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  1. The UK has decided to allow Huawei hardware in non-critical areas of 5G networks The UK government has announced that it will allow telecoms firms to continue using Huawei equipment in their 5G networks, but with restrictions. The government decided that only 35% of a network, including masts, can be supplied by Huawei. Further, it has said that Huawei hardware can’t be used in sensitive parts of the network, nor can it be used near military bases nor nuclear sites. Commenting on the decision, Huawei’s UK chief Victor Zhang said: “Huaw
  2. LONDON (AP) — Britain's competition watchdog said Tuesday it launched a formal inquiry into Google's takeover of cloud data analytics company Looker Data Sciences, as it intensifies scrutiny of technology deals. The Competition and Markets Authority said it had notified the two companies on Monday that it was opening an initial inquiry and would decide on Feb. 13 whether to escalate it to a more in-depth investigation. The authority said this month it was looking into whether the $2.6 billion acquisition would result in less
  3. BT has confirmed it will offer 5G mobile plans to its residential and business customers from this autumn, starting with those on a BT Plus package. The company’s EE brand was the first to launch 5G mobile services in the UK this May and BT says its own brand divisions will be the first to offer the service as part of a converged mobile and broadband package. 5G for BT mobile customers will initially be available in the busiest parts of London, Birmingham, Manchester, Edinburgh, Cardiff, Belfast, Glasgow, Newcastle, Liverpool, Leeds, Hull, Sheffield
  4. Human rights group Liberty has lost its latest High Court challenge against the Government’s mass surveillance powers. Liberty brought the challenge against parts of the Investigatory Powers Act (IPA) – dubbed the “Snoopers’ Charter” by critics – which allow intelligence agencies to obtain and store communications data, and take remote control of electronic devices through “bulk hacking”. The group claimed the Government’s powers under IPA, which include the power to intercept the private information of the entire UK population, are too wide an
  5. The company that owns Pornhub and YouPorn has developed a verification system called AgeID X-rated websites were set to be blocked on 15 July this year, but now the new laws have been delayed again. It is still unknown how far the porn block implementation will be pushed back, with an administrative error causing an indefinite wait. All internet providers will block x-rated websites when the new system comes into place, with users having to verify their age before they can proceed. Users will be automatically blocked fr
  6. A court has ordered Grant West to pay back his victims with his cryptocurrency savings. But how much are they worth now, two years after his arrest? LONDON—A UK court today ordered a hacker, who carried out attacks on more than 100 firms, to pay back victims using cryptocurrency. The problem? The bitcoin, which was worth more than $2 million two years ago when the crimes were committed, is now worth half that. The unusual case is yet another ruling that could bolster bitcoin’s legal standing as an asset class. Police say Grant West, 27, from Ken
  7. John McAfee of antivirus software fame has arrived in London from the Dominican Republic, where he had been detained for several days with his wife and several others for entering the Caribbean nation with a cache of weapons on his yacht, his lawyer said Friday. Authorities “asked him where he wanted to go, and he decided on London,” his attorney Candido Simon told Reuters. News of his arrival in the UK came two days after McAfee, 73, the eponymous founder of the PC software security giant, said on Twitter that he was released “after four days of confinemen
  8. UK made illegal copies and mismanaged Schengen travelers database EU officials indirectly confirm UK's gross mismanagement detailed in an unconfirmed report last week. Authorities in the United Kingdom have made unauthorized copies of data stored inside a EU database for tracking undocumented migrants, missing people, stolen cars, or suspected criminals. Named the Schengen Information System (SIS), this is a EU-run database that stores information such as names, personal details, photographs, fingerprints, and arrest warrants for 500,000 non-EU citizens
  9. Just over one million computers in the NHS are still using Windows 7. With less than half a year to go before support ends for Windows 7, about three-quarters of computers in the UK's National Health Service (NHS) are still running the OS. Just over one million computers in the NHS are still using Windows 7, according to a written answer from the Department of Health and Social Care. Having so many machines still running Windows 7 is a problem, according to Jo Platt MP, shadow cabinet office minister, as the end of extended support in January 20
  10. Brexit, Huawei and a potential digital tax are all challenges that Boris Johnson must tackle as he takes power. As of Wednesday afternoon, the UK will have a new prime minister in Conservative politician Boris Johnson. It's a time in history when governments around the world are coming to terms with the increasing crossover between technology and politics. With the society moving full pelt into the era of 5G, deepfakes and new surveillance technologies, Johnson will have decisions to make in order to secure the country's position as a tech leader in the world. The
  11. The first is opening Manchester today Beginning today, Amazon will open 10 brick and mortar stores in locations throughout the UK as part of a scheme which it claims will help small businesses combine online and in-person sales. The new "Clicks and Mortar" stores will sell goods like homeware, health and beauty products, food and drink, and electronics. They will also act as a location for customers to see and try out products from online-only brands like Swifty Scooters.
  12. Sajid Javid inks court papers for hearing tomorrow UK Home Secretary Sajid Javid revealed this morning that he has signed papers to have Julian Assange extradited to the US. Speaking on BBC radio earlier today, Javid said: "There's an extradition request from the US that is before the courts tomorrow but yesterday I signed the extradition order and certified it and that will be going in front of the courts tomorrow." Javid's certifying of the US extradition request lodged this week is the first formal step in having Assange sent across the pond.
  13. MI5 headquarters in London The security service MI5 has handled large amounts of personal data in an "undoubtedly unlawful" way, a watchdog has said. The Investigatory Powers Commissioner said information gathered under warrants was kept too long and not stored safely. Civil rights group Liberty said the breaches involved the "mass collection of data of innocent citizens". The high court heard MI5 knew about the issues in 2016 but kept them secret. "MI5 have been holding on to people's data - ordinary people's data, your data, my da
  14. Councils are sharing information about users of their websites – including when they seek help with a benefit claim, or with a disability or alcoholism – with dozens of private companies. More than 400 local authorities allowed at least one third-party company to track individuals who visit their sites, an investigation has revealed. Some councils were found to be letting companies track use of sensitive sections of their sites, such as when people were seeking financial help or support for substance abuse. Data obtained from cookies tracking wh
  15. GCHQ and Ministry of Defence to roll out national task force of hackers after months of delay A specialist cyber force of hackers who can target hostile states and terror groups is due to be launched later in the spring, after many months of delays and turf wars between the Ministry of Defence and GCHQ. The National Cyber Force – containing an estimated 500 specialists – has been in the works for two years but sources said that after months of wrangling over the details, the specialist unit was close to being formally announced. Britain is keen to be seen as a “cyber p
  16. Sir Andrew Parker also claims UK spies are not doing bulk surveillance Do you expect me to talk, Parker?' / 'No, Mr Bond, I expect you to decrypt!' British spies are once again stipulating that tech companies break their encryption so life is made easier for state-sponsored eavesdroppers. The head of the domestic spy agency, Sir Andrew Parker, demanded that companies such as Facebook compromise the security of their messaging products so spies could read off the contents of messages at will. Although Sir Andrew linked this need to serious crimes such as terrorism
  17. Blighty will be subject to EU rules, but have no way to influence them IT'S BEEN CONFIRMED that the United Kingdom won't have a say in European artificial intelligence (AI) or data protection rules following Brexit. The European Commission's chief negotiator on Brexit, Michel Barnier, has shot down the ICO's suggestion that the UK have a seat at the decision-making table after the country leaves the Union. ICO leader Elizabeth Denham told MPs earlier this month that a bespoke data agreement - which would give the UK's data protection age
  18. Here’s a casualty of the cashless society you might not have previously thought of: the humble street performer. After all, if more of us are paying our way with smartphones and contactless cards, how can we give spare change to musicians on the subway? London has one solution: a new scheme that outfits performers with contactless payment terminals. The project was launched this weekend by the city’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, and is a collaboration with Busk In London (a professional body for buskers) and the Swedish payments firm iZettle (which was bought this month by PayPa
  19. Woman, 61, dies in hospital in north of capital after being admitted with head injuries A 95-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering his carer after a woman died in hospital, police have said. The Metropolitan police said they believed the 61-year-old woman’s injuries were sustained at a residential address in Islington, north London, where she was working as a carer. The London ambulance service was called to the property at 4.15am on Thursday and sent two crews, a spokesman said. “We treated one person at the scene and took the
  20. New research has revealed that 60 percent of all UK citizens have used pirate services to stream or download TV, films or music. However, the vast majority of these self-proclaimed pirates say they tend to find legal options first. These and other findings suggest that piracy remains an availability problem and that 'pirates' are among the most engaged consumers. Online piracy is often portrayed as a simple problem. People download or stream something that’s not theirs because they don’t want to pay. While this may apply in some cases, the reality i
  21. Bulk data collection revealed by Edward Snowden has been been found to violate privacy rights of UK citizens. The European Court of Human Rights Court Room Mass surveillance and data collection programs used by the UK government breached privacy and don't meet the necessary legal requirements to guarantee rights will be upheld, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has ruled. The court has concluded that the UK's mass interception programmes breached the European Convention on Human Rights. The case of 'Big Brother Watch and Others v the United King
  22. Collective action seeking up to £3.2bn for claims Google bypassed privacy settings of Apple’s Safari browser The collective action is being led by former Which? director Richard Lloyd over claims Google bypassed the privacy settings of Apple’s Safari browser on iPhones . Google is being sued in the high court for as much as £3.2bn for the alleged “clandestine tracking and collation” of personal information from 4.4 million iPhone users in the UK. The collective action is being led by former Which? director Richard Lloyd over claims Google bypasse
  23. UK Internet users are no stranger to website blocking. Many of the world's largest pirate sites, including The Pirate Bay, are inaccessible due to court orders. But does this mean that piracy has been eradicated as well? A look at the most visited websites in the UK suggests that there is still a long way to go. Website blocking is without a doubt one of the favorite anti-piracy tools of the entertainment industries. The UK is a leader on this front after the High Court ordered the largest ISPs to block access to popular file-sharing sites. Over time the num
  24. Auntie's outage comes on predicted hottest day of the year Screenshot of BBC website returning HTTP 500 The entire BBC website (less iPlayer) went down briefly this morning. Auntie's online offerings, ranging from free online news to telly and radio listings, recipes and educational content for kids, were all briefly offline. All the BBC's sub-sites were throwing up HTTP 500 errors, complete with a nice little graphic of the BBC test card doctored with a burning background. A reference to the scorchio Great British Summer, perhaps? As R
  25. The UK’s digital and culture secretary is urging businesses and charities to prepare for stronger data protection laws in the light of new information. Less than half of UK businesses and charities are aware of new data laws just four months before the compliance deadline, a government-sponsored survey has revealed, with awareness in the construction and manufacturing sectors particularly low. Businesses in the finance and insurance sectors have the highest awareness of the changes to be brought in through the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which will b
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