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  1. Security upgrade — Firefox turns encrypted DNS on by default to thwart snooping ISPs US-based Firefox users get encrypted DNS lookups today or within a few weeks. Enlarge Getty Images | Anadolu Agency Firefox will start switching browser users to Cloudflare's encrypted-DNS service today and roll out the change across the United States in the coming weeks. "Today, Firefox began the rollout of encrypted DNS over HTTPS (DoH) by default for US-based users," Firefox maker Mozilla said in an announcement scheduled to go live at this link Tuesday morning. "The rollout will continue over the next few weeks to confirm no major issues are discovered as this new protocol is enabled for Firefox's US-based users." DNS over HTTPS helps keep eavesdroppers from seeing what DNS lookups your browser is making, potentially making it more difficult for Internet service providers or other third parties to monitor what websites you visit. As we've previously written, Mozilla's embrace of DNS over HTTPS is fueled in part by concerns about ISPs monitoring customers' Web usage. Mobile broadband providers were caught selling their customers' real-time location data to third parties, and Internet providers can use browsing history to deliver targeted ads. Wireless and wired Internet providers are suing the state of Maine to stop a Web-browsing privacy law that would require ISPs to get customers' opt-in consent before using or sharing browsing history and other sensitive data. The telecom companies already convinced Congress and President Trump to eliminate a similar federal law in 2017. ISPs protested encrypted-DNS plans Mozilla has not been deterred by a broadband-industry lobbying campaign against encrypted DNS. The ISPs' lobbying targeted Google's plan for the Chrome browser, even though Firefox is deploying DNS over HTTPS more aggressively. With Web users already being tracked heavily by companies like Google and Facebook, Mozilla has said it is embracing DNS over HTTPS because "we don't want to see that business model duplicated in the middle of the network" and "it's just a mistake to use DNS for those purposes." "Today, we know that unencrypted DNS is not only vulnerable to spying but is being exploited, and so we are helping the Internet to make the shift to more secure alternatives," Mozilla said in its announcement today. "We do this by performing DNS lookups in an encrypted HTTPS connection. This helps hide your browsing history from attackers on the network, [and] helps prevent data collection by third parties on the network that ties your computer to websites you visit." While Firefox's encrypted DNS uses Cloudflare by default, users can change that to NextDNS in the Firefox settings or manually enter the address of another encrypted-DNS service. Firefox users can also disable the new default setting if they don't want to use any of the encrypted-DNS options. Mozilla has said it is open to adding more encrypted-DNS providers as long as they meet a list of requirements for privacy and transparency and don't block or filter domains by default "unless specifically required by law in the jurisdiction in which the resolver operates." Mozilla isn't turning encrypted DNS on automatically outside the United States. But users outside the US and US-based users who haven't gotten the new default setting yet can enable DNS over HTTPS in the Firefox settings. To do that, go to Firefox "Preferences," then "General," scroll all the way down to "Network Settings," click "Settings," then click "Enable DNS over HTTPS." After clicking that box, you can choose Cloudflare, choose NextDNS, or enter a custom server. There's a list of encrypted-DNS servers at this Github page. Encrypted DNS will not be turned on by default in certain cases, such as when Firefox detects that enterprise policies have been set on the device or when it detects the presence of parental controls. Those and other questions about how DNS over HTTPS works in Firefox are answered in this FAQ. Google's plan for encrypted DNS in Chrome—which is still in the experimental phase and hasn't been deployed to everyone—is a little different from Mozilla's. Instead of automatically switching users to a DNS provider chosen by Google, Chrome sticks with whichever DNS provider the user has selected. If the user-selected DNS provider offers encrypted lookups and is in this list of providers, Chrome automatically upgrades the user to that DNS provider's encrypted service. If the user-selected DNS provider isn't in the list, Chrome makes no changes. Source: Firefox turns encrypted DNS on by default to thwart snooping ISPs (Ars Technica)
  2. Microsoft will integrate DNS over HTTPS in Windows 10 Microsoft revealed plans to integrate native support for DNS over HTTPS in the company's Windows 10 operating system in November 2019. The announcement was made on Microsoft's Networking blog on November 17, 2019. DNS over HTTPS is designed to improve privacy, security and the reliability by encrypting DNS queries that are handled in plaintext currently. DNS over HTTPS has been on the rise lately. Mozilla, Google, Opera as as well as several public DNS providers announced support for the standard. Support in programs, e.g. a web browser, means that the DNS queries that originate from that program are encrypted. Other queries, e.g. from another browser that does not support DNS over HTTPS or is configured not to use it, won't benefit from that integration however. Microsoft's announcement brings DNS over HTTPS support to the Windows operating system. The company plans to introduce it to preview builds of Windows 10 in the future before it releases it in a final version of the operating system. Microsoft plans to follow Google's implementation, at least initially. Google revealed some time ago that it will roll out DNS over HTTPS in Chrome, but only on systems that use a DNS service that supports DNS over HTTPS. In other words: Google won't alter the DNS provider of the system. Mozilla and Opera decided to pick a provider, at least initially, and that means that the local DNS provider may be overridden in the browser. Microsoft notes that it won't be making changes to the DNS server configuration of the Windows machine. Administrators (and users) are in control when it comes to the selection of the DNS provider on Windows and the introduction of support for DNS over HTTPS on Windows won't change that. The change may benefit users without them knowing about it. If a system is configured to use a DNS provider that supports DNS over HTTPS, that system will automatically use the new standard so that DNS data is encrypted. The company plans to introduce "more privacy-friendly ways" for its customers to discover DNS settings in Windows and raise awareness for DNS over HTTPS in the operating system. Microsoft revealed four guiding principles for the implementation: Windows DNS needs to be as private and functional as possible by default without the need for user or admin configuration because Windows DNS traffic represents a snapshot of the user’s browsing history. Privacy-minded Windows users and administrators need to be guided to DNS settings even if they don't know what DNS is yet. Windows users and administrators need to be able to improve their DNS configuration with as few simple actions as possible. Windows users and administrators need to explicitly allow fallback from encrypted DNS once configured. Closing words Microsoft did not reveal a schedule for the integration but it is clear that it will land in a future Insider build for Windows 10 first. Integration in Windows -- and other client operating systems -- makes more sense than integrating the functionality into individual programs. Users who want to use DNS over HTTPS may simply pick a DNS provider that supports it to enable the feature for all applications that run on the system. Source: Microsoft will integrate DNS over HTTPS in Windows 10 (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  3. Google plans to test DNS over HTTPS in Chrome 78 Google revealed plans to test the company's implementation of DNS over HTTPS (DoH) in Chrome 78. DNS over HTTPS aims to improve security and privacy of DNS requests by utilizing HTTPS. The current stable version of Chrome is 77 released on September 10, 2019. Google notes that DoH prevents other WiFi users from seeing visited websites; common attacks such as spoofing or pharming could potentially be prevented by using DoH. Google decided to test the DoH implementation in a different way than Mozilla. Mozilla selected Cloudflare as its partner in the testing phase and will use Cloudflare as the default provider when it rolls out the feature to US users in late September 2019. Firefox users have options to change the DNS over HTTPS provider or turn off the feature entirely in the browser. Google's DNS over HTTPS plan Google picked a different route for the test. The company decided to test the implementation using multiple DoH providers. The company could have used its own DoH service for the tests but decided to select multiple providers instead. Tests will upgrade Chrome installations to use DoH if the DNS service that is used on the system supports DoH. Google circumnavigates any criticism in regards to privacy that Mozilla faced when it announced the partnership with Cloudflare. Google selected the cooperating providers for "their strong stance on security and privacy" and "readiness of their DoH services" and agreement to participate in the test. The following providers were picked by the company: Cleanbrowsing Cloudflare DNS.SB Google OpenDNS Quad9 If Chrome runs on a system that uses one of these services for DNS, it will start using DoH instead when Chrome 78 launches. The experiment will run on all platforms for a fraction of Chrome users with the exception of Chrome on Linux and iOS. Chrome will revert to the regular DNS service in the case of errors. Most managed Chrome deployments will be excluded from the experiment, and Google plans to provide details on DoH policies on the company's Chrome Enterprise blog before release to provide administrators with information on configuring those. Chrome users may use the flag chrome://flags/#dns-over-http to opt in or out of the experiment. The flag is not integrated in any version of the Chrome browser yet. Secure DNS lookups Enables DNS over HTTPS. When this feature is enabled, your browser may try to use a secure HTTPS connection to look up the addresses of websites and other web resources. – Mac, Windows, Chrome OS, Android Closing Words Most Chromium-based browsers and Firefox will start to use DNS over HTTPS in the near future. Firefox provides options to disable the feature and Chrome comes with an experimental flag that offers the same. Experimental flags may be removed at one point in the future however and it is unclear at this point whether Google plans to add a switch to Chrome's preference to enable or disable the feature. Source: Google plans to test DNS over HTTPS in Chrome 78 (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  4. Mozilla plans to roll out DNS over HTTPS to US users in late September 2019 Starting in late September 2019, DNS over HTTPS (DoH) is going to be rolled out to Firefox users in the United States. DNS over HTTPS encrypts DNS requests to improve security and privacy of these requests. Most DNS requests happen in the open currently; anyone listening to the traffic gets records of site and IP addresses that were looked up while using an Internet connection among other things. DoH encrypts the traffic and while that looks good on first glance, it needs to be noted that TLS still gives away the destination in plaintext. One example: Internet providers may block certain DNS requests, e.g. when they have received a court order to block certain resources on the Internet. It is not the best method to prevent people from accessing a site on the Internet but it is used nevertheless. DoH is excellent against censorship that uses DNS manipulation. Tip: check out our detailed guide on configuring DNS over HTTPS in Firefox. Mozilla started to look into the implementation of DoH in Firefox in 2018. The organization ran a controversial Shield study in 2018 to gather data that it needed for the planned implementation of the feature. The study was controversial because Mozilla used the third-party Cloudflare as the DNS over HTTPS service which meant that all user traffic flowed through the Cloudflare network. Mozilla revealed in April 2019 that its plan to enable DoH in Firefox had not changed. The organization created a list of policies that DoH providers had to conform to if they wanted their service to be integrated in Firefox. In "What's next in making encrypted DNS-over-HTTPS the Default", Mozilla confirmed that it would begin to enable DoH in Firefox starting in late September 2019. The feature will be enabled for some users from the United States and Mozilla plans to monitor the implementation before DoH is rolled out to a larger part of the user base and eventually all users from the United States. We plan to gradually roll out DoH in the USA starting in late September. Our plan is to start slowly enabling DoH for a small percentage of users while monitoring for any issues before enabling for a larger audience. If this goes well, we will let you know when we’re ready for 100% deployment. While DNS over HTTPS will be the default for the majority of Firefox installations in the United States, it won't be enabled for some configurations: If parental controls are used, DoH won't be enabled provided that Mozilla detects the use correctly. Enterprise configurations are respected as well and DoH is disabled unless "explicitly enabled by enterprise configuration". Fall back option if DNS issues or split horizon configuration cause lookup failures. Network administrations may configure their networks in the following way to highlight to Firefox that the network is unsuitable for DoH usage: DNS queries for the A and AAAA records for the domain “use-application-dns.net” must respond with NXDOMAIN rather than the IP address retrieved from the authoritative nameserver. How to block DNS over HTTPS You have two options when it comes to DoH in Firefox. You can change the default provider -- Cloudflare is the default -- to another provider (for whatever reason) or block the entire feature so that it won't be used. If you don't want to use it, set the value of network.trr.mode to 0 5 on about:config. Source: Mozilla plans to roll out DNS over HTTPS to US users in late September 2019 (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  5. How to configure the DNS in iOS We taught you how to configure Safari in iOS to take control of how the browser works. Continuing with our internet tweaks, we are going to tell you how to configure the DNS in iOS. You should know that there is one huge drawback in iOS concerning DNS. You can only set a custom DNS if you are connected to a Wi-Fi connection. You cannot change the DNS on mobile networks, it’s just bizarre. One option around this would be to use a VPN instead that uses its own DNS service. When Android Pie was launched, many praised the addition of a native DNS option. Many iOS users aren’t aware that this option has been in their iPhone/iPad for a long time. The reason why they may not have known about it, is because it isn’t kind of visible in the settings. You’ll understand why we say this in a moment. How to configure the DNS in iOS 1. Open the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad 2. Navigate to the Wi-Fi options on the side-bar. 3. Now, on the right pane, you will see the name of the Wi-Fi network you are connected to. It will have a blue checkmark next to it, to indicate it is working fine. 4. Tap anywhere on the line with the Wi-Fi network’s name or the icons on the edge. This open’s the settings which are specific to the selected network. 5. Scroll down till you say the Configure DNS option. If it says “Automatic”, it means no custom DNS has been enabled, and the network is connecting to your ISP’s DNS servers. 6. Tap on Configure DNS, and then on the “Manual” option. Now you will see an Add server option. 7. Use this to set any DNS that you want to. Don’t forget to hit the save button on the top right corner, to finish adding the DNS server. Okay, you probably guessed this. Yeah, if you have more than one Wi-Fi networks, you’re going to need to setup a DNS for each of those. Here are a few popular public DNS services which are reliable: CloudFlare DNS: 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 (Cloudflare has DNS apps for Android and iOS as well= AdGuard DNS: 176.103.130.130 and 176.103.130.131 OpenDNS: 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220 Quad9 DNS: 9.9.9.9 and 149.112.112.112 Google DNS: 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 AdGuard DNS is very useful, because it acts as a system-wide ad blocker. You can check out our Adguard DNS review here. Closing Words Personally, I don’t like Apple’s Settings app and the way it presents the options for changing the DNS. In comparison, on Android Pie, the DNS option is straightforward. You go to Settings > Network & Internet > Advanced > Private DNS. Bam, there it is, it’s a one-time setting and it works across all networks (Wi-Fi and Mobile). Even if you don’t remember the option’s location, you can just open Settings on your Android device and type DNS and it will display the option for you. Do the same thing on iOS, and you get nothing, it’s not a searchable option. Source: How to configure the DNS in iOS (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  6. I have a domain name ending in .TK, from freenom and webhosting supplied by bplaced. Do I use freenom's DNS to add info. from bplaced or vice-versa? In other words do I tell the host of the web site about the domain, the other way around or do I have to tell each about the other? The host of the website offer their own domain buying service which confuses things (for me). freenom talk about 20202020 or 20202121 as servers and bplace talk about DNS Crec or records? I'd appreciate someone familiar running through the setup procedure as although they have tried to translate from German to English their instructions are not very clear to me. is this right?
  7. Mozilla published a list of requirements that companies need to meet if they want to be included as Trusted Recursive Resolvers for Firefox's upcoming DNS-over-HTTPS feature. DNS-over-HTTPS aims to improve user privacy, security and the reliability of connections by sending and receiving DNS information using HTTPS. Mozilla ran a Shield study in 2018 to test the DNS-over-HTTPS implementation in Firefox Nightly versions. The organization selected Cloudflare as its partner for the study after Cloudflare agreed to Mozilla's requirements to not keep records or sell or transfer data to third-parties. Firefox users may configure DNS-over-HTTPS in the browser. Mozilla plans to make it the default in Firefox going forward; while that is beneficial overall, doing so comes with its own set of issues and concerns. Firefox will use the feature for DNS related activities and not the DNS configured on the computer. Means: local hosts files, resolvers, or custom DNS providers will be ignored. The selection of Cloudflare as the first partner was controversial. Mozilla plans to make DNS-over-HTTPS the default in the Firefox web browser. Firefox users may still disable the feature once Mozilla makes the switch from off to on though. The organization wants to select a number of companies for use as Trusted Recursive Resolvers in the Firefox web browser. To address concerns in regards to privacy, Mozilla created a list of policies that these organizations need to conform to. User data may only be retained for up to 24 hours and that needs to be done "for the purpose of operating the service". Aggregate data may be kept for longer. Personal information, IP addresses, user query patterns, or other data that may identify users may not be retained, sold, or transferred. Data gathered from acting as a resolver may not be combined with other data that "can be used to identify individual users". Rights to user data may not be sold, licensed, sublicensed or granted. Resolver must support DNS Query Name Minimisation (to improve privacy, the resolver does not send the full original QNAME to the upstream name server). The resolver must not "propagate unnecessary information about queries to authoritative name servers". Organizations need a "public privacy notice specifically for the resolver service". Organizations need to publish a transparency report "at least yearly". The company that operates the resolver should not block or filter domains unless required by law. Organizations need to maintain public documentation that lists all domains that are blocked and maintain a log that highlights when domains get added or removed. The resolver needs to provide an "accurate NXDOMAIN response" when a domain cannot be resolved and not alter the response, e.g. redirect a user to alternative content. Mozilla's system will be opt-out means that it is enabled by default for all Firefox users if Mozilla does not change that prior to integration in Firefox Stable. Source: Mozilla still on track to enable DNS-over-HTTPS by default in Firefox (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  8. selesn777

    NetSetMan Pro 3.7.3 Retail

    NetSetMan Pro 3.7.3 Retail NetSetMan is a network settings manager which can easily switch between 6 different, visually structured profiles including IP addresses, gateways (incl. Metric), DNS servers, WINS servers, IPv4 and IPv6, extensive WiFi managment, computer name, workgroup, DNS domain, default printer, network drives, NIC status, SMTP server, hosts and scripts. NetSetMan offers you a powerful, easy-to-use interface to manage all your network settings at a glance. Main features: Management for network settings (LAN & WLAN)Tray-Info for all current IP settingsNSM Service to allow the use without admin privilegesAdministration for defining usage permissionsQuick switch from the tray iconAuto-saving of all settingsCommand line activationQuick access to frequently used Windows locationsTwo different user interfaces (Full & Compact)3.7. - 2014-06-03 Free vs Pro Website: http://www.netsetman.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 (x86-x64) Language: Ml Medicine: Keygen Size: 3,66 Mb.
  9. In recent years, there has been an explosion of services designed to let you access geo-restricted content from anywhere in the world. Originally, VPNs were all the rage. But with the VPN clampdown by services like Netflix and BBC iPlayer, some users have turned to smart DNS providers instead. For people who are desperate to access such apps, they both have pros and cons. Of course, changing your DNS servers or using a VPN can have exceptional benefits outside the world of geo-blocking. However, many users won’t care about those benefits. To help you out, I’m going to focus on the two solutions specifically from the standpoint of someone who is using them to access blocked content. What are they? How to they work? And, most importantly, what impact do they have on your online security? Keep reading to find out. What Is a VPN? A VPN (Virtual Private Network) lets you connect to a secure private network remotely. They are widely used by companies to allow employees to access databases and business-critical apps when they are out of the office. Connecting to a VPN (such as ExpressVPN or any provider in our best VPNs list) will direct all your internet traffic to the new network, and you effectively do your browsing through that network. In addition to getting around geo-blocking, VPNs significantly improve your online security and privacy. In an age when it seems like every company in the world is trying to get access to your data and browsing history, everyone should be using one. What Is DNS? DNS stands for “Domain Name System.” It’s like the phone book of the internet. DNS servers are responsible for pairing web domains (such as google.com) with the site’s underlying IP address. As such, changing your DNS provider away from your ISP’s default service can bring awesome benefits, including faster browsing, parental controls, and increased security technology. Unlike regular DNS, smart DNS directs users to a proxy server which is specifically designed to help unblock restricted content. How Do VPNs Help Access Restricted Content? When connecting to a VPN, your computer acts like it’s in the physical location of the VPN network. More importantly, websites see an IP address in a particular location and automatically assume you’re based there. For example, if you live in the United Kingdom and connect to a VPN in the United States, websites will display the American version of the site. What’s the Problem With VPNs? In the last couple of years, websites that offer streaming content have started blocking users on VPNs. It’s surprisingly straightforward to achieve: the companies collate a list of IP addresses used by VPN providers and block any traffic that originates from them. Of course, some IP addresses will always slip through the cracks, thus resulting in a game of whack-a-mole between the content providers and VPN companies. How Do DNS Servers Help Access Restricted Content? With the ever-decreasing reliability of VPNs for accessing geo-blocked content, users have been migrating to smart DNS providers instead. The principle is the same as VPNs: both your computer and websites you visit are spoofed into thinking you’re in a different place from your true locale. However, while the effect for the user is the same, the underlying process is very different. A smart DNS will receive information about a user’s location and change it to a new location before resolving the IP query. It does this by routing all your traffic through a dedicated proxy server. The server is located in the country where the website you want to visit is based. The Security Implications of VPNs VPNs are the number one weapon in the battle to keep yourself safe from prying eyes. If you use a VPN, the biggest benefit is encrypted traffic. A hacker won’t be able to see what you’re doing online, and neither will your ISP. It passes through a secure tunnel to the VPN network, and won’t be visible by anyone until it enters the public internet. And remember, if you only visit HTTPS sites, your browsing will always be encrypted. If you’re choosing a VPN provider, you still need to pay attention to the VPN protocols. Most providers offer SSL/TLS, PPTP, IPSec, and L2TP — but they are not all equal, especially from a security standpoint. For example, there are known vulnerabilities with PPTP, with many problems deriving from the authentication processes it uses. As a rule of thumb, you should use SSL protocols. The most security-conscious VPNs won’t even anonymously log traffic. Theoretically, logs could allow a VPN provider to match an IP address and a time stamp to one of their customers. If the provider finds itself on the end of a court’s subpoena because some of its users have been accessing illegal content or downloading copyrighted videos, the company might potentially “fold” rather quickly and relinquish any information they have. The Security Implications of Smart DNS Smart DNS servers are not security measures. Yes, some top-end DNS providers introduce technology such as DNS-over-HTTPS and DNSSEC, but you won’t find those features on services that solely focus on forging your location. Most importantly, DNS servers do not encrypt your data. This dramatically increases their speed compared to VPNs (which is a big reason why they’re popular among cord-cutters), but they will not hide your traffic from companies, websites, your ISP, governments, or anyone else who wants to spy on you. Ultimately, all your traffic is logged against your IP address, and anyone with the right tools can view it. You’re also putting yourself at risk from man-in-the-middle attacks (MITM). MITM attacks occur when an attacker is intercepting and altering any traffic between two parties who believe they are communicating directly with each other. DNS servers are one of the main ways in which hackers launch MITM attacks. It is very easy for an unscrupulous smart DNS provider to offer rock bottom prices then conduct DNS hijacking on all its customers. Look no further than the now infamous Hola VPN incident to see how low some people are willing to stoop in the pursuit of profit. Before signing up to a smart DNS provider, spend a few hours carefully studying the company’s privacy policy. It will help shed light on what your provider is logging, what it knows about you, and if it is profiting off your data. The Bottom Line If you are desperate to watch the latest season of Orange Is The New Black, you need to give VPNs a wide berth. They are unreliable and no longer fit for purpose if you want to unblock content. Instead, you should use a smart DNS service. However, users should also use a VPN service. If you value your privacy and security, there is no better way to keep yourself safe online. Remember, smart DNS providers do not help your security — if anything, they hinder it. Article source
  10. tao

    Today we mitigated 1.1.1.1

    On May 31, 2018 we had a 17 minute outage on our 1.1.1.1 resolver service; this was our doing and not the result of an attack. Cloudflare is protected from attacks by the Gatebot DDoS mitigation pipeline. Gatebot performs hundreds of mitigations a day, shielding our infrastructure and our customers from L3/L4 and L7 attacks. Here is a chart of a count of daily Gatebot actions this year: In the past, we have blogged about our systems: Meet Gatebot, a bot that allows us to sleep Today, things didn't go as planned. Gatebot Cloudflare’s network is large, handles many different types of traffic and mitigates different types of known and not-yet-seen attacks. The Gatebot pipeline manages this complexity in three separate stages: attack detection - collects live traffic measurements across the globe and detects attacks reactive automation - chooses appropriate mitigations mitigations - executes mitigation logic on the edge The benign-sounding "reactive automation" part is actually the most complicated stage in the pipeline. We expected that from the start, which is why we implemented this stage using a custom Functional Reactive Programming (FRP) framework. If you want to know more about it, see the talk and the presentation. Our mitigation logic often combines multiple inputs from different internal systems, to come up with the best, most appropriate mitigation. One of the most important inputs is the metadata about our IP address allocations: we mitigate attacks hitting HTTP and DNS IP ranges differently. Our FRP framework allows us to express this in clear and readable code. For example, this is part of the code responsible for performing DNS attack mitigation: def action_gk_dns(...): [...] if port != 53: return None if whitelisted_ip.get(ip): return None if ip not in ANYCAST_IPS: return None [...] It's the last check in this code that we tried to improve today. Clearly, the code above is a huge oversimplification of all that goes into attack mitigation, but making an early decision about whether the attacked IP serves DNS traffic or not is important. It's that check that went wrong today. If the IP does serve DNS traffic then attack mitigation is handled differently from IPs that never serve DNS. Cloudflare is growing, so must Gatebot Gatebot was created in early 2015. Three years may not sound like much time, but since then we've grown dramatically and added layers of services to our software stack. Many of the internal integration points that we rely on today didn't exist then. One of them is what we call the Provision API. When Gatebot sees an IP address, it needs to be able to figure out whether or not it’s one of Cloudflare’s addresses. Provision API is a simple RESTful API used to provide this kind of information. This is a relatively new API, and prior to its existence, Gatebot had to figure out which IP addresses were Cloudflare addresses by reading a list of networks from a hard-coded file. In the code snippet above, the ANYCAST_IPS variable is populated using this file. Things went wrong Today, in an effort to reclaim some technical debt, we deployed new code that introduced Gatebot to Provision API. What we did not account for, and what Provision API didn’t know about, was that 1.1.1.0/24 and 1.0.0.0/24 are special IP ranges. Frankly speaking, almost every IP range is "special" for one reason or another, since our IP configuration is rather complex. But our recursive DNS resolver ranges are even more special: they are relatively new, and we're using them in a very unique way. Our hardcoded list of Cloudflare addresses contained a manual exception specifically for these ranges. As you might be able to guess by now, we didn't implement this manual exception while we were doing the integration work. Remember, the whole idea of the fix was to remove the hardcoded gotchas! Impact The effect was that, after pushing the new code release, our systems interpreted the resolver traffic as an attack. The automatic systems deployed DNS mitigations for our DNS resolver IP ranges for 17 minutes, between 17:58 and 18:13 May 31st UTC. This caused 1.1.1.1 DNS resolver to be globally inaccessible. Lessons Learned While Gatebot, the DDoS mitigation system, has great power, we failed to test the changes thoroughly. We are using today’s incident to improve our internal systems. Our team is incredibly proud of 1.1.1.1 and Gatebot, but today we fell short. We want to apologize to all of our customers. We will use today’s incident to improve. The next time we mitigate 1.1.1.1 traffic, we will make sure there is a legitimate attack hitting us. < Here >
  11. Jime234

    Changing Mobile Data DNS

    Hi, I wanted to change the DNS of the Mobile Data of my Android Smart Phone. Its a simple process to Change DNS of WiFi but Mobile Data is just something else.. I've searched and tried some apps to change DNS but then I don't know it worked or not, there is no way to check ! Has anyone here tried it ?
  12. Smart multi-homed name resolution is a DNS related feature that Microsoft introduced in Windows 8 and implemented in Windows 10 as well. The feature is designed to speed up DNS resolution on a device running Windows 8 or newer by sending DNS requests across all available network adapters. Microsoft refined the feature in Windows 10 as it selects the information that is returned the fastest automatically. While the feature makes sense from a performance point of view, it introduces an issue from a privacy one. If you connect to a VPN network on a Windows machine for instance, smart multi-homed name resolution may lead to DNS leakage. Since requests are sent out to all network adapters at the same time, all configured DNS servers receive the requests and with them information on the sites that you visit. Turn off smart multi-homed name resolution in Windows Microsoft introduced a Registry key and policy to manage the feature in Windows 8. Registry (Windows 8.x only) Note: manipulating the Registry may lead to issues if done incorrectly. It is suggested that you create a backup of the Windows Registry before you continue. This can be done by selecting a Registry Hive in the Registry Editor, and then File > Export from the menu bar. 1.Open the Windows Registry Editor. One easy option to do that is to tap on the Windows-key, type regedit.exe, and hit the Enter-key. Windows throws an UAC prompt which you need to confirm. 2.Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows NT\DNSClient 3.If the Dword value DisableSmartNameResolution exists already, make sure it is set to 1. 4.If it does not exist, right-click on DNSClient, and select New > Dword (32-bit) Value from the menu. 5.Name it DisableSmartNameResolution. 6.Set its value to 1. You may turn the feature back on at any time by setting the value to 0, or by deleting the Dword value. 7.Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Dnscache\Parameters 8.If the Dword value DisableParallelAandAAAA exists already, make sure its value is set to 1. 9.If the value does not exist, right-click on Parameters, and select New > Dword (32-bit) Value. 10.Name it DisableParallelAandAAAA. 11.Set the value of the Dword to 1. You can turn the feature back on by setting the value to 0, or by deleting the value. I have created a Registry file that makes both changes to the Windows Registry when executed. You can download it with a click on the following link: disable-smart-name-resolution.zip https://www.ghacks.net/download/136552/ Group Policy (Windows 8 and Windows 10) The Registry key that worked under Windows 8 does not seem to work under Windows 10 anymore. Windows 10 users and admins may set a policy however to turn the feature off.  Specifies that a multi-homed DNS client should optimize name resolution across networks. The setting improves performance by issuing parallel DNS, link local multicast name resolution (LLMNR) and NetBIOS over TCP/IP (NetBT) queries across all networks. In the event that multiple positive responses are received, the network binding order is used to determine which response to accept. Note that the Group Policy Editor is only available in professional editions of Windows 10. Windows 10 Home users may want to check out Policy Plus that introduces policy editing to Home editions of Windows 10. 1.Do the following to open the Group Policy Editor in Windows: Tap on the Windows-key on the keyboard, type gpedit.msc, and hit the Enter-key on the keyboard. 2.Go to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Network > DNS Client > Turn off smart multi-homed name resolution. 3.Set the policy to enabled, to disable the smart multi-homed name resolution feature of the system.  If you enable this policy setting, the DNS client will not perform any optimizations. DNS queries will be issued across all networks first. LLMNR queries will be issued if the DNS queries fail, followed by NetBT queries if LLMNR queries fail. Closing Words Some DNS clients that you may run on Windows machines come with DNS leak protection to prevent these leaks. OpenDNS users may enable the block-outside-dns option for instance in the client to do so. Source
  13. straycat19

    Internet Speed Up By Changing DNS

    What DNS is best for you? The big question is how to find a new DNS and how to know it will be any better than your current one. Google has a solution called namebench. This lightweight program will test your DNS against other popular DNS servers. Once it finishes the comparison, it will give you detailed statistics on performance and recommend the best DNS for you to use. Download Instructions To download the program, navigate to the namebench download page by using the links at the end of this article. On the left side of the namebench download page, there is a green header labeled "Featured." Here is where you will find the program you need. For PC users, click the second download link with the ending "Windows.exe". Mac users should select the download link ending in "Mac_OS_X.dmg". You will be redirected to another page that has another download link. This link should be highlighted in green and have the same name as the previous download link you clicked. Note: If the download link is not highlighted in green or the download link is different from the first, do not click on it. It is not the download link you're looking for. Click the highlighted download link and your download will begin immediately. After the download is complete, extract the installation files. namebench will launch automatically. Managing namebench On the first window, you'll see a field labeled Nameservers. This will automatically be filled with the IP address of your current DNS. Below the Nameservers field are two checkboxes. One says "Include global DNS providers," the other says "Include best available regional DNS services." Leave both of these checked. The next area is for secondary options. The first checkbox lets you check if the DNS is blocking certain sites. If you're looking for a DNS with filtering options, definitely select this one. It will tell you how effective a DNS is at blocking unwanted content. The second checkbox will publish your results anonymously. This will help provide more accurate results to you and others in the future. You can leave this blank or check it. Neither will affect the comparisons you're given. Next, set the location dropdown to your country. In the Query Data Source dropdown menu, select your default browser. If you aren't sure what browser you use, visit this site. In the Health Check Performance section, you normally want this set to Fast. This will test the speed of 40 nameservers. But if your Internet connection is slow or unreliable, change Fast to "Slow (unstable network)." For the number of queries, the standard 250 should be sufficient. But if you're on a slower network, you may want to decrease the amount. Once you've got your settings in place, hit Start Benchmark. While namebench is running, you should avoid using the Internet as that can affect its results. When namebench completes, it will open up a new browser window with your results. There's a lot of information in this window. We'll focus on the most important parts. The first box gives you a DNS recommendation and tells you the possible speed increase by switching. The box immediately to the right gives you the settings of the recommended DNS and two backups. Below these boxes are a series of charts and graphs. These visualize and breakdown the performance of each DNS. You can find exact details about each graph at Namebench's wiki. Change your router settings Now that you know which DNS is best for you, you need to change the settings on your router. That improves all the gadgets on your network. To edit your router settings, you'll need to open your browser and type in your router's IP address and enter your username and password. You can find out your router's default IP address and login information in the router manual. Once you access the router's settings, take a look under the basic settings. You should see fields for Primary DNS and Secondary DNS. Write down both of the IP addresses in case you need to go back to them later. Next, replace the existing IP addresses with the Primary and Secondary IP addresses from Namebench's "Recommended configuration" box. Then Save your router settings and log out. If you don't have a router, you can change the DNS settings right on your computer. For Windows, look under Start>>Control Panel>>Network and Internet>>Network and Share Center. Click the "Manage network connections" link on the left. Right-click on the Local Area Connection icon and select Properties. Under the Networking tab, click on Internet Protocol Version 4 and click the Properties button. Under the General tab, click "Use the following DNS server addresses" and enter the DNS addresses provided by namebench. Then click OK. On a Mac, go to System Preferences>>Network. Click the lock icon in the lower left corner and enter your password. Select Built-in Ethernet and click Advanced. Select the DNS tab and click the + icon. Add the DNS addresses from namebench and put them at the top of the list. Click Apply and OK. Flush the old DNS cache Once your DNS is changed on your router or computer, there is still one more task. To finish, you'll want to flush your computer's current DNS cache. This prevents it from trying to use the old DNS server to look up sites you visit often. To flush your DNS on Windows Vista or later, type CMD into the search field in the Start menu and hit Enter. A Command window should open up. Type "ipconfig /flushdns" (minus quotes). Now hit Enter and you should see "Successfully flushed the DNS Resolver Cache." To flush your DNS on Mac OS X, first click on Spotlight. It's the magnifying glass at the top right. Now type in Terminal and hit Enter. When the Terminal window opens, enter "dscacheutil -flushcache" (no quotes). Now hit Enter. You should see "bash-2.05a$ dscacheutil -flushcache" if all went well. Namebench Downloads Page Namebench Wiki
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  15. selesn777

    NetSetMan Pro 3.7.2 Retail

    NetSetMan Pro 3.7.2 Retail NetSetMan is a network settings manager which can easily switch between 6 different, visually structured profiles including IP addresses, gateways (incl. Metric), DNS servers, WINS servers, IPv4 and IPv6, extensive WiFi managment, computer name, workgroup, DNS domain, default printer, network drives, NIC status, SMTP server, hosts and scripts. NetSetMan offers you a powerful, easy-to-use interface to manage all your network settings at a glance. Main features: Management for network settings (LAN & WLAN)Tray-Info for all current IP settingsNSM Service to allow the use without admin privilegesAdministration for defining usage permissionsQuick switch from the tray iconAuto-saving of all settingsCommand line activationQuick access to frequently used Windows locationsTwo different user interfaces (Full & Compact)3.7.2 - 2014-04-29 Website: http://www.netsetman.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 (x86-x64) Language: Ml Medicine: Keygen Size: 3,24 Mb.
  16. PointDNS says most of its DNS servers are online again after a massive DDoS attack late last week took down the service provider. A post on the company’s Twitter account on Friday said the provider was adding nameservers and working with network providers to restore service to its customers. Many of those same customers took to social media complaining about downtime and unavailability of their own websites and services. According to its website, PointDNS services more than 220,000 domains worldwide. Earlier today, a post from parent company Copper.io said services were “back to normal.” This was the second large attack against a DNS provider in the last two weeks. On April 30,UltraDNA mitigated a DDoS attack that kept most of its customers offline for the better part of a day. The SANS Institute’s Internet Storm Center said the attack peaked at 100 Gbps against one of UltraDNS’ customers. The attack resulted in latency issues for other UltraDNS customers. Last week, Incapsula, a cloud-based application delivery company that also sells security services, said it fought back a 25 million packets per second DDoS attack and that many of the DNS queries held non-spoofed IP data. This stands in contrast to many other massive DDoS attacks of late, in particular reflection or amplification attacks, that rely on spoofed addresses to send massive quantities of bad traffic at a target. The Incapsula-mitigated attack was traced back to IP addresses belonging to a pair of DDoS protection services, which are designed for high-capacity traffic management, Incapsula said. Hackers can take advantage of this to pull off DDoS attacks without amplification. These latest attacks, meanwhile, continue a trend of volumetric DDoS attacks reaching new heights. A recent report from Arbor Networks said the provider has already tracked more than 70 DDoS attacks that topped 100 Gbps or more of malicious traffic. The largest on record reached between 325 Gbps and 400 Gbps of traffic. Almost all of these attacks rely on DNS reflection or a growing number on network time protocol amplification attacks. In both cases, IP addresses are spoofed as the target, and massive amounts of traffic is sent their way at no cost to the attacker. US-CERT issued an advisory in January warning companies that hackers were exploiting NTP vulnerabilities to flood networks with UDP traffic. NTP servers are publicly available machines used to synchronize computer clocks. With NTP amplification attacks, hackers exploit the MON_GETLIST feature in NTP servers, which returns the IP address of the last 600 machines interacting with an NTP server. Monlists are a classic set-and-forget feature and are vulnerable to hackers makingforged REQ_MON_GETLIST requests enabling traffic amplification. With DNS amplification attacks, attackers take advantage of any number of the 28 million open DNS resolvers on the Internet to launch large-scale DDoS attacks. The motivations are varied. Ideological hackers use them to take down services in protest, while profit-motivated criminals can use DDoS as a cover for intellectual property theft and financial fraud. Source
  17. ramonjosegn

    Smart DNS Proxy - Giveaway suscription

    Smart DNS Proxy is a versatile DNS service that works on many devices. You can use it to unblock websites, stream music and videos. It is faster than VPN, and for a limited time it is FREE! I am testing and is works very fine and speedy http://www.smartdnsproxy.com/
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