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Batu69

What Is the Maximum Size a Windows Page File Can Be?

13 posts in this topic

xwhat-is-the-maximum-size-that-a-windows

 

Whether it is just a matter of curiosity or a genuine need to know before adjusting the size of the file on your own computer, just how large can a Windows page file actually be? Today’s SuperUser Q&A post has the answer to a curious reader’s question.

 

Today’s Question & Answer session comes to us courtesy of SuperUser—a subdivision of Stack Exchange, a community-driven grouping of Q&A web sites.

 

The Question

SuperUser reader Marina Dunst wants to know the maximum size that a Windows Page File can be:

I know that the recommended size for a Windows page file (C:\Pagefile.sys) is around 1.5 to 2 times the amount of RAM. Out of curiosity, what is the maximum size that a Windows Page File can be?

The Answer

SuperUser contributors Steven, Ramhound, and Techie007 have the answer for us. First up, Steven:

Quote

The size limit on Windows 7 is 16TB.

xwhat-is-the-maximum-size-that-a-windows

Source: Learn Best Practices for Optimizing the Virtual Memory Configuration [Microsoft TechNet]

 

When attempting to set a larger amount, Windows will display the error:

xwhat-is-the-maximum-size-that-a-windows

This limit is also the maximum file size for a file on Windows 7 NTFS.

Source: NTFS [Wikipedia]

 

The maximum file size for NTFS on Windows 8 and 10 is larger, but it is unclear if a larger Page File is allowed.

 

Followed by Ramhound:

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Based on my research, the maximum Page File size for Windows 8 and 10 is identical to that of Windows 7. The process for changing the Page File’s size has not changed, which means the exact same logic is used.

 

And our final answer from Techie007:

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I believe that 32-bit versions of Windows can only handle Page Files up to 4GB in size.

 


Have something to add to the explanation? Sound off in the comments. Want to read more answers from other tech-savvy Stack Exchange users? Check out the full discussion thread here.

 

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Whats the use of pagefiles if you have 32GB RAM ?

I dont have any pagefile anymore on my Win10x64, its faster without..............:D

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20 minutes ago, Pete 12 said:

Whats the use of pagefiles if you have 32GB RAM ?

I dont have any pagefile anymore on my Win10x64, its faster without..............:D

No bugs , no crash ? :o:)

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" No bugs , no crash ? ".......................nope ! :D

But if you do have crashes , bsod etc. , you dont get a dumpfile of the crash anymore , without pagefile...........

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:doh::D

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10 hours ago, Actarusse said:

No bugs , no crash ? :o:)

 

I have 128GB in my new computers and haven't used a pagefile in several years since I started installing 32GB.  Never a crash and no bugs.  Since it doesn't have to swap data to the HDD/SSD it is actually much faster because memory is faster than any drive device.  The only way you would have a bug/crash is if you had a defective memory chip.

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1 hour ago, straycat19 said:

 

I have 128GB in my new computers and haven't used a pagefile in several years since I started installing 32GB.  Never a crash and no bugs.  Since it doesn't have to swap data to the HDD/SSD it is actually much faster because memory is faster than any drive device.  The only way you would have a bug/crash is if you had a defective memory chip.

 

I wonder if you would recommend doing so on a smaller RAM PC, something like 8GB or such.

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6 minutes ago, DKT27 said:

 

I wonder if you would recommend doing so on a smaller RAM PC, something like 8GB or such.

i have 8GB, so id like to know also.

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, DKT27 said:

 

I wonder if you would recommend doing so on a smaller RAM PC, something like 8GB or such.

 

52 minutes ago, Kerry4444 said:

i have 8GB, so id like to know also.

 

i remove pagefile in old computer / 4gb - never problem

may be problem if you open lot heavy programs simultaneous

if any problem - system only slow & warning about memory & tell you close some programs

 

 

Edited by VIKTOR PAVEL

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Posted (edited)

Just Let Windows adjust your page file.  Darn sounds like we are back to Windows XP and before TWEAKING something that does not need tweaking. 

 

 

 

1 hour ago, DKT27 said:

 

I wonder if you would recommend doing so on a smaller RAM PC, something like 8GB or such.

Virtual memory for your computer is hard drive space used by Windows when it fills up the physical RAM. Let’s say you have a computer that has 1 GB of RAM and you’re running several applications at once that might need a total of 1.5 GB of memory. Windows will fill up the 1 GB and then uses the free space on the hard drive to store the rest. This is called the paging file or virtual memory and Windows will increase and decrease the size of this file as needed. Writing to disk takes much longer than writing to physical RAM, so when Windows uses the paging file, computer performance degrades.

That’s why you’ll always hear people asking if you have enough RAM because the more RAM you have, the better your computers’ performance will be. However, we can tweak the virtual memory settings so that the paging file does not get fragmented and so that Windows does not have to grow or shrink the size of the paging file, both of which will cause the computer to slow down, especially on older machines.

By default, Windows uses the boot partition (the partition that contains your operating system files) and it is recommended to set the size of the paging file to 1.5 times the amount of RAM that you have.

To change the virtual memory settings, go to Start, Control Panel and click on System. Click on the Advanced tab and under the Performance box, click Settings. In Windows 7, you’ll need to click on Advanced System Settings on the left side to bring up the System Properties dialog.

=========================

Have Fun.  Don't forget to disable you Swap File and reboot into SAFE Mode and Defrag your hard Drive and then Reboot your Computer and Create your Swap File so that it is Contiguous.  Just thought I would add that last bit.

Edited by Airstream_Bill
Correction
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3 hours ago, Airstream_Bill said:

Just Let Windows adjust your page file.  Darn sounds like we are back to Windows XP and before TWEAKING something that does not need tweaking.

 

Actually, letting windows control the pagefile, which was referred to as a dynamic pagefile, really slows the computer down as it has to expand and contract the space as it works.  The rule of thumb was to create a static pagefile that reserved the amount of space designated on the drive that was two times the amount of ram in the machine.  However, I always used 2.5 times the amount of ram as I found that 2 times may not be sufficient in all cases.  I also created the pagefile immediately after installing windows so it would be contiguous and close to the start of the disk which made it even faster for the system.  If you used a dynamic pagefile and a defragger you could see how windows spread it out and it would be in the slower portions of the disk as it was constantly rewritten.

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Never use pagefile on SSD , if you have plenty of RAM !

Using pagefile may also shorten the life of your SSD , the less writing to it the better ..........

You can switch off the superfetch for the same reason, these things are slowing down your rig and killing your SSD .........

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14 hours ago, straycat19 said:

Actually, letting windows control the pagefile, which was referred to as a dynamic pagefile, really slows the computer down as it has to expand and contract the space as it works.  The rule of thumb was to create a static pagefile that reserved the amount of space designated on the drive that was two times the amount of ram in the machine.  However, I always used 2.5 times the amount of ram as I found that 2 times may not be sufficient in all cases.  I also created the pagefile immediately after installing windows so it would be contiguous and close to the start of the disk which made it even faster for the system.  If you used a dynamic pagefile and a defragger you could see how windows spread it out and it would be in the slower portions of the disk as it was constantly rewritten.

 

I kind of agree. Letting OS manage it increases fragmentation on the HDD. I guess 20GB size might be good. But while running games, I found that games use almost as much as PF as much as it uses the RAM. It probably depends on the games I think.

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