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  1. Here's what's new for Windows 8.1 and 7 this Patch Tuesday We are now in the second Tuesday of September, and in usual Microsoft fashion, that means it's Patch Tuesday. Every supported version of Windows is getting updates today, and that includes Windows 8.1. Plus, if you're paying for extended security updates (ESU), there are new updates for Windows 7, too. As usual, there are two flavors of the monthly updates, one containing only security fixes and one with other quality fixes, the monthly rollup update. For Windows 8.1, the monthly rollup is KB4577066, and it can be downloaded manually here. It contains the following fixes: Updates time zone information for Yukon, Canada. Addresses an issue when you evaluate the compatibility status of the Windows ecosystem to help ensure application and device compatibility for all updates to Windows. Addresses a security vulnerability issue with user proxies and HTTP-based intranet servers. After you install this update, HTTP-based intranet servers cannot leverage a user proxy to detect updates by default. Scans that use these servers will fail if the clients do not have a configured system proxy. If you must leverage a user proxy, you must configure the behavior by using the Windows Update policy “Allow user proxy to be used as a fallback if detection using system proxy fails.” This change does not affect customers who secure their Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) servers that use the Transport Layer Security (TLS) or Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocols. For more information, see Ensuring clients stay secure, changes to scans against Windows Server Update Service (WSUS) servers. Security updates to Windows Media, Windows Input and Composition, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Graphics, Windows Cloud Infrastructure, Windows Authentication, Windows Cryptography, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Kernel, Windows Hybrid Cloud Networking, Windows Peripherals, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Update Stack, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, and Windows SQL components. It also has a single known issue that's been around for months: Symptom Workaround Certain operations, such as rename, that you perform on files or folders that are on a Cluster Shared Volume (CSV) may fail with the error, “STATUS_BAD_IMPERSONATION_LEVEL (0xC00000A5)”. This occurs when you perform the operation on a CSV owner node from a process that doesn’t have administrator privilege. Do one of the following: Perform the operation from a process that has administrator privilege. Perform the operation from a node that doesn’t have CSV ownership. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. As for the security-only update, it's KB4577071, and it can be downloaded manually here. It only includes these updates: Security updates to Windows Media, Windows Input and Composition, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Graphics, Windows Cloud Infrastructure, Windows Authentication, Windows Cryptography, Windows Fundamentals, Windows Kernel, Windows Hybrid Cloud Networking, Windows Peripherals, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Update Stack, and Windows SQL components. It has the same known issue as the monthly rollup. As for Windows 7, which - again - is only getting updates for paying ESU customers, the monthly rollup update is KB4577051, and it can be downloaded manually here. Here's what's changed: Updates time zone information for Yukon, Canada. Addresses a security vulnerability issue with user proxies and HTTP-based intranet servers. After you install this update, HTTP-based intranet servers cannot leverage a user proxy to detect updates by default. Scans that use these servers will fail if the clients do not have a configured system proxy. If you must leverage a user proxy, you must configure the behavior by using the Windows Update policy “Allow user proxy to be used as a fallback if detection using system proxy fails.” This change does not affect customers who secure their Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) servers that use the Transport Layer Security (TLS) or Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocols. For more information, see Ensuring clients stay secure, changes to scans against Windows Server Update Service (WSUS) servers. Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Graphics, Windows Media, Windows Cloud Infrastructure, Windows Authentication, Windows Cryptography, Windows Kernel, Windows Hybrid Cloud Networking, Windows Peripherals, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Network Security and Containers, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, and Windows SQL components. The only known issue is the same as for Windows 8.1. Microsoft also notes that the update will fail to install if you don't have a valid key to receive security updates beyond the original end of support date. As for the security-only update, it's KB4577053, and it can be downloaded manually here. It contains these changes: Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Graphics, Windows Media, Windows Cloud Infrastructure, Windows Authentication, Windows Cryptography, Windows Kernel, Windows Hybrid Cloud Networking, Windows Peripherals, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Network Security and Containers, and Windows SQL components. It has the same known issue mentioned above. As a reminder, the quality updates are usually automatically installed through Windows Update, but you'll need to download the security-only updates manually if you want them. Here's what's new for Windows 8.1 and 7 this Patch Tuesday
  2. Here's what's new for Windows 7 and 8.1 this Patch Tuesday If you look at your calendars today, you may notice that it's the second Tuesday of August, and that means it's time for this month's Patch Tuesday from Microsoft. As usual, every supported version of Windows is getting updates, and that includes Windows 8.1. Windows 7 is no longer support for most users, but if you're paying for Extended Security Updates (ESU), you can still get updates for a few more years. As usual, there are two types of updates going out - a monthly rollup update and a security-only update. The monthly rollup updates are usually installed automatically on supported devices, but the security-only updates need to be downloaded manually. For Windows 8.1, the monthly rollup update is KB4571703, and it can be downloaded manually here. Here's what's new: Addresses an issue that prevents you from installing some .msi apps. This occurs when a device is managed by a Group Policy that redirects the AppData folder to a network folder. Addresses an issue in Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps that allows single sign-on authentication when an app does not have the Enterprise Authentication capability. With the release of CVE-2020-1509, UWP applications might begin prompting the user for credentials. Addresses an issue in Microsoft Edge IE Mode when opening multiple documents from a SharePoint site. Addresses an issue in Microsoft Edge IE Mode that occurs when you browse using anchor links. Addresses an issue with loading Browser Helper Objects in Microsoft Edge IE Mode. Addresses an issue where certain applications that rely on the JScript Scripting Engine become unresponsive under load. Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Graphics, Windows Media, Windows Shell, Windows Cloud Infrastructure, Windows Authentication, Windows Kernel, Windows Hybrid Cloud Networking, Windows Peripherals, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows File Server and Clustering, Windows Hybrid Storage Services, Windows SQL components, Microsoft Scripting Engine, and Windows Remote Desktop. There is a known issue with this release, and it's similar to what we've seen in a few previous updates: Symptom Workaround Certain operations, such as rename, that you perform on files or folders that are on a Cluster Shared Volume (CSV) may fail with the error, “STATUS_BAD_IMPERSONATION_LEVEL (0xC00000A5)”. This occurs when you perform the operation on a CSV owner node from a process that doesn’t have administrator privilege. Do one of the following: Perform the operation from a process that has administrator privilege. Perform the operation from a node that doesn’t have CSV ownership. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. As for the security-only update, it's KB4571723, and you can download it manually here. It only includes the security updates mentioned in the monthly rollup above. The known issue is also the same. Turning to Windows 7, which is only supported for paying ESU customers, the monthly rollup update is KB4571729, and it can be downloaded manually here. It includes the following improvements and fixes: Addresses an issue that prevents you from installing some .msi apps. This occurs when a device is managed by a Group Policy that redirects the AppData folder to a network folder. Addresses an issue in Microsoft Edge IE Mode when opening multiple documents from a SharePoint site. Addresses an issue in Microsoft Edge IE Mode that occurs when you browse using anchor links. Addresses an issue with loading Browser Helper Objects in Microsoft Edge IE Mode. Addresses an issue where certain applications that rely on the JScript Scripting Engine become unresponsive under load. Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Graphics, Windows Media, Windows Cloud Infrastructure, Windows Authentication, Windows Kernel, Windows Hybrid Cloud Networking, Windows Peripherals, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows File Server and Clustering, Windows Hybrid Storage Services, Microsoft Scripting Engine, and Windows SQL components. The single known issue is the same one as what's listed above for Windows 8.1. Finally, the security-only update for Windows 7 is KB4571719, and you can download it manually here. As you'd expect, it includes the same security fixes as the monthly rollup, but nothing else. The known issue is also the same. Here's what's new for Windows 7 and 8.1 this Patch Tuesday
  3. It appears that the Windows 7 ESU Bypass is indeed working Support for Microsoft's Windows 7 operating system ended on January 14, 2020 officially. Home users cannot extend support for the operating system while business and Enterprise customers may extend support by up to three years; this is done by joining the ESU program which is available per machine (business) or per user (Enterprise). A bypass to use ESU-only patches on Home machines -- basically any machine that has not joined the program officially -- was discovered and published in December 2019. The bypass worked with the test ESU patch that Microsoft released but it was not clear back then if it would also work with "real" patches. Now that the first post-Windows 7 support patch has been released, confirmations are coming in that the bypass is indeed working. Note: we suggest that backups are created of important data, better the entire system, before the bypass or any of the updates that Microsoft released for Windows 7 are installed. If something goes wrong, it is then possible to go back to the previous version without losing any data. The process of using the bypass with the Windows 7 patches released in February would look like this (note that you should not install the latest SSU KB4537829 as the bypass does not seem to work anymore if it is installed). Install the bypass. You can grab the latest version from the MDL forum (account needed), or download it from Gitlab. The password is 2020. Download and install the ESU Test update KB4528069. It should install fine. Restart the System. Install the following updates: KB4538483, KB4537820, KB4537767, and KB4537813. Restart the system. Our colleagues over at Deskmodder found another option that supports the installation of the latest SSU: Install the bypass. Install the ESU Test update. Remove the bypass. Install the SSU KB4537829. Install the KB4537820 update. Closing Words It remains to be seen if the bypass will continue to work in the coming months or years.For now, it may be an option in some situations provided that backups are created. Source: It appears that the Windows 7 ESU Bypass is indeed working (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  4. Many of us are still hooked on Windows 7 and that's a huge problem Devices still running on Windows 7 targeted by hackers (Image credit: Future) The US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has published a warning notice highlighting dangers posed by the continued usage of Windows 7, retired by Microsoft earlier this year. The much-loved operating system reached end of life on January 14, meaning security patches, software updates and technical assistance are no longer available - but many users have remained loyal to the outdated OS regardless. However, according to the FBI notice, Windows 7 is attracting the attention of malicious cyber actors, who are seeking to take advantage of undiscovered security flaws in the no-longer-supported operating system. Windows 7 customers that purchased an Extended Security Update (ESU) plan are the only exception; security support for these users will extend until January 2023. Windows 7 end of life According to the FBI, there is strong precedent for cyberattacks on unsupported Windows operating systems and remote desktop protocols. With the vast majority of Windows 7 customers unable to patch their systems, the intelligence agency believes criminals will continue to look upon the operating system as a “soft target”. “The FBI has observed cybercriminals targeting computer network infrastructure after an operating system achieves end of life status,” reads the FBI notice. “Continuing to use Windows 7 within an enterprise may provide cybercriminals access into computer systems. As time passes, Windows 7 becomes more vulnerable to exploitation due to lack of security updates and new vulnerabilities discovered.” To mitigate against the threat of attack, the FBI advises users adopt a “multilayered approach” to protection. This involves updating operating systems to the latest supported version (i.e. Windows 10), checking antivirus and spam filters are properly configured and isolating computer systems that cannot be updated. “Migrating to a new operating system can pose its own unique challenges, such as cost for new hardware and software and updating existing custom software. However, these challenges do not outweigh the loss of intellectual property and threats to an organization,” added the FBI. Many of us are still hooked on Windows 7 and that's a huge problem
  5. This new Zoom security flaw lets hackers target Windows 7 PCs Windows 7 devices at risk from Zoom Zero Day vulnerability (Image credit: Shutterstock) Zoom is facing more security scrutiny after a new flaw was found to open up the service to hackers, putting Windows 7 users at risk. Researchers at Slovenian cybersecurity firm ACROS Security has revealed a previously unknown flaw in the videoconferencing software Zoom could allow a hacker to remotely commandeer computers running old versions of the Microsoft Windows operating system. The “zero-day” vulnerability applies to Zoom software running on Windows 7, or even older operating systems. Windows 7 Zoom ACROS Security noted that anyone able to successfully exploit the vulnerability could access files on the vulnerable computer, and even take over the entire device. Microsoft has been trying to convince Windows 7 users to upgrade to newer software versions in recent years, but with little success - despite offering free upgrades to Windows 10. The company revealed it would be ending technical support out for Windows 7 on January 15 2020, meaning it would no longer offer patches and security updates for Windows 7. That means that any bugs or problems still found in the software will never get fixed. Likewise, any security vulnerabilities could also remain in Windows 7, as Microsoft is unlikely to patch those unless they are very severe – more on that in a moment. Many large organisations, including the NHS, still use Windows 7 on many devices, with Microsoft allowing customers to pay extra to receive specilaised support. “Zoom takes all reports of potential security vulnerabilities seriously,” a Zoom spokesperson said in a statement. “This morning we received a report of an issue impacting users running Windows 7 and older. We have confirmed this issue and are currently working on a patch to quickly resolve it.” The issue is the latest in a litany of security worries for Zoom, which has exploded in popularity in 2020 thanks to the remote working boom caused by the global pandemic. The sudden and increased demand on the company's systems was unlike anything most companies have ever experienced, with criminals also attacking Zoom with gusto. Following a number of high-profile issues, company's CEO Eric S. Yuan promised more transparency and announce a 90-day freeze on all new features not related to privacy, safety or security back in April - however this deadline was missed earlier this month. This new Zoom security flaw lets hackers target Windows 7 PCs
  6. 1. The only version that you can successfully install at first launch is .NET Framework 4.5.2 - this will work for you, guaranteed! 2. All other .NET Framework 4.x will fail in first attempt. On any next attempt you will have success, but don't hurry to enjoy, you still be unlucky (read at point 5 below). 3. If you want to install all other versions at first launch, you must install manually this certificate first. 4. If you are trying to install certificate from third part apps, for example from Inno Setup, you will be unlucky. (Already tried these two methods) 5. If you have already installed .NET Framework 4.7.2 which officially include all previous versions (4.0–4.7) you are not be able to install SDK (Software Development Kit) for Windows 7. You will get report that you are using Pre-Release of the required .NET Framework 4.0 and you must install at least RTM version. Otherwise you are not able to install all features and they will stay as inactive gray components unchecked without ability to check. 6. If you install .NET Framework 4.0 or .NET Framework 4.5.2 you are able to fully install SDK for Windows 7, it will be recognized now. In short - do not use any other version .NET Framework 4 except version 4.5.2 for Windows 7 OS. They are not optimized for using on any device, for example on Virtual Machines.
  7. Patch Tuesday: Here's what's new for Windows 7 and 8.1 this month Today is the second Tuesday of May, and that means it's time for this month's Patch Tuesday. Microsoft is rolling out cumulative updates for all supported versions of Windows, and that includes Windows 8.1 and Windows 7. Keep in mind, Windows 7 actually reached end of support earlier this year, so you'll only be getting updates if you're a business user paying for extended security updates. These monthly updates come in two flavors - monthly rollup and a security-only update - and by default, you'll get the monthly rollup automatically. For Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2, the monthly rollup update is KB4556846, and you can download it manually here, though you can also get it through Windows Update. It includes the following changes: Updates the 2020 start date for daylight saving time (DST) in the Kingdom of Morocco. For more information, see KB4557900. Addresses an issue that causes offline file syncing to stop responding or fail in mobsyc.exe. Security updates to Internet Explorer, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Kernel, Windows Core Networking, Internet Information Services, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Active Directory, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, and Windows Storage and Filesystems. The update has no known issues. As for the security-only update, it's labeled as KB4556853 and you can download it manually here. This one won't be sent out through Windows Update, so you'll need to download and install it yourself. As you'd expect, this update focuses exclusively on security fixes and improvements: Updates the 2020 start date for daylight saving time (DST) in the Kingdom of Morocco. For more information, see KB4557900. Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Kernel, Windows Core Networking, Internet Information Services, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Active Directory, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, and Windows Storage and Filesystems. It also has no known issues As for Windows 7, the monthly rollup update is KB4556836 and it can be downloaded manually here. Again, it's only available for businesses that are paying for extended security updates, since support for Windows 7 officially ended back in January. It includes the following changes: Addresses an issue that prevents certain apps from installing if they are published using a Group Policy Object. Addresses an issue that causes Windows to incorrectly report the connection state of a network interface. The issue might cause software that queries the media connection state to receive a result of “Unknown” from a network interface after installing Windows updates released after February 11, 2020. This issue has been observed in the Network Access Manager component of the Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client. Updates the 2020 start date for daylight saving time (DST) in the Kingdom of Morocco. For more information, see KB4557900. Security updates to Internet Explorer, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Apps, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Kernel, Internet Information Services, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Active Directory, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, and Windows Storage and Filesystems. There aren't any known issues with the update itself, but editions not supported by by Windows 7 ESUs will see an error if they try to install the update: Symptom Workaround After installing this update and restarting your device, you might receive the error, “Failure to configure Windows updates. Reverting Changes. Do not turn off your computer,” and the update might show as Failed in Update History. This is expected in the following circumstances: If you are installing this update on a device that is running an edition that is not supported for ESU. For a complete list of which editions are supported, see KB4497181. If you do not have an ESU MAK add-on key installed and activated. If you have purchased an ESU key and have encountered this issue, please verify you have applied all prerequisites and that your key is activated. For information on activation, please see this blog post. For information on the prerequisites, see the "How to get this update" section of this article. Finally, the Windows 7 security-only update is KB4556843 and it can be downloaded manually here. It includes the following security fixes: Updates the 2020 start date for daylight saving time (DST) in the Kingdom of Morocco. For more information, see KB4557900. Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Apps, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Kernel, Internet Information Services, Windows Network Security and Containers, Windows Active Directory, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, and Windows Storage and Filesystems. The single known issue is the same as what's in the monthly rollup. Source: Patch Tuesday: Here's what's new for Windows 7 and 8.1 this month (Neowin)
  8. Greetings everyone, This guide will help you to manually backup all third-party drivers (non- microsoft drivers) from an existing Windows 7 installation. I did some testing and found that all the hardware drivers are stored in C:\Windows\System32\DriverStore\FileRepository directory. What you have to do is: (i)Go to C:\Windows\System32\DriverStore\FileRepository (ii)Sort by last modified date & (iii)Check and copy folder for non-microsoft drivers to say C:\Drivers. That's all IGNORE those folder which don't contain *.cat file. I also slipstreamed the above drivers in Windows 7 January 2020 Disc Image & it integrated successfully. Command Line Interface(Extract): C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7601.24499 Details for image : C:\Win7\sources\install.wim Index : 1 Name : Windows 7 HOMEBASIC Description : Windows 7 HOMEBASIC Size : 14,867,750,897 bytes Index : 2 Name : Windows 7 HOMEPREMIUM Description : Windows 7 HOMEPREMIUM Size : 15,386,654,205 bytes Index : 3 Name : Windows 7 PROFESSIONAL Description : Windows 7 PROFESSIONAL Size : 15,291,878,047 bytes Index : 4 Name : Windows 7 ULTIMATE Description : Windows 7 ULTIMATE Size : 15,454,575,521 bytes The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>PAUSE Press any key to continue . . . C:\Windows\system32>mkdir C:\ULTIMATE C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Mount-WIM /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim /index: 4 /MountDir:C:\ULTIMATE Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7601.24499 Mounting image [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Driver /Driver:C:\Drivers /Recu rse Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7601.24499 Image Version: 6.1.7601.24499 Searching for driver packages to install... Found 19 driver package(s) to install. Installing 1 of 19 - C:\Drivers\atheros_bth.inf_amd64_neutral_7f7d27b8abb6001a\a theros_bth.inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 2 of 19 - C:\Drivers\dptf_cpu.inf_amd64_neutral_aa6e0c437ab150d5\dptf _cpu.inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 3 of 19 - C:\Drivers\esif_manager.inf_amd64_neutral_c73fefaf22ba926a\ esif_manager.inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 4 of 19 - C:\Drivers\hdxma7.inf_amd64_neutral_9bbcdf3b5e3fc734\hdxma7 .inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 5 of 19 - C:\Drivers\heci.inf_amd64_neutral_16593ab35133f7a6\heci.inf : The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 6 of 19 - C:\Drivers\iaahcic.inf_amd64_neutral_0a9d931ff5b9c7cf\iaAHC IC.inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 7 of 19 - C:\Drivers\ialpss2_gpio2_skl.inf_amd64_neutral_be53f7a7c63d ac92\iaLPSS2_GPIO2_SKL.inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 8 of 19 - C:\Drivers\ialpss2_i2c_skl.inf_amd64_neutral_b2e38689a4eb38 7b\iaLPSS2_I2C_SKL.inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 9 of 19 - C:\Drivers\intcdaud.inf_amd64_neutral_66e0a5048e30f9c5\Intc DAud.inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 10 of 19 - C:\Drivers\k120130.inf_amd64_neutral_299d0c74ec099c32\K120 130.inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 11 of 19 - C:\Drivers\netathr7x.inf_amd64_neutral_f6b1b7669e6ad5b3\ne tathr7x.inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 12 of 19 - C:\Drivers\rt64win7.inf_amd64_neutral_ded7d70457da510f\rt6 4win7.inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 13 of 19 - C:\Drivers\rtsuerx.inf_amd64_neutral_c49dd1b16298e63c\RtsU erX.inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 14 of 19 - C:\Drivers\sunrisepoint-lpsystem.inf_amd64_neutral_c08c10f a27075155\sunrisepoint-lpsystem.inf: The driver package was successfully install ed. Installing 15 of 19 - C:\Drivers\sunrisepoint-lpsystemlpss.inf_amd64_neutral_244 c81f76a71145b\sunrisepoint-lpsystemlpss.inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 16 of 19 - C:\Drivers\sunrisepoint-lpsystemthermal.inf_amd64_neutral_ 7e014774b9c5f768\sunrisepoint-lpsystemthermal.inf: The driver package was succes sfully installed. Installing 17 of 19 - C:\Drivers\synpd.inf_amd64_neutral_5ab01e2e519fd6f2\synpd. inf: The driver package was successfully installed. Installing 18 of 19 - C:\Drivers\USB\iusb3hub.inf: The driver package was succes sfully installed. Installing 19 of 19 - C:\Drivers\USB\iusb3xhc.inf: The driver package was succes sfully installed. The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Unmount-WIM /MountDir:C:\ULTIMATE /Commit Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7601.24499 Image File : C:\Win7\sources\install.wim Image Index : 4 Saving image [==========================100.0%==========================] Unmounting image [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>rmdir C:\ULTIMATE C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7601.24499 Details for image : C:\Win7\sources\install.wim Index : 1 Name : Windows 7 HOMEBASIC Description : Windows 7 HOMEBASIC Size : 16,074,956,469 bytes Index : 2 Name : Windows 7 HOMEPREMIUM Description : Windows 7 HOMEPREMIUM Size : 16,593,602,612 bytes Index : 3 Name : Windows 7 PROFESSIONAL Description : Windows 7 PROFESSIONAL Size : 16,498,828,957 bytes Index : 4 Name : Windows 7 ULTIMATE Description : Windows 7 ULTIMATE Size : 16,661,516,327 bytes The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>PAUSE Press any key to continue . . . Regards. EDIT 1 : As an extra precaution(optional), it's better to delete the *.pnf files from copied folders as these files are machine-specific and are created by the system when the driver is installed for device. EDIT 2: If you're planning to slipstreamed all third-party drivers like I do above then don't forget to integrate dotNet also in Windows 7 January 2020 ISOs as some drivers malfunction like MaxxAudioPro, Synaptics Touchpad Driver, etc. without it. EDIT 3: Or you can simply use this third-party program called Windows Download Integrator (Not Recommended) shared by @Mach1 to do this work for you. CREDITS: @abbodi1406
  9. haris_sane69

    [SCRIPT] Windows 7 January 2020 ISOs

    Greetings Everyone, I know its too late but still..😜 This script will help you to create a Microsoft Media Refresh January 2020 disc image (ISO file). Base ISO: Microsoft Media Refresh SP1 November 2010 ISOs (Win7_Pro_SP1_English_x64.iso) This guide assumes that you already have the above mentioned disc image and have made no previous modifications on the ISO. Steps: 1) Manually create four folders viz., Win7, Updates, IE11 & ISO in C:\Drive 2) Mount Disc Image & copy all its Contents to C:\Win7 3) Go to C:\Win7\sources folder & delete ei.cfg file 4) Download KB3020369-x64, kb3125574-v4-x64, KB2729094-v2-x64, KB2670838-x64, KB2834140-v2-x64, KB2639308-x64, KB2990941-v3-x64, KB3087873-v2-x64, kb4474419-v3-x64, kb4490628-x64 & kb4534310-x64 UPDATES from https://catalog.update.microsoft.com/ & paste it to C:\Updates KB2990941 & KB3087873 ain't available on above site. Therefore, download Gigabyte Windows USB Tool and extract it. Link: http://download.gigabyte.eu/FileList/Utility/mb_utility_windowsimagetool.zip Find KB2990941 and KB3087873 from the extracted folder: mb_utility_windowsimagetool\WindowsImageTool\HOTFIX\x64 5) Download IE11 as a Cab File: http://download.microsoft.com/download/7/7/D/77DEA30E-F617-4088-9352-FDBFED2987EE/IE11-Windows6.1-KB2841134-x64.cab & paste it to C:\IE11 6) Download oscdmig and extract it. Link: https://www.sevenforums.com/attachments/tutorials/32382d1256189124-make-bootable-iso-student-d-l-oscdimg.zip Paste it to C:\Windows\System32. For Windows 7 HOMEBASIC Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim PAUSE mkdir C:\HOMEBASIC Dism /Mount-WIM /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim /index:1 /MountDir:C:\HOMEBASIC Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3020369-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb3125574-v4-x64_2dafb1d203c8964239af3048b5dd4b1264cd93b9.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2729094-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2670838-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2834140-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2639308-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /packagepath:C:\IE11 Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2990941-v3-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3087873-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4474419-v3-x64_b5614c6cea5cb4e198717789633dca16308ef79c.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4490628-x64_d3de52d6987f7c8bdc2c015dca69eac96047c76e.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4534310-x64_4dc78a6eeb14e2eac1ede7381f4a93658c8e2cdc.msu Dism /Unmount-WIM /MountDir:C:\HOMEBASIC /Commit rmdir C:\HOMEBASIC Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim oscdimg -LTEST -m -u2 -bootdata:2#p0,e,bC:\Win7\boot\etfsboot.com#pEF,e,bC:\Win7\efi\microsoft\boot\efisys.bin C:\Win7\ C:\ISO\Win7UEFI.ISO PAUSE For Windows 7 HOMEPREMIUM Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim PAUSE mkdir C:\HOMEPREMIUM Dism /Mount-WIM /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim /index:2 /MountDir:C:\HOMEPREMIUM Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3020369-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb3125574-v4-x64_2dafb1d203c8964239af3048b5dd4b1264cd93b9.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2729094-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2670838-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2834140-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2639308-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /packagepath:C:\IE11 Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2990941-v3-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3087873-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4474419-v3-x64_b5614c6cea5cb4e198717789633dca16308ef79c.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4490628-x64_d3de52d6987f7c8bdc2c015dca69eac96047c76e.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4534310-x64_4dc78a6eeb14e2eac1ede7381f4a93658c8e2cdc.msu Dism /Unmount-WIM /MountDir:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Commit rmdir C:\HOMEPREMIUM Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim oscdimg -LTEST -m -u2 -bootdata:2#p0,e,bC:\Win7\boot\etfsboot.com#pEF,e,bC:\Win7\efi\microsoft\boot\efisys.bin C:\Win7\ C:\ISO\Win7UEFI.ISO PAUSE For Windows 7 PROFESSIONAL Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim PAUSE mkdir C:\PROFESSIONAL Dism /Mount-WIM /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim /index:3 /MountDir:C:\PROFESSIONAL Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3020369-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb3125574-v4-x64_2dafb1d203c8964239af3048b5dd4b1264cd93b9.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2729094-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2670838-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2834140-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2639308-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /packagepath:C:\IE11 Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2990941-v3-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3087873-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4474419-v3-x64_b5614c6cea5cb4e198717789633dca16308ef79c.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4490628-x64_d3de52d6987f7c8bdc2c015dca69eac96047c76e.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4534310-x64_4dc78a6eeb14e2eac1ede7381f4a93658c8e2cdc.msu Dism /Unmount-WIM /MountDir:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Commit rmdir C:\PROFESSIONAL Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim oscdimg -LTEST -m -u2 -bootdata:2#p0,e,bC:\Win7\boot\etfsboot.com#pEF,e,bC:\Win7\efi\microsoft\boot\efisys.bin C:\Win7\ C:\ISO\Win7UEFI.ISO PAUSE For Windows 7 ULTIMATE Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim PAUSE mkdir C:\ULTIMATE Dism /Mount-WIM /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim /index:4 /MountDir:C:\ULTIMATE Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3020369-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb3125574-v4-x64_2dafb1d203c8964239af3048b5dd4b1264cd93b9.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2729094-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2670838-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2834140-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2639308-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /packagepath:C:\IE11 Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2990941-v3-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-KB3087873-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4474419-v3-x64_b5614c6cea5cb4e198717789633dca16308ef79c.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4490628-x64_d3de52d6987f7c8bdc2c015dca69eac96047c76e.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4534310-x64_4dc78a6eeb14e2eac1ede7381f4a93658c8e2cdc.msu Dism /Unmount-WIM /MountDir:C:\ULTIMATE /Commit rmdir C:\ULTIMATE Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim oscdimg -LTEST -m -u2 -bootdata:2#p0,e,bC:\Win7\boot\etfsboot.com#pEF,e,bC:\Win7\efi\microsoft\boot\efisys.bin C:\Win7\ C:\ISO\Win7UEFI.ISO PAUSE For Windows 7 AIO Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim PAUSE mkdir C:\HOMEBASIC Dism /Mount-WIM /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim /index:1 /MountDir:C:\HOMEBASIC Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3020369-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb3125574-v4-x64_2dafb1d203c8964239af3048b5dd4b1264cd93b9.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2729094-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2670838-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2834140-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2639308-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /packagepath:C:\IE11 Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2990941-v3-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3087873-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4474419-v3-x64_b5614c6cea5cb4e198717789633dca16308ef79c.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4490628-x64_d3de52d6987f7c8bdc2c015dca69eac96047c76e.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEBASIC /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4534310-x64_4dc78a6eeb14e2eac1ede7381f4a93658c8e2cdc.msu Dism /Unmount-WIM /MountDir:C:\HOMEBASIC /Commit rmdir C:\HOMEBASIC mkdir C:\HOMEPREMIUM Dism /Mount-WIM /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim /index:2 /MountDir:C:\HOMEPREMIUM Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3020369-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb3125574-v4-x64_2dafb1d203c8964239af3048b5dd4b1264cd93b9.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2729094-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2670838-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2834140-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2639308-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /packagepath:C:\IE11 Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2990941-v3-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3087873-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4474419-v3-x64_b5614c6cea5cb4e198717789633dca16308ef79c.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4490628-x64_d3de52d6987f7c8bdc2c015dca69eac96047c76e.msu Dism /Image:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4534310-x64_4dc78a6eeb14e2eac1ede7381f4a93658c8e2cdc.msu Dism /Unmount-WIM /MountDir:C:\HOMEPREMIUM /Commit rmdir C:\HOMEPREMIUM mkdir C:\PROFESSIONAL Dism /Mount-WIM /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim /index:3 /MountDir:C:\PROFESSIONAL Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3020369-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb3125574-v4-x64_2dafb1d203c8964239af3048b5dd4b1264cd93b9.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2729094-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2670838-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2834140-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2639308-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /packagepath:C:\IE11 Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2990941-v3-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3087873-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4474419-v3-x64_b5614c6cea5cb4e198717789633dca16308ef79c.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4490628-x64_d3de52d6987f7c8bdc2c015dca69eac96047c76e.msu Dism /Image:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4534310-x64_4dc78a6eeb14e2eac1ede7381f4a93658c8e2cdc.msu Dism /Unmount-WIM /MountDir:C:\PROFESSIONAL /Commit rmdir C:\PROFESSIONAL mkdir C:\ULTIMATE Dism /Mount-WIM /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim /index:4 /MountDir:C:\ULTIMATE Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3020369-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb3125574-v4-x64_2dafb1d203c8964239af3048b5dd4b1264cd93b9.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2729094-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2670838-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2834140-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2639308-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /packagepath:C:\IE11 Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2990941-v3-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-KB3087873-v2-x64.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4474419-v3-x64_b5614c6cea5cb4e198717789633dca16308ef79c.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4490628-x64_d3de52d6987f7c8bdc2c015dca69eac96047c76e.msu Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4534310-x64_4dc78a6eeb14e2eac1ede7381f4a93658c8e2cdc.msu Dism /Unmount-WIM /MountDir:C:\ULTIMATE /Commit rmdir C:\ULTIMATE Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim oscdimg -LTEST -m -u2 -bootdata:2#p0,e,bC:\Win7\boot\etfsboot.com#pEF,e,bC:\Win7\efi\microsoft\boot\efisys.bin C:\Win7\ C:\ISO\Win7UEFI.ISO PAUSE Copy the script of your choice & paste it to notepad. Ensure the script is saved as a batch file (ending in extension .bat). Note: This script must be run uninterrupted and it takes at least a couple of hours to run so you will want to prevent your computer from going to sleep or for interference from the likes of Windows Update during this time. I myself tested the Windows 7 AIO Script & it took around 5 hours on my 6th generation intel skylake system. Here is the command line interface of Win 7 AIO Script(Extract): C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Details for image : C:\Win7\sources\install.wim Index : 1 Name : Windows 7 HOMEBASIC Description : Windows 7 HOMEBASIC Size : 11,710,161,360 bytes Index : 2 Name : Windows 7 HOMEPREMIUM Description : Windows 7 HOMEPREMIUM Size : 12,222,587,449 bytes Index : 3 Name : Windows 7 PROFESSIONAL Description : Windows 7 PROFESSIONAL Size : 12,122,886,417 bytes Index : 4 Name : Windows 7 ULTIMATE Description : Windows 7 ULTIMATE Size : 12,285,492,779 bytes The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>PAUSE Press any key to continue . . . C:\Windows\system32>mkdir C:\ULTIMATE C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Mount-WIM /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim /index: 4 /MountDir:C:\ULTIMATE Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Mounting image [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates \Windows6.1-KB3020369-x64.msu Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Image Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Processing 1 of 1 - Adding package C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB3020369-x64.msu [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates \windows6.1-kb3125574-v4-x64_2dafb1d203c8964239af3048b5dd4b1264cd93b9.msu Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Image Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Processing 1 of 1 - Adding package C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb3125574-v4-x64_2dafb1 d203c8964239af3048b5dd4b1264cd93b9.msu [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates \Windows6.1-KB2729094-v2-x64.msu Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Image Version: 6.1.7601.23403 Processing 1 of 1 - Adding package C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2729094-v2-x64.msu [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates \Windows6.1-KB2670838-x64.msu Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Image Version: 6.1.7601.23403 Processing 1 of 1 - Adding package C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2670838-x64.msu [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates \Windows6.1-KB2834140-v2-x64.msu Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Image Version: 6.1.7601.23403 Processing 1 of 1 - Adding package C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2834140-v2-x64.msu [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates \Windows6.1-KB2639308-x64.msu Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Image Version: 6.1.7601.23403 Processing 1 of 1 - Adding package C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2639308-x64.msu [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /packagepath:C:\IE11 Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Image Version: 6.1.7601.23403 Processing 1 of 1 - Adding package Microsoft-Windows-InternetExplorer-Package-To pLevel~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~~11.2.9600.16428 [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates \Windows6.1-KB2990941-v3-x64.msu Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Image Version: 6.1.7601.23403 Processing 1 of 1 - Adding package C:\Updates\Windows6.1-KB2990941-v3-x64.msu [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates \windows6.1-KB3087873-v2-x64.msu Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Image Version: 6.1.7601.23403 Processing 1 of 1 - Adding package C:\Updates\windows6.1-KB3087873-v2-x64.msu [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates \windows6.1-kb4474419-v3-x64_b5614c6cea5cb4e198717789633dca16308ef79c.msu Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Image Version: 6.1.7601.23403 Processing 1 of 1 - Adding package C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4474419-v3-x64_b5614c 6cea5cb4e198717789633dca16308ef79c.msu [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates \windows6.1-kb4490628-x64_d3de52d6987f7c8bdc2c015dca69eac96047c76e.msu Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Image Version: 6.1.7601.23403 Processing 1 of 1 - Adding package C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4490628-x64_d3de52d69 87f7c8bdc2c015dca69eac96047c76e.msu [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Image:C:\ULTIMATE /Add-Package /PackagePath:C:\Updates \windows6.1-kb4534310-x64_4dc78a6eeb14e2eac1ede7381f4a93658c8e2cdc.msu Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Image Version: 6.1.7601.23403 Processing 1 of 1 - Adding package C:\Updates\windows6.1-kb4534310-x64_4dc78a6ee b14e2eac1ede7381f4a93658c8e2cdc.msu [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Unmount-WIM /MountDir:C:\ULTIMATE /Commit Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Image File : C:\Win7\sources\install.wim Image Index : 4 Saving image [==========================100.0%==========================] Unmounting image [==========================100.0%==========================] The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>rmdir C:\ULTIMATE C:\Windows\system32>Dism /Get-WimInfo /WimFile:C:\Win7\sources\install.wim Deployment Image Servicing and Management tool Version: 6.1.7600.16385 Details for image : C:\Win7\sources\install.wim Index : 1 Name : Windows 7 HOMEBASIC Description : Windows 7 HOMEBASIC Size : 14,867,750,897 bytes Index : 2 Name : Windows 7 HOMEPREMIUM Description : Windows 7 HOMEPREMIUM Size : 15,386,654,205 bytes Index : 3 Name : Windows 7 PROFESSIONAL Description : Windows 7 PROFESSIONAL Size : 15,291,878,047 bytes Index : 4 Name : Windows 7 ULTIMATE Description : Windows 7 ULTIMATE Size : 15,454,575,521 bytes The operation completed successfully. C:\Windows\system32>oscdimg -LTEST -m -u2 -bootdata:2#p0,e,bC:\Win7\boot\etfsboo t.com#pEF,e,bC:\Win7\efi\microsoft\boot\efisys.bin C:\Win7\ C:\ISO\Win7UEFI.ISO OSCDIMG 2.54 CD-ROM and DVD-ROM Premastering Utility Copyright (C) Microsoft, 1993-2007. All rights reserved. Licensed only for producing Microsoft authorized content. Scanning source tree (500 files in 46 directories) Scanning source tree complete (876 files in 200 directories) Computing directory information complete Image file is 5166202880 bytes Writing 876 files in 200 directories to C:\ISO\Win7UEFI.ISO 100% complete Final image file is 5168396288 bytes Done. C:\Windows\system32>PAUSE Press any key to continue . . . Host System: Windows 7 x64 CREDITS: @philipyip
  10. vizit

    Driver update

    I am looking for a free software to update the drivers. A lot of software are available over the internet but all are not up to the mark. They are lagging one way or the other. So I request you to please suggest me a good software to update the drivers
  11. Microsoft to support new Edge browser until July 15, 2021 on Windows 7 Microsoft released the first stable version of the company's new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge web browser one day after it ended support for its Windows 7 operating system. Support for Windows 7 ended on January 14, 2020 for Home customers. Business and Enterprise customers have options to extend support by up to three years if they pay Microsoft for Extended Security Updates. The release of the new Microsoft Edge web browser for Windows 7 raised some questions. One of the main questions concerned support for the browser under Windows 7. For how long would Microsoft support the Chromium-based Edge browser on Windows 7? Microsoft has now provided an answer to that question. According to the company, the new Microsoft Edge web browser will be supported on Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 until July 15, 2021. We will continue to support Microsoft Edge on Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 until July 15, 2021. These operating systems are out of support and Microsoft recommends you move to a supported operating system such as Windows 10. While Microsoft Edge helps keep you more secure on the web, your PC may still be vulnerable to security risks. In order for IE mode to be supported on these operating systems the devices will need to have the Extended Security Updates for Windows 7. Without the Windows 7 Extended Security updates Internet Explorer functionality will be vulnerable to security risks. Additionally, IE mode functionality may cease to work without the continued servicing through the extended security updates. The browser's IE Mode (Internet Explorer mode) is only available on systems that have joined the Extended Security Updates program because of security risks involved. One question that has not been answered in the context is whether the new Microsoft Edge browser will remain supported for customers with Extended Security Updates functionality beyond July 15, 2021. These may get support until early 2023 for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, and ending Edge support early may not sit well with some of these customers. Source: Microsoft to support new Edge browser until July 15, 2021 on Windows 7 (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  12. 0Patch publishes micropatch to address Windows Font Parsing vulnerability Microsoft published an advisory about a new font parsing vulnerability in Windows on March 23, 2020. The company rated the vulnerability as critical and said that it was aware of limited targeted attacks exploiting the vulnerability. Microsoft listed several workarounds to mitigate attacks but they all reduced functionality for users in one way or another. Microsoft has yet to release a security patch to address the issue for all versions of Windows affected by the vulnerability. Security company 0Patch, well-known for its pledge to create and distribute patches for the Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 operating systems that ran out of official support this year. While business and Enterprise customers may extend support by up to three years, home users cannot officially and 0Patch patches. Microsoft already announced that it won't provide the font parsing patch for unsupported versions of Windows 7 while it will provide it to companies and Enterprise organizations that have joined the ESU program to receive extended support updates. 0Patch announced today that it has created a micro-patch for the font parsing vulnerability that affects all major client and server versions of the Windows operating system. A blog post on the official 0Patch blog lists the official information and analyzes the workarounds that Microsoft posted. While all work to a degree, all have disadvantages that 0Patch highlights. Disabling the preview pane, details pane and thumbnails in Windows Explorer for example only blocks attacks when the file manager is used but it won't protect against other attack vectors. The team analyzed the vulnerability -- it had to since Microsoft did not disclose details about it -- and found a solution that it turned into a micro patch. Basically, what 0Patch did was put a bouncer in front of font operations if Adobe Type 1 Script fonts are used so that the vulnerability cannot be exploited. So we decided to find the common execution point that various Windows applications such as Windows Explorer, Font Viewer, and applications using Windows-integrated font support are using to pass a font to Windows, then place a bouncer there that would keep Adobe Type 1 PostScript fonts out. The blog post goes into detail and users interested in additional details may check it out for additional information on the implementation. All administrators need to do is install the micro patch on the device to protect it against the vulnerability. With this micropatch in place, all applications using Windows GDI for font-related operations will find any Adobe Type 1 PostScript fonts rendered invalid and unable to load. For example, Windows Explorer will start looking like this when viewing a folder with a pair of otherwise valid PFM and PFB files. The patch is available for free for Windows 7 64-bit and Windows Server 2008 R2 without Extended Security Updates. 0Patch plans to create patches for ESU versions of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2, as well as Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 soon as well. Windows 10 and Server won't receive the patch as these systems face less of a risk from the vulnerability than previous versions of Windows. Here is a video by the company: Source: 0Patch publishes micropatch to address Windows Font Parsing vulnerability (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  13. Greetings everyone, This guide is in continuation of my previous topic. It will help you to integrate latest Microsoft .NET Framework 4.8(Recommended) & Visual C++ Redistributable Packages install runtime components(Optional) in Win7UEFI.iso which was previously created in C:\ISO folder. This is the last thing you should do after slipstreaming all necessary updates & drivers(if any) in Windows 7 Disc Image (ISO file). STEPS: 1) Manually create WinTemp & WA2Manual folder in C:\ Drive. 2) Mount the above ISO & copy all its contents to C:\WinTemp. 3) Download simple conversion/manual integration pack for addons & extract it to C:\WA2Manual. Link: https://m.put.re/99TkTpX2.zip 4) Download dotNetFx48_20200114_x64.WA & vcredist_x64_Win7_20191015.WA from below link and copy it to C:\WA2Manual. https://github.com/abbodi1406/dotNetFx4xW7A/releases/tag/20.01.14 https://gitlab.com/stdout12/adns/uploads/21564cca02c77c5571511a5acd54e5a7/vcredist_x64_Win7_20191015.WA 5) Run WA2MAN.cmd & wait for its completion. It will create two sub-folder viz., dotNetFx48_20200114_x64 & vcredist_x64_Win7_20191015 6) Now mount the index(s): For Windows 7 HOMEBASIC For Windows 7 HOMEPREMIUM For Windows 7 PROFESSIONAL For Windows 7 ULTIMATE For Windows 7 AIO Save it as a batch file on desktop say "mount.bat" and then right click on it & run as admin. 7) Now integrate the dotnet & VCredist by running Integrator.cmd as admin created on above sub-folder. Enter the mounted path say C:\PROFESSIONAL. For Win7AIO you have to run Integrator.cmd 4 TIMES to cover all indexes. In Total 8(=4+4)Times. Finally unmount the index(s): For Windows 7 HOMEBASIC For Windows 7 HOMEPREMIUM For Windows 7 PROFESSIONAL For Windows 7 ULTIMATE For Windows 7 AIO Save it as a batch file say "unmount.bat" on Desktop & run as admin New Disc Image(ISO file) will be created in C:\ Drive. Credits: @abbodi1406
  14. Key Points The Windows 7 upgrade cycle is not as far along as it usually is this far along, Microsoft finance chief Amy Hood said on Monday. Around 23% of Windows desktop machines are still running Windows 7. Microsoft still sees plenty of opportunity to for customers to upgrade machines from Windows 7 to Windows 10, and not only because of coronavirus fallout. Usually, Microsoft sees a pronounced increase in revenue around the time it ends support for an older version of its Windows operating system as individuals and companies buy PCs with the latest from Microsoft. Then, over time, the impact tails off, making for tougher year-over-year upgrade comparisons. It's taking longer this time around, which could spread out the revenue generated from the upgrade process to additional quarters. Analysts watch Windows revenue closely, as it gives Microsoft 15% of its revenue and meaningful profit. Amy Hood, Microsoft's finance chief, indicated to analysts in January that China's public health situation and a chip shortage could be factors in the prolonged Windows refresh cycle. At the time, she issued a quarterly revenue guidance range for the business segment including Windows that was wider than usual to reflect impact from the coronavirus in particular. Then, last week, in the midst of a market selloff, Microsoft said it did not expect to reach that guidance range, sending Microsoft and other stocks lower. The cycle is not as far along as it usually is at this point in the timeline, Hood said on Monday during a conversation with Morgan Stanley analyst Keith Weiss at Morgan Stanley's Technology Media and Telecom conference in San Francisco. Microsoft ended support for Windows 7 in January. Here's what Hood said: I think, in general, these cycles tend to look similar. But what I would say is this one is certainly more complicated by a number of things that I'll talk about in a second. What is different about this is there still remains quite a bit of opportunity more than we saw at this point in the prior cycle. A lot of that exists where you would expect it to exist, which is small and medium business segment. Not unusual, but it means that we do have some room to continue to grow and likely means that the curve will look different than last time in terms of its shape. Now, then you add to it two complicating factors, one of which you brought up, which have been chip supply, which has impacted some of the growth rates over the past bit. And then, the second one which is the supply chain currently in China in terms of bindings and productions. And so those will — and as we've talked about, will impact the quarterly results. And so I'm not sure it'll look like the exact same curve in terms of the prior cycle, not just because we have a little bit more left to go than we have had in prior cycles, but also because it's been a bit more volatile due to those two issues as we work through them. Microsoft released Windows 7 in 2009. Other than Windows 10, it's the most popular version of Windows on desktop, with about 23% share in February, according to Statcounter. Windows 8 and Windows 8.1, which came out in 2012 and 2013, respectively, are less widely used than Windows 7. Microsoft said in 2018 that there were 1.5 billion Windows devices. "I feel great that we're executing well on end of support," Hood said on Monday, speaking of older versions of Windows PC licenses and other products. "It builds a great funnel for us as we think about transition to the cloud for customers and helping them on their hybrid journey." Source
  15. New actively exploited IE bug forces Microsoft to patch Windows 7 again Both Windows 7 and Internet Explorer was meant to exit support last month, but it seems Microsoft just can’t stop patching its out-of-support operating systems. An actively exploited Javascript engine bug has caused Microsoft to release a new patch for the old browser all the way to IE9. The CVE-2020-0674 entry notes: A remote code execution vulnerability exists in the way that the scripting engine handles objects in memory in Internet Explorer. The vulnerability could corrupt memory in such a way that an attacker could execute arbitrary code in the context of the current user. An attacker who successfully exploited the vulnerability could gain the same user rights as the current user. If the current user is logged on with administrative user rights, an attacker who successfully exploited the vulnerability could take control of an affected system. An attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights. In a web-based attack scenario, an attacker could host a specially crafted website that is designed to exploit the vulnerability through Internet Explorer and then convince a user to view the website. An attacker could also embed an ActiveX control marked “safe for initialization” in an application or Microsoft Office document that hosts the IE rendering engine. The attacker could also take advantage of compromised websites and websites that accept or host user-provided content or advertisements. These websites could contain specially crafted content that could exploit the vulnerability. The security update addresses the vulnerability by modifying how the scripting engine handles objects in memory The exploit could be triggered via any application that can host HTML such as a document or PDF, and it has a Critical rating on Windows 7, 8.1 and 10, and is currently being actively exploited in the wild. Microsoft is releasing a patch for all these operating systems, and also Windows Server 2008, 2012 and 2019. Read more and find download links at Microsoft here. Via SCMagazine Source: New actively exploited IE bug forces Microsoft to patch Windows 7 again (MSPoweruser)
  16. Thought you already paid for Win7 Extended Security Updates? Think again. Even if you bought and paid for Win7 extended security patches, and even if you’ve followed all of the instructions to install the ESU key, and even if Microsoft’s test program said your installation was complete — it wasn’t. And isn’t. Let me introduce you to the new KB 4538483. Thinkstock/Microsoft I’m hearing lots of complaints from people who spent good money to get Win7 Extended Security Updates, but don’t see this month’s patches. There’s a reason why. Microsoft didn’t bother to tell us that you need a new patch, released yesterday, in order to start receiving Win7 ESU updates. You have to download the new patch, KB 4538483, from the Microsoft Catalog, and install it manually before the updates even appear. Folks who spent money to get the February and later patches are livid. Yesterday, after releasing the February updates, Microsoft modified its ESU Procedure page to add this step: Download and install the Extended Security Updates (ESU) Licensing Preparation Package. For more information, see the following articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 4538483 Extended Security Updates (ESU) Licensing Preparation Package for Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 4538484 Extended Security Updates (ESU) Licensing Preparation Package for Windows Server 2008 SP2 The upshot: If you (or your company) paid for extended updates, unless you know by osmosis that you have to install this additional package, and then you download and install KB 4538483 manually, you won’t see any February patches. Adding insult to pinheaded injury, if your machine is all prepped to receive Extended Security Updates — using the instructions that were in effect before yesterday — and you don’t install KB 4538483 (or KB 4538484) manually, you won’t even see the Office patches for that machine. This new KB 4538483 patch has to be manually installed, even if your machine has passed Microsoft's KB 4528069 tests to verify that ESU is properly set up. Patch Lady Susan Bradley kicks it, “While I'm glad that Microsoft offered Win7 Extended Security Updates to small businesses, I'm also concerned that I have now put small businesses at the mercy of what feels like a less-than-planned implementation. In order to get patched by Windows Update, one has to stumble on a brand new blog post out today and download a patch only on the Catalog site. The idea behind paid-for security patches is to make it easier to be patched while you are still running Windows 7, not make it harder to get updates.” Need help? We’re ready on AskWoody.com. Source: Thought you already paid for Win7 Extended Security Updates? Think again. (Computerworld - Woody Leonhard)
  17. French terminal flashes sous-vêtements at Paris patty punters Bork!Bork!Bork! Welcome to another instalment in our occasional series of software being poorly where it really shouldn't. Today it is Five Guys, where the burgers are fresh, but the software less so… Seeking to muscle in on McDonald's greasy grip on borkage comes upstart burger chain (in the UK at least) Five Guys and a very unhappy terminal in Paris La Défense. While the outfit might trumpet its "Handcrafted Burgers & Fries since 1986," the sad little Windows flag puts things very much in the 21st century. Snapped in January by an eagle-eyed Register reader, the NCR terminal looks to be showing Windows 7 wallpaper. This is no guarantee that Windows 7 is actually running on the thing – it might be the work of a Linux admin with a particularly evil sense of humour or possibly a bitmap left lingering like a bad smell following an upgrade. Then there is the whole Windows 10 in France thing. After all, back in 2016, regulators got a little stroppy over Windows 10's supposed slurping habits that left the Commission Nationale de l'Informatique et des Libertés (CNIL) thwacking the software behemoth with the stale baguette of privacy. We're sure everyone is best buddies now, of course. Right? Or maybe it is simply that like all too many computers out there, it continues to run the end-of-life Operating System in the face of Microsoft's increasingly shrill pleas to please, please stop. Naturally, we would not suggest that the premium patty flinger's wares were as time-expired as Windows 7. We also asked the burger flippers what might have befallen the customer-facing device, but have yet to receive a response. As ever, if the architects of the borkage feel the urge to explain themselves, we will update accordingly. In the meantime, we were delighted to note the terminal's frame asking customers to ask staff about allergies. How about Windows 7? The thought of that being served up with some appetisingly steaming comestibles (and fries) could cause this hack to break out in hives. Source
  18. Hello everyone. I am in desperate need of help in finding a driver software for Wipro Wep LQ DSI 5235 dot matrix printer for Windows 7 Professional x64 version. If any member from the forum possess the required digitally signed driver, please help me with it. Thank you.
  19. The Free Software Foundation really set the bar high there Good news everybody! The Free Software Foundation has blown through its self-imposed target of 7,777 signatories in its efforts to persuade Microsoft to make Windows 7 open source. We noted last week the GNU-gang's attempt to coax the born-again open-sourcerer formerly known as "The Beast Of Redmond" into making a surprise deposit into GitHub. The thinking was that since Windows 7 has now come to the end of the road, as far as free security updates are concerned, then perhaps Microsoft might release it as open software? We put it to the Free Software Foundation that it might be more complicated than that – after all, Windows 7 contains all manner of codecs and the like licensed from third parties, as well as code licensed back to those same customers. The FSF's Greg Farough told us: "We want all software to be free software." The clue, after all, is in the name. "But Microsoft freeing just the operating system itself would satisfy our demand here." But what of those enterprises that have already paid for support? Should Microsoft start lobbing out refunds or fork the freshly open-sourced code base? "Enterprises wouldn't be paying for a licence anymore," explained Farough, "but they would still need support." With what we imagine is the starry-eyed glint of a true believer, he added: "They could either choose to take that on internally, with other vendors, or stick with Microsoft. That's one of the beauties of free software. "You may still have to pay for support, but you can shop around without arbitrary restrictions, and you're not paying for just a licence." Certainly, anyone who has had to explain to a bean counter that Linux is free but those who look after it – internally or externally – still expect to be paid will know that there is always a cost somewhere down the line. We put it to Farough that other obsolete software in the Office or Server lines might also benefit from the open source wand. He agreed, but said the focus was on Windows 7 due to "headlines we're seeing about users feeling left in the lurch by the EOL". Farough told us that the FSF usually gives Microsoft stick "for their proprietary software", but since the giant had "been talking so much about how they now support free software (they usually say 'open source' or 'Linux'), we think they should take this opportunity to do the right thing." Freeing the software, he reckoned, would mean it would stay alive as long as someone could be bothered to maintain the thing. "Intentionally killing Windows [7] off," he said, "is irresponsible and even disrespectful to the many people who have spent so much time using and developing it." While those who developed it (Microsoft) would dearly like to see the back of it, Farough has a point regarding those used to its familiar Aero desktop. A good portion of users remain on the platform unable or unwilling to upgrade or pay for extended support. "We do already have our own operating system, GNU/Linux, so we don't *need* Windows 7," Farough said, but added the FSF would be happy to shepherd Microsoft through the wilds of open-source licenceland (and all the monsters within). "As the FSF is the caretaker of the GPL, we feel confident in our ability to assist them." We asked Microsoft if it had any more thoughts now that the petition had passed its target but the company declined to comment. And the target? Far be it from us to suggest it might have been a little on the low side, but more people signed a petition to sort out the roads in the UK county of Surrey. Or ban the sale of fireworks to the clearly untrustworthy British public. To be frank, Satan is more likely to caught riding a snowplough before that source is made free. Certainly in the near to medium term. In the meantime, if Windows 10 is out of the question and you're reluctant to pay Apple's idiot tax, then perhaps a look a modern Linux distribution will be enough to scratch that free software itch. The world has, after all, moved on a bit in the decade since Windows 7 was new. Source
  20. Antivirus for Windows 7: support continues All antivirus solutions remain supported on Microsoft's Windows 7 operating system after Microsoft ended support for it on January 14, 2020. The Windows 7 operating system has a large usage base even after support end. While the trend showed a decline for some time, latest NetMarketShare usage stats suggest that it is still installed on over 30% of desktop devices worldwide. Enterprise customers and businesses may buy support extensions for up to three years; Microsoft decided against making the same offer to users of Home versions of Windows 7. While Microsoft's support ended in January, some of the company's products and most third-party products continue to support Windows 7 at least for the time being. Antivirus solutions are essential for devices that connect to the Internet or public networks, especially if the operating system itself is out of support and won't receive security updates anymore. Tip: Home users may use the solution provided by 0Patch to receive some free (some paid) security patches for Windows 7 after support end. Antivirus solutions never provide 100% protection and that is even more so the case when it comes to operating systems that are not supported with security patches anymore. A good antivirus solution may however prevent certain attacks or reduce the impact that these attacks have, especially if it is updated regularly. German antivirus testing institute AV Test wanted to know which antivirus solutions would continue to support Microsoft's Windows 7 operating system after support end, and for how long. The institute contacted antivirus companies to find out and published a table of its findings on its website. According to the information, most antivirus solutions continue to be supported on Windows 7 for at least two years. All companies continue to support their antivirus solution with signature updates for the time being. Here is the summary: Microsoft Security Essentials -- no more program updates, but signature updates continue to be provided. Sophos -- on premise support until December 2020, cloud-managed support until June 2021. McAfee -- at least until December 2021. F-Secure - at least until December 2021. Avira -- support ends November 2022. AhnLab, AVG, Avast, Bitdefender, Bullgard, Carbon Black, ESET, FireEye, G Data, Ikarus, Kaspersky, K7 Computing, Microworld, PC Matic, Quickheal, Sqqrite, Symantec/NortonLifeLock, ThreatTrack / Vipre, TotalAV, Trend Micro -- support for at least 2 years. Source: Antivirus for Windows 7: support continues (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  21. 'Its life doesn't have to end!' More than 10 years on from its campaign to persuade users to dump Windows 7 for a non-proprietary alternative, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) has kicked off a petition to urge Microsoft to open-source the recently snuffed software. On the face of it, the logic seems pretty simple. On 14 January Windows 7 reached its end of life as Microsoft turned off the free security update taps with a final fix (which seemed to bork desktop wallpapers for some users). "Its life doesn't have to end," cried the foundation. "We call on Microsoft to upcycle it instead." Unfortunately, the FSF couldn't resist a final dig, saying the killing of the OS had brought to an end "its updates as well as its 10 years of poisoning education, invading privacy, and threatening user security." Hey team, way to go on persuading the Redmond gang to do you a solid. Suggesting such a release would go some way to "undo past wrongs" may not be a persuasive argument for the Seattle suits, who probably saw Windows 7 as way of undoing the heinous deeds of Vista. There is a precedent. Ancient MS-DOS and Word code has been opened up, and the Calculator app found in the current Windows 10 now lurks on GitHub. But an entire, relatively recent OS? We can see some problems, not least the licensed components lurking in Windows 7 that would need to be either excised or open-sourced as well. Then there are the bits and pieces that the company would consider valuable secrets (large chunks of Windows 7 linger on in Windows 10 after all.) And then there is the fact that Windows 7 is not actually unsupported. Three more years of updates are available for those who can pay. And with Windows (as well those parts of it licensed to third parties) still accounting for a sizeable chunk of Microsoft's revenues, we can imagine a very functional and highly compatible free version is not really in the company's best fiscal interests. And let's be honest, who knows what might be lurking in that code. "Take that, Penguin fsckers!" anyone? It was a different time. The Register contacted Microsoft on the off-chance that Windows 7 might be showing up on GitHub at some point soon, but we were told that the company doesn't comment on rumours and speculation. The Win 7 request from FSF is neither rumour nor speculation. In any event, if open source is your thing, there are plenty of Linux distributions in a far better state of usefulness than what was around when Windows 7 first launched. And if there is that Windows app you just can't do without, the popular compatibility layer Wine received a bump to version 5 this week, replete with over 7,400 tweaks to allow you to inflict more Windows apps on your Penguin-tinged OS. Still, never say never. If you told us 10 years ago that Microsoft would be about to ship a version of Windows containing the Linux kernel we might have sprayed precious beer from our nostrils. So who knows what else might be coming down the line? Source
  22. Facepalm: It’s been almost two weeks since Microsoft officially ended its extended support for Windows 7, but the Redmond firm is introducing another free update for the OS that fixes a bug it introduced in the final public updates. As reported by The Verge, one of Microsoft’s final free Windows 7 updates—KB4534310—is causing wallpaper problems for some users. After installation, an image can display as black when set to Stretch. The issue only appears to affect stretched wallpapers, fit, fill, tile, or center options still work normally. Microsoft had initially said that the fix would only be available to organizations who pay the expensive Extended Security Updates (ESUs), but it has now decided to offer it for free to everyone running Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1. While the bug isn’t exactly a major one, the fact Microsoft introduced it just as the company stopped supporting non-paying Windows 7 users is a bad look. Pushing out the fix to everyone will help avoid some negative PR. ESUs aren’t cheap. During the first year, those using Windows 7 Enterprise will pay $25 per machine. This doubles to $50 in the second year and goes up to $100 for the third year. It’s even more expensive for those using Windows 7 Pro. ESUs for this version start at $50 before going up to $100 in year two and $200 during year three. Many businesses have been slow to migrate from Windows 7 to Windows 10, including the German government, which has to pay Microsoft around $886,000 for ESUs. In other Windows 7 news, the Free Software Foundation is demanding that the OS be released as free software. Source: https://www.techspot.com/news/83729-microsoft-issuing-free-windows-7-fix-after-introducing.html
  23. Suitable attire, seeing that it's dead Microsoft has given Windows 7 users a parting gift with its last update as some holdouts are reporting existing desktop wallpaper being replaced by a sombre black screen – presumably in mourning for the veteran OS. Others have also called out problems on Windows 10, but it is the venerable (and potentially vulnerable) 7 that is generating the most heat. The issue, which is causing debate on the likes of Reddit, appears to have kicked off following last week's monthly roll-up, KB4534310 or the security-only update KB4534314, the last for those on Windows 7 and not enrolled in the Extended Security Update (ESU) programme. The problem seems to afflict those with stretched wallpaper and, more worryingly, appears to have also hit organisations with "wallpaper set by group" policy. Users aren't keen on change, and we can imagine a good few BOFHs receiving calls from customers distressed by the disappearance of the usual company logo and the arrival of something a lot darker, almost... funeral-like. The Register has contacted Microsoft to find out if this is a known issue. The company did warn users not on ESU, domain joined or kiosk versions of Windows 7 to expect to see an out-of-support nag screen, but switching off a beloved kitten or puppy backdrop is perhaps a step too far. Users have performed their own sleuthing and discovered that wallpapers pop back to life if the offending patch is removed. This is unfortunate, since there are some important fixes in there that really should be installed. Others have suggested not using the stretch option (and so manually ensuring images fit) or firing up the good old Aero theme. A Register reader got in touch to tell us the problem had hit computers at his organisation, where wallpaper is enforced by policy. Others have donned the tinfoil conspiracy hats, muttering that the borkage is part of a dastardly Redmondian scheme to rip the beloved OS from their hands. Right. To complicate things further, not all stretched images are affected. However, if your screen has suddenly turned black, we'd suggest trying out some different image sizes before throwing in the towel. We will update this story if Microsoft responds. Source
  24. Microsoft computer users should be aware of a recent scam that is making the rounds. The Better Business Bureau (BBB) is warning users of crooks who might look to trick them into paying for an “expiring Windows license” that they may not need. The scam is tied to the recent end of technical support for the ‘Windows 7’ operating system. The typical ploy involves a call from a person who says they are a Microsoft employee. That person might recommend a system upgrade that requires paying a yearly fee. There could also be a request to get remote access to a user’s computer, putting the user at risk for identity theft. The BBB says reputable companies do not call customers without permission. Microsoft, in particular, says all their support requests start with customers. If a claim seems unusual, the BBB says the user should do their own research before taking any help. Microsoft Windows 7 tech support ended announcement / Courtesy: Microsoft Microsoft ended its technical support for ‘Windows 7’ on Tuesday, Jan. 14. The BBB says to report tech support scams to Microsoft here, and get information about upgrading from Windows 7 here. Source
  25. Karlston

    Seven high points of Windows 7

    Seven high points of Windows 7 What a long ride it's been for Microsoft's popular OS. Support for Windows 7 ends today, making this a good time to look at some of its highs and lows over the years. pan xiaozhen modified by IDG Comm. / Microsoft (CC0) Today Microsoft issues its final free security update for Windows 7, putting an end to that operating system's decade. To remember that service — a retirement party but without the cloyingly sweet cake and cheap gold watch — Computerworld selected seven highlights of Windows 7. While the seven do not pretend to trace Windows 7's history, they illustrate the influence and impact of the OS. Here's to Windows 7. Raise a glass, for cryin' out loud. It salvaged Microsoft's reputation after the Vista debacle The numbers say it all. Windows Vista, the 2006 replacement for Windows XP, topped out at 20% of all Windows versions in October 2009. Even though the OS it followed was long in the tooth — XP was nearly twice the age of a typical version when it was supplanted — Vista struggled to put a dent in its forerunner's share. Windows XP still accounted for 75% of all Windows activity when Vista peaked. Windows 7 drove down Vista's share toot sweet: In 18 months, Vista's share of all Windows had fallen to 11.5%. Users couldn't wait to rid themselves of Vista. But then, what would you expect of an OS that fostered a class-action lawsuit? The three-quarters-of-a-billion-dollar snafu An oversight — so said Microsoft — with Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1) cost the company €561 million ($732 million at the time) when the European Union's anti-trust regulators fined the firm for omitting a browser choice feature. The March 2013 decision by EU officials — the first time regulators there punished a company for shirking an antitrust agreement — ultimately stemmed from a 2007 complaint by rival Opera Software, which alleged that Microsoft manipulated the battle for browser share by tying Internet Explorer (IE) to Windows. Two years later, Microsoft agreed to show European users of Windows a "browser ballot," a screen that displayed download links to other browsers, including Google's Chrome, Mozilla's Firefox and Opera's namesake. But Microsoft failed to show that ballot to users of Windows 7 SP1 for some 14 months, from May 2011 until July 2012. More than 15 million users did not see the ballot as they should have, the EU charged. In mid-2012, Microsoft admitted the goof and apologized, even as it downplayed the problem, saying it had been purely a "technical error" and blaming an engineering team. Microsoft failed to disclose the snafu in the self-certified compliance reports it was required to submit to EU authorities. In fact, Microsoft had ignored a user who reported the omission of the browser ballot in Windows 7 SP1. That user had queried support representatives in March 2011, a month after the launch of SP1 and two months before the start of the span during which regulators claimed Microsoft had scratched the ballot, saying, "I do not see the options for the browser choice." Although a support engineer replied to the user in the online forum, he paid no notice to the question of the ballot's whereabouts. SKU insanity Microsoft tried to hang onto the netbook market for a while longer with Windows 7 Starter, one of a ballooning number of SKUs (stock-keeping units) segregating the OS. Starter, which had been preceded by same-named versions on both Windows XP and Vista, was meant to service the netbook market, the name for the smaller, less capable, and most importantly, cheaper notebook computers that juiced PC sales after their 2007 debut. Windows XP Starter and Windows Vista Starter had been sold only in a small number of markets outside the U.S.; Windows 7 Starter was sold domestically, however. (Microsoft kept calling these systems "small notebooks," eschewing the "netbook" nomenclature for some reason.) By the time of Windows 7's late-2009 launch, netbooks were plainly converging with standard small and light notebooks and/or sub-notebooks (another name for another category, or sub-category). Microsoft acknowledged that, at least to some extent, by dropping the three-applications-at-a-time restriction from Windows 7 Starter that had been imposed on XP's and Vista's versions. Other omissions and limitations remained, however. Windows 7 Starter left out the "Aero" graphic user interface (GUI) that was Windows 7's most visible feature, omitted support for DVD playback and did not provide the ability to change the desktop background. (What?) Starter was also a signal that Microsoft still held a more-is-better belief when it came to fragmenting an OS into multiple versions, or SKUs. Windows 7, like its Vista forerunner, came in six: Starter, Home Basic, Home Premium, Professional, Enterprise and Ultimate. (Vista had used Business rather than Professional.) Because Windows XP also featured half a dozen SKUs — although the versions were different in several cases — Microsoft pushed six SKUs from 2001, XP's launch, through 2017, Vista's retirement. From 2012 on, however, Microsoft pared Windows to three with Windows 8 (four if you counted Windows RT, which no one should) and maintained that number, at least at the beginning, with Windows 10 (we're counting Home, Pro and Enterprise). Since 10's launch, though, Microsoft has loosened its belt, expanding the SKUs with options like Windows 10 Pro Workstation and Windows 10 S, even as it tightened said strip of leather by dropping something-for-everyone SKUs like Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise. Belly up to the bar Windows 7 boosted the size of the taskbar and added several elements that remain to this day in its successor, 10. Microsoft beefed up the taskbar's vertical dimension by 33% — when using the by-default large icon and labels option — from Windows Vista, and also expanded the width of the active application tiles as well as the icons for pinned apps. Features like jump lists — click on the taskbar icon for Word, say, and a list of recently-opened documents appears — pinning and thumbnails (admittedly introduced in Vista but made larger and interactive in Windows 7) have proven durable enough to last through multiple OS generations. For a blast from the past, check out this blog about the Windows 7 taskbar that was posted almost a year before the operating system's release. It was authored by Steven Sinofsky, at the time one of the development heads for the OS. (Later, Sinofsky became president of the Windows Division, where he became the public face of Windows 8, the heir to 7 that bombed.) The end of an era 
Windows 7 was Microsoft's last stable OS. For a bit more than a decade, Windows 7 remained fixed, steadfast, unvarying, enduring. According to Microsoft's model, we'll never see Windows like that again, not on personal computers. (Windows 10 LTSC may be meant to stay static for 10 years, but it's not suited for general PC purposes.) Windows 7 sported just a single service pack (SP), the cumulative roll-ups released at irregular intervals, that was issued in February 2011, about 16 months after the OS's debut. But although Windows 7 SP1 contained some changes, they were all under the hood; nothing visible to users was altered. Much the same could be said for a subsequent platform update, a February 2013 release focused on graphics and imaging components and including Internet Explorer 10 (IE10). Meanwhile, Windows 10 morphs every 12 months if enterprise customers are lucky (and the 2019 major-minor pattern continues), every six months if they're not. Post-retirement patches step into daylight Microsoft believed commercial customers were so enamored of Windows 7 — and would hold onto the OS in such numbers — that for the first time the company publicly unveiled a program to provide post-retirement security updates. That was a significantly different approach than the company has used before as an OS nears it end times. Called Extended Support Updates (ESU) and revealed in September 2018 — a year and a half prior to Windows 7's expiration — the program focused on volume-licensing customers, its largest and most important patrons. Those businesses would be able to purchase support in one-year increments for up to three years, with prices doubling in the second year, doubling again in the third. Customers with subscriptions to Windows 10 would receive a discount. (Near the last minute — in October 2019 — Microsoft caved to small businesses and said it would also sell ESU to customers who did not have existing volume licensing plans in place.) What was remarkable about ESU wasn't its existence, but that Microsoft was so public about it. The firm has sold post-retirement programs before, notably when Windows XP neared its retirement. But those deals were clouded in secrecy, with mysterious — and negotiable — price points. Prior to Windows XP's 2014 exit from support, Microsoft sold "custom support agreements," or CSAs, to its larger customers. But buying CSA was a completely-behind-the-scenes process done on a company-by-company basis, with virtually no public information about the program nor price lists. That allowed Microsoft to dramatically raise CSA prices in late 2012 and 2013, then turn around and slash them just days before XP's retirement. Don't it always seem to go..., you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone The world-turned-upside-down shock of Windows 10 — its continual updating most notably — did more than anything else to elevate Windows 7's long-term reputation. Faced with the jolt of Windows 10, its predecessor came off looking that much more composed. At the risk of being rejoined with an "OK, boomer," and knowing that nostalgia can backlight even incompetence with an artificial glow, Computerworld proposes that Windows 7 was what an OS should be, serviced as an OS ought to be, useful like an OS better be. Much of that stems from the habits that Microsoft force-fed customers. Updates should be discrete so that individual patches can be postponed or rejected outright; feature additions should arrive only after years-long intervals to maximize learning "expense;" the OS should not transmit vast quantities of telemetric and diagnostic data to Redmond's servers. And so on. But Microsoft upturned all of that in a single swoop, unlike the gradualism of Windows' past. No wonder there was resistance from enterprise customers, who on the whole valued continuity and tradition. But what they were objecting to was not Windows 10 per se — from the start the OS was widely praised on its merits — but instead Microsoft's changing policies of servicing. Where features were extensively criticized — such as 10's data hoovering — they were integral to those policies' execution (at least in Microsoft's mind), not integral to the OS as an OS. That that has been the case can be confirmed by looking at the most substantial changes Microsoft has made to Windows 10 since its mid-2015 launch. Those changes have largely been made to the servicing policies, not to the OS itself. For these reasons, Computerworld wagers that Windows 7 will be long viewed as peak enterprise OS and remembered, fairly or not, more fondly than if it had been succeeded by, say, Windows 9 in 2015. (Where's Windows 8 in all this? Invisible, frankly. That OS was an even bigger dud than Vista for corporate customers.) Things have gone this way before, of course. Windows is famous, in fact, for its good-bad cadence of editions. Windows XP was good, Vista was not; Windows 7 good, Windows 8 not. Here, however, Microsoft has boosted Windows 7's standing not by creating a substandard edition as follow-up but by changing practices and policies of that successor. Microsoft recognizes what it has done. That's clear from the modifications it's made to Windows 10, such as lengthening the support lifespan and reducing the number of true feature upgrades; it's shifted that operating system closer to the model of ... Windows 7. Source: Seven high points of Windows 7 (Computerworld - Gregg Keizer)
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