recommended): http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup.exe Offline installers: http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup_offline.exe
  18. The Most Trusted Security 220 million people choose AVAST to keep them safe online – more than any security company. avast! is the most trusted name in the antivirus industry, actively protecting more than 220 million people around the world. We’ve been protecting devices and data for over 25 years, in over 40 languages, on every populated continent. Need more than that? Secure even your financial transactions Your money really deserves a solid level of protection against theft. With avast! SafeZone, you can set your favorite banking or shopping sites to automatically launch in a ‘virtual window’, to ensure that all of your sensitive financial transactions stay private. Perfect for auction sites, buying concert tickets, booking with hotels or airlines, online gaming, or any sort of monetary transfer, it now has a sleeker look and is super-easy to launch and use. And if that’s not enough… Increase your security by automatically updating other programs on your PC Hackers count on people to use outdated versions of such applications as browsers or PDF readers, so most virus and malware threats exploit security holes that newer versions fix. As it’s annoying but vital to update all those programs manually, Premier’s automatic Software Updater does it for you – to make sure you’re using the latest versions to close those security holes. Features Intelligent Antivirus With new DynaGen technology Anti-malware Protection Plus anti-spyware & anti-rootkit SafeZone For secured payments & banking Silent Firewall Against hacker attacks Anti-spam Against phishing & scam emails Automatic Software Updater Keeps other programs updated AccessAnywhere Access your PC over the Internet Data Shredder For a military-grade permanent data erasure Key features Changelog-New or Changelog-All Homepage OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 / 8.1 / 10 (x86-x64) Language: ML / ENG / RUS Medicine: Trial reset / License | Download Final avast! Antivirus Free | Download Final avast! Pro | Download Final avast! Internet Security | Download Final avast! Premier | Download Beta avast! Antivirus Free | Download Beta avast! Pro | Download Beta avast! Internet Security | Download Beta avast! Premier | Download Avast! Clear Download Hactivator for Premium & Internet Security version (NEW!): See @coua post. Hactivator 2018 yet to be released.
  19. The Most Trusted Security 220 million people choose AVAST to keep them safe online – more than any security company. avast! is the most trusted name in the antivirus industry, actively protecting more than 220 million people around the world. We’ve been protecting devices and data for over 25 years, in over 40 languages, on every populated continent. Need more than that? Secure even your financial transactions Your money really deserves a solid level of protection against theft. With avast! SafeZone, you can set your favorite banking or shopping sites to automatically launch in a ‘virtual window’, to ensure that all of your sensitive financial transactions stay private. Perfect for auction sites, buying concert tickets, booking with hotels or airlines, online gaming, or any sort of monetary transfer, it now has a sleeker look and is super-easy to launch and use. And if that’s not enough… Increase your security by automatically updating other programs on your PC Hackers count on people to use outdated versions of such applications as browsers or PDF readers, so most virus and malware threats exploit security holes that newer versions fix. As it’s annoying but vital to update all those programs manually, Premier’s automatic Software Updater does it for you – to make sure you’re using the latest versions to close those security holes. Features Key features Changelog Homepage OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 / 8.1 / 10 (x86-x64) Language: ML / ENG / RUS Medicine: Trial reset / License | Download Final avast! Antivirus Free | Download Final avast! Pro | Download Final avast! Internet Security | Download Final avast! Premier | Download Beta avast! Antivirus Free | Download Beta avast! Pro | Download Beta avast! Internet Security | Download Beta avast! Premier | Download Avast! Clear Download Hactivator for Premium & Internet Security version (NEW!):
  20. Avast bundles CCleaner with Avast Free Antivirus Avast acquired Piriform, the maker of CCleaner and other popular programs in July 2017. The Czech security company is known for its line of free and commercial security products for Windows and other operating system, and for acquiring the security company AVG in a billion Dollar deal. Piriform released CCleaner more than a decade ago, and the program grew quickly to become one of the most popular cleaning programs for Windows. The company's infrastructure was compromised in September, and a malicious version of CCleaner was distributed from company servers for about a month as a consequence. Avast and Piriform were quick to point out that Piriform would continue to develop CCleaner and other products, and that Piriform products would be maintained separately from Avast's own software catalog. Avast did hint at synergies however in the acquisition announcement but did not reveal more than that back then. If you have downloaded and installed CCleaner on Windows recently -- the free version of the program that comes with an installer will do -- you may have identified one of the synergies already. The CCleaner installer comes with adware offers. This has been the case for years, and many experienced users avoided this by using the portable version of the application instead. Source
  21. What's new: - Now you can send feedback and bug reports from Settings > About - Recycle Bin content can now be shredded via Windows contextual menu (Avast Premier only) - Redesigned Scan & Shields screens in the Protection menu for easier navigation - Redesigned Avast Passwords UI for easier use - More detailed status reporting to Windows Security Center in Windows 10 Fall Creators Update - Nested virtualization support for AMD CPUs - Better proxy detection by setup and update from Windows settings Fixed: - Fixed a problem with white UI (you might see more processes AvastUI.exe now, but that's OK) - Sensitive Data Shield now works with Windows XP and Vista - Anti-Phishing Protection in Web Shield now works with Windows XP - Clicking Scan Details in the Notification Center no longer starts another scan - Fixed Avast service crash when a license expires - Fixed performance scan in Performance > Cleanup Premium - Fixed issue where Behavior Shield sometimes cut off a user’s Internet connection - False positives can now be reported directly from threat detection warnings (File Shield) - Fixed boot issue on Windows XP when Virtual PC driver is installed - Fixed BSOD caused by conflict between DELL percsas3 and Avast Self-defense drivers How to install: 1. Update from your existing Avast version via Settings -> Update -> Update program 2. Or you can download and install from here Online installers (recommended): http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup.exe Offline installers: http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup_offline.exe
  22. What's new: - Fixed issues with deleting Firewall rules during program update - Fixed issues with Passive mode - Added support for custom folders in Ransomware shield - Fixed repeating scheduled scans - Fixed update action from Windows Security Center - Polishing of Virus Chest - Fixed issue with Gmail signature (007 error) that was breaking outgoing emails - Fixed Firewall new network toaster to set the correct profile How to install: 1. Update from your existing Avast version via Settings -> Update -> Update program 2. Or you can download and install from here Online installers (recommended): http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup.exe Offline installers: http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup_offline.exe
  23. Official Announcement/News: CCleaner v5.36 Changelog: v5.36.6278 (24 Oct 2017) Browser Cleaning - Firefox: updated Session cleaning rule to support changes in Firefox 56.0 - Chrome (& Chromium): updated Internet History cleaning rule to clean user activity data - Opera: updated Internet History cleaning rule to clean user activity data Default Cleaning Rules - Windows Explorer: Most Recently Used documents and other MRU files no longer cleaned by default - Windows Defender: Scan history no longer cleaned by default - Microsoft Office: MRUs no longer cleaned by default - Edge, Chrome/Chromium, Firefox, Opera, Safari, Thunderbird: Current session data no longer cleaned by default Emergency Updater - Added new executable: "CCUpdate.exe" - Added new Windows Scheduled Task: "CCleaner Update" History https://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/version-history Standard Edition https://download.piriform.com/ccsetup536.exe Professional Edition https://download.piriform.com/ccsetup536pro.exe https://download.piriform.com/pro/ccsetup536_pro.exe Technician Edition https://download.piriform.com/te/ccsetup536_te.exe Business Edition https://download.piriform.com/be/ccsetup536_be_trial.exe https://download.piriform.com/be/ccsetup536_be.exe Business Edition MSI x64 https://download.piriform.com/be/ccsetup536_x64_be.msi Business Edition MSI x86 https://download.piriform.com/be/ccsetup536_x86_be.msi Slim v5.36 https://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/download/slim/downloadfile Portable https://www.piriform.com/ccleaner/download/portable/downloadfile Winapp2.ini: https://github.com/MoscaDotTo/Winapp2/blob/master/Winapp2.ini Other Links: https://d1k4dgg08m176h.cloudfront.net/te/ccsetup536_te.exe https://d1k4dgg08m176h.cloudfront.net/pro/ccsetup536_pro.exe https://d1k4dgg08m176h.cloudfront.net/be/ccsetup536_be.exe https://d1k4dgg08m176h.cloudfront.net/ccn/CCNPro208_Setup.exe CCleanerv5.36.6278 crack & activator&Core keygen& DefoX bundel patch - shared by hacker7: Site: https://www.upload.ee Sharecode[?]: /files/7589994/ccleaner_med.zip.html CCleaner Keygen - CORE - shared by Alv37: Site: https://yadi.sk Sharecode[?]: /d/KCqC0e-03Kwd3D CCleaner Mod by @knowledge - Emergency Update Removed, portable Site: https://www.upload.ee Sharecode[?]: /files/7590273/ccleaner.rar.html Portable CCleaner Professional 5.36.6278 Plus 32-64 bit Multilingual Online - Or Technician or Business By PortableAppZ Download Portable CCleaner Online (0.8 MB) Site: https://www.upload.ee Sharecode[?]: /files/6675592/CCleaner_Portable_xxx_pro-be-te_32-64-bit_Multilingual_Online.exe.html Select Edition and enter: 536 Winapp2 included. Extract and run *Portable. Language set by launcher according UserDefaultLang (if you don't want: write UserDefaultLang=false in *Portable.ini). Technician Portable - Multilang - FC Portables:
  24. Hackers broke into British company Piriform’s free software for optimizing computer performance last month potentially allowing them to control the devices of more than two million users, the company and independent researchers said on Monday. The malicious program was slipped into legitimate software called CCleaner, which is downloaded for personal computers and Android phones as often as five million times a week. It cleans up junk programs and advertising cookies to speed up devices. CCleaner is the main product made by London’s Piriform, which was bought in July by Prague-based Avast, one of the world’s largest computer security vendors. At the time of the acquisition, the company said 130 million people used CCleaner. A version of CCleaner downloaded in August included remote administration tools that tried to connect to several unregistered web pages, presumably to download additional unauthorized programs, security researchers at Cisco’s (CSCO.O) Talos unit said. Talos researcher Craig Williams said it was a sophisticated attack because it penetrated an established and trusted supplier in a manner similar to June’s “NotPetya” attack on companies that downloaded infected Ukrainian accounting software. “There is nothing a user could have noticed,” Williams said, noting that the optimization software had a proper digital certificate, which means that other computers automatically trust the program. In a blog post, Piriform confirmed that two programs released in August were compromised. It advised users of CCleaner v5.33.6162 and CCleaner Cloud v1.07.3191 to download new versions. A spokeswoman said that 2.27 million users had downloaded the August version of CCleaner while only 5,000 users had installed the compromised version of CCleaner Cloud. Piriform said that Avast, its new parent company, had uncovered the attacks on Sept. 12. A new, uncompromised version of CCleaner was released the same day and a clean version of CCleaner Cloud was released on Sept. 15, it said. The nature of the attack code suggests that the hacker won access to a machine used to create CCleaner, Williams said. CCleaner does not update automatically, so each person who has installed the problematic version will need to delete it and install a fresh version, he said. Williams said that Talos detected the issue at an early stage, when the hackers appeared to be collecting information from infected machines, rather than forcing them to install new programs. Piriform said it had worked with U.S. law enforcement to shut down a server located in the United States to which traffic was set to be directed. It said the server was closed down on Sept. 15 “before any known harm was done”. Source
  25. stable version 17.6.2310 has just been released. What's new: - Improved Anti-Phishing prevents you from falling victim to scams and fake sites (no browser extension needed!) - New standalone Avast Cleanup Premium product with improved cleaning (to be rolled out in stages) - We now recommend scanning for hidden network threats when you first connect to a new network - Our systray icon now shows when you have a security notification - Improved threat detections are now more visible and more informative about threats Online installers (recommended): http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_pro_antivirus_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup.exe Offline installers: http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_free_antivirus_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_pro_antivirus_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_internet_security_setup_offline.exe http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avast_premier_antivirus_setup_offline.exe Avast Clear (Uninstall Utility) http://files.avast.com/iavs9x/avastclear.exe
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