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  1. The Leicester City owner's helicopter has crashed in a car park outside the club's ground shortly after taking off following a match. It is not known if Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha was in the helicopter at the time. Leicester City had been playing West Ham United in the Premier League at their King Power stadium. One witness said he saw Leicester's goalkeeper Kasper Schmeichel run out towards the crashed helicopter. The game, which ended 1-1, kicked off at 17:30 BST and finished about one hour before the helicopter took off. Mr Srivaddhanaprabha was at the game and spoke
  2. Football will continue to be a force in the United Kingdom. The NFL on Tuesday confirmed that London will host four regular-season games in 2019 at Wembley Stadium and the new stadium being built for Tottenham Hotspur. The league did not specify which teams will make the trip overseas or when the games will take place. "The games in the past few weeks have once again demonstrated the incredible passion of NFL fans in the UK," NFL executive vice president Mark Waller said in a statement. "The support of our stadium partners, the Mayor o
  3. Chancellor Phillip Hammond targets tax avoidance by large tech firms in the Budget. Technology giants will have to pay more tax in the UK under new regulations unveiled by the Government today. In his Budget statement this afternoon, Chancellor Phillip Hammond revealed a two percent "digital services tax" on large tech firms such as Amazon, Facebook and Google. From April 2020, large social media platforms, search engines and online marketplaces will pay a 2 percent tax on the revenues they earn which are linked to UK users. The tax f
  4. Mohammad Maroof suspended after image appears on Mums United WhatsApp group A councillor who accidentally sent a picture of a topless woman to a group of campaigners during a meeting has been suspended. Mohammad Maroof, a Sheffield city councillor, posted the explicit image on a Mums United WhatsApp group while its founder, Sahira Irshad, presented a petition on knife crime. Maroof said he was “very embarrassed” and apologised for what he described as an “honest mistake”. He said he had been trying to attach a video of Irshad’s speech.
  5. The UK Government has committed £2 million to fund the ongoing "Get it Right" anti-piracy campaign until 2021. Under this program, UK Internet providers and rightsholders have teamed up to warn alleged pirates and educate the public at large on how to access content through 'genuine' channels. Four years ago, copyright indistry groups and Internet providers teamed up to fight online piracy in the UK. Backed by the Government, they launched several educational campaigns under the “Get it Right” banner. Under the program, ISPs send out piracy warnings to subs
  6. The British prime minister acknowledged she would have lost the vote, scheduled for tomorrow, by a “significant” margin. Prime Minister Theresa May has pulled a vote on her Brexit deal, throwing the UK’s plan to leave the European Union into chaos after she admitted she did not have the votes to get it through parliament. MPs could now have to wait until January 21, 2019 to vote on the government’s beleaguered deal, May announced in the House of Commons on Monday afternoon. “If we went ahead and held the vote tomorrow the deal
  7. The UK’s National Health Service has been ordered to stop buying more fax machines. It also must stop using the machines entirely by April 2020, as part of an effort to modernize the healthcare organization. More than 9,000 fax machines are in use by the NHS, a July survey found. All will be replaced by email, according to a report from the BBC. The shift, ordered by UK health secretary Matt Hancock, is intended to improve patient safety and make communications more secure. Rebecca McIntyre, a cognitive behavioral therapist, told the BBC that using fa
  8. The pound has fallen to an 18-month low against the dollar amid mounting uncertainty about the terms of the UK's exit from the EU. After reports that Theresa May is delaying Tuesday's vote on her Brexit deal, the pound fell to $1.2656, its lowest level since June 2017. The pound slipped to three-month lows against the euro, trading at €1.1085 The currency is seen as a barometer of the Brexit negotiations, analysts said. "Until the market knows what will happen with respect to Brexit one way or the other then they [traders] will remain extremely anxious,
  9. Drug-related hospital admissions down 95% after onsite testing at festival in Cambridgeshire An alarming rise in drug-related deaths at music festivals can be countered by testing illicit substances onsite, according to the first academic study of its kind, which has triggered calls for similar services to be rolled out at all major events. Testers found that one in five substances sold at the Secret Garden Party, a four-day festival in Cambridgeshire in July 2016, were not as described by dealers. Samples contained ketamine instead of co
  10. The purpose of a government committee is to be critical. If it did nothing but agree with its subject matter status quo, there would be little point to it. That said, in the latest report published November 12, 2018 by the UK parliament's Joint Committee on the National Security Strategy, this committee is somewhat critical of the UK's National Security Strategy (NCS). This report (PDF) specifically examines the critical national infrastructure (CNI -- or more usually in the U.S., just CI). It says, for example, "The Government's current approach to improving the cyber
  11. LONDON (Reuters) - Uber [UBER.UL] has lost its latest court bid to stop its British drivers being classified as workers, entitling them to rights such as the minimum wage, in a decision which jeopardizes the taxi app’s business model. Two drivers successfully argued at a tribunal in 2016 that the Silicon Valley firm exerted significant control over them to provide an on-demand service, and that they should cease to be considered as self-employed, which gives few protections in law. An employment appeal tribunal upheld that decision last year, prompting Uber
  12. Companies could face fines if they fail to take down content quickly. Enlarge / British Prime Minister Theresa May. Jack Taylor/Getty Images The British government is considering sweeping new laws to regulate problematic content online, ranging from terrorist propaganda to fake news. A new proposal unveiled on Monday would impose a new "duty of care" on websites hosting user-submitted content. Under the plan, a new UK agency would develop codes of practice outlining how sites should deal with various types of harmful content.
  13. A family were forced to sit on the floor of an airplane during their flight home from Menorca after being told that their allocated seats did not exist. Paula Taylor and her daughter, Brooke, were forced to sit on the floor during the flight Paula Taylor, 44, her husband Ian, 55, and their daughter Brooke, 10, from Alcester, Warwickshire, arrived early at Mahon airport in June last year for their flight with TUI airlines. They were given the seat numbers 41 D, E and F, but when they boarded the plane they could not find their seats and cabin crew inste
  14. Online filth flicks fans will just have to swallow the verification process THE INEVITABLE HAS HAPPENED: porn fans will soon have to prove they're old enough to bash one out to online grot flicks and pics, as the UK has passed the porn age verification law. The whole quest to choke easy access to porn websites without viewers needing to prove they're 18-years-old has been undergoing since 2015 as part of the government's mission to rear-end porn access. A whole host of technical problems for posing such a law on the orgy of porn websites across t
  15. Cybersecurity: UK could build an automatic national defence system, says GCHQ chief Government, security firms and technology companies should be doing the heavy lifting when it comes to protecting against hacking and cyberattacks, says the UK's intelligence service. The UK could one day create a national cyber-defence system built on sharing real-time cybersecurity information between intelligence agencies and business, the hea
  16. ATLANTA - Rapper 21 Savage, who claims to be from Atlanta’s Zone 6, has been arrested by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Rapper 21 Savage was arrested by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Atlanta Sunday morning, on the grounds that he is actually from the United Kingdom and overstayed his visa, according to reports in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and TMZ “U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) arrested unlawfully present United Kingdom national Sha Yaa Bin Abraham-Joseph AKA ’21 Savage’ during a targeted opera
  17. Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), the UK’s counterpart to the National Security Agency (NSA), has fired the latest shot in the crypto wars. In a post to Lawfare titled Principles for a More Informed Exceptional Access Debate, two of Britain’s top spooks introduced what they’re framing as a kinder, gentler approach to compromising the encryption that keeps us safe online. This new proposal from GCHQ—which we’ve heard rumors of for nearly a year—eschews one discredited method for breaking encryption (key escrow) and instead adopts a novel approach referred to as the “ghost.”
  18. 5G-connected cows test milking parlor of the future SHEPTON MALLET, England (Reuters) - They may look like regular cows, but a herd of Friesian dairy cattle at a British farm are internet pioneers and they are enjoying the benefits of 5G connectivity before you. Cisco Systems Inc, which is developing network infrastructure for the emerging technology, has set up 5G testbeds to trial wireless and mobile connectivity in three rural locations. 5G promises super-fast connections, which evangelists say will transform the way we live our lives, enabli
  19. UK Parliament: Ban all loot boxes until evidence proves they’re safe for kids Call comes as part of massive inquiry into "immersive and addictive technologies." Enlarge / UK Parliament sends a clear signal: loot boxes in series like FIFA are on notice. EA / Machkovech UK Parliament published a wide-ranging inquiry on Thursday looking into the rise of "immersive and addictive technologies" and what the British government should do to recognize manipulative, unsafe, and otherwise uncouth business practices in a rapidly changin
  20. THE USE of facial recognition by South Wales Police has been deemed lawful in a ruling on Wednesday by the High Court in London following a judicial review. Welsh cops' use of facial recognition is legal, High Court rules Civil rights group Liberty and local Cardiff resident Ed Bridges had challenged the deployment of facial recognition in the first legal challenge to UK police use of facial recognition technology. It was first used by South Wales Police in a trial during the Champions League Final at Cardiff's Millennium Stadium in June 2017. In total
  21. The CEO of an energy firm based in the UK thought he was following his boss’s urgent orders in March when he transferred funds to a third-party. But the request actually came from the AI-assisted voice of a fraudster. The Wall Street Journal reports that the mark believed he was speaking to the CEO of his businesses’ parent company based in Germany. The German-accented caller told him to send €220,000 ($243,000 USD) to a Hungarian supplier within the hour. The firm’s insurance company, Euler Hermes Group SA, shared information about the crime with WSJ but would not rev
  22. Climbdown follows difficulties with implementing plan to ensure users are over 18 Plans to introduce a nationwide age verification system for online pornography have been abandoned by the government after years of technical troubles and concerns from privacy campaigners. The climbdown follows countless difficulties with implementing the policy, which would have required all pornography websites to ensure users were over 18. Methods would have included checking credit cards or allowing people to buy a “porn pass” age verification document from a newsagent.
  23. The UK Just Got More Power From Renewables Than Fossil Fuels, a First Since 1882 Photo: Getty It’s been an eventful year for carbon-free energy in the UK. First, Great Britain went a week without coal for the first time since the Industrial Revolution. Then the country fired (wound?) up the world’s largest offshore wind farm. And on Monday, a new analysis claims that renewables generated more power in the UK than fossil fuels for three months, the first time that’s happ
  24. But .uk domain suspensions are actually slightly down for the first time in recent years. Over 28,000 .uk domain names were suspended in the last year over reports of criminal activity. Nominet, which is responsible for keeping the .uk internet infrastructure secure, can suspend domains following notification from the police or other law enforcement agencies that the domain is being used for criminal activity. Domains that are suspended cannot be used as part of website or email addresses. The number of domains suspended between 1 November 2018
  25. Despite looking to make DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) the default for its American users, Mozilla has assured culture secretary Nicky Morgan that this won't be the case in the UK. DoH has been fairly controversial, with the Internet Services Providers Association (ISPAUK) nominating Mozilla for an 'Internet Villain' over the whole thing, saying it will "bypass UK filtering obligations and parental controls, undermining internet safety standards in the UK." In his letter to Morgan, Mozilla vice president of global policy, trust and security, Alan Davidson, stressed t
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