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  1. All Activation Windows 7-8-10 v19.3 - 2018 All methods of activation in the hand tested after the "anti-piracy" KB971033 update DG Win & Soft offers you a complete collection of programs and ways to Activate Windows. All methods and programs personally verified by us many times and we can safely recommend them to you. NOTE: All programs must be Run as Administrator! Additional Information: - If you have a direct hand, you want to activate in the Off-line mode and no longer bother to search for keys every six months, then you are prepared activation via firmware BIOS. But be careful, because if your not the right things, you have a chance to bungle the operation and will have to contact the service center. And keep in mind that for every BIOS (AMI, Award, Phoenix) has its own specific program (AMI - amitool, etc.), what is your BIOS can see when you boot the computer. - If you do not want to make any changes either in your "iron", or in the Windows itself, and that your activation is not distinguished by anything from legal activation, your choice of KMS server. With the use of virtual machines, this method can also be called Off-line. But you should know that this method of activation for six months and 180 days, you again have to repeat it. Also, this method only and Professional version Enterprise - If you did not accept neither the first nor the second of our suggested methods you can use the activators. Without going into too much detail, we can say that activators emulate the BIOS with slicom 2.1. But no one gives a guarantee that Microsoft will not release a patch or update that will detect the presence of emulation and reset the activation. We recommend to start with Windows 7 Activator Loader eXtreme Edition (Napalum), because He has a huge number of settings and features and good will activate automatically What's new in the assembly: Updated KMS section All new marked as (New) Added build option in the form of installation executable file List of programs: Office 2013-2016 C2R (New) Office 2013-2016 C2R License v1.04 (New) Garbage Collector v1.3.4 (New) PIDKey v2.1.2.1017 MSActBackUp v1.2.3 Microsoft Product Keys 2.6.3 Re-Loader Activator 3.0 Beta 3 KMS Tools 08/07/2018 by Ratiborus (New) KMSAuto Lite 1.3.4 KMSAuto Net 2016 1.5.3 KMSmicro WO w7 v1.0.1 KMSpico 10.2.0 Final SuperMini_KMS AAct v3.8.4 (New) AAct Network 1.0.1 (New) Windows 7 Loader eXtremev3.503 Re-Loader Activator 2.6 Final Microsoft Toolkit 2.6.2 ODIN 1.3.7 by secr9tos GUI MBR SLIC Loader 0.621 v1.2 Windows Loader v2.2 WindSLIC-UEFI-SLIC-injector SLIC 2.1 BINS FAQ on creating firmware SLIC_ToolKit_V3.2 Programs for firmware Resetting the trial period (rearm) Three-component activation What's New in Build v19.3: • Added a new language to the shell • Now you can switch the language to English (US) and back to Russian (RU) (the switch is in the top panel) • A new kind of activator for the office + Garbage Collector • Updated other KMS • All marked with (New) Language: Russian, English OS: Windows (XP), Windows (Vista), Windows (7), Windows (8), Windows (10). Download - 326 MB: Site: https://sendit.cloud Sharecode[?]: /paezalxzmnzl Site: https://www.multiup.eu/ Sharecode[?]: download/bdd2bb77d29465432d86ac72a2b664c3/all-activation-windows-7-8-10-v19-3-20_-p2p.rar
  2. All Activation Windows 7-8-10 v19.6 - 2018 All methods of activation in the hand tested after the "anti-piracy" KB971033 update DG Win & Soft offers you a complete collection of programs and ways to Activate Windows. All methods and programs personally verified by us many times and we can safely recommend them to you. NOTE: All programs must be Run as Administrator! Additional Information: - If you have a direct hand, you want to activate in the Off-line mode and no longer bother to search for keys every six months, then you are prepared activation via firmware BIOS. But be careful, because if your not the right things, you have a chance to bungle the operation and will have to contact the service center. And keep in mind that for every BIOS (AMI, Award, Phoenix) has its own specific program (AMI - amitool, etc.), what is your BIOS can see when you boot the computer. - If you do not want to make any changes either in your "iron", or in the Windows itself, and that your activation is not distinguished by anything from legal activation, your choice of KMS server. With the use of virtual machines, this method can also be called Off-line. But you should know that this method of activation for six months and 180 days, you again have to repeat it. Also, this method only and Professional version Enterprise - If you did not accept neither the first nor the second of our suggested methods you can use the activators. Without going into too much detail, we can say that activators emulate the BIOS with slicom 2.1. But no one gives a guarantee that Microsoft will not release a patch or update that will detect the presence of emulation and reset the activation. We recommend to start with Windows 7 Activator Loader eXtreme Edition (Napalum), because He has a huge number of settings and features and good will activate automatically What's new in the assembly: Updated KMS section All new marked as (New) Added build option in the form of installation executable file List of programs: Office 2013-2016 C2R 6.2 (New) Office 2013-2016 C2R License v1.05 (New) Garbage Collector v1.3.4 PIDKey v2.1.2.1017 MSActBackUp v1.2.3 Microsoft Product Keys 2.6.3 Re-Loader Activator 3.0 Beta 3 KMS Tools 01.03.2018 by Ratiborus (New) KMSAuto Lite 1.3.5.2 (New) KMSAuto Net 2016 1.5.3 KMSmicro WO w7 v1.0.1 KMSpico 10.2.0 Final SuperMini_KMS AAct v3.8.5(New) AAct Network 1.0.1 Windows 7 Loader eXtremev3.503 Re-Loader Activator 2.6 Final Microsoft Toolkit 2.6.2 ODIN 1.3.7 by secr9tos GUI MBR SLIC Loader 0.621 v1.2 Windows Loader v2.2 WindSLIC-UEFI-SLIC-injector SLIC 2.1 What's New in Build v19.6: AAct 3.8.5 KMS Tools 01.03.2018 KMSAuto Lite 1.3.5.2 Office 2013-2016 C2R License v1.0.5 Office 2013-2016 C2R Install v6.0.2 All marked with (New) Language: Russian, English OS: Windows (XP), Windows (Vista), Windows (7), Windows (8), Windows (10). Download - 327.61 MB: Site: https://openload.co Sharecode[?]: /f/5J9vMtSwvdE/ALTT1962018-MW.rar Pwd: www.megamw.com
  3. WPD v1.1.582 Hi there! If you are here you have probably heard about rather tricky and complex Windows 10 privacy settings and how much data it can collect without user’s knowledge or consent. So, we have tried to resolve this problem and created WPD – a tweaker that contains all main settings in one place! You can customize Group Policy, Services and Tasks, responsible for data collection and sending, as you like. And furthermore, if you want, you can block a bunch of Microsoft's ip's to which data is sent. Disable Windows features and make various tweaks Wrapped in a clean and attractive interface, this program provides you with intuitive and practical options for tweaking your computer, whether you're running Windows 7 or 10. It doesn't require installation so you can copy the downloaded package to a USB flash drive to directly launch it on any PC without setup. Administrative rights are required, though. The main app menu is brought up to the screen at startup, allowing you to access the privacy-related features, firewall settings, apps to uninstall, or other tweaks to make. Configure privacy, firewall and app settings When it comes to privacy matters, you can deactivate the steps recorder, advertising ID, search companion, telemetry, Windows Error Reporting, handwriting auto learning, OneDrive (for file storage), and others. Some of the options displayed here might seem confusing. However, you don't have to look up definitions on the web since WPD shows descriptions in tooltips next to each option. Otherwise, you can disable everything listed here with the click of a button. As far as firewall settings are concerned, Windows Privacy Dashboard can be instructed to block Windows telemetry, third-party apps and Windows Updates from establishing Internet connections. If you change your mind and wish to reset these options to default, you can simply delete the newly created rules. Uninstall unwanted apps and perform tweaks Only Modern UI apps can be uninstalled with the aid of this utility, whether they came bundled with the operating system or got installed from other sources. Lastly, the tweaker gives you the possibility to hide sync provider notifications, allow the swap file to be cleared during restart, and prevent apps from using your camera, microphone and other devices. Taking everything into consideration, WPD turns out to be a straightforward and useful system tweaker. It enabled and disabled system settings without any issues on Windows 10 in our tests. WPD is free, totally portable, has a nice user-friendly interface, and doesn't contain any advertisement or malicious code. Currently we don't have a code signing certificate, so Widnows SmartScreen might be little nervous, just skip it. Supported OS: Windows 10 Enterprise 1709, 1703, 1607 Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB 2016, 2015 Windows 10 Pro 1709, 1703, 1607 Windows 10 Home 1709, 1703 Windows 8-8.1 Windows 7 Screenshots: Changelog: 1.1.582 - 10/18/2017 Added Fall Creators Update support. Added command line arguments. For more info check Readme file inside the archive. Added warning dialog box when trying to delete all apps. Fixed work on Windows 7 and Windows 8 Home. Updated build-in firewall rules. Firewall notification icon now requires only the first rule to be applied. Added notification label showing the date of the latest available rule (built-in or online). User interface improvements. Bug fixes. 1.1.512 - 08/09/2017 Updated build-in firewall rules. Minor fixes. Preparing for the Fall Creators Update. 1.1.475 - 07/03/2017 Appx package errors no longer terminate WPD. 1.1.474 - 07/02/2017 Added ability to create system restore point. Added new settings to the Tweaker tab. Added Windows 8-8.1 support. Updated build-in firewall rules. Better error handling. Minor fixes. 1.1.451 - 06/10/2017 Updated firewall rules. User interface improvements. 1.1.435 - 05/24/2017 Added new firewall tab. Added feedback button. Updated firewall rules. User interface improvements. 1.0.395 - 04/14/2017 Code has been rewritten and optimized. New UI. Added ability to delete built-in Windows Store apps. Added Switch All button to the privacy tab. Added full support of Windows 10 Home. Added new settings to the tweaker tab. Home: https://getwpd.com/ Download: https://getwpd.com/get/latest.zip Firewall rules: Oct 17, 2017 CRC32: 0FF17F90 gHacks.net Review: Control Windows 10 Privacy with WPD
  4. All Activation Windows 7-8-10 v17.0 - 2017 All methods of activation in the hand tested after the "anti-piracy" KB971033 update DG Win & Soft offers you a complete collection of programs and ways to Activate Windows. All methods and programs personally verified by us many times and we can safely recommend them to you. NOTE: All programs must be Run as Administrator! Additional Information: - If you have a direct hand, you want to activate in the Off-line mode and no longer bother to search for keys every six months, then you are prepared activation via firmware BIOS. But be careful, because if your not the right things, you have a chance to bungle the operation and will have to contact the service center. And keep in mind that for every BIOS (AMI, Award, Phoenix) has its own specific program (AMI - amitool, etc.), what is your BIOS can see when you boot the computer. - If you do not want to make any changes either in your "iron", or in the Windows itself, and that your activation is not distinguished by anything from legal activation, your choice of KMS server. With the use of virtual machines, this method can also be called Off-line. But you should know that this method of activation for six months and 180 days, you again have to repeat it. Also, this method only and Professional version Enterprise - If you did not accept neither the first nor the second of our suggested methods you can use the activators. Without going into too much detail, we can say that activators emulate the BIOS with slicom 2.1. But no one gives a guarantee that Microsoft will not release a patch or update that will detect the presence of emulation and reset the activation. We recommend to start with Windows 7 Activator Loader eXtreme Edition (Napalum), because He has a huge number of settings and features and good will activate automatically What's new in the assembly: Updated KMS section All new marked as (New) Added build option in the form of installation executable file List of programs: PIDKey v2.1.2.1017 MSActBackUp 1.1.0 Microsoft Product Keys 2.6.3 Re-Loader Activator 3.0 Beta 3 KMS Tools 12/10/2017 by Ratiborus (New) KMSAuto Lite 1.3.3 KMSAuto Net 2016 1.5.1 2017 KMSmicro WO w7 v1. 0.1 KMSpico 10.2.0 Final SuperMini_KMS AAct v3.7 (New) Windows 7 Loader eXtremev3.503 Re-Loader Activator 2.6 Final Microsoft Toolkit 2.6.2 ODIN 1.3.7 by secr9tos GUI MBR SLIC Loader 0.621 v1.2 Windows Loader v2.2 WindSLIC-UEFI-SLIC-injector SLIC 2.1 BINS FAQ for creating the firmware SLIC_ToolKit_V3.2 Programs for the firmware Reset of the trial period (rearm) Three-component activation Language: Russian, English OS: Windows (XP), Windows (Vista), Windows (7), Windows (8), Windows (10). Download - 490.6 MB: Site: https://www.multiup.eu/en Sharecode[?]: /download/00334f75cc207f13a42d28f9a05454eb/All.activation.Windows.7-8-10.v17.0-P2P.iso
  5. vissha

    8GadgetPack 24.0 Final

    8GadgetPack makes it possible to use gadgets on Windows 10 / 8.1 / 8. 8GadgetPack - a tool that will help bring back the familiar gadgets on the desktop in Windows 8, which will help you quickly get the right information (clock, calendar, weather, currency exchange rates, system, and so on). Gadgets are installed in the same simple manner as earlier. Included with the program are 45 gadgets (official from Microsoft, as well as the most popular), also included is a gadget 7 Sidebar, which mimics the Sidebar gadgets Windows Vista. The program has a set of standard and some additional gadgets, and also supports the installation of new ones. Feature of the program: handy window c settings "8GadgetPack Tools", which contains the following options: - Disable startup programs; - Reset all the gadgets (back to how things were after the installation); - Visit the website of the program; - Leave a review; - Uninstall applications Version History: 2017/10/07: Version 24.0 released. Some compatibility bugfixes for the upcoming Windows 10 version in October. Also fixed some bugs that might occur if you use Clipboarder and Word/Excel (it's actually not Clipboarders fault, but I guess MS will never fix these bugs. So I added a workaround.). Updated some gadgets. Homepage: https://8gadgetpack.net/ Download: https://8gadgetpack.net/download230/8GadgetPackSetup.msi
  6. If you have Windows 8.1 set to update automatically, you may find you can no longer sign in to your PC with a Microsoft account. Looks like the cause is KB 4038792, the September monthly rollup. OpenClipArt-Vectors (CC0) This month’s Patch Tuesday brought some weird Windows bugs, but this one’s probably the worst. I’m seeing reports all over the web that folks running Windows 8.1 aren’t able to log in to their computers using a Microsoft account. Microsoft’s response at this point is that they’re aware of the problem, but if you want to use your machine, you need to log on with a local account. Woody Leonhard/IDG That isn’t a whole lot of help for people who haven’t set up a local account or need to get to something on the machine that’s only available to the Microsoft account. More than a week ago, in a reply on the Microsoft Answers forum, Microsoft employee Yolvi Ell laid the blame firmly at the foot of this month’s Windows 8.1 update: This is a known bug in Windows 8.1 after the latest September update. Our Support Engineers are already looking into it and doing their best to resolve it as quickly as possible so as to minimize the inconvenience to our customers. That would seem to implicate KB 4038792, the 2017-09 monthly rollup for Windows 8.1 and Server 2012 R2. It isn’t clear at this point if the bug also affects the September security-only update for Windows 8.1, KB 4038793. Ell goes on to say, as of early Monday morning: As of the moment, affected Windows 8.1 users may use a local account instead of a Microsoft account while our engineers are fixing the bug. We have not yet received any news about when the fix will be released. We'll update this thread once it's available. How widespread is the problem? I see Microsoft Answers forum posts going back to Sept. 13, the day after the patch was released, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here and here. There’s a lengthy TechNet thread here. There are discussions on Bleepingcomputer, MS Power User and Windows Central, as well as an early Japanese-language post on livedoor.jp. Those posts describe various parts of the problem, but the common denominator seems to be an unexpected change at the time of this month’s Windows 8.1 security update. Microsoft is fully aware that their Windows 8.1 customers are getting hung out to dry. Instead of answers, we’re getting pablum. Still using Windows 8.1? We feel your pain. Drop by the AskWoody Lounge. Source: Win 8.1 monthly rollup leaves customers unable to use Microsoft account (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  7. It's like the c:\con\con bug all over again. Those of you with long memories might remember one of the more amusing (or perhaps annoying) bugs of the Windows 95 and 98 era. Certain specially crafted filenames could make the operating system crash. Malicious users could use this to attack other people's machines by using one of the special filenames as an image source; the browser would try to access the bad file, and Windows would promptly fall over. It turns out that Windows 7 and 8.1 (and Windows Vista, but that's out of support anyway) have a similar kind of bug. They can be taken advantage of in the same kind of way: certain bad filenames make the system lock up or occasionally crash with a blue screen of death, and malicious webpages can embed those filenames by using them as image sources. If you visit such a page (in any browser), your PC will hang shortly after and possibly crash outright. The Windows 9x-era bug was due to an error in the way that operating systems handled special filenames. Windows has a number of filenames that are "special" because they don't correspond to any actual file; instead, they represent hardware devices. These special filenames can be accessed from any location in the file system, even though they don't exist on-disk. While any of these special filenames would have worked, the most common one used to crash old Windows machines was con, a special filename that represents the physical console: the keyboard (for input) and the screen (for output). Windows correctly handled simple attempts to access the con device, but a filename included two references to the special device—for example, c:\con\con—then Windows would crash. If that file was referenced from a webpage, for example, by trying to load an image from file:///c:/con/con then the machine would crash whenever the malicious page was accessed. The new bug, which fortunately doesn't appear to afflict Windows 10, uses another special filename. This time around, the special filename of choice is $MFT. $MFT is the name given to one of the special metadata files that are used by Windows' NTFS filesystem. The file exists in the root directory of each NTFS volume, but the NTFS driver handles it in special ways, and it's hidden from view and inaccessible to most software. Attempts to open the file are normally blocked, but in a move reminiscent of the Windows 9x flaw, if the filename is used as if it were a directory name—for example, trying to open the file c:\$MFT\123—then the NTFS driver takes out a lock on the file and never releases it. Every subsequent operation sits around waiting for the lock to be released.Forever. This blocks any and all other attempts to access the file system, and so every program will start to hang, rendering the machine unusable until it is rebooted. As was the case nearly 20 years ago, webpages that use the bad filename in, for example, an image source will provoke the bug and make the machine stop responding. Depending on what the machine is doing concurrently, it will sometimes blue screen. Either way, you're going to need to reboot it to recover. Some browsers will block attempts to access these local resources, but Internet Explorer, for example, will merrily try to access the bad file. We couldn't immediately cause the same thing to occur remotely (for example, by sending IIS a request for a bad filename), but it wouldn't immediately surprise us if certain configurations or trickery were enough to cause the same problem. Microsoft has been informed, but at the time of publication has not told us when or if the problem will be patched. Article source
  8. vissha

    8GadgetPack 23.0 Final

    8GadgetPack makes it possible to use gadgets on Windows 10 / 8.1 / 8. Version History: Version 23.0 released. Made some usability tests and quite some issues came up! Added newsletter option so you can get notified about updates via mail. Fixed rare crash in Clipboarder when opening a link. Added workaround for a bug in MS Word when copying a formula while Clipboarder is running (Word crashes when the user copies a formula and then the textformat of the clipboard is requested. Clipboarder detects this now and skips the text formats). Added also another workaround for a minor bug in Word: When a certain clipboard format is requested Word adds a favorit inside the document. That format is now skipped as well. Fixed a bug with the "Enable unformatted paste" option in Clipboarder when used with the right shift-button. Clipboarder now handles images with transparency copied in browsers correctly. Added Date Time, Digitalclock, Turn off PC, CPU and Network Utilization Gadgets. Removed Google Mail gadget (it no longer works). You can place gadgets on the sidebar whereever you want now without snapping while holding Shift. Added workaround for a bug that caused several gadgets to fail sometimes during startup. Fixed a bug that caused gadgets to go behind the sidebar sometimes. Fixed many minor issues. Homepage: http://8gadgetpack.net/ Download: http://8gadgetpack.net/download230/8GadgetPackSetup.msi
  9. Bypass For Windows Update Lock For Next-Gen Processors Found A first workaround for the blocking of Windows Update on Windows 7 or 8.1 PCs with next-generation processors has been discovered. Microsoft blocked the delivery of Windows Updates recently to Windows 7 and 8.1 devices powered by a next-generation processor. The company announced the support change in January 2017. Broken down to the essentials, it means that Intel Kaby Lake and AMD Bristol Ridge processors are only support by Windows 10, and not older versions of Windows. To hammer that home, Microsoft made the decision to block Windows Update on Windows 7 or 8.1 PCs with those next generation processors. The company introduced patches, KB4012218 and KB4012219 for instance, which introduced process generation and hardware support detection on Windows 7 and 8.1 systems. Windows users who run Windows Update get the unsupported hardware error prompt when they try to scan for and download the latest patches for their -- still supported -- operating system. Bypass for Windows Update lock for next-gen processors GitHub user zeffy made the decision to take a closer look at how the actual blocking is done on the operating system level. What he did was the following: Download the Patch KB4012218 from Microsoft. Extract the content of the MSU file using the expand command line tool. Expand basically extracts all files that are part of an update file so that you can analyze each individually. This resulted in a long list of files. He used PowerShell to filter the files for anything starting with "wu" to filter out Windows Update related files. He then ran diff tools to compare the binaries of the files in the new update file with those on the actual operating system. He discovered the dynamic link library wuaueng.dll, and found the two functions IsCPUSupported(void) and IsDeviceServiceable(void) in it. Now that he found the culprits that blocked the installation of updates on machines with next generation processors, he came up with a solution for that. His preferred solution jumps over the whole "IsDeviceServiceable(void)" body so that Windows Update is notified that the CPU on the machine is supported. The solution requires the patching of the dll file. He has uploaded the patched files for 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 to the GitHub project page. The source code has been made available there as well for you to check. The patches come as scripts that you just need to run to make the necessary changes. Windows Update should work just like before then even on Windows 7 or Windows 8.1 systems with next generation processors Attention: it is recommended that you create a backup of the wuaueng.dll file before you patch it. Even better, create a backup of the system partition just to be on the safe side of things. One caveat of the method is that any new version of wuaueng.dll that Microsoft releases requires new patching. Microsoft may device other means to block updates on those systems as well in the future. (via Sergey) Now You: What's your take on Microsoft blocking updates for customer systems? Source
  10. Windows 7 reaching end of support in January 2020 Starting this month, Microsoft is no longer shipping updates for Windows 7 and 8.1 when new processors are detected, as the company is only supporting these chips on Windows 10. Part of Redmond’s strategy to encourage the transition to Windows 10, the blocking of updates on Windows 7 and 8.1 systems powered by processors like AMD’s Ryzen or Intel’s Kaby Lake, leaves users with no other option than to upgrade to the latest operating system. A notification that’s displayed to users when trying to update these systems provides them with instructions on how to perform the switch to Windows 10. “Your PC uses a processor that is designed for the latest version of Windows. Because the processor is not supported together with the Windows version that you are currently using, your system will miss the important security updates,” this notification reads. The benefits of moving to Windows 10 It goes without saying that without patches and security updates, systems remain vulnerable just like they are running an unsupported version of Windows, while at the same time missing all the opportunities of new technologies that are bundled into Windows 10. In terms of gaming, for example, users who are upgrading to Windows 10 can use not only the new DirectX 12, but also the Game mode that’s exclusively available in the Windows 10 Creators Update. This new feature boosts gaming performance by setting the game’s main process to high priority level, while also pushing other less critical processes to standby mode for reduced resource usage. Migrating to Windows 10 is a step that sooner or later everyone needs to make, especially because older operating systems are slowly but surely reaching end of support anyway. Windows 7, for example, is projected to stop receiving updates is January 2020, so users running it have less than 3 years to perform the switch to Windows 10. Source
  11. Windows XP Has More Users than Windows Vista and Windows 8 Combined, Avast Says Avast provides Windows usage data in latest report While it’s important to note that these figures come from computers running Avast, they do align with the statistics provided by research firms whose main activity is monitoring operating system usage, so there’s a good chance these are accurate. First and foremost, there’s leader Windows 7. According to Avast, the operating system launched in 2009 is currently powering more than 56 million computers where its antivirus product is installed, and this means a share of no less than 48.35 percent. Windows 10 is growing, the security firm says, and it managed to reach a share of 30.46 percent, which accounts for a little over 35 million devices running Avast security software. Windows XP still a super-popular choice But what’s a little more worrying for everyone, including here Microsoft, users, and Avast itself, is that Windows XP, which was launched in 2001 and no longer receives security updates since April 2014, is still running on more than 6.5 million computers. This means that it has a share of 5.64 percent, more than Windows 8 (2.51 percent) and Windows Vista (2.08 percent) combined. Windows 8 was launched in 2012 as Microsoft’s new revolution, but its small market share is mostly the result of most people choosing the free upgrade to Windows 8.1. The OS launched one year later has a share of 10.96 percent, which represents 12.7 million PCs running Avast. For what it’s worth, Windows Vista is also reaching end of support next month, so users who are still running this OS, and there are at least 2 million according to Avast, should already start planning the upgrade. Windows 10 is the safest bet right now, as Windows 7 itself is also projected to reach EOL in January 2020. Source
  12. Mark your calendar: Microsoft's promise to cut off Win7 and 8.1 support for the latest PCs will cause howls of pain next month Credit: wezlo Events of the past week have drawn into sharp focus the likely result of next month's patching cycle. If you have a Windows 7 or 8.1 PC that you bought, built, or upgraded in the past year or so, it would behoove you to understand exactly what Microsoft plans. Many people -- I'll raise my hand here -- thought that Skylake-based computers would continue to receive Windows 7 and 8.1 patches until the respective end-of-life. We are wrong. Let's start with the basics. Intel introduced its so-called 6th Generation Skylake processor in August 2015. It slowly replaced the older Broadwell series, all of which will continue to work with Win7 and 8.1. Skylake now is slowly being replaced by 7th Generation Kaby Lake processors, which will not get Win7 or 8.1 support from Microsoft. To date, Intel has released 50 or so different Skylake processors. There are also dozens of Kaby Lake processors, which were introduced in August 2016. On the AMD side there's a distinction made between the older Opteron series, the APU series (which includes Kaveri, Carrizo, and Bristol Ridge processors, named Athlon, Sempron, A4, A6, and E4) and the brand-new Ryzen processors, which are only now appearing on store shelves. Most observers say that 7th Generation AMD chips start with the Bristol Ridge APUs, which appeared in May, 2016. There's no change at all between the core architecture of the Carrizo and Bristol Ridge chips. As I'll explain later, the distinction between 6th Generation Carrizo and 7th Generation Bristol Ridge is pivotal. To see if you have a Bristol Ridge chip, as opposed to a Carrizo chip, use Speccy to find your APU model number, then look up your APU model number for Bristol Ridge desktop processors or portable processors. Where the troubles began The whole Windows 7/8.1 support mess started in January of last year, when Windows honcho Terry Myerson declared that "as new silicon generations are introduced, they will require the latest Windows platform at that time for support." At first, Myerson promised: Through July 17, 2017, Skylake devices on the supported list will also be supported with Windows 7 and 8.1. During the 18-month support period, these systems should be upgraded to Windows 10 to continue receiving support after the period ends. After July 2017, the most critical Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 security updates will be addressed for these configurations, and will be released if the update does not risk the reliability or compatibility of the Windows 7/8.1 platform on other devices. Screams from enterprise customers reached all the way to the hallowed halls of Redmond. The promised demise of Win7 on Skylake machines changed later in January, then in March 2016, and in August 2016 they changed again. As of August, Microsoft exec Shad Larsen promised: This policy change primarily applies to our commercial customers who are currently managing deployments with Windows 7 and Windows 8.1, and does not apply to customers running Windows 10 ... future silicon platforms, including Intel's upcoming 7th Gen Intel Core (Kaby Lake) processor family and AMD's 7th generation processors (e.g. Bristol Ridge) will only be supported on Windows 10, and all future silicon releases will require the latest release of Windows 10.... 6th Gen Intel Core devices on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 will be supported with all applicable security updates until the end of support for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1.... This change is made possible through the strong partnership with our OEM partners and Intel who will be performing security update validation testing and upgrade testing for 6th Gen Intel Core systems running Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 through the end of support dates. On the same day, Microsoft updated a list of Skylake systems supported on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 that includes links to manufacturer's websites, listing specific model numbers that the manufacturer commits to support with Windows 7 and 8.1 updates. The 12 deputized manufacturers and the links provided by Microsoft are: Acer ASUS Dell Epson (in Japanese) Fujitsu HP Lenovo LG (a Korean-language site that doesn't contain any model numbers) MouseComputer (in Japanese) NEC (in Japanese) Panasonic Positivo (in Brazilian Portuguese) Samsung Toshiba Wortmann (in German) VAIO (in Japanese) Sites like Dell's are just as confused as I was. Dell says, "Microsoft originally indicated Skylake support would end in 2017. Microsoft has now extended Skylake support for Windows 7 through January 14, 2020 and for Windows 8.1 through January 10, 2023." That isn't quite true. Microsoft has said that Dell will extend support for its listed Skylake systems through end-of-life for Win7 and 8.1. Here are the conclusions that I draw from Microsoft's statements: If you have a custom built machine with a Skylake processor, you're out of luck. Since the machine doesn't appear on this list of anointed PCs, Microsoft won't support Win7 or 8.1 on your machine. If you upgraded a machine to a Skylake processor, you're out of luck. If you bought a machine from a different manufacturer, or your specific machine doesn't appear on the manufacturer's indicated website, you're out of luck. Most people -- most manufacturers -- don't understand this. I didn't. I don't know what Microsoft intends to do with AMD chips. The way the announcements stand, AMD Bristol Ridge PCs won't have Win7 or 8.1 support, and there's no magic list of manufacturers or machines that are exempt from the ruling. Where does that leave you? So if you're running a recent-vintage PC and using Windows 7 or 8.1, what happens if you run afoul of the patch police? It's all well and good if Win7 is "no longer supported" on your PC, but what does that mean in real terms? Will your PC halt and catch fire? Thanks to several reports that I talked about yesterday, including the tales of woe from folks who installed a Monthly Rollup Preview, I'm willing to bet that the blockade will unfold like this: Step 1: April 10 rolls around, and about noon, Microsoft pushes its usual Patch Tuesday updates out the automatic update chute. Step 2: Those gullible (or trusting) enough to have Win7 or 8.1 Automatic Update turned on will get the April Monthly Rollup (that is, the "April 2017 Security Monthly Quality Rollup"), which will install the next time the machine's rebooted. Step 3: The Monthly Rollup installs itself and makes changes to Windows Update Agent, effectively preventing Windows Update from running again on this machine. The installer displays this message: IDG The machine won't be destroyed, if this scenario plays out the way I think it will. Your PC will just have Windows Update disabled. (Which some people view as a feature, not a problem, but I digress.) We're still poking and prodding on the AskWoody Lounge to see what, exactly, gets disabled. None of this is documented anywhere, of course. It's important to note that machines connected to a corporate Update Server (WSUS, SCCM, or the like) will only get the Monthly Rollup if it's pushed out by the admin. Even if Windows Update gets clobbered, it's unlikely that domain-managed PCs will suffer any ill effect, as they don't use Windows Update the same way most of us do. I have no idea how Microsoft intends to block Win7 updates on recent PCs attached to an update-managed domain. This scenario brings up an obvious question: Will your machine get update-kneecapped? I don't know. There's no program I know of that you can run (short of a Monthly Rollup Preview, which I never recommend) that will definitively say, "If you install the Monthly Rollup in April, Windows Update will get disabled." At this point, there's no warning either. No "Click here to install the Monthly Rollup and disable Windows Update going forward" safety net. All you get is a loud thud and that Unsupported hardware notice. Will Microsoft go ahead with this latest push to get well-heeled customers, with the latest hardware, to change to Windows 10? Microsoft's under no obligation to support Windows 7 and 8.1 on any hardware that appears at a future date. I think. But this approach, if it unfolds in this manner, is sure to rankle more-advanced users who have paid for both Windows 7 and for a shiny new CPU. We should know a lot more on April 10. Discussion continues on the AskWoody Lounge. Source: Microsoft will kill some Windows 7 and 8.1 support in April (InfoWorld - Woody Leonhard)
  13. Windows 8.1 with Bing - AKA CoreConnected x86/x64 ( Murphy78 ) Description from Murphy Installation Keys [ If needed ] --> http://pastebin.com/U2T8XFj8 Hash File info: X19-57134_SW_DVD9_NTRL_Win_with_Bing_8.1_32BIT_English_OEM.imgSize: 2.77 GBSHA1: 63422A198729941F47E7F3563197B1F3AC8C5640 File info: X19-57272_SW_DVD9_NTRL_Win_with_Bing_8.1_64BIT_English_OEM.imgSize: 3.71 GBSHA1: BDC1E5FDBC1FAD5FE26155BAB6DAB7D95F434DEA Language - en-US (United States locale) x86 http://usersfiles.com/yd0pt26mulh4magnet:?xt=urn:btih:cc9748e655915fbe107ca6196cebda51d544a108&dn=Windows+8.1+with+Bing+-+AKA+CoreConnected+x86&tr=udp%3A//tracker.openbittorrent.com%3A80&tr=udp%3A//tracker.publicbt.com%3A80&tr=udp%3A//tracker.istole.it%3A6969&tr=udp%3A//open.demonii.com%3A1337x64 http://usersfiles.com/o9x7w6g0x33y magnet:?xt=urn:btih:af8ffdaae70636719b0d70f1d30f1ba5359710b8&dn=Windows+8.1+with+Bing+-+AKA+CoreConnected+x64&tr=udp%3A//tracker.openbittorrent.com%3A80&tr=udp%3A//tracker.publicbt.com%3A80&tr=udp%3A//tracker.istole.it%3A6969&tr=udp%3A//open.demonii.com%3A1337i will test this if i had time :P Source
  14. As threatened, Microsoft is actively blocking Windows 7 and 8.1 updates on newer hardware, but users report some success in getting around the ban Credit: cnythxi / iStock Microsoft is carrying through on its threat to actively block Windows 7 and 8.1 updates on the latest Kaby Lake and Ryzen processors. Some folks are looking for ways to get around the block, and they appear to have had some success. We knew this day was coming. A year-old threat from Microsoft that “Windows 10 will be the only supported Windows platform” on Kaby Lake and Ryzen processors re-emerged last week. A thread on Reddit reported that folks who had the nerve to use Windows 7 or 8.1 would be blocked from updates if their PCs had the latest Intel Kaby Lake or AMD Ryzen processors. The blogosphere understandably went wild, even though nobody at that point had actually seen the block in action. That has now changed. Yesterday poster dave1977nj on AskWoody submitted screenshots of his attempts to install the "March 2017 Preview of Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems" (KB4012218) on his Kaby Lake PC. InfoWorld InfoWorld Of course I’ve long railed against installing Previews, and you’d be well-advised to avoid them, but the deeper question is what actually happened? The Win7 update history page says this Preview: Enabled detection of processor generation and hardware support when PC tries to scan or download updates through Windows Update. This is all well and good, but how does the detection work? Has Microsoft effectively blocked all security updates on Kaby Lake and Ryzen processors, or is it making life difficult for those users of the new hardware who want to stick with Windows 7 or 8.1? Poster abbodi86 sheds some light: The Preview Rollup itself block future usage of Windows Update on these processors, not that WU blocked Preview Rollup 🙂. All future rollups will have this restriction, so i guess it’s a lost cause. Manual installation (through dism, not msu) seems to be working fine In other words, by installing this Preview Rollup (and presumably all future Monthly Rollups), Windows Update itself has been changed, so it won’t work on Kaby Lake and Ryzen systems. Once the Preview Rollup is installed, Windows Update turns belly up, with a “could not search for new updates” message. Abbodi86 also says that in the future, Kaby Lake and Ryzen customers won’t be able to install the regular monthly security-only patches by manually downloading the month’s MSU file from the Microsoft Catalog and running the MSU file (an approach I call “Group B”). It isn’t clear to me what will happen when you try to run an MSU file directly, after installing KB 4102218 (or 4102219, the analogous Preview for Win 8.1). We probably won’t know for sure until the security-only patch for April appears. Using the DISM command to install security patches would be a bit convoluted, but possible, if worse comes to worst. It also isn’t clear to me if the Windows Update MiniTool (see Martin Brinkmann on ghacks) will continue to work, or if it can be modified to work. Poster ch100 says: This is an excellent question and the implications are very subtle. WUMT uses the Windows Update agent already installed, but can use any agent, without forcing an upgrade, as WU would do for example with 7.6.7600.256 being upgraded to 7.6.7600.320. I do not endorse this approach of not allowing the normal WU mechanism to complete, but it is a very interesting path to investigate. 🙂 If you’re thinking about using WUMT, please note this caution. Finally, it also isn’t clear to me if uninstalling KB 4012218 (or KB 4012219) will restore Windows Update to its original functionality. For years I’ve resisted disabling Windows Update and the wuauserv service. Windows Update and Microsoft Update pick up patches that manual scans frequently overlook, including IE and .Net patches, and many more subtle fixes. Updating Office without Microsoft Update would take the patience of Job. Some folks disable Windows Update to shut off the flow of unpredictable patches. But if Microsoft itself is going to disable Windows Update, who am I to argue? Look for the latest test results and head-scratchings on the AskWoody Lounge. Source: Search begins for workarounds to Microsoft's Win7/8.1 on Kaby Lake/Ryzen patch ban (InfoWorld - Woody Leonhard)
  15. IObit Start Menu 8 Pro - 1 Year[365 Days] Promo by BitsDuJour Overview: Before Windows 8 and Windows 10, life was so much simpler – to get started doing anything, you’d just click on the Start menu. But after upgrading your computer to these new operating systems, you figured out your first problem – no Start menu! Get it back quickly using today’s discount software promotion, Start Menu 8! Start Menu 8 brings the classic Start Menu to Windows 8 and Windows 10, and offers a powerful file search that’s 20% faster! What’s more, the background color of your new Start Menu will change to match your desktop background. And about that faster file search - Start Menu 8 lets you pin frequently used and recent files to the Start Menu so you don’t have to repeat your search every time! Ever go to click on something in Windows, only to accidentally click on an ad and jump to somewhere you never intended to go? Eliminate this situation by installing Start Menu 8, which offers a Start Menu completely free of advertising! Best of all, you can customize your Start Menu 8 settings with your own account picture, favorite applications, and even alter the way programs are displayed! Features: Get the Start Menu back in Windows 8/Windows 10 Enjoy a 20% faster file search Pin frequently used files to the Start Menu Eliminate distracting ads from the Start Menu Customize the Start Menu to your liking After you purchase you will receive a download link to install the software Download available for: Windows 10, 8, 7, Vista, XP More Info: Product Homepage Product Manual: Complete User Guide Links: Offer: http://www.bitsdujour.com/software/start-menu-8/buy=true Shared Key: Note: Limited Period Offer. The full version costs $7.99 annually. However, it is free for limited period. 24 Hours Giveaway. Only few hours left. Hurry. Current Status: Open. Terms: After you purchase Start Menu 8 it may be used for 12 months and will not function after that unless you renew your subscription. Upgrades to future versions of the software will require additional payment. Installing a new version may overwrite the existing version and invalidate your license key. Downloads: Offline Installer[MajorGeeks.com]: http://www.iobit.com/downloadcenter.php?product=iobit-startmenu8 Offline Installer[Direct] - Size: 11.4 MB: http://update.iobit.com/dl/sm8-setup.exe
  16. KB 4012982 says that Microsoft will prevent updates on the newer hardware, but has actually seen one of the error messages? Credit: Stuart Seeger It's hard to pin down the source of a flame war like the one currently underway in the Windows blog echo chamber. Yes, Microsoft's KB 4012982, published last week, says that Microsoft will actively block Win7 and 8.1 updates on the newer hardware. There's a mighty AMD Reddit thread on the topic. Bloggers are beating their chests about it, although Microsoft first warned about the direction more than a year ago. What I want to know: Have you seen the warning message? I've looked high and low and can't find anybody running a Kaby Lake or Ryzen processor (or Qualcomm 8996, for that matter) who's had their Win7 or 8.1 patches blocked. According to Microsoft, attempting to update Win7 or 8.1 on one of those newer machines should result in errors: When you try to scan or download updates through Windows Update, you receive the following error message: Unsupported Hardware Your PC uses a processor that isn't supported on this version of Windows and you won't receive updates. Additionally, you may see an error message on the Windows Update window that resembles the following: Windows could not search for new updates An error occurred while checking for new updates for your computer. Error(s) found: Code 80240037 Windows Update encountered an unknown error. A Win 8.1 user named JayzTwoCents posted a video on YouTube showing that he was able to install and update Win 8.1 on a Kaby Lake processor on Jan. 24. Has something changed since then? If Microsoft is blocking Win7 or 8.1 patches on Kaby Lake or Ryzen processors, will running through WSUS Offline Update -- which downloads and installs patches independently of Windows Update -- bypass the block? If you've been blocked, I'd sure like to hear about it. Post your real world results on the AskWoody Lounge. Source: Is Microsoft blocking Win7/8.1 updates on Kaby Lake and Ryzen chips? (InfoWorld - Woody Leonhard)
  17. Update : This Post is Less Active DEAD Now as the Microsoft Subscription got Expired! No doubt november_ra1n is Awesome and i am also a BIG FAN of HIM but sometimes, it feels that my download links should be directly from the Developer. So, here anyone can request MSDN's Original Downloads Links for almost all Microsoft Products (except some VL Editions) and anyone can provide Download Links only via PM [Private Message] directly to requester. Edit : Time for some more instructions as the thread is GROWING so the headache is. Please Visit the following link and find your desired content then make a request in the given example format only : MSDN Product Download Library Page Example Correct Request Format : ============================================================================= How to find desired M$ product in MSDN Download Library : ================================================================================================================== How to find desired M$ product's #FileID in MSDN Download Library : ========================================================================================================================================= Bonus Tip : Update 1 : Since anyone can Download Most of Microsoft Windows 7, 8.1 & 10's editions from Microsoft's Official TechBench program Webpage with a Little Exercise, i ADDED the asf's Thread because this one is also providing Direct Download Links (identical to MSDN) from the Developer itself..Remember !! that was the MAIN PURPOSE behind this thread. It will help some requesters as well as me also (because of Lack of Time, i am unable to reply most of time). CREDITS : @asf Update 2 : There is a TOOL called *Microsoft Windows and Office ISO Download Tool* is available from http://www.heidoc.net/ which can provide Download Links of Most of Microsoft Office ISOs and Microsoft Windows 7, 8.1 & 10's editions from Microsoft's Official server easily, i ADDED the Tool's Download Link below Thread Because this one is also providing Direct Download Links (identical to MSDN) from the Developer itself..Remember !! that was the MAIN PURPOSE behind this thread. It will help some requesters as well as me also (because of Lack of Time, i am unable to reply most of time). Download Microsoft Windows and Office ISO Download Tool PS :
  18. Microsoft Re-Releases Snooping Patches KB 2952664, KB 2976978 Earlier versions of the Win7 and 8.1 patches kicked off enhanced snooping routines, and there's no indication what's changed in these versions We don't know what KB 2952664 (for Windows 7) and KB 2976978 (for Windows 8.1) actually do. But both patches have been shown in the past to trigger a new Windows task called DoScheduledTelemetryRun. The patches appeared in the Automatic Update chute earlier todayas Optional, so they won't be installed unless you specifically check and install them. But in the past, the Optional versions have been converted rapidly to Recommended, and thus installed on most machines. The last release of KB 2952664 went from Optional to Recommend in a week. Microsoft's descriptions of the patches are quite bland: GWX, of course, is Microsoft's malware-like "Get Windows 10" campaign that plagued Windows 7 and 8.1 users last year. I last wrote about the patches on Oct. 5, 2016: The revision dates on the KB articles don't instill any confidence. When I wrote about KB 2952664 last October, I noted that the KB article was up to revision 25, dated Oct. 4, 2016. The current KB article, dated Feb. 9, 2017, is at revision 11. I have no idea what's up. Why is Microsoft releasing this CEIP diagnostic program on a Thursday? Why isn't it being held for next Tuesday's Monthly Rollup? Why does it fall outside the announced schedule of Security Only and Monthly Rollup patches? Why did the revision numbers change? But I do know that earlier versions of these patches triggered new snooping scans, whether the Customer Experience Improvement Program is enabled or not. And I do know that Microsoft hasn't documented much at all. Discussion continues on the AskWoody Lounge. AskWoody Lounge - Comments Source Alternate Source: Windows KB2652664 And KB2976978 Telemetry Updates Re-Released (Again)
  19. Here are the details on the undocumented patch that mysteriously appeared yesterday Credit: NARA Yesterday, I started receiving reports of a recommended update that suddenly appeared in the Windows Update listing for some Windows 7 and 8.1 machines. (As "recommended," it may appear in your Windows Update Optional list, or in your Important list.) There's no KB number, which means you can't uninstall it via the "Uninstall an update" dialog, and links from Windows Update turned up nonexistent pages. Running a search for "8/19/2016 10.1.2.80" through the Windows Update Catalog results in 55 different downloads, all of which appear to be identical. They all have the same filename, and a random hex file comparison came up with no differences (thx to td and DougCuk). The description in the Update Catalog says it's an "INTEL USB driver update released in August 2016," and individual files are for a wide variety of processors and USB Enhanced Host Controller types. The closest driver update I could find on the Intel site is the "Intel(R) Server Chipset Driver for Windows" version 10.1.2.77, dated Aug. 29. The dates don't line up, the version numbers don't jibe (10.1.2.77 on the Intel site, 10.1.2.80 in Windows Update), and the size is wrong (the Intel download is 2.71 MB, where the Windows Update download is 67 KB). AskWoody poster John Hillig, referencing the Viper site, says: Intel Chipset INF 10.1.2.77 -- 08/03/16 Is Not WHQL and has the chipset type CAT/INF files packaged into Intels SetupChipset.exe stand alone installer. Intel Chipset INF 10.1.2.80 -- 08/19/16 via Windows Update Is WHQL and is packaged as separate chipset type CAT/INF files for install by Windows INF installer. Which explains the differences in version numbers, dates, and file sizes. Overnight, Windows guru Günter Born took apart the download and came to some interesting conclusions. Writing on his blog Born's Tech and Windows World, he describes how the patch appears to be destined for Broadwell and Haswell chips and for "some hardware components." Tearing into an .inf file he found this description: ; ** Filename: AvotonUSB.inf ** ; ** Abstract: Assigns the null driver to devices ** ; ** for yellow-bang removal and ** ; ** brands Intel(R) devices ** Born examined many of the files and concludes, "The .inf files for new CPU chip sets contains a list of device ids for drivers, needed to support the CPU chipset." He concludes that the drivers -- null drivers, which don't do anything -- are placeholders that define device IDs for various motherboard components, getting rid of the yellow "!" in Device Manager. That seems innocuous enough, but it looks like the installer wipes out whatever device drivers may already exist. Born cites two examples: I found a case here, where the optional update replaced an already installed and needed SMBus driver -- so the user was no more able to read its DIMM temperature, using Intel Desktop Utilities. A 2nd incident has been reported as a user comment within my German blog post. The user reported, that his Wi-Fi adapter stalled after installing this optional update. Bottom line: At best, installing this patch will remove some of the yellow bangs in Device Manager. At worst it'll break an already-good driver. Avoid it. Source: Don't install this patch: Intel System 8/19/2016 12:00:00 AM 10.1.2.80 (InfoWorld - Woody Leonhard) Bottom line: Don’t install the ‘INTEL – System – 8/19/2016 12:00:00 AM – 10.1.2.80’ patch (AskWoody)
  20. It’s still too early to install the latest patches for Win7, 8.1, and Office, but next month things will get less complicated Credit: Thinkstock This is the last month we’ll see security bulletins from Microsoft—and I can’t wait. Patch numbers are currently interlocked, with security bulletins referencing KB numbers that aren’t available in the Windows 10 cumulative updates or in the Windows 7 or 8.1 security-only or monthly rollup patches. But hang in there, it will get less complicated next month. I hope. This month there were 12 security bulletins from Microsoft, six rated critical, six important, the obligatory Flash Player patch, updates for the Excel Viewer and the Office Compatibility Pack, and a bewildering array of previews, which you don’t want unless you’re testing software. There was also a welcome revamp in the way Win7 and 8.1 security-only and monthly rollup patches overlap/supersede each other. The Win10 1607 cumulative update KB 3206632, as explained yesterday, fixed a major internet connection bug. Here’s what you need to know about the other Patch Tuesday updates. There’s the usual massive list of Office 2003, 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2016 patches in KB 3208595, which combines the Dec. 6 non-security updates with the Dec. 13 security updates. Almost a hundred patches appear on the list. I haven’t heard of any problems with them, but the month is yet young. The SANS Internet Storm Center says that there are known exploits for four of this month’s patches – that’s the zero-day count. Two of the already-exploited patches are for Internet Explorer and Edge, which you probably aren’t using. One of them is for the .Net Framework patch KB 3205640 (more on that later). Leaving one “real” zero-day that most folks need to be concerned about: MS16-146 / KB 3204066, the security update for Microsoft Graphics Component. Tyler Reguly at Tripwire describes the issue this way: Two code execution vulnerabilities in the Windows Graphic component and an information disclosure in GDI. In addition to the vulnerability fixes, this update provides defense-in-depth changes that are not fully documented in the bulletin. It looks like the already-exploited hole is CVE-2016-7272, a remote code-execution vulnerability that we have very little published information about. If you see any in-the-real-world reports of exploits, let me know on AskWoody.com. Which brings me to the morass known as .Net Framework updates. In October we had separate patches for .Net 3.5.1 security-only, and for .Net 4.x security-only. This month, we have a security-only update for .Net 4.6.2, and a monthly rollup for all versions of .Net (including 4.6.2). If you’re running Win7, you can find the security-only patch for .Net 4.6.2, KB 3205394, in the Microsoft Update Catalog. Or you can find the monthly rollup via Windows Update. There’s a raging debate on AskWoody.com about the intrusive nature of .Net Framework Monthly Rollups. The general consensus is that most Windows users are OK installing the whole monthly rollup, instead of trying to pluck out the security-only portions. Finally, for those of you still running Vista, I have this advice from AskWoody contributor ER about speeding up your Windows Update scans: It looks like the KB3204723 security updates from MS security bulletin MS16-151 are the new Windows Update win32k.sys “speed-up” fixes for Windows Vista & Server 2008. Once again, KB3204723 is a new temporary “speedup” patch that will work from Dec. 13, 2016 to Jan. 9, 2017. As usual, I recommend you hold off on applying any of these patches until the initial carnage has run its course. When it’s safe to patch, I’ll post full details, including download links for those of you who wish to stay in the “Group B” security-only camp. The discussion continues on AskWoody.com. Source: Say goodbye to Microsoft security bulletins (InfoWorld - Woody Leonhard)
  21. Microsoft Fixes problems With Win7/8.1 “Group B” Security-Only Patching Method Yes, MS has acknowledged the problem with fixing security-only bugs in non-security monthly rollup patches. And, yes, they say they’re going to fix it. Big news. Tell your Win7 friends. InfoWorld Woody on Windows UPDATE: It pains me to say that my interpretation of Microsoft’s post may be overly optimistic. See the comments here for details. It’s possible that the fix will only be made to the supersedence chain – not to the underlying patches. Sigh. Source - AskWoody Microsoft fixes Windows 7 'Group B' security-only patching method Great news: TechNet blog eschews fixing Win7/8.1 security-only bugs with monthly rollup patches In what may be the most important news for ongoing Windows 7 customers since the patchocalypse, Microsoft field engineer Scott Breen has both analyzed the key problem with "Group B" security-only patching in Windows 7, and has promised a solution. Don't be put off by the title -- Update to Supersedence Behaviour for Security Only and Security Monthly Quality Rollup Updates. The underlying message is crucial for Win7 and 8.1 users who aren't connected to a corporate update manager. The crux of the matter lies in the way Win7 (and 8.1) users update their machines, starting last October. I divide the patching universe into two hemispheres: Group A is willing to take all of Microsoft's new telemetry systems, along with potentially useful nonsecurity updates. It installs the Monthly rollup (in Microsoft parlance the "Security Monthly Quality Rollup" patch). Group B doesn't want any more snooping than absolutely necessary and doesn't care about improvements like daylight saving time zone changes. But it does want to keep applying security patches. It installs Security-only patches (Microsoft-speak "Security Only Quality Update"). The key problem arises when Microsoft introduces a bug in a Security-only patch and then fixes that bug in a Monthly Rollup patch. By forcing Security-only updaters to install a non-security rollup, Microsoft effectively bars customers from only installing security patches. Breen illustrates the problem with this graphic. A bug in an October Security-only patch was fixed in a November monthly rollup. (I believe he's referring to the MS16-087 print spooler bug.) Says Breen: It also threw the Win7 (and 8.1, Server 2008 R2, Server 2012, and Server 2012 R2) patching community into a black hole. Although few people realized it, the integrity of the security-only patching method was at stake. Many knowledgeable Win7 patchers simply threw in the towel: If Microsoft was going to force them to install the non-security (read: telemetry) patches, they didn't want any of it. They didn't sign up for Windows 7 snooping, so they stopped patching entirely. I'm very happy to report that Microsoft has acknowledged the error of its ways. Starting this month, Breen says, bugs in Monthly Rollup patches will be fixed in Monthly Rollup patches, and bugs in Security-only patches will be fixed by changing the metadata in those patches. Those of you who deal with WSUS or SCCM can read his article and see how that key change will ripple into the WSUS listing. For those of you who just worry about patching Windows 7 (or 8.1, Server, etc.), you can stick to your guns. If there's a bug in a Security-only patch, it'll get fixed in a Security-only patch -- possibly the same Security-only patch will be re-issued, perhaps a subsequent patch will just roll over the bad one. It's a great day for Windows 7 and 8.1 customers. Source - InfoWorld Woody on Windows Alternate Source - gHacks - Changes to Windows Update supersedence
  22. [Guide + Tested Fix - New] Install This Extracted Windows Update Client for Win 8.1 To Fix Windows Update Not Completing Check for Updates Overview: A set of CBS packages which form "KB3163023 Windows Update Client" update for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2 This update provide latest improvements and fixes to Windows Update, specially: An optimization that addresses long scan time for updates. Details of the Extracted Windows Update Client: They only contain Windows Update components that are included in the rollup. These packages are originally sub-packages and part of "July 2016 update rollup KB3172614" Repacked the latest Windows Update Client separately for those who have issues with July 2016 rollup KB3172614 or do not want to install it Also added workaround to hide the packages from being shown in "Installed Updates" panel multiple entries Personally Tested - Details: Tested Working 100%. Tested - No Telemetry. Tested - No Win 10 related components. Install Notes: Make sure the downloaded zip file is not read-only or blocked extract the file to a folder with a simple space-less path to avoid troubles For online installation on live running system: run install-online.cmd as administrator you will be notified to restart the system to complete installation if succeeded For offline integration into image: Mount the image of install.wim no need for this step if the target image is already deployed on another partition/drive Run integrate-offline.cmd as administrator and enter the correct path for mounted/deployed image Note: Make sure you use Windows 8.1 Host OS or higher. Downloads: Windows8.1-KB3163023-x86.zip - [Size: 3.06 MB] MD5: 7d846f9d1d98b049a42985da4a04df03 SHA-1: b1eb060d2f14b392232cae84ea10f865c5258f11 Windows8.1-KB3163023-x64.zip - [Size: 4.69 MB] MD5: 112162880e58ad8104cb2a64358735a5 SHA-1: 939ffc8a1abf6337736092453514bc9878a46a25 Uninstall Notes - Not Required 99.9%: You don’t normally need to uninstall it, doing so will erase WU database. If a new WU client is released or included in Monthly Quality Rollup, Disk Cleanup will take care of older version and remove it. If you still want to uninstall, you can use DISM tool to uninstall using below command. Launch cmd as admin and execute: for /L %i in (93,1,328) do (if exist “%windir%\servicing\Packages\Package_%i_for_KB3172614*.mum” dism /online /norestart /remove-package /packagename:Package_%i_for_KB3172614~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~6.3.1.4) Courtesy: Abbodi(AskWoody)
  23. [Guide + Tested Fix] Windows Update in Windows 8.1[x86+x64]: Slow/Not Checking for Updates - High CPU/RAM Usage - Internet Usage but no updates detected - Last Update stays Days Ago or Never - No Internet Usage - Slow Installation Issues Many people fed up with Windows Update issues and many sites/forums and even the Microsoft Support requesting for a refresh/reset/reinstall/clean installation of the OS[Windows 8.1]. However, it is unnecessary if you follow the below tested guide. Also, those who have already done refresh/reset/reinstall/clean installation of the OS can make use of the fix in the end of the guide directly to fix Windows Update Issues. Many wonder when they install Windows 8, windows updates work fine but after upgrading to Windows 8.1, the issue starts again. Many of Windows troubleshooting guide including the Microsoft Support guides and everywhere ask users to Enable Automatic Updates and it'll download the necessary updates to fix the issue for recently installed OS devices[clean/fresh install]. However, this isn't working for most people. Also, the settings "Metered Connection", "Automatic Updates linked to Maintenance", Fast Startup and more settings hinder the normal fix on Windows 8/8.1 and later. Microsoft is really making things hard. If you wait for maintenance to fix, it won't. You'll either end up with maintenance completed but issue not fixed or maintenance doesn't run at set time. FYI: In my context, Windows Update corruption is mostly linked with inbuilt background tasks like Maintenance, Automatic Defragmentation and some of our own/scheduled/set time for "Sleep" or "Hibernate" settings/config. Note: Some sites/forums incl. Technet/Microsoft Support may recommend entering Audit Mode/OOBE Mode using Sysprep to check for updates and then boot to normal mode. However, it is currently reported by many that Windows Update doesn't detect any updates in this mode but stuck in checking for updates loop and also your OS may enter into Audit mode loop which mostly the tricks to come out doesn't work at all. It happened to me once. I had to re-install the OS completely again. Hence, please don't ever test it to fix Windows Update issues. FYI: In this guide, I'm not mentioning KB2919355 since the newer windows installation ISO already include this update. If you have a much older ISO, then you should check in "Installed Updates". If not found, download and install this update from here: x86 or x64. Please read install instructions and install the updates in the specified order or you'll land in a new trouble. Read "Steps to Avoid Searching for Updates Issue while using Standalone Installers" in the end of this post for faster installation initiation of standalone installer. Basic Steps: Note: Not applicable to recently installed OS devices[clean/fresh install] or if you recently used refresh/reset. Please skip the basic step and move to the next step. Others, follow the Basic Steps before proceeding to "Windows Update Fix - Tested". In Windows 8.1, if you experience issues with Windows Update, please follow the basic steps one after another. Check Connection Settings: Open "Internet Options" from IE or open Windows Explorer and copy paste "Control Panel\Network and Internet" and press enter. Click on "Connections" tab. Then click on "LAN Settings". Make sure "Automatically detect settings" is Enabled and others incl. Proxy are Unchecked. Now follow the further steps. Check Windows Update is turned on with proper setting and you have a stable internet connection: Note: Make sure that updates are turned on for other Microsoft Products and Services. You can check this here: Open Windows Update, you should see that: You receive updates stating "For Windows and other products from Microsoft Update". If it states, "Windows only", then click on "Change Settings" and check the box under "Microsoft Update". Inbuilt Windows Update Troubleshooter & Standalone Troubleshooter: Open Control Panel, Click "Find and Fix Problems". Alternatively, copy paste "Control Panel\All Control Panel Items\Troubleshooting" in address bar without quotes in windows explorer. Or Open Action Center and click "Troubleshooting". Under "System and Security", Click "Fix problems with Windows Update". Click on "Advanced" and click "Run as administrator". Now, click Next. Optionally, if you want to know the issues detected before fixing, then uncheck the "Apply repairs automatically" and then click Next. Take note of the detected error codes, issues and the fixes done. It'd be helpful, if you still have trouble after applying all the steps. Now Reboot[make sure the fast startup is disabled] in power options. Power Options-> Choose what the power buttons do -> change settings that are currently unavailable. After reboot, open both the task manager[to check network usage and activity, CPU usage and RAM usage] and Windows Update. Now, click on Check for Updates. Max time to wait on an average internet speed is 1 hour. If it solves the issue, well done. If not, try the same using latest Diagnostic Windows Update Troubleshooter from here. CHKDSK in command prompt: Open elevated command prompt, which means Command Prompt[Run as administrator]. Press "Ctrl + X" and press "Shift + A". Note: If your main partition is not "C:" drive, replace the "C:" with your main partition drive letter in the command "CHKDSK C: /F /R" without quotes and run it. It should ask for reboot(s). It should fix some Windows Update issues. If you still have issue with Windows Update, proceed to next step. Inbuilt DISM Tool: Make sure that you have internet connection turned on. Also, make sure you keep a copy of the log file from "Main partition->Windows->Logs->DISM->dism.log" after running "ScanHealth" or "RestoreHealth" or "Start ComponentCleanup". Open elevated command prompt, which means Command Prompt[Run as administrator]. Press "Ctrl + X" and press "Shift + A". Now, run the command "DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /CheckHealth" without quotes. It should show no component corruption found. If it shows corruption found, run the command "DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /ScanHealth" to check if the corruption is repairable. If repairable, Run the command "DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth". Note: It'll take few mins to hours. It starts doing its work from 20%. However, it stops in 40% too. If it shows corruption fixed, then the DISM part is over and proceed with sfc scan step-7. However, if you get corruption not fixed, then proceed with the sub-steps below. You need a Windows 8.1 OS installation ISO with "install.wim" file located in "sources" folder. If you don't have one, you can get it from Tech Bench download ISO for Windows 8.1. Since the Tech Bench download page is blocked after Windows 10 upgrade offer ended, Please Reply to this thread and I'll provide the unique Microsoft download link in PM. Once you have the ISO, mount the ISO. No need of third party tools. Just right click the ISO and choose "Mount". Now, open elevated command prompt and run the command "Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:wim:D:\sources\install.wim:1 /LimitAccess" Note: Replace "D:" with the exact drive letter of the mounted ISO. It should fix the corruption. If you get error, run the command "Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /StartComponentCleanup" and then run the RestoreHealth Command above. If corruption is fixed, then you should run the sfc /scannow. You can view the usage guide here. Make sure you keep a copy of the log file from "Main partition->Windows->Logs->CBS->CBS.log" Now Check for Updates in Windows Update and if still taking hours with no detection or no internet usage with more CPU usage, proceed to next step "Windows Update Fix - Tested". Windows Update Fix - Tested: Note: This fix is also applicable for clean install / refresh / reset / recently installed devices. This fix doesn't have any Windows 10 connection or telemetry which makes it trusted fix from Microsoft. Download using Microsoft Update Catalog: Note: If you use IE with Microsoft Update Catalog with addon, you can continue using IE. Or if you have other browsers, you can use it instantly without any addon installation. Visit this page and click "Download" according to architecture and OS installed. In the pop-up window, click the link to start downloading the .msu file. Download from Download Center: You can visit this KB Details page and locate the downloads according to architecture and OS installed. Steps to Avoid Searching for Updates Issue while using Standalone Installers: Change Windows Update Setting to "Never check for updates" and Disable/Disconnect Internet. Install the update. Note: After installation started, change Windows Update Setting to "Check for updates but let me choose whether to download and install them" and enable Internet. Note: If you are already in a search for updates loop in standalone installer, close the window and use end process tree in open task manager -> Details tab -> wusa.exe. Once done, open main partition in Windows explorer and delete the newly created folder named in a type of encrypted code. Then follow the above 2 steps to install again. [Not-Recommended Fix] Alternatively, If you like to fix with Win 10 related update, you can manually install alternate fix KB3112336 or any newer Windows Update Client for Windows 8.1. Source: My own article guide by personal experience. Update - New Windows Update Client to fix if the above fix doesn't help:
  24. Microsoft Pulls MS 3197868, The Win7 Security Rollup That Blew Apart Malwarebytes Thanks to Abbodi… Microsoft has pulled KB 3197868. You can search for it in the Update Catalog: https://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=3197868 That’s right. The November Monthly Rollup for Win7 ain’t there any more. I guess that settles the question of whether Malwarebytes or Microsoft made a mistake. Malwarebytes stated a week ago: and they haven’t changed their tune. Malwarebytes fixed the problem very quickly. If you’ve updated Malwarebytes Anti-Malware in the past week, you’re fine. Those of you in Group A who haven’t yet applied the November patches can go ahead. Remarkably, the Preview of next month’s Monthly Rollup is still in the Update Catalog. Sounds like Microsoft forgot to sign 500 files in the November Monthly Rollup, but remembered to sign them in the preview of next month’s Monthly Rollup. No idea if we’ll get KB 3197868 back before the turkeys gobble. UPDATE: On Wednesday evening, both November Monthly Rollups, KB3197874 and KB3197868, came back online. They’re marked “Last modified: 11/23/2016”. No idea why they were pulled – and Microsoft isn’t saying. Source FYI: November 2016 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2 - (KB3197874) too pulled off. You'd now see only October 2016 Rollup in Windows Update. Hence, it is better to install Security Only Quality Rollups - Group B or Don't install any updates - Group W(C). Update: Win 7/8.1 November Monthly Rollups - Patched 23 November 2016 are up. Group A Update now using Windows Update! Note: Microsoft Update Catalog isn't updated with patched rollup, still signed 3 November 2016.
  25. MS-DEFCON 4: Time To Get November Windows And Office Patches Applied If you have Win7 or 8.1, follow How to cautiously update Windows 7 and 8.1 machines. For those in Group B, the update you want from the Microsoft Catalog is here: Win7 64-bit: http://download.windowsupdate.com/c/msdownload/update/software/secu/2016/11/windows6.1-kb3197867-x64_6f8f45a5706eeee8ac05aa16fa91c984a9edb929.msu Win7 32-bit: http://download.windowsupdate.com/c/msdownload/update/software/secu/2016/11/windows6.1-kb3197867-x86_2313232edda5cca08115455d91120ab3790896ba.msu [NOTE: My earlier link was incorrect!] Win 8.1 64-bit: http://download.windowsupdate.com/d/msdownload/update/software/secu/2016/11/windows8.1-kb3197873-x64_cd0325f40c0d25960e462946f6b736aa7c0ed674.msu [NOTE AGAIN: My earlier link was wrong. Thanks, everybody.] Win 8.1 32-bit: http://download.windowsupdate.com/c/msdownload/update/software/secu/2016/11/windows8.1-kb3197873-x86_b906109f30b735290a431fdc8397249cfcc3e84b.msu If you have Win10, follow my new Win10Tip Apply updates carefully As usual, if you have any problems, tell me all about it! Windows Patches/Security November 2016 Black Tuesday Source
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