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Found 169 results

  1. Ubuntu 17.04 Canonical Adam Conrad announced that the forthcoming Final Beta release of the Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system is now in freeze until its launch late on March 23, 2017. Ubuntu 17.04 has been in development since October last year, during which it received one Alpha and one Beta milestones, but only for the opt-in flavors. Ubuntu itself will participate only in the upcoming Final Beta release, which is expected to land tomorrow if everything goes according to plan. However, the developer informs the Ubuntu community that the queue freeze will last from March 21 until the final release of Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) on April 13, 2017, which means that no major package updates will land in the repositories, exception making those that are approved a member of the release team. "As with the previous releases, we have a bot in place that will accept uploads that are unseeded and don't affect images," said Adam Conrad. Don't take this as an open invitation to break Feature Freeze on those components, this is just to reduce the burden on the release team, so we only review the uploads that need very serious consideration." As mentioned before, Ubuntu 17.04 Final Beta is arriving late on Thursday, March 23, and you are urged to download the Live ISO images, install them on a spare computer or partition designed for testing purposes only, and report any bugs or issues you might encounter. The rest of the official Ubuntu flavors will also participate in tomorrow's Final Beta release. Source
  2. Zorin OS 12 hits half million downloads Believe it or not, the Zorin OS 12 open-source operating system passed the half million downloads mark today, as the development team proudly announced the milestone on the official Twitter account of the project. Zorin OS 12 launched last year on November 18 based on the long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system. It's dubbed by the development team as "the biggest release ever" and it introduced an entirely new Zorin Desktop experience that promises to make your PC more powerful and enjoyable to use. During these past four months since its release, Zorin OS 12 has been downloaded over half a million times from the official website, according to the Zorin team, who said that more than 60% of these are coming from Windows and Mac users who wanted to migrate to an open-source, Linux-based operating system. "Just over 4 months after the release, we’re excited to announce that Zorin OS 12 has been downloaded over 500,000 times," reads the announcement. "We’re also happy to see that over 60% of these downloads were coming from Windows and macOS, reflecting our mission to bring the power of Linux to people who’ve never had access to it before." Zorin OS 12 Lite Edition is coming soon The first point release, Zorin OS 12.1, also arrived and contributed to the half million downloads mark, along with the Zorin OS 12 Business and Education editions, and it now looks like the development team is working hard to release the Zorin OS 12 Lite flavor featuring the a brand-new Xfce-based desktop environment. A first preview of Zorin OS 12 Lite is coming in the next few weeks so stay tuned on our Linux news section for the latest Zorin OS articles. In the meantime, you can download the Zorin OS 12.1, Zorin OS 12 Business, and Zorin OS 12.1 Education Live ISO images right now from our website if you want to install the Ubuntu-based operating system on your personal computer. Source
  3. Canonical announces Ubuntu Linux 12.04 ESM (Extended Security Maintenance) On April 25th, Ubuntu Linux 12.04 LTS will no longer be supported by Canonical. Why? That is the 5 year anniversary of the release, which is the amount of support time given to an LTS (Long Term Support) version of the Linux distribution. For many home users, this really doesn't matter, as they have probably already upgraded to a newer version. Unfortunately, some businesses do not upgrade as regularly. In fact, some organizations may not be ready to move on from Ubuntu 12.04. Tough luck? Not at all. Today, Canonical introduces Ubuntu Linux 12.04 ESM. This "Extended Security Maintenance" release is not free, however -- organizations must pay for the extended support. "Following the end-of-life of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, Canonical is offering Ubuntu 12.04 ESM (Extended Security Maintenance), which provides important security fixes for the kernel and the most essential user space packages in Ubuntu 12.04. These updates are delivered in a secure, private archive exclusively available to Ubuntu Advantage customers," says Canonical. The company further says, "All Ubuntu 12.04 LTS users are encouraged to upgrade to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. But for those who cannot upgrade immediately, Ubuntu 12.04 ESM updates will help ensure the on-going security and integrity of Ubuntu 12.04 systems". If you are interested in leveraging this ESM version of the Linux Distribution, you must become a paid Ubuntu Advantage member. To check out pricing, just head over to the website here. While using this ESM version is certainly a smart move, businesses should also consider upgrading to a newer version of the operating system -- after extensive testing, of course. Source
  4. It Looks Like Ubuntu 17.04 Might Ship with Mesa 17.0.1 and X.Org Server 1.19.2 Both packages are now ready for testing in the proposed repo In his latest blog post, the developer reveals the fact that the long-anticipated X.Org 1.19 display server is now ready for public testing on a special PPA (Personal Package Archive) for Ubuntu 17.04, along with Mesa 17.0.1, which appears to rest in the proposed repository of the forthcoming distribution at the moment of writing. "I’ve prepared X server 1.19.2 along with the driver rebuilds for zesty on the staging ppa here: https://launchpad.net/~canonical-x/+archive/ubuntu/x-staging, " said Timo Aaltonen, Hardware Enablement, Field Expert Squad Team Lead at Canonical. "It also comes with Mesa 17.0.1 while it’s still stuck in zesty-proposed." A call for testing Of course, this is more of a call for testing than an announcement, so don't get too excited. Of course, it will be a huge achievement for Canonical to ship the Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) release with an up-to-date graphics stack based on X.Org Server 1.19 and Mesa 17.0, which translates to a major performance gain for your gaming experience. Therefore, if you want to see Mesa 17 and X.Org Server 1.19 in Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), we recommend that you set up a special partition and test drive the two technologies from the staging PPA linked above. Make sure that you report any issues you might encounter with your graphics cards, especially AMD Radeon and Intel users. According to Timo Aaltonen, Canonical's plan is to bring both X.Org Server 1.19.2 and Mesa 17.0.1 to the main repos of Ubuntu 17.04 next week, if everything goes well and there won't be any blockers, so fingers crossed for a better gaming experience on Ubuntu. Meanwhile, the Linux 4.10.1 kernel has landed in the Zesty Zapus repos. Source
  5. Firm's efforts in convergence computing recognized by award Convergence computing is an area that attracted the investments of several technology giants, including Microsoft, which tried to tackle this growing business with Windows 10 and its siblings aimed at tablets and smartphones. And while Microsoft itself put a lot of efforts into getting this concept right, it’s Canonical the one that did it right, a recent award received by the company seems to suggest. Canonical, which is widely known as the owner of Ubuntu, received the Orange Outstanding achievement for converged computing & digital openness at the Orange Device Partner Awards ceremony, with event organizers explaining that only “organizations that have contributed to the smartphone revolution” are recognized by this award. In other words, Canonical did a much better job with Ubuntu convergence than Microsoft with its Continuum feature, which is supposed to turn a Windows 10 Mobile device into a mobile PC with the help of an external screen. “This annual event looks back over the last ten years and recognises the rapid evolution of the mobile industry, and we are excited to highlight those contributions by awarding in areas of innovation, design and marketing. We wish all of our awardees the best for 2017,” Yves Maître, Executive Vice President, Connected Objects and Partnerships, Orange, said in a press statement that you can read in full below. Microsoft also planning Continuum improvements While Canonical is getting all the praises for its convergence implementation, Microsoft is also planning several improvements for its Continuum feature that would contribute to a more PC-like experience with a mobile phone. As we’ve explained when we reviewed the Continuum experience with the HP Elite X3 Windows 10 Mobile device, using a Windows phone as a PC is still very limited, mostly because despite the bigger screen, essential features are missing for the time being. With Continuum, there are no resizable windows and no taskbar support, while the entire experience itself proves to be rather slow despite the powerful hardware in the phone. New features, such as window mode, will be released with the Windows 10 Creators Update in April, along with a bunch of other improvements that would contribute to a more genuine PC experience. In the meantime, however, the award received by Canonical shows that Microsoft needs to up the ante and do better in this convergence push, especially given than its mobile platform is trailing behind its rivals. Source
  6. linux os

    Zorin OS 12.1 Released We are pleased to announce the release of Zorin OS 12.1. This new release brings together the latest software updates, bug fixes, new desktop features, performance enhancements and hardware support. Zorin OS 12.1 introduces an updated hardware enablement stack. The newly-included Linux kernel 4.8 as well as an updated X server graphics stack adds compatibility for newer computers and hardware in Zorin OS. One of the new desktop features is an easy way to add app icons to the desktop. Simply open the Zorin menu and right-click on an app to view the option to add it to the Desktop or to Favorites. After installing Zorin OS 12.1, you will have the latest versions of the pre-installed packages. That means less software updates will need to be downloaded after installing Zorin OS onto your computer. All editions of Zorin OS – Core, Ultimate and Business – are now available to download as version 12.1. If you’ve already downloaded and installed Zorin OS 12, you can update your system to 12.1 by installing the latest updates from the Software Updater. In order to upgrade to the newer Linux kernel and graphics stack in Zorin OS 12, you can open the Terminal (by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T) and enter the following command: sudo apt install --install-recommends xserver-xorg-hwe-16.04
  7. KDE Connect Indicator Now Lets You Send SMS from the Ubuntu Desktop Do you want to send SMS messages from the Ubuntu desktop? Well, now you can. Indicator KDE Connect, the handy panel applet that lets interact with your Android phone from Ubuntu, has been updated with experimental support for sending SMS. Yup, you read that correctly: you can send SMS from the desktop without needing to pick up your phone. KDE Connect (the ‘engine’ that works as the bridge between desktop and phone) added SMS reply functionality in its 1.0 release last year, but this is the first time that indicator-kdeconnect (the front-end that lets you use it on Ubuntu and other desktops) has exposed the feature to users. Texting from Ubuntu using this feature isn’t quite as seamless as it is on the Plasma desktop integration , where you can click ‘reply’ to an incoming SMS notification on the desktop. Instead, on Unity, Cinnamon, Budgie and related desktops, you need to select the “Send SMS” feature from the KDE Connect indicator menu, manually enter a phone number, and then enter your message. The SMS itself is still sent via your phone over Wi-Fi, so if you don’t have signal (or enough credit to send a message) don’t expect magic to happen! One downside: you’re given no feedback as to whether the SMS is sent successfully or not. To find that out you will need to pick up your phone and check. As before, you can also see (truncated) received SMS notifications on the desktop while using KDE Connect. Unlike other notifications the bridge serves these do not use the native notify-OSD bubbles on Ubuntu, and instead appear in their own window: While this sounds inelegant this is actually a sensible solution as it means you’re less likely to miss a message alert as they stick around until actioned. Send Multiple Files Other changes to indicator since we last featured it include monochrome icons in GNOME, translation updates and a far simpler file sending experience. You can now send multiple files to your Android devices via the the integrated kdeconnect-send tool. Better yet, trusted devices appear in the Nautilus (or Caja/Nemo/Etc) context menu so that you can send files directly to a device, no device picker required! You can now send multiple files directly to your device I haven’t personally tried this with any file manager besides Nautilus 3.20 so be aware that your own milage may vary with this specific feature. How To Install KDE Connect Indicator on Ubuntu We’ve shown you how to install KDE Connect Indicator on Ubuntu before, but there’s no harm in running over it again, right? First things first: you need to add the following PPA. It contains both the latest upstream release of KDE Connect plus the latest version of the indicator applet for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:varlesh-l/indicator-kdeconnect If you’re running Ubuntu 16.10 you can install both packages using the PPA above but you must run the following command before performing the update and install commands: sudo sed -i 's/yakkety/xenial/g' /etc/apt/sources.list.d/varlesh-l-ubuntu-indicator-kdeconnect-yakkety.list Finally, install indicator KDE Connect and its engine by running: sudo apt update && sudo apt install kdeconnect indicator-kdeconnect Once install has finished up you may need to logout or reboot and back in for the app to start working correctly (you may not; your milage may vary). Set Up KDE Connect on Your Phone That’s your desktop side set-up, on to your Android phone or tablet from the Google Play Store (below) or via F-Droid. << Install KDE Connect from the Google Play Store >> Ensure that your Android phone or tablet is on the same Wi-Fi network as your Ubuntu PC. Then, proceed to pair your device: Launch ‘indicator kdeconnect’ from the Dash In the indicator menu, select ‘Request pairing’ On your phone, accept pairing request That’s it, you’re done! Source
  8. How to Install Wine 2.0 Stable in Ubuntu 16.04, 14.04, 16.10 After more than a year of development, Wine 2.0 stable was finally released a few hours ago. Here’s how to install it via PPA in Ubuntu 16.10, Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 14.04, and derivatives. Wine 2.0 release highlights: support for Microsoft Office 2013 the 64-bit support on macOS. support for Unicode 9.0 better HiDPI scaling GStreamer 1.0 support an updated Gecko engine More Direct3D 10 and 11 features And much more, see the announcement Install Wine 2.0 (Staging) via official Wine PPA: The official Wine PPA offers Wine-staging packages that are kinda different to the distro packages. Wine Staging provides extra features and fixes, but it’s installed to /opt/wine-staging. Thanks to this, you can have both regular Wine version and Wine-Staging in single system. To add the PPA, open terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) and run the command: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:wine/wine-builds For 64-bit system, enable 32-bit architecture (if you haven’t already) via sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386 Then updates and install Wine 2.0 staging via commands: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install --install-recommends wine-staging To use Wine-Staging, simply add “/opt/wine-staging/bin/” in the fond of executable, for example: /opt/wine-staging/bin/wine /opt/wine-staging/bin/winecfg For more, see the Wine-Staging usage. Install Wine 2.0 (regular) in Ubuntu via Ricotz’s PPA: Rico Tzschichholz is maintaining an unofficial PPA with regular Wine packages. The PPA’s working good though it’s marked as unstable in the name. To add the PPA, open terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) and run command: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ricotz/unstable Remove previous Wine 1.8 or other regular Wine packages via command: sudo apt remove wine wine1.8 wine-stable libwine* fonts-wine* && sudo apt autoremove Finally update and install Wine 2.0 via: sudo apt update sudo apt install wine2.0 How to Uninstall: To remove Wine 2.0, simply run the apt remove command in terminal with sudo privilege: sudo apt remove wine2.0 wine-staging && sudo apt autoremove And you can remove the PPAs by going to Software & Updates utility under Other Software tab. Source Alternate Source - 1: Wine 2.0 Released, Lets You Run Microsoft Office 2013 on Linux Alternate Source - 2: Wine 2.0 Released, Now Supports Microsoft Office 2013
  9. Canonical Launches Ubuntu Tutorials Linux is arguably the most successful open source project in all of history. The success of the kernel -- and operating systems that use it -- are not due to any one man or woman. Actually, the achievements are thanks to the Linux community. In other words, it is a team effort -- developers, users, and more. For a Linux distribution, such as Ubuntu, to continue its progress, Canonical needs developers to remain interested -- this includes getting new people involved and educated. This week, the company launched Ubuntu Tutorials -- based on Google's open source Codelab. No, it is not self-learning for new workstation users, but for programmers and developers. "Ubuntu tutorials are a topic-specific walkthroughs, giving you a very practical experience on a particular domain. They are just like learning from pair programming except you can do it on your own! They provide a step-by-step process to doing development and devops activities on Ubuntu machines, servers or devices," says Canonical. The Ubuntu-maintainer further says, "You can as well work offline if you desire and always take your tutorials with you! Using the snap technology, we built a tutorial snap including the same content and the same technology as the one you can find on the website." Canonical shares the following details about the tutorials. Just as the Linux community is a group effort, so shall be Ubuntu Tutorials. You see, Canonical is asking for assistance in creating new tutorials. If you are interested in contributing to tutorials.ubuntu.com, the company shares the rather lengthy guidelines here. Will you participate in creating tutorials? If yes, tell me how in the comments below. Source
  10. Canonical to Remove Old Unity 7 Scopes from Ubuntu Because They're Not Secure These won't be supported by Unity 8 anyway April will see the release of Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, but it also marks the fifth year of Unity user interface's implementation, which was first introduced as part of the Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) release. While Canonical's engineers are concentrating all of their efforts on bringing us the next-generation Unity 8 user interface, current Ubuntu Linux releases are still successfully using Unity 7, and so will Ubuntu 17.04. Old, unmaintained Unity 7 Scopes are still out there However, it would appear that the Ubuntu repositories still include some old, unmaintained Scopes that have security issues open, posing a threat to the entire system if installed and used. Most of these are related to some popular music playback apps and include unity-scope-audacious, unity-scope-clementine, unity-scope-gmusicbrowser, unity-scope-guayadeque, unity-scope-musique, and unity-scope-gourmet. Because of that, Canonical is planning on removing these and many other unmaintained Unity 7 Scopes from the official repositories, if their maintainers don't step up to patch any of the existing security issues, and also because Unity 8 won't support them. "Couple this with the decision to turn off online searches by default and I think it's time to consider dropping these Scopes from the archive. Plus of course, the fact that they won't work in Unity 8 in the future anyway," said Will Cooke, Ubuntu Desktop Manager at Canonical. If you submitted a Unity 7 Scope in the past, and no longer offer security fixes for it, please do everyone a favor and remove it from the repositories as soon as possible. Unity 7 will be supported for a few more years, but it doesn't have to be insecure. Source
  11. Canonical: 2017 Will See a Mir 1.0 Release, Plans to Implement Vulkan Support 2016 was a good year for Mir, says the company behind Ubuntu As most of you are aware, Canonical develops its own display server for Ubuntu, called Mir, which, in some ways, is similar to the X.Org Server and Wayland technologies. While Ubuntu on the desktop still uses X.Org Server's components, Mir is currently heavily tested for the Unity 8 user interface that Canonical plans on implementing by default for future releases of Ubuntu Linux, for desktops. However, until now, Mir has only been successfully deployed on mobile devices, powering the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system used in various official and unofficial Ubuntu Phone and Tablets. According to Alan Griffiths, Software Engineer at Canonical, 2016 was a great year for Mir, and in 2017 the company plans on releasing the 1.0 milestone of the display server, which should implement the long-anticipated Vulkan support. "2017 will see a cleanup of our "toolkit" API and better support for "platform" plugin modules," said Griffiths. "We will then be working on upstreaming our Mesa patch. That will allow us to release our (currently experimental) Vulkan support." Canonical is working on reducing latency for Mir Canonical worked very hard in 2016 to improve its Mir display server by enabling a client-side toolkit, application, or library to work on Mir, as well as to upstream Mir support into GTK+ 3, Qt, SDL2, and Kodi. They also managed to create Mir Abstraction Layer and released MirAL 1.0, but for 2017 the company plans on enabling Mir on new platforms, upstream their Mesa patch, and enable Mir on a new graphics API, such as Vulkan. Canonical is now working on reducing latency for Mir, and hops that 2017 will be the year when Mir becomes mature enough to be used on desktops, powering the next-generation Unity 8 display server. At the moment, the company did not reveal the exact date when Mir 1.0 will see the light of day, so we can only guess that it could launch sometime around the release of Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), in mid-April, when they'll prepare for Ubuntu 17.10. Source
  12. It’s Time to Ditch Skype and TeamSpeak, Discord Launches Its App for Linux Users The app is now available for Ubuntu Linux and other distros Linux was the missing piece for them to achieve full status and offer their services across all major platforms, both on desktop and mobile. Discord is currently available for Android, iOS, Mac, and Windows, but you can also use it directly from the Web, using a compatible web browser. The app appears to be a direct competitor to Microsoft's Skype VoIP client, as well as the well-known TeamSpeak voice communication platform. It offers a wide range of features, including IP and DDoS protection, in-game overlay, smart push notifications, individual volume control, support for multiple channels, and a modern text chat. Other noteworthy features of Discord include support for codecs, permissions, and custom keyboard shortcuts, a direct messaging system and friends list. It also promises to keep the CPU usage as minimal as possible, offering low latency support for audio and automatic failover functionality. Install Discord on Ubuntu now The first stable release of the official Discord app for Linux systems, versioned 0.0.1, is currently available for download as a binary package for Debian and Ubuntu-based distributions, such as Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, etc. However, to install it, you'll need to have a 64-bit installation. There's also a source tarball available for download in case you're not running an operating system based on Debian or Ubuntu, but you'll have to compile it. It appears that Discord 0.0.1 already made its way into the Arch Linux AUR repositories, and it's coming soon to Solus, too. Other distros may add Discord to their repositories in the coming weeks. Stoked to announce our super sick app for LINUX. Chris was massaging this for ages but it's like super sick now https://t.co/hQtQpZO95c pic.twitter.com/lVyDkBD3cN — Discord (@discordapp) January 11, 2017 Source
  13. Meet The GPD Pocket, A 7-inch Ubuntu Laptop The GPD Pocket Do you have small hands? Are you a Borrower? Do you consider 10-inch netbooks to be monstrous? If so, the GPD Pocket may be right up your (very miniature) street. GPD Pocket, 7″ Laptop The GPD Pocket is a 7-inch laptop that’s small enough to slip in to a pocket — and it will apparently be available in two versions: with Windows 10, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. As reported on Liliputing, GPD (the company who makes the device) is currently only showing the device off a few fancy renders and photos with a prototype unit. But GPD has form for releasing other (similar) devices, like the GPD Win, and Android gaming portables, so although a novelty this latest device is unlikely to be outright vapourware. The GPD Pocket touts some impressive specifications for the size, including a quad-core Intel Atom x7-Z8700 processor (the same one used in the Microsoft Surface 3), 4GB RAM and a high-res IPS touch display: 7-inch IPS touch display Intel Atom x7-Z8700 (quad-core @ 1.6GHz) 4GB of RAM 128GB of storage 1x USB Type-C 1x USB 3.0 Mini HDMI Out MicroSD Card slot Courage jack (“headphone port”) 7000 mAh battery The overall dimensions of the device mean you won’t be able to hammer away on a full-sized keyboard, but the chiclet style QWERTY one included (plus a ThinkPad-like mouse nub as there’s no room for a touchpad) looks perfectly serviceable for tweets, forum posts and some basic web browsing. Since I doubt anyone would be using this device as their primary device issues to do with the keyboard size, or lack of palm rest, etc, are unlikely to be primary considerations. No, the GPD Pocket is, as the name suggests, intended as the sort of device you literally slide into your pocket as you head out the door. The “bad” news is that, like everything these days, GPD plan to crowdfund the GPD Pocket over on Indiegogo sometime in February. Currently there’s no indication of pricing or release date, but providing it’s not too weighted at the high-end it could make a nice midrange alternative to Linux hobbyists. Source
  14. Watch This Terrifying 13ft Robot Walk, Thanks To Ubuntu The world’s first manned robot took its first formative (and no doubt very loud) steps in South Korea last week — but you may be surprised to hear that Ubuntu was there to assist it. Standing an impressive 13 feet high, the bipedal Method-2 robot is referred to “robot-powered suit” that responds and mimics the actions of the person sat inside the cockpit, Ripley Power Loader style! The machine, which is able to walk like a human, has to haul a huge 130kg arms in each lunge forward, and weighs 1.5 ton in total. From a short video posted by Ruptly TV, Ubuntu is involved in helping engineers monitor, debug, and process the robot as it stomps forward. While there’s no suggestion that the robot itself runs on Ubuntu or Linux (something that is not improbable) it’s nonetheless great to see open-source software (especially of the flavor we write about) being used in advancements in robotics and engineering. Around 30 engineers are said to have on the mechanical marvel, the design of which is, in part, inspired by films like Terminator says its (famous) designer Vitaly Bulgarov. R&D spending on the creation has thus far hit $200 million, and news reports say the Method-2 could go on sale by the end of 2017 — with an equally giant price tag of $8.3 million! For more details on the robot, including a glimpse at some truly epic sci-fi-esque photos of the machine in action, see this blog post over on Design Boom. And if you’re lucky enough to get to try one, please don’t run sudo snap install skynet on it! Source
  15. Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 Officially Released with Revamped Unity 8 Interface, Fixes Available now for all supported Ubuntu Phone/Table devices Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 has been in development for the past two and a half months, but it focuses on fixing bugs than adding new features. Probably the most exciting thing implemented in the OTA-14 update is a revamped Unity 8 design that sports a brand-new task manager with support for fuzzy backgrounds and app icons. "This time not so many changes released in overall but with the goal of introducing less regressions. Also, the commit log for this release isn't too verbose due to multiple different cherry-picking we had todo during the release. Possibly the best way to know what changed is looking at the Launchpad milestone," said Lukasz Zemczak. Oxide 1.17 and Opus audio codec support have landed Also new in the Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 update is version 1.17 of the Chromium-based Oxide web engine library, as well as Opus audio codec support, which was implemented in the qt-multimedia package. Among the improvements, we can mention that SMS notifications should now be displayed when the device is locked. Other than that, the device should no longer appear off during an image update, some alarm issues have been fixed, and it looks like vibrations will work again when other vibrations are enabled. There are various other small fixes, and for more details we recommend studying the full changelog on the Launchpad page of the OTA-14 milestone. Meanwhile, you can check your Ubuntu Phone or Tablet device to see if the Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 is available, as it has been released as a phased update, which means that it might take up to 24 hours to land in all regions. If you do not see the update, check again in a few hours, but by tomorrow, December 8, everyone should have it. Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 is currently supported on BQ Aquaris E4.5, BQ Aquaris E5, BQ Aquaris M10, BQ Aquaris M10 HD, Meizu MX4, Meizu PRO 5, Nexus 4, and Nexus 7 devices. Please note that the x86 emulator images don't work on Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) hosts. Check out the release notes for more details! Source
  16. Ubuntu Budgie Minimal Edition Coming Soon for Those Who Love Customizing the OS The ISO image is now in testing and uses 220MB of RAM However, we're aware of the fact that the Ubuntu Budgie team have a lot of work on their hands re-branding the entire project from the old name (budgie-remix) to the new one, and we can all agree it's a huge effort. Also, they're preparing for the distribution's first release as an official Ubuntu flavor, as part of Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus). The first development snapshot of Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 might land later this month, on December 29, when some of the opt-in flavors will participate in the Alpha 1 release. Until then, it looks like the team is working on an ultra minimal version of Ubuntu Budgie, for those who love customizing their installations. Ubuntu Budgie Minimal ISO will use 220MB of RAM or less The good news is that the Ubuntu Budgie Minimal ISO image will use no less than 220MB of RAM, which means that it's perfect for deployments of the Ubuntu-based operating system on computers from 10 years ago, especially considering the fact that the Budgie desktop environment is also very low on resources. However, it is mainly designed for those who want a barebone version of the OS, which they can shape into anything they want from Ubuntu Budgie by adding only the packages they see fit for their needs. More details about Ubuntu Budgie Minimal Edition will be unveiled shortly. A download link for the Ubuntu Budgie Ultra Minimal Edition is coming soon and will be available on the distro's website if you plan on taking it for a test drive. As usual, we'll keep you guys informed with the development cycle of Ubuntu Budgie, as well as the rest of the Ubuntu flavors, for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) release, so stay tuned. Ultra minimal version of #ubuntubudgie now in testing - 220MB or less of RAM - for all of you who love customising their distro! pic.twitter.com/RyuFD8rhjG — Ubuntu Budgie (@UbuntuBudgie) December 10, 2016 Source
  17. Mesa 12.0.4 Promises 15% Performance Boost for Radeon Users on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS It's also coming soon to Ubuntu 16.10 users The Mesa 3D Graphics Library is a unique open-source implementation of the OpenGL graphics API for Linux-based operating systems, and it includes drivers for Intel, Radeon, and Nvidia graphics cards. But it looks like Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) was shipping with a pretty old version of Mesa. "[Ubuntu] 16.04 shipped with 11.2.0 so it’s a slightly bigger update there, while yakkety is already on 12.0.3 but the new version should give radeon users a 15% performance boost in certain games with complex shaders," explained Timo Aaltonen, Hardware Enablement, Field Expert Squad Team Lead at Canonical Ltd. Mesa 12.0.4 is coming soon to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.10 Therefore, the good news we'd like to share with you today is that Mesa 12.0.4 3D Graphics Library, which is currently the most advanced release of the Mesa 12.0 series, is coming soon to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 16.10, promising a 15% performance boost for AMD Radeon graphics cards. But before it lands in the stable repos of the latest Ubuntu releases, it needs to be thoroughly tested. Therefore, users are invited by Timo Aaltonen to give Mesa 12.0.4 a spin by adding his PPA (Personal Package Archive) using the commands listed below in the Terminal app and report if it works or not with their GPU. Intel Skylake seems to work well with Mesa 12.0.4, according to the developer. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:tjaalton/test sudo apt-get update Source
  18. You Can Now Package Your Apps as Snaps without Bundling Their Dependencies Resulting Snaps should be significantly smaller This is possible now because the latest ubuntu-app-platform snap build incorporates the standard Qt 5 libraries, the QML (Qt Meta Language) runtime, the Ubuntu UI (User Interface) toolkit, and their dependencies. The Oxide web engine library based on Chromium and related QML bindings is also bundled in the ubuntu-app-platform snap, so the new Snaps should now be significantly smaller. "This allows app developers to declare a dependency on this snap through the content sharing mechanism, thus reducing dramatically the size of the resulting app snaps," explains the developer. "I went through the exercise with the webbrowser-app snap. This proved surprisingly easy and the size of the snap (amd64 architecture) went down from 136MB to 22MB, a sizeable saving!" Snapcraft will soon be updated to support the new changes At the moment of writing this article, the Snapcraft Snap creator utility does not support the changes made to the ubuntu-app-platform snap, so it will still crawl for dependencies when attempting to package your apps as Snaps. An updated Snapcraft version will soon be made available for supported Ubuntu platforms. Also, if your app depends on a specific Qt module, you'll need to add it to the build. For those interested in more details, we recommend to check out actual changes made to the snapcraft.yaml file, as well as the temporary workaround that lets you use Snapcraft with the latest ubuntu-app-platform snap. All these changes lay the groundwork for next step in the massive adoption of Snaps as the universal package format for Linux-based operating systems. Source
  19. NeoFetch — See System Information from the Command Line on Linux Terminal-based system information tools are unashamedly geeky — and yet undoubtedly useful, too. With the tap of a quick command you can “fetch” all sorts of information about your system, from what kernel you’re running to what icon pack you’re currently using. While not to everyone’s tastes, such tools are often a lot quicker and surfacing what you need when you need it, rather than you having to point and click you way through apps like i-Nex or CPU-g. That garble is why I was stoked to find a link to Neofetch in my tips inbox recently (our recent call for content has done wonders). Neofetch is now my favourite CLI system information tool. Written in Bash, Neofetch displays information about your system next to an ASCII operating system logo (or any picture you configure it to display). Designed to handle show and tell, apps like neofetch are a mainstay of desktop screenshots. They can distill information about the operating system, kernel version, and desktop environment, but also what theme or icons are being used, which window manager, and even which version of Bash! Basically, its the sort of tool made for Linux nerds like us! What’s super-duper great about Neofetch is that it’s super cross-platform —uup, not just cross-platform but super cross-platform. You can run Neofetch anywhere you can run Bash. That means it runs on Linux, MacOS, iOS, BSD, Solaris, Android, and (yup) even Windows 10. One of Neaofetch’s “pluses” over similar CLI system info tools is the extent to which you can customise it. Neofetch is highly customizable through the use of command line flags or the user config file. There are over 50 config options to play around with. You can even run the app and have it take a screenshot of your entire screen! Install Neofetch in Ubuntu You can istall Neofetch Ubuntu in a number of ways, including from source. By far the easiest (and the one that ensures you get new versions as and when they’re releases) method is to make use of its official PPA. This provides the very latest release in a neatly packed, er, package for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and above (including Zesty). To add the PPA run the following commands from your Terminal app of choice: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:dawidd0811/neofetch sudo apt update && sudo apt install neofetch Alternatively, you can download an installer package directly from the PPA’s packages page: <<< Download Neofetch 1.9.1 for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS >>> As Neofetch is a command-line tool you won’t find an app icon in the Dash. Instead, to use it, simply run the following from whichever terminal emulator you prefer: neofetch from the command line. Run neofetch --help to see a full list of the various command line arguments. Feel free to share screenshots of Neofetch from your desktop in the comments below! Source
  20. Windows 10 is a really great desktop operating system, but it is not for everyone. For those that care deeply about security and privacy, an open source Linux-based operating system is a wise alternative. The problem? Learning a new user interface can be hard for some. If you have always used a Windows OS in the past, moving to a desktop environment like GNOME or Unity can be confusing and scary. Luckily, for those that have difficulty with change, there are some Linux-based operating systems that are designed for Windows-switchers. One fairly popular such offering, Zorin OS, has now reached version 12. It is designed to be familiar to former users of Microsoft's OS. While the company does charge for an "Ultimate" version, the "Core" edition of Zorin OS 12 is entirely free. "Many of the built-in system apps have seen extensive improvements both visually and under the hood. Zorin OS 12 is powered by Linux Kernel version 4.4, which now works with even more hardware and introduces performance enhancements and security improvements. As Zorin OS 12 is based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, it will be supported with security updates until April 2021. This makes Zorin OS 12 the ideal choice for large deployments in businesses, governments, schools and organisations", says The Zorin OS Team. The team further says, "with Zorin OS 12, we are introducing a new release schedule going into the future. Major releases of Zorin OS will now be made once every 2 years. In between, a number of point releases will be made that will include incremental updates to the built in apps as well as support for new hardware, security fixes and various under-the-hood improvements. This gives you the optimal balance between the robustness of tried-and-tested technology and the latest and greatest features. By focusing on one release at a time, we will be able to provide the best possible experience to everyone using Zorin OS". Zorin OS features some really great features, such as Google Drive integration with the file browser. This means Google users can easily access their cloud storage without any confusing setup. Chromium browser is installed by default, which is really the right thing to do nowadays. Look, I know some folks deeply care about Firefox -- which is available to use too -- but Chromium is just the better offering at this time. The all-new Zorin Desktop 2.0 DE can be customized to look more like GNOME or macOS too (Ultimate-version only). If you are ready to download it, you can get the operating system here. If you are new to Zorin, I suggest opting for the free "Core" edition. However, if you find that you like it and want the additional features, the €15 is a reasonably priced way to support the developer. The desktop environment even features useful gestures, 3+ finger pinch opens the Activities Overview 4 finger drag (up or down) switches workspaces 3 finger hold & tap switches between apps Which the team shares here.
  21. It's now in Ubuntu 16.10, 16.04 LTS, 14.04 LTS and 12.04 LTS Firefox 50.0 on Ubuntu Linux Three days after we reported on the official availability of the Mozilla Firefox 50.0 web browser for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems, it looks like users of the Ubuntu Linux OS can now install the application. That's right, Mozilla Firefox 50.0 is now officially available in the repositories of all supported Ubuntu OSes, including Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin), and you can use it right now if you update your system. However, you should not get all that excited because Firefox 50.0 is not a major update. The web browser ships only with native Emoji fonts support, something that most of you won't use anyway, support for cycling through tabs in the recently used order using the Ctrl+Tab keyboard shortcut, and support for searching whole words. A total of 18 security issues have been patched in Firefox 50.0 Mozilla Firefox 50.0 appears to be more of a security and bugfix release, and, according to Canonical's USN-3124-1 security advisory, a total of 18 vulnerability were addressed, as the web browser could be made to crash or run programs with the user's rights if a malicious website was accessed. Don't hesitate to check out the technical details about the security fixes patched in Mozilla Firefox 50.0 by accessing the above Ubuntu Security Notice, but, in the meantime, we recommend that you update your Ubuntu OS as soon as possible to be able to install and use Firefox 50.0. Make sure you restart the web browser. To update, simply open the Ubuntu Software application, access the Updates tab, and install all the updated packages listed there. You can also do it via the command-line by running the "sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade" command in the Terminal app. More details can be found at https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Security/Upgrades. Article source
  22. Ubuntu Budgie Is Now an Official Ubuntu Flavor The distro features the Budgie desktop environment That's right, after two successful major releases, budgie-remix has finally been accepted as an official Ubuntu flavor, earlier today during a meeting where four members of Canonical's Ubuntu Technical Board voted positive. As such, we're extremely happy to inform our readers that the new Ubuntu flavor is called Ubuntu Budgie. In April this year, when budgie-remix hit the road towards its first major release, versioned 16.04, we reported that David Mohammed was kind enough to inform Softpedia about the fact that he got in touch with Ubuntu MATE leader Martin Wimpress, who urged the developer to target Ubuntu 16.10 for an official status. budgie-remix 16.10 arrived as well this fall shortly after the release of Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), and the dream of becoming an official Ubuntu flavor is now a reality. "We now move full steam ahead and look forward to working with the Ubuntu Developer Membership Board to examine and work through the technical aspects [...] 17.04 will be our first official release under the new name," said David Mohammed in the announcement. Budgie 11 desktop environment is coming soon to Ubuntu Budgie 16.10 After this major announcement, most probably the budgie-remix developers will have a lot of work on their hands with the rebranding of the entire project from budgie-remix to Ubuntu Budgie, including the website and other components of the distribution, but we don't know yet if existing users will receive the changes. However, we know for sure that when the Solus Project releases the Budgie 11 desktop environment later this year, Ubuntu Budgie users will receive the major update as well through the official channels. In the meantime, you can start using Ubuntu Budgie right now by downloading the latest release from budgie-remix. In related news, the Ubuntu Budgie developers have recently discussed with Solus Project leader Ikey Doherty to ensure an effective and positive collaboration between the two teams, which means that any improvement made by Ubuntu Budgie devs to the Budgie desktop will also land for Solus users, or users of other distros using Budgie. "I look forward to working with you all in attaining that goal of making Budgie the number one go-to desktop, and honestly, us all enjoying it on an equal peer footing, is the most important part to me," said Ikey Doherty, who is currently working hard on re-architecting the Budgie desktop environment as detailed in our exclusive story. Source
  23. Ubuntu and Linux Mint are currently arguably 2 of the most popular Linux distros (with Debian) around. They are both quite user-friendly and for the Linux newbie, you couldn’t be wrong choosing either. For a very long time, Ubuntu was considered the distro of choice by most Linux enthusiasts, but it has currently been surpassed by Linux Mint (and Debian) as the distro with most hits. But which one is better? I believe we all have our favorite distros but having used either of these distros, I’m gonna make an argument for why I believe one is better than the other, so kindly indulge me and let’s see if you can agree with me. System Requirements Both Ubuntu and Linux Mint have quite similar requirements. For new computers, whichever way you go, you’re going to be fine. For older hardware, Ubuntu does best with Lubuntu, Xubuntu and Ubuntu MATE flavors and Mint users also have Mint MATE edition available. Installation There isn’t much difference in the installation experience of both distros. Both use the Ubiquity installer and the experience is quite similar. Ubuntu and Mint both offer support for UEFI. Interface(default) The default interface for Ubuntu is Canonical’s own built DE called Unity. With Unity, Canonical provides a global menu and notification area occupying the top panel. Some common applications live in a dock on the left. You launch software from the Dash by clicking on the Ubuntu icon. Mint ships with Cinnamon as its default DE. Applications appear in the panel on the bottom of the desktop, with a launcher menu in the bottom left and system icons on the right in a manner quite similar to MS Windows. Unity may feel more familiar to Mac OS X users, while Windows user will feel right at home on Linux Mint. Software (out of the box) Both Mint and Ubuntu use mostly free and open source software. Unlike Ubuntu, Linux Mint comes pre-installed with some proprietary software that most users tend to need, such as Flash, Java, audio and video codecs. Both distros come pre-installed with Libreoffice and Firefox browser. With Mint, you also get VLC and GIMP out of the box. Overall, Mint comes with more apps out of the box than with Ubuntu. Software Installation Both Ubuntu and Mint also have their own app stores that make it easy to find and download new software. Gnome software (previously Ubuntu's Software Center) comes with Ubuntu and Mint also offers Mint Software Manager(also responsible for updates) which is usually mistaken as a system tool instead of an app store. Both stores provide you with a ton of open source software for you to download and use. Official Spins There are ten different official flavors of Ubuntu listed on their website. Besides the Unity desktop, you have alternatives that have their default DEs to GNOME, KDE, LXDE, XFCE, MATE, and MythTV. There are also specialized distributions including Edubuntu for education community, Ubuntu Studio for multimedia production. There’s also Ubuntu Kylin for Chinese users. Linux Mint on the other hand comes in four main distros. There’s Cinnamon, MATE, KDE, and XFCE. Customization (default flavor) One great thing about Linux is the amount of customization it allows. With Ubuntu, most of this has been done away with in recent releases. You are quite limited on what you can tweak. Mint on the other hand has lots of settings that allow you to tweak everything down to the very little details of your interface. It customization is your thing, Mint does it way better. Performance (default flavor) Linux Mint most definitely has an edge when it comes to speed and performance. On a newer machine, the difference may be barely noticeable, but on older hardware, it will definitely feel faster. Ubuntu appears to run slower the older the machine gets. If you’re going to use Ubuntu on older hardware, I recommend your go in for Lubuntu or Xubuntu. Upgradeability Both Linux Mint and Ubuntu allow you to update to the new releases from the very recent version almost as soon as they are available. Software updates are also provided have easy-to-use updaters. For Ubuntu, it’s just a case of clicking on the Dash icon in the dock, and searching for the Software Updater. For Ubuntu, you use the software updater to check, download and install any updates (OS or apps), downloads them and then installs them. The process is similar in Mint using the Update Manager app to update your apps or OS.It is also worth noting that there has been some concern towards Mint’s approach to providing important updates Support While Ubuntu has software company Canonical behind it to run its development, Linux Mint relies on individual users and companies using the OS to act as sponsors, donors and partners. Both distros also have vibrant community support. In Summary Both Ubuntu and Linux Mint have a lot going for them and choosing one over the other. The main difference between the two is how they are implemented in terms of the User Interface and support. Between the default flavors, (Ubuntu Unity and Mint Cinnamon),it is not easy recommending one over the other. Ubuntu suffered a great deal of backlash due to Unity even though it is considered the more modern of the two, whilst Cinnamon is considered the more traditional but looks a bit old-fashioned. So which one is better? My Verdict... Based on the arguments I have outlined for either distros, I have provide a scorecard for them. Ubuntu has a lot going for it but in comes up on top only in 3 categories whilst Linux Mint comes top in 4 categories. Canonical has done a great job at keeping Ubuntu stable and secure. They also try well to keep their official packages as new and updated always. They lay down their own infrastructure (that Mint relies on). They provide a go-to point for transitioning OS users and companies. But Mint’s desktop and menus are easy to use whilst Ubuntu’s dash can be sort of confusing especially for new users. It's the gate that ex-Windows users walk through and as such is the most welcoming to such persons. Mint gives more in terms of the pre-installed software but finding and installing software from Ubuntu’s Software Center can be a little more easier. So I’m choosing Mint over Ubuntu, but don’t get me wrong, Ubuntu with Unity is awesome once you know what you are about. But with Canonical chasing unification of the desktop and mobile with Unity 8, I do belive Linux Mint in its current state is wee bit superior to Ubuntu. Mint is possibly "Ubuntu done better". Overall, Linux Mint with Cinnamon feels far more polished than Ubuntu with Unity. Source: http://www.linuxandubuntu.com/home/ubuntu-vs-linux-mint-which-is-better-in-2016
  24. Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) - Stable - Final - Direct Download & Alternate Downloads: Ubuntu is distributed on two types of images described below. Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Server install image The server install image allows you to install Ubuntu permanently on a computer for use as a server. It will not install a graphical user interface. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) server install image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) server install image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. A full list of available files, including BitTorrent files, can be found below. If you need help burning these images to disk, see the Create a bootable USB stick on Windows or the Image Burning Guide or the USB Image Writing Guide. Download Pen Drive Linux's USB Installer or Download the Rufus USB installer Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavours: For Ubutnu Flavours downloads, you can view below. However, Edubuntu isn't available post Trusty Tahr. Ubuntu Flavour - Lubuntu - 16.10 Lubuntu is distributed on two types of images described below. Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Lubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are three images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Mac (PowerPC) and IBM-PPC (POWER5) desktop image For Apple Macintosh G3, G4, and G5 computers, including iBooks and PowerBooks as well as older IBM OpenPower 7xx machines. Alternate install image The alternate install image allows you to perform certain specialist installations of Lubuntu. It provides for the following situations: setting up automated deployments; upgrading from older installations without network access; LVM and/or RAID partitioning; installs on systems with less than about 384MiB of RAM (although note that low-memory systems may not be able to run a full desktop environment reasonably). In the event that you encounter a bug using the alternate installer, please file a bug on the debian-installer package. There are three images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) alternate install image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) alternate install image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Mac (PowerPC) and IBM-PPC (POWER5) alternate install image For Apple Macintosh G3, G4, and G5 computers, including iBooks and PowerBooks as well as older IBM OpenPower 7xx machines. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Kubuntu - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Kubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Mythubuntu - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Mythbuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Xubuntu - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Xubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 192MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Kylin - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-Kylin without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu MATE - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-MATE without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Mac (PowerPC) and IBM-PPC (POWER5) desktop image For Apple Macintosh G3, G4, and G5 computers, including iBooks and PowerBooks as well as older IBM OpenPower 7xx machines. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu GNOME - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-GNOME without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Studio - 16.10 Ubuntu-Studio is distributed on two types of images described below. Install/live DVD The combined install/live DVD allows you either to install Ubuntu-Studio permanently on a computer, or (by entering 'live' at the boot prompt) to try Ubuntu-Studio without changing your computer at all. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) Install/live DVD Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) Install/live DVD For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg
  25. Includes Ubuntu 16.04, 14.04, and 12.04 LTS Chris Coulson from Canonical published two security advisories to inform the Ubuntu Linux community about the availability of the latest Mozilla products in all supported releases. Mozilla announced the other day that its popular Firefox web browser, which is being used in the majority of GNU/Linux distributions by default, has hit a new milestone, version 49.0, bringing various new features, such as updated Firefox Login Manager and Reader Mode or better video performance on SSSE3 systems without hardware acceleration. Mozilla Firefox 49.0 also ships with updated HTML5 video and audio technologies that let users play files at 1.25x speeds or loop them. To track font memory usage, Firefox 49.0 contains new improvements to the about:memory reports, and it looks like there's now better font shaping thanks to the re-implementation of the Graphite2 rendering engine by default. On the other hand, Mozilla Thunderbird 45.3.0 ships with several bug fixes for various issues discovered recently, such as the inability to use Disposition-Notification-To in mail.compose.other.header, corruption of the drafts summary database due to certain messages, or the composing identity problems with "edit as new message" on a received email. Ubuntu users can install Firefox 49.0 and Thunderbird 45.3 now Therefore, if you're using any of the officially supported Ubuntu releases or flavors, such as Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, or Ubuntu GNOME, you can now update your installation to get the recently released Mozilla Firefox 49.0 web browser and Mozilla Thunderbird 45.3.0 email and news client. They are available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin). To update, simply open the Ubuntu Software or Synaptic Package Manager apps, check for recent updates and install them. You can also open a terminal emulator and run the "sudo apt update && sudo apt dist-upgrade" command. Please keep in mind that you'll need to restart your Firefox and Thunderbird session after installing the new software versions. Good luck! Article source