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  1. It starts with a backpack of $200 of electronics and poor Wi-Fi security The US Department of the Interior (DoI) spectacularly failed its latest computer security assessment, mostly for a lack of Wi-Fi defenses. This is according to a report [PDF] from the department's inspector general (via NextGov) which found that, among other failings, the DoI internal wireless network could be broken into over the air using a smartphone and less than $200 of gear stuffed into a backpack. For those unfamiliar, the Department of Interior manages America's natural parks, government-owned lands, and services for indigenous people. It is a massive organization with about 70,000 employees spread around hundreds of different programs. "These attacks — which went undetected by security guards and IT security staff as we explored department facilities — were highly successful," the penetration-test report noted. "In fact, we intercepted and decrypted wireless network traffic in multiple bureaus." It went on: "Even worse, with regard to two bureaus, our penetration test went far beyond the wireless network at issue and gained access to their internal networks. In addition, we successfully obtained the credentials of a bureau IT employee and were able to use that person’s credentials to log into the bureau’s help desk ticketing system and view the list of tickets assigned to the employee." In short, a red team set up malicious wireless access points that masqueraded as legit Wi-Fi base stations, aka evil twins, and used these to harvest network credentials from unsuspecting users who connected to the gadgets. Thus federal staff joining what they thought were proper wireless networks were connecting to bogus ones that collected their login details. Using this information, the would-be baddies then joined the legit networks, accessed internal systems at two bureau offices, and also sniffed and cracked a number of account credentials going over the air. From the report: Our evaluation revealed that the Department did not deploy and operate a secure wireless network infrastructure, as required by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) guidance and industry best practices. We conducted reconnaissance and penetration testing of wireless networks representing each bureau and office. To do this, we assembled portable test units for less than $200 that were easily concealed in a backpack or purse and operated these units with smartphones from publicly accessible areas and locations open to visitors. Our attacks simulated the techniques of malicious actors attempting to break into departmental wireless networks, such as eavesdropping, evil twin, and password cracking. In fact, the attacks were so successful, "one bureau shut down its enterprise-wide wireless infrastructure for three weeks" to shore up its defenses. Here's what those units – containing unspecified hardware but likely some kind of Wi-Fi-enabled RaspberryPi-like gizmos attached to batteries – looked like: One of the wireless test units and when placed in a bag The infosec experts also noted other security shortfalls, such as a lack of network segmentation that would allow intruders to casually move between systems, incomplete inventory records of wireless networks, and a reliance on pre-shared keys that could be exploited by miscreants to eavesdrop on network traffic. "Without network segmentation, an attacker, once inside a bureau’s network, can pivot to other bureaus and their computer networks without restriction or detection," the red team explained. Ultimately, the pen-testers said, the department's failings came from the top down. Many of the branch offices, it is said, were not given guidance on how to keep their networks secure. A lack of attention to basic security practices cleared the way for outsiders to harvest user credentials, and gain access to the inner-workings of the US government with nothing more than a backpack of electronics from Amazon. "The department’s contradictory and outdated guidance, incomplete inventory, and lack of technical security testing led to its implementation of insecure wireless networks," the report thundered. "We exploited vulnerabilities in the protocols used to authenticate individuals using unique user credentials and those using pre-shared keys. In addition, we gained more access than necessary because the department did not follow the principle of least privilege and did not have the proper defense-in-depth security controls." What's worse, the red teamers said they could have done more theoretical damage had it not been for bureaucracy getting in the way. Get these peeps a few more laptops and some expense accounts, stat. "We were unable to perform additional planned tests due to the lack of a reliable inventory," they noted. "We were also limited in our ability to focus our testing on high-risk networks." While the watchdog's report involves a government IT setup, its findings and recommendations should be noted by private organizations, particularly those that do contract work for Uncle Sam. Multiple attacks on governments have been carried out by first targeting the networks of contractors. Source
  2. How-To Find Your Exact Wi-Fi Signal Strength With Command-Prompt Assuming you're currently connected to the internet via Wi-Fi, open a Command-Prompt and type in netsh wlan show interface. Near the bottom, you will see Signal and your percentage. Now you know your exact signal strength. WiFi signal strenght
  3. Change WiFi Roaming Sensitivity to improve Wi-Fi reception & performance If you wish to improve the Wi-Fi reception and performance on your Windows PC, you may want to consider changing the WiFi Roaming Sensitivity or Aggressiveness. Roaming Sensitivity is the rate at which your device selects and switches to the nearest available point of access, offering a better signal. It is based on the signal strength and quality – and not on the distance to the WiFi point. Intel products use the term Roaming Aggressiveness, whereas Ralink and some others use Roaming Sensitivity. But they basically mean the same. If you are receiving a poor WiFi performance you should configure the wireless network adapter to use the Maximum Performance setting. You could also try updating your network adapter drivers to their latest version and see if that helps you. These tips to increase WiFi speed & and coverage area and how to improve Wireless Network Signal may also help you. WiFi Roaming Sensitivity or Aggressiveness If you are facing poor Wi-Fi reception you may also change the WiFi Roaming Sensitivity or Aggressiveness to improve Wi-Fi reception & performance and see if that works for you. To configure the WiFi Roaming Sensitivity, in Windows 10, open the WinX Menu by right-clicking on the Start and selecting Device Manager. ExpamdNetwork adapters and identify your WiFi or wireless device. Double-click on the entry to open its Properties box. Now under the Advanced tab, scroll down the Property list till you see Roaming Aggressiveness or Roaming Sensitivity. Next, under the Value drop-down, you will see the following options: Lowest: Your device will not roam. Medium-Low: Roaming is allowed. Medium: It is a balanced setting between roaming and performance. Medium-High: Roaming is more frequent. Highest: The device continuously tracks the WiFi quality. If any degradation occurs, it tries to find and roam to a better access point. Select Medium-High or High. to improve your Wi-Fi performance. Source This actually worked for me with a cheap TP-link adapter. Setting was on low so I set it to high and effectively doubled my speed. It's crap compared to my hard line but still an improvement nonetheless.
  4. LizardSystems Wi-Fi Scanner 4.7 build 187 Easy-to-use tool to scan for and analyze 802.11a/b/g/n/ac wireless networks Wi-Fi Scanner allows you to easily locate visible wireless networks and its corresponding information. The tool obtains the network name (SSID), signal strength (RSSI) and quality, MAC address (BSSID), channel, maximum and achievable data rate, security, and much more. Wi-Fi Scanner is useful for normal access point users who need to find out the signal strength distribution for their wireless network at home, or choose a position for their access point for optimal signal quality. Using Wi-Fi Scanner, you can evaluate the allocation of wireless networks by channel and select the least congested bandwidth for their access point, allowing them to increase their connection speed significantly. In addition, Wi-Fi Scanner is an indispensable tool for corporate network administrators in performing tasks such as configuration, planning and monitoring security parameters on business wireless networks. Key features: Simple, fast wireless network search Support for 802.11ac and 802.11a/b/g/n Support for 2.4 and 5 GHz frequency bands Support for 20, 40, 80, 160 and 80+80 MHz channel widths Display detailed information for wireless network: network name (SSID), signal level (RSSI), MAC address (BSSID), signal quality, channel, achievable and maximum data rate, encryption, channel utilization, clients etc. Show detailed description of information elements (IE) Detect security standards WEP, WPA or WPA2 for wireless networks Support for WPS 1.0 and WPS 2.0 Device name and model number discovery of access points Display changes in signal level over time in graphical form Display signal spectrum mask for each wireless network Customizable graph color for any wireless network Filter list of detected wireless networks by specified parameters (quality, network mode, security, etc.) Connect to detected networks Display Wi-Fi radio state (software, hardware) Display wireless connection parameters Display wireless connection statistics in the form of graphs and tables Manage wireless connection profiles Disconnect/connect wireless adapters Freeware (for personal use) or Payware (for business use) Home Page: https://lizardsystems.com/wi-fi-scanner/ Release history: https://lizardsystems.com/wi-fi-scanner/releases/ Download: https://lizardsystems.com/download/wifiscanner_setup.exe Medicine: For business license (thanks to DeLino): Site: https://www.upload.ee Sharecode: /files/8420204/Business.rar.html Previous version: https://www.nsaneforums.com/topic/354077-lizardsystems-wi-fi-scanner-46-build-183/
  5. Yet another bug in Win10 1903: Upgrade may knock out certain WiFi cards Microsoft just announced that it’s putting a hold on upgrading machines to Win10 version 1903 for “some devices with Intel Centrino 6205/6235 and Broadcom 802.11ac Wi-Fi cards.” Here’s the full announcement: Safeguard on certain devices with some Intel and Broadcom Wi-Fi adapters Microsoft and NEC have found incompatibility issues with Intel Centrino 6205/6235 and Broadcom 802.11ac Wi-Fi cards when running Windows 10, version 1903 on specific models of NEC devices. If these devices are updated to Windows 10, version 1903, they will no longer be able to use any Wi-Fi connections. The Wi-Fi driver may have a yellow exclamation point in device manager. The task tray icon for networking may show the icon for no internet and Network & Internet settings may not show any Wi-Fi networks. To safeguard your update experience, we have applied a compatibility hold on the affected devices from being offered Windows 10, version 1903. Affected platforms: Client: Windows 10, version 1903 Workaround: If you are using an affected device and you have already installed Windows 10, version 1903, you can mitigate the issue disabling then re-enabling the Wi-Fi adapter in Device Manager. You should now be able to use Wi-Fi until your next reboot. Next steps: Microsoft and NEC are working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. Note We recommend that you do not attempt to manually update using the Update now button or the Media Creation Tool until this issue has been resolved. I’m trying to remember when the “Update now” button appears. I know about “Download and install now,” but “Update now” doesn’t sound familiar. Source: Yet another bug in Win10 1903: Upgrade may knock out certain WiFi cards (AskWoody - Woody Leonhard)
  6. Kyle_Katarn

    dot11Expert 1.5.2

    dot11Expert is a troubleshooting software for your WLAN (Wifi network) that gives you detailed technical information about your Wifi network adapters, your Wifi networks and their associated access points. Deep statistics about network adapters (MAC and PHY level) Automatic sensing of Wifi networks and access points Graphical display of RSSI of all available networks Internationalization support Web site : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?dot11expert Download : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/dot11expert.exe
  7. Kyle_Katarn

    dot11Expert 1.5.1

    dot11Expert is a troubleshooting software for your WLAN (Wifi network) that gives you detailed technical information about your Wifi network adapters, your Wifi networks and their associated access points. Deep statistics about network adapters (MAC and PHY level) Automatic sensing of Wifi networks and access points Graphical display of RSSI of all available networks Internationalization support Web site : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?dot11expert Download : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/dot11expert.exe
  8. dot11Expert is a troubleshooting software for your WLAN (Wifi network) that gives you detailed technical information about your Wifi network adapters, your Wifi networks and their associated access points. Deep statistics about network adapters (MAC and PHY level) Automatic sensing of Wifi networks and access points Graphical display of RSSI of all available networks Internationalization support http://www.kcsoftwares.com/images/dot11e_screen_s.png Web site : http://www.kcsoftwares.com/?dot11expert Download : http://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/dot11expert.exe
  9. Kyle_Katarn

    dot11Expert 1.5

    dot11Expert is a troubleshooting software for your WLAN (Wifi network) that gives you detailed technical information about your Wifi network adapters, your Wifi networks and their associated access points. Deep statistics about network adapters (MAC and PHY level) Automatic sensing of Wifi networks and access points Graphical display of RSSI of all available networks Internationalization support Web site : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?dot11expert Download : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/dot11expert.exe
  10. Hello ! Can u guys name some apps that can limit and controll wich devices are connected to my wifi network ? If possible, i want a desktop app that can show me like : Hey ! This device (phone, tablet, whatever....) is connected to your wifi net : and then show me some options like letting that device to stay connected to internet for an amount of time a day and to be able to turn off internet remotely for that device/s I knew i used in the past an windows app something called Connect......and whatever but pls, show some other apps I want as many options as possible Thank u and Merry Christmass !
  11. selesn777

    NetSetMan Pro 3.7.3 Retail

    NetSetMan Pro 3.7.3 Retail NetSetMan is a network settings manager which can easily switch between 6 different, visually structured profiles including IP addresses, gateways (incl. Metric), DNS servers, WINS servers, IPv4 and IPv6, extensive WiFi managment, computer name, workgroup, DNS domain, default printer, network drives, NIC status, SMTP server, hosts and scripts. NetSetMan offers you a powerful, easy-to-use interface to manage all your network settings at a glance. Main features: Management for network settings (LAN & WLAN)Tray-Info for all current IP settingsNSM Service to allow the use without admin privilegesAdministration for defining usage permissionsQuick switch from the tray iconAuto-saving of all settingsCommand line activationQuick access to frequently used Windows locationsTwo different user interfaces (Full & Compact)3.7. - 2014-06-03 Free vs Pro Website: http://www.netsetman.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 (x86-x64) Language: Ml Medicine: Keygen Size: 3,66 Mb.
  12. selesn777

    Cain & Abel 4.9.56 Portable

    Cain & Abel 4.9.56 Portable Cain & Abel is a password recovery tool for Microsoft Operating Systems. It allows easy recovery of various kind of passwords by sniffing the network, cracking encrypted passwords using Dictionary, Brute-Force and Cryptanalysis attacks, recording VoIP conversations, decoding scrambled passwords, recovering wireless network keys, revealing password boxes, uncovering cached passwords and analyzing routing protocols. The program does not exploit any software vulnerabilities or bugs that could not be fixed with little effort. It covers some security aspects/weakness present in protocol's standards, authentication methods and caching mechanisms; its main purpose is the simplified recovery of passwords and credentials from various sources, however it also ships some "non standard" utilities for Microsoft Windows users. Cain & Abel has been developed in the hope that it will be useful for network administrators, teachers, security consultants/professionals, forensic staff, security software vendors, professional penetration tester and everyone else that plans to use it for ethical reasons. The author will not help or support any illegal activity done with this program. Be warned that there is the possibility that you will cause damages and/or loss of data using this software and that in no events shall the author be liable for such damages or loss of data. Please carefully read the License Agreement included in the program before using it. The latest version is faster and contains a lot of new features like APR (Arp Poison Routing) which enables sniffing on switched LANs and Man-in-the-Middle attacks. The sniffer in this version can also analyze encrypted protocols such as SSH-1 and HTTPS, and contains filters to capture credentials from a wide range of authentication mechanisms. The new version also ships routing protocols authentication monitors and routes extractors, dictionary and brute-force crackers for all common hashing algorithms and for several specific authentications, password/hash calculators, cryptanalysis attacks, password decoders and some not so common utilities related to network and system security. Cain & Abel v4.9.56 released Added Windows Vault Password Decoder.Added Windows 8 support in LSA Secret Dumper.Added Windows 8 support in Credential Manager Password Decoder.Added Windows 8 support in EditBox Revealer.Added ability to keep original extensions in fake certificates.Added support for Windows 8 RDP Client in APR-RDP sniffer filter.Winpcap library upgrade to version 4.1.3 (Windows8 supported)Added Root Certificate Generator in Certificate Spoofing configuration page.Added experimental Certificate Injection feature to inject custom certificates into HTTPS/ProxyHTTPS responses directed to victim APR's clients.Added Anticache option for APR-HTTPS/APR-ProxyHTTPS (touch "If-Modified-Since" and "If-None-Match" fields in HTTP headers from client).Added Anticompress option for APR-HTTPS/APR-ProxyHTTPS (touch "Accept-Encoding" field in HTTP headers from client).Added Anticompress option for APR-IMAPS (touch "COMPRESS=DEFLATE" field in capabilities from server).Speed improvement in Certificate Collector.Speed improvement in APR engine.Speed improvement all APR-SSL sniffer filters.Added Automatic extraction of Subject Common Name (CN) from server certificates to be used as hostname in APR-SSL lists.Preservation of Subject Alternative Name extension in fake certificates.New Base64 Password Decoder dialog.OpenSSL library upgrade to version 1.0.1f.OUI List updated.Several bugs fixed.Homepage: http://www.oxid.it/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: Eng Size: 12,70 Mb.
  13. If I turn on my smartphone HotSpot, how can I find out if someone else is using my data or trying to crack my password? Also how can I find out what site surfed or softwares was downloaded using my wifi/HotSpot?
  14. Kyle_Katarn

    dot11Expert 1.4.1

    dot11Expert is a troubleshooting software for your WLAN (Wifi network) that gives you detailed technical information about your Wifi network adapters, your Wifi networks and their associated access points. Deep statistics about network adapters (MAC and PHY level) Automatic sensing of Wifi networks and access points Graphical display of RSSI of all available networks Internationalization support Web site : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/?dot11expert Download : https://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/dot11expert.exe
  15. Chances are you have a Wi-Fi network at home, or live close to one (or more) that tantalizingly pops up in a list whenever you boot up the laptop. The problem is, if there's a lock next to the network name (AKA the SSID, or service set identifier), that indicates security is activated. Without the password or passphrase, you're not going to get access to that network, or the sweet, sweet internet that goes with it. Perhaps you forgot the password on your own network, or don't have neighbors willing to share the Wi-Fi goodness. You could just go to a café, buy a latte, and use the "free" Wi-Fi there. Download an app for your phone like WiFi-Map (available for iOS and Android), and you'll have a list of over 2 million hotspots with free Wi-Fi for the taking (including some passwords for locked Wi-Fi connections, if they're shared by any of the app's 7 million users). However, there are other ways to get back on the wireless. Some require such extreme patience and waiting that the café idea is going to look pretty good. Read on if you can't wait. Windows Commands to Get the Key This trick works to recover a Wi-Fi network password (aka network security key) only if you've previously attached to the Wi-Fi in question using that very password. In other words, it only works if you've forgotten a previously used password. It works because Windows 8 and 10 create a profile of every Wi-Fi network to which you attach. If you tell Windows to forget the network, then it also forgets the password, so this won't work. But most people never explicitly do that. It requires that you go into a Windows Command Prompt with administrative privileges. To do so, use Cortana to search for "cmd" and the menu will show Command Prompt; right-click that entry and select "Run as administrator." That'll open the black box full of white text with the prompt inside—it's the line with a > at the end, probably something like C:\WINDOWS\system32\>. A blinking cursor will indicate where you type. Start with this: netsh wlan show profile The results will bring up a section called User Profiles—those are all the Wi-Fi networks (aka WLANs, or wireless local area networks) you've accessed and saved. Pick the one you want to get the password for, highlight it, and copy it. At the prompt below, type the following, but replace the Xs with the network name you copied; you only need the quotation marks if the network name has spaces in it. netsh wlan show profile name="XXXXXXXX" key=clear In the new data that comes up, look under Security Settings for the line "Key Content." The word displayed is the Wi-Fi password/key you are missing. On macOS, open up the Spotlight search (Cmd+Space) and type terminal to get the Mac equivalent of a command prompt. Type the following, replacing the Xs with the network name. security find-generic-password -wa XXXXX Reset the Router Before you do a full router reset just to get on the wireless, try to log into the router first. From there, you can easily reset your Wi-Fi password/key if you've forgotten it. That's not possible if you don't know the password for the router, either. (They're not the same thing unless you set it up that way). Resetting the router only works if you have access. That access could be over Wi-Fi (which we've just established you don't have) or physically utilizing an Ethernet cable. Or that access can simply be that you are in the same room as the router. Almost every router in existence has a recessed reset button. Push it with a pen or unfolded paperclip, hold it for about 10 seconds, and the router will reset to the factory settings. If you've got a router that came from your internet service provider (ISP), check the stickers on the unit before a reset—the ISP might have printed the router and Wi-Fi key right on the hardware. Once a router is reset, you need another password (plus a username) to access the router itself. Again, you can do this via a PC attached to the router via Ethernet—you'll need that since the reset probably killed any potential Wi-Fi connection you had going in. The actual access is typically done with a web browser. The URL to type is either 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1, or some variation. Try them randomly; that generally works. To figure out which one, on the PC connected to the router, open a command prompt and type "ipconfig" without the quotes. Look among the gobbledygook for an "IPv4 Address," which will start with 192.168. The other two spaces, called octets, are going to be different numbers between 0 and 255. Note the third octet (probably a 1 or 0). The fourth is specific to the PC you're using to log into the router. In the browser, type 192.168.x.1, replacing the X with the number you found in the ipconfig search. The 1 in the last octet should point at the router—it's the number one device on the network. At this point, the router should then ask for a username and password. You can check your manual, but you probably lost it or threw it away. So instead, go to RouterPasswords.com, which exists for one reason: to tell people the default username/password on every router ever created. You'll need the router's model number, but that's easy enough to find on the back or bottom. You'll quickly see a pattern among router makers of having the username of admin and a password of password. Since most people are lazy and don't change an assigned password, you could try those options before hitting the reset button. (But c'mon, you're better than that—change the password when you access the router's settings via your web browser.) Once you've accessed the router interface, go to the Wi-Fi settings, turn on the wireless networks, and assign strong but easy-to-recall passwords. After all, you don't want to share with neighbors without your permission. Make that Wi-Fi password easy to type on a mobile device, too. Nothing is more frustrating than trying to get a smartphone on Wi-Fi with some cryptic, impossible to key-in-via-thumbs nonsense, even if it is the most secure. Crack the Code You didn't come here because the headline said "reset the router," though. You want to know how to crack the password on a Wi-Fi network. Searching on "wi-fi password hack," or other variations, nets you a lot of links—mostly for software on sites where the adware and bots and scams are pouring like snake oil. Download them at your own risk, for Windows PCs especially. It's best to have a PC that you can afford to get effed up a bit if you go that route. I had multiple attempts with tools I found just get outright deleted by my antivirus before I could even try to run the EXE installation file. You could create a system just for this kind of thing, maybe dual-boot into a separate operating system that can do what's called "penetration testing"—a form of offensive approach security, where you examine a network for any and all possible paths of a breach. Kali Linux is a Linux distribution built for just that purpose. You can run Kali Linux off a CD or USB key without even installing it to your PC's hard drive. It's free and comes with all the tools you'd need to crack a network. It even now comes as an app for Windows 10 in the Windows App Store! If you're only after a Wi-Fi network, the Wifislax distro is a Live CD targets them directly. If you don't want to install a whole OS, then try the tried-and-true tools of Wi-Fi hackers. Aircrack has been around for years, going back to when Wi-Fi security was only based on WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy). WEP was weak even back in the day and was supplanted in 2004 by WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access). Aircrack-ng—labeled as a "set of tools for auditing wireless networks," so it should be part of any network admin's toolkit—will take on cracking WEP and WPA-PSK keys. It comes with full documentation, but it's not simple. To crack a network you need to have the right kind of Wi-Fi adapter in your computer, one that supports packet injection. You need to be comfortable with the command line and have a lot of patience. Your Wi-Fi adapter and Aircrack have to gather a lot of data to get anywhere close to decrypting the passkey on the network you're targeting. It could take a while. Here's a how-to on doing it using Aircrack installed on Kali Linux. Another option on the PC using the command line is Airgeddon. If you prefer a graphical user interface (GUI), there is KisMAC for macOS. It's mainly known as a "sniffer" for seeking out Wi-Fi networks. It's the kind of thing we don't need much of these days since our phones and tablets do a pretty good job of showing us every Wi-Fi signal in the air around us. But, it can crack some keys with the right adapter installed. Also on the Mac: Wi-Fi Crack. To use those, or Aircrack-ng on the Mac, you need to install them using MacPorts, a tool for installing command-line products on the Mac. Cracking the much stronger WPA/WPA2 passwords and passphrases is the real trick. Reaver-wps is the one tool that appears to be up to the task. You'll need that command-line comfort again to work with it. After two to 10 hours of brute force attacks, Reaver should be able to reveal a password... but it's only going to work if the router you're going after has both a strong signal and WPS (Wi-Fi Protected Setup) turned on. WPS is the feature where you can push a button on the router, another button on a Wi-Fi device, and they find each other and link auto-magically, with a fully encrypted connection. It's also the "hole" through which Reaver crawls. (Even if you turn off WPS, sometimes it's not completely off, but turning it off is your only recourse if you're worried about hacks on your own router via Reaver. Or, get a router that doesn't support WPS.) Hacking Wi-Fi over WPS is also possible with some tools on Android, which only work if the Android device has been rooted. Check out Wifi WPS WPA Tester, Reaver for Android, or Kali Linux Nethunter as options. Article
  16. Kyle_Katarn

    dot11Expert 1.4

    dot11Expert is a troubleshooting software for your WLAN (Wifi network) that gives you detailed technical information about your Wifi network adapters, your Wifi networks and their associated access points. Deep statistics about network adapters (MAC and PHY level) Automatic sensing of Wifi networks and access points Graphical display of RSSI of all available networks Internationalization support Web site : http://www.kcsoftwares.com/?dot11expert Download : http://www.kcsoftwares.com/files/dot11expert.exe
  17. vissha

    WiFi Password Remover 6.0

    WiFi Password Remover is the Free software to quickly recover and remove Wireless account passwords stored on your system. For each recovered Wi-Fi account, it displays following details, WiFi Name (SSID) Security Settings (WEP-64/WEP-128/WPA2/AES/TKIP) Password Type Password in Hex format Password in clear text Once recovered, you can either remove single or all of them with just a click. Before proceeding with deletion, you can also take a backup of recovered Wi-Fi password list to HTML/XML/TEXT/CSV file. Note: Wi-Fi Password Remover is not hacking or cracking tool as it can only help you to recover and remove your wireless config passwords stored on your system. One of the unique feature of this tool is that it can recover all type of Wi-Fi passwords including the ones which are not shown by 'Windows Wireless Manager', thus allowing you to remove all the hidden wireless passwords/profiles also. WiFi Password Remover is fully portable and works on both 32-bit & 64-bit platforms starting from Windows Vista to new Windows 10 version. Ad-Supported Version 6.0 : 25th Oct 2017 Mega 2017 release with the enhanced Wi-Fi Security settings details. Also added right click menu option to quickly copy both Hex & Text Password. Website: http://securityxploded.com/wifi-password-remover.php Features & Benefits Installation & Uninstallation How to Use? Screenshots Release History Download or Download
  18. Microsoft Lumia DENIM​ Update Last night I decided to do an update to my Lumia 630, to my surprise the long awaited DENIM Update was finally here in preparation for the Windows 10 Upgrade... Many details are covered at the link mentioned above but one which I am quite happy about is the fact that now on Windows Phones.. We have the ability to create a personal WiFi Hotspot. This interests me a great deal as I will no longer have to buy another SIM Card and pay a data plan for my tablet.. Owning the phone for the first few months made me quite jealous and perturbed at the fact that iPhone users had this capability right on the phone natively and yet Microsoft did not. Many attempts at ​connecting virtual Wifi Routers.. Proxy connections and fake apps which did not do as advertised later I gave up with no hope.. Now I am a happy Wind​ows Phone owner.
  19. Hi friends, I have installed latest version of bluestack And Everytime I download a game or install, it ask me to log in google account And when I do It says no internet is connected and ask me to connect wifi (in bluestack) and when I do that, it keeps on connecting to wifi and stays like that. This never happens in previous version. I have taken screenshots but this forms dont have image upload option
  20. Maxidix Wifi Suite 14.05.12.563 + Portable Maxidix Wifi Suite is a unique and easy to use software that gives you a full control over Wi-Fi connections and provides a set of useful extra features. Features: 14.05.12.563 (5/12/2014) new feature: Network Monitor. Explore devices connected to your WI-FI network.enables wi-fi adapter hot spot mode, if it was previously disabled by other softwareimport and export of IP-profiles introducedWi-Fi profiles improvementsinterface improvementsIP profiles switching speed improvedalternative DNS-address can be specified in IP-profilefixed bug causes problems with auto-switching of IP profile linked to wifi-networkWifi Suite is now digitally signed, so users shouldn't be hassled with "unknown publisher" alerts any more.Website: http://www.maxidix.com OS: Windows 2008 / XP / Vista / 7 / 8 (x86-x64) Language: ML Medicine: Keygen Size: 5,42 / 13,00 Mb.
  21. Veronisoft IP Net Checker 1.5.7.9 (x32/x64) IP Net Checker is a network monitoring software that allows you to verify the network connectivity of IP hosts on the Internet and LAN. The program periodically pings, checks TCP ports or HTTP on user specified computers (workstations, servers) or other network devices (routers). It is able to check IP and show notifications when the states of some computers change. You can also view and access shared folders, open web and ftp, ping, trace rout and sending messages. IP Net Checker can generate status log files. Features: Max. number of checking IP - 70PING/TCP/HTTP checkingVisual(Box Design, Message Box), Sound(Text Speak,Custom WAV) notificationsExecuting custom actions (commands, applications, BAT File) on status changeLogging options to text file or csv status logIs able to run three IP Net Checker instance on the same computer (parameter: /secondary and /tertiary)Website: http://veronisoft.hostei.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 (x86-x64) Language: Eng Medicine: Serial Size: 1,47 / 1,64 Mb.
  22. selesn777

    NetSetMan Pro 3.7.2 Retail

    NetSetMan Pro 3.7.2 Retail NetSetMan is a network settings manager which can easily switch between 6 different, visually structured profiles including IP addresses, gateways (incl. Metric), DNS servers, WINS servers, IPv4 and IPv6, extensive WiFi managment, computer name, workgroup, DNS domain, default printer, network drives, NIC status, SMTP server, hosts and scripts. NetSetMan offers you a powerful, easy-to-use interface to manage all your network settings at a glance. Main features: Management for network settings (LAN & WLAN)Tray-Info for all current IP settingsNSM Service to allow the use without admin privilegesAdministration for defining usage permissionsQuick switch from the tray iconAuto-saving of all settingsCommand line activationQuick access to frequently used Windows locationsTwo different user interfaces (Full & Compact)3.7.2 - 2014-04-29 Website: http://www.netsetman.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 (x86-x64) Language: Ml Medicine: Keygen Size: 3,24 Mb.
  23. TamoSoft CommView for WiFi 7.0.777 CommView for WiFi - a tool for monitoring and analyzing network packets on wireless networking standards 802.11 a / b / g / n, combines performance, flexibility and ease of use. CommView for WiFi can capture all network packets transmitted on the air, for further detailed display important information such as the list of access points and nodes, statistics for each node and the channel, signal strength, a list of packets and network connections, protocol distribution charts, etc. With this information, CommView can help you view and analyze every packet to identify problems in the networks more efficiently troubleshoot software and hardware. The composition of CommView for WiFi module also includes VoIP, for in-depth analysis, recording, and playback of voice messages and SIP H.323. Packets can be decrypted utilizing user-defined WEP or WPA-PSK and are decoded down to the lowest level. With over 70 supported protocols, CommView for WiFi allows the detail of a captured packet using a convenient, tree-like structure to display protocol layers and packet headers. Captured packets can be saved to a file for later analysis. A flexible system of filters makes it possible to drop unnecessary packets or capture only those packets that you want. Configurable alarms can notify the user about important events such as suspicious packets, high bandwidth utilization, or unknown addresses. CommView for WiFi - a comprehensive and affordable tool for wireless LAN administrators, experts in the field of network security, network programmers, or anyone who wants to see the whole picture of the WLAN traffic. This program works in Windows XP / Vista / 7/8 or Windows Server 2003/2008/2012 (supported by 32 - and 64-bit versions) to work requires a compatible wireless network adapter. A list of compatible adapters listed below: Supported adapters What you can do with CommView for WiFiScan the air for the stations and access points Wi-Fi.Intercept wireless traffic 802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11g and 802.11n.Specify WEP or WPA keys to decrypt encrypted packets.To see detailed statistics IP-connections: IP-addresses, ports, sessions, etc.Reconstruct TCP-session.Set up alerts that notify you about important events, such as suspicious packets, high bandwidth utilization, unknown addresses, etc.See chart IP-protocols and upper layer protocols.Monitor bandwidth.Browse captured and decoded packets in real time.Search for strings or hex-data in captured packets.Save and load packages.Import and export files in formats Sniffer ®, EtherPeek ™, AiroPeek ™, Observer ®, NetMon, and Tcpdump / Wireshark.Export any IP-address SmartWhois for quick and easy way to get information about it.Carry out simultaneous capture of data from multiple channels (using a compatible USB-adapter).To capture packets A-MPDU and A-MSDU.Who needs CommView for WiFiAdministrators wireless networks.Professionals in the field of network security.Home users who want to monitor the activity in your wireless network.Programmers developing software for wireless networks.Website: http://www.tamos.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 / Server 2003 / 2008 / 2012 Language: Ml Medicine: Patch - REPT (New!) for version 7.0.777 Size: 48,46 MB
  24. selesn777

    MyLanViewer 4.17.4 + Portable

    MyLanViewer 4.17.4 + Portable MyLanViewer Network/IP Scanner is a powerful Netbios and LAN/Network IP address scanner for Windows, whois and traceroute tool, remote shutdown and Wake On LAN (WOL) manager, wireless network scanner and monitor. This application will help you find all IP addresses, MAC addresses and shared folders of computers on your wired or wireless (Wi-Fi) network. The program scans network and displays your network computers in an easy to read, buddy-list style window that provides the computer name, IP address, MAC address, NIC vendor, OS version, logged users, shared folders and other technical details for each computer. MyLanViewer Network/IP Scanner supports remote shutdown, wake-on-lan, lock workstation, log off, sleep, hibernate, reboot and power off. It is able to monitor IP address and show notifications when the states of some computers change. MyLanViewer Network/IP Scanner can also view and access shared folders, terminate user sessions, disable shared folders, show netstat information and detect rogue DHCP servers. The software can monitor all devices (even hidden) on your subnet, and show notifications when the new devices will be found (for example, to know who is connected to your WiFi router or wireless network). The program easy to install and use, and has a user-friendly and beautiful interface. Website: http://www.mylanviewer.com OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: Eng / Rus Medicine: Patch Size: 5,34 / 5,74 Mb.
  25. If you’ve ever poked around your WiFi router’s settings, you’ve probably seen the word channel. Most routers have their channel set to Auto, but I’m sure that a most of us have looked through that list of a dozen or so channels and wondered what they are, and more importantly, which of the channels are faster than the others. Well, I’m happy to report that some channels are indeed much faster — but that doesn’t mean you should go ahead and recklessly change them. Read on to find out more about 802.11 channels, interference, and the massive difference between 2.4GHz and 5GHz WiFi. Channels 1,6,and 11 First of all, we’ll talk about 2.4GHz, because as of the start of 2014 almost all WiFi installations still use the 2.4GHz band. 802.11ac, which debuted last year, will drive the adoption of 5GHz — but due to backwards compatibility and dual-radio routers and devices, 2.4GHz will probably reign for a while yet. All of the versions of WiFi up to and including 802.11n (a, b, g, n) operate between the frequencies of 2400 and 2500MHz. These paltry 100MHz are separated into 14 channels of 20MHz each. As you have probably worked out, 14 lots of 20MHz is a lot more than 100MHz — and as a result, every 2.4GHz channel overlaps with at least two (but usually four) other channels (see diagram above). As you can probably imagine, using overlapping channels is bad — in fact, it’s the primary reason for awful throughput on your wireless network. Fortunately, channels 1, 6, and 11 are spaced far enough apart that they don’t overlap. On a non-MIMO setup (i.e. 802.11 a, b, or g) you should always try to use channel 1, 6, or 11. If you use 802.11n with 20MHz channels, stick to channels 1, 6, and 11 — if you want to use 40MHz channels, be aware that the airwaves might be very congested unless you live in a detached house in the middle of nowhere (like me). What channel should you use in built-up area? So, if you want maximum throughput and minimal interference, channels 1, 6, and 11 are your best choice — but depending on other wireless networks in your vicinity, one of those channels might be a much better choice than the others. For example, if you’re using channel 1, but someone next door is inconsiderately using channel 2, then your throughput will plummet. In that situation, you would have to change to channel 11 to completely avoid the interference (though 6 would be pretty good as well). It might be tempting to use a channel other than 1, 6, or 11 — but remember that you will then be the cause of interference (and everyone on 1, 6, and 11 will stomp on your throughput, anyway). In an ideal world, you would talk to your neighbors and get every router to use channels 1, 6, or 11. Bear in mind that walls do a pretty good job of attenuating (weakening) a signal — so if there’s a brick wall between you and a neighbor, you could probably both use channel 1 without interfering with each other, but if it’s a thin wall (or there’s lots of windows) you should use different channels. There are tools that can help you find the clearest channel, such as Vistumbler, but it’s probably easier to just switch between channels 1, 6, and 11 until you find one that works well. (If you have two laptops, you can copy a file between them to test the throughput of each channel.) But what about 5GHz? The great thing about 5GHz (802.11n and 802.11ac), because there’s much more free space at the higher frequencies, is that offers 23 non-overlapping 20MHz channels! It’s also worth pointing out that, starting with 802.11n, wireless technology in general is a lot more advanced than the olden days of 802.11 b and g. If you own a modern 802.11n router (i.e. if you bought a router in the last couple of years), it likely has some fancy hardware inside that chooses the right channel and modifies the output power to maximize throughput and minimize interference. If you’re using the 5GHz band, and your walls aren’t paper-thin, then attenuation and the general lack of 5GHz devices should mean that there’s very little interference in your apartment, possibly even allowing you to use the fatter 40, 80, and 160MHz channels if you feel like it. Eventually, as everyone upgrades to newer hardware and moves towards 5GHz, picking the right channel will mostly become a thing of the past. There might still be some cases where it makes sense to hand-tune your router’s channel selection, but when you’re dealing with MIMO setups (up to eight in 802.11ac), it’s generally a better idea to let your router do its own thing. Eventually, of course, 5GHz will fill up as well — but hopefully by then, we’ll have worked out how to use even higher frequencies (60GHz WiGig) or entirely new antenna designs (pCells, infinite capacity vortex beams) to cope with our wireless networking demands. Source
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