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Found 160 results

  1. Canonical to Remove Old Unity 7 Scopes from Ubuntu Because They're Not Secure These won't be supported by Unity 8 anyway April will see the release of Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, but it also marks the fifth year of Unity user interface's implementation, which was first introduced as part of the Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) release. While Canonical's engineers are concentrating all of their efforts on bringing us the next-generation Unity 8 user interface, current Ubuntu Linux releases are still successfully using Unity 7, and so will Ubuntu 17.04. Old, unmaintained Unity 7 Scopes are still out there However, it would appear that the Ubuntu repositories still include some old, unmaintained Scopes that have security issues open, posing a threat to the entire system if installed and used. Most of these are related to some popular music playback apps and include unity-scope-audacious, unity-scope-clementine, unity-scope-gmusicbrowser, unity-scope-guayadeque, unity-scope-musique, and unity-scope-gourmet. Because of that, Canonical is planning on removing these and many other unmaintained Unity 7 Scopes from the official repositories, if their maintainers don't step up to patch any of the existing security issues, and also because Unity 8 won't support them. "Couple this with the decision to turn off online searches by default and I think it's time to consider dropping these Scopes from the archive. Plus of course, the fact that they won't work in Unity 8 in the future anyway," said Will Cooke, Ubuntu Desktop Manager at Canonical. If you submitted a Unity 7 Scope in the past, and no longer offer security fixes for it, please do everyone a favor and remove it from the repositories as soon as possible. Unity 7 will be supported for a few more years, but it doesn't have to be insecure. Source
  2. Canonical: 2017 Will See a Mir 1.0 Release, Plans to Implement Vulkan Support 2016 was a good year for Mir, says the company behind Ubuntu As most of you are aware, Canonical develops its own display server for Ubuntu, called Mir, which, in some ways, is similar to the X.Org Server and Wayland technologies. While Ubuntu on the desktop still uses X.Org Server's components, Mir is currently heavily tested for the Unity 8 user interface that Canonical plans on implementing by default for future releases of Ubuntu Linux, for desktops. However, until now, Mir has only been successfully deployed on mobile devices, powering the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system used in various official and unofficial Ubuntu Phone and Tablets. According to Alan Griffiths, Software Engineer at Canonical, 2016 was a great year for Mir, and in 2017 the company plans on releasing the 1.0 milestone of the display server, which should implement the long-anticipated Vulkan support. "2017 will see a cleanup of our "toolkit" API and better support for "platform" plugin modules," said Griffiths. "We will then be working on upstreaming our Mesa patch. That will allow us to release our (currently experimental) Vulkan support." Canonical is working on reducing latency for Mir Canonical worked very hard in 2016 to improve its Mir display server by enabling a client-side toolkit, application, or library to work on Mir, as well as to upstream Mir support into GTK+ 3, Qt, SDL2, and Kodi. They also managed to create Mir Abstraction Layer and released MirAL 1.0, but for 2017 the company plans on enabling Mir on new platforms, upstream their Mesa patch, and enable Mir on a new graphics API, such as Vulkan. Canonical is now working on reducing latency for Mir, and hops that 2017 will be the year when Mir becomes mature enough to be used on desktops, powering the next-generation Unity 8 display server. At the moment, the company did not reveal the exact date when Mir 1.0 will see the light of day, so we can only guess that it could launch sometime around the release of Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), in mid-April, when they'll prepare for Ubuntu 17.10. Source
  3. It’s Time to Ditch Skype and TeamSpeak, Discord Launches Its App for Linux Users The app is now available for Ubuntu Linux and other distros Linux was the missing piece for them to achieve full status and offer their services across all major platforms, both on desktop and mobile. Discord is currently available for Android, iOS, Mac, and Windows, but you can also use it directly from the Web, using a compatible web browser. The app appears to be a direct competitor to Microsoft's Skype VoIP client, as well as the well-known TeamSpeak voice communication platform. It offers a wide range of features, including IP and DDoS protection, in-game overlay, smart push notifications, individual volume control, support for multiple channels, and a modern text chat. Other noteworthy features of Discord include support for codecs, permissions, and custom keyboard shortcuts, a direct messaging system and friends list. It also promises to keep the CPU usage as minimal as possible, offering low latency support for audio and automatic failover functionality. Install Discord on Ubuntu now The first stable release of the official Discord app for Linux systems, versioned 0.0.1, is currently available for download as a binary package for Debian and Ubuntu-based distributions, such as Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, etc. However, to install it, you'll need to have a 64-bit installation. There's also a source tarball available for download in case you're not running an operating system based on Debian or Ubuntu, but you'll have to compile it. It appears that Discord 0.0.1 already made its way into the Arch Linux AUR repositories, and it's coming soon to Solus, too. Other distros may add Discord to their repositories in the coming weeks. Stoked to announce our super sick app for LINUX. Chris was massaging this for ages but it's like super sick now https://t.co/hQtQpZO95c pic.twitter.com/lVyDkBD3cN — Discord (@discordapp) January 11, 2017 Source
  4. Meet The GPD Pocket, A 7-inch Ubuntu Laptop The GPD Pocket Do you have small hands? Are you a Borrower? Do you consider 10-inch netbooks to be monstrous? If so, the GPD Pocket may be right up your (very miniature) street. GPD Pocket, 7″ Laptop The GPD Pocket is a 7-inch laptop that’s small enough to slip in to a pocket — and it will apparently be available in two versions: with Windows 10, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. As reported on Liliputing, GPD (the company who makes the device) is currently only showing the device off a few fancy renders and photos with a prototype unit. But GPD has form for releasing other (similar) devices, like the GPD Win, and Android gaming portables, so although a novelty this latest device is unlikely to be outright vapourware. The GPD Pocket touts some impressive specifications for the size, including a quad-core Intel Atom x7-Z8700 processor (the same one used in the Microsoft Surface 3), 4GB RAM and a high-res IPS touch display: 7-inch IPS touch display Intel Atom x7-Z8700 (quad-core @ 1.6GHz) 4GB of RAM 128GB of storage 1x USB Type-C 1x USB 3.0 Mini HDMI Out MicroSD Card slot Courage jack (“headphone port”) 7000 mAh battery The overall dimensions of the device mean you won’t be able to hammer away on a full-sized keyboard, but the chiclet style QWERTY one included (plus a ThinkPad-like mouse nub as there’s no room for a touchpad) looks perfectly serviceable for tweets, forum posts and some basic web browsing. Since I doubt anyone would be using this device as their primary device issues to do with the keyboard size, or lack of palm rest, etc, are unlikely to be primary considerations. No, the GPD Pocket is, as the name suggests, intended as the sort of device you literally slide into your pocket as you head out the door. The “bad” news is that, like everything these days, GPD plan to crowdfund the GPD Pocket over on Indiegogo sometime in February. Currently there’s no indication of pricing or release date, but providing it’s not too weighted at the high-end it could make a nice midrange alternative to Linux hobbyists. Source
  5. Watch This Terrifying 13ft Robot Walk, Thanks To Ubuntu The world’s first manned robot took its first formative (and no doubt very loud) steps in South Korea last week — but you may be surprised to hear that Ubuntu was there to assist it. Standing an impressive 13 feet high, the bipedal Method-2 robot is referred to “robot-powered suit” that responds and mimics the actions of the person sat inside the cockpit, Ripley Power Loader style! The machine, which is able to walk like a human, has to haul a huge 130kg arms in each lunge forward, and weighs 1.5 ton in total. From a short video posted by Ruptly TV, Ubuntu is involved in helping engineers monitor, debug, and process the robot as it stomps forward. While there’s no suggestion that the robot itself runs on Ubuntu or Linux (something that is not improbable) it’s nonetheless great to see open-source software (especially of the flavor we write about) being used in advancements in robotics and engineering. Around 30 engineers are said to have on the mechanical marvel, the design of which is, in part, inspired by films like Terminator says its (famous) designer Vitaly Bulgarov. R&D spending on the creation has thus far hit $200 million, and news reports say the Method-2 could go on sale by the end of 2017 — with an equally giant price tag of $8.3 million! For more details on the robot, including a glimpse at some truly epic sci-fi-esque photos of the machine in action, see this blog post over on Design Boom. And if you’re lucky enough to get to try one, please don’t run sudo snap install skynet on it! Source
  6. Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 Officially Released with Revamped Unity 8 Interface, Fixes Available now for all supported Ubuntu Phone/Table devices Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 has been in development for the past two and a half months, but it focuses on fixing bugs than adding new features. Probably the most exciting thing implemented in the OTA-14 update is a revamped Unity 8 design that sports a brand-new task manager with support for fuzzy backgrounds and app icons. "This time not so many changes released in overall but with the goal of introducing less regressions. Also, the commit log for this release isn't too verbose due to multiple different cherry-picking we had todo during the release. Possibly the best way to know what changed is looking at the Launchpad milestone," said Lukasz Zemczak. Oxide 1.17 and Opus audio codec support have landed Also new in the Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 update is version 1.17 of the Chromium-based Oxide web engine library, as well as Opus audio codec support, which was implemented in the qt-multimedia package. Among the improvements, we can mention that SMS notifications should now be displayed when the device is locked. Other than that, the device should no longer appear off during an image update, some alarm issues have been fixed, and it looks like vibrations will work again when other vibrations are enabled. There are various other small fixes, and for more details we recommend studying the full changelog on the Launchpad page of the OTA-14 milestone. Meanwhile, you can check your Ubuntu Phone or Tablet device to see if the Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 is available, as it has been released as a phased update, which means that it might take up to 24 hours to land in all regions. If you do not see the update, check again in a few hours, but by tomorrow, December 8, everyone should have it. Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 is currently supported on BQ Aquaris E4.5, BQ Aquaris E5, BQ Aquaris M10, BQ Aquaris M10 HD, Meizu MX4, Meizu PRO 5, Nexus 4, and Nexus 7 devices. Please note that the x86 emulator images don't work on Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) hosts. Check out the release notes for more details! Source
  7. Ubuntu Budgie Minimal Edition Coming Soon for Those Who Love Customizing the OS The ISO image is now in testing and uses 220MB of RAM However, we're aware of the fact that the Ubuntu Budgie team have a lot of work on their hands re-branding the entire project from the old name (budgie-remix) to the new one, and we can all agree it's a huge effort. Also, they're preparing for the distribution's first release as an official Ubuntu flavor, as part of Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus). The first development snapshot of Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 might land later this month, on December 29, when some of the opt-in flavors will participate in the Alpha 1 release. Until then, it looks like the team is working on an ultra minimal version of Ubuntu Budgie, for those who love customizing their installations. Ubuntu Budgie Minimal ISO will use 220MB of RAM or less The good news is that the Ubuntu Budgie Minimal ISO image will use no less than 220MB of RAM, which means that it's perfect for deployments of the Ubuntu-based operating system on computers from 10 years ago, especially considering the fact that the Budgie desktop environment is also very low on resources. However, it is mainly designed for those who want a barebone version of the OS, which they can shape into anything they want from Ubuntu Budgie by adding only the packages they see fit for their needs. More details about Ubuntu Budgie Minimal Edition will be unveiled shortly. A download link for the Ubuntu Budgie Ultra Minimal Edition is coming soon and will be available on the distro's website if you plan on taking it for a test drive. As usual, we'll keep you guys informed with the development cycle of Ubuntu Budgie, as well as the rest of the Ubuntu flavors, for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) release, so stay tuned. Ultra minimal version of #ubuntubudgie now in testing - 220MB or less of RAM - for all of you who love customising their distro! pic.twitter.com/RyuFD8rhjG — Ubuntu Budgie (@UbuntuBudgie) December 10, 2016 Source
  8. Mesa 12.0.4 Promises 15% Performance Boost for Radeon Users on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS It's also coming soon to Ubuntu 16.10 users The Mesa 3D Graphics Library is a unique open-source implementation of the OpenGL graphics API for Linux-based operating systems, and it includes drivers for Intel, Radeon, and Nvidia graphics cards. But it looks like Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) was shipping with a pretty old version of Mesa. "[Ubuntu] 16.04 shipped with 11.2.0 so it’s a slightly bigger update there, while yakkety is already on 12.0.3 but the new version should give radeon users a 15% performance boost in certain games with complex shaders," explained Timo Aaltonen, Hardware Enablement, Field Expert Squad Team Lead at Canonical Ltd. Mesa 12.0.4 is coming soon to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.10 Therefore, the good news we'd like to share with you today is that Mesa 12.0.4 3D Graphics Library, which is currently the most advanced release of the Mesa 12.0 series, is coming soon to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 16.10, promising a 15% performance boost for AMD Radeon graphics cards. But before it lands in the stable repos of the latest Ubuntu releases, it needs to be thoroughly tested. Therefore, users are invited by Timo Aaltonen to give Mesa 12.0.4 a spin by adding his PPA (Personal Package Archive) using the commands listed below in the Terminal app and report if it works or not with their GPU. Intel Skylake seems to work well with Mesa 12.0.4, according to the developer. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:tjaalton/test sudo apt-get update Source
  9. You Can Now Package Your Apps as Snaps without Bundling Their Dependencies Resulting Snaps should be significantly smaller This is possible now because the latest ubuntu-app-platform snap build incorporates the standard Qt 5 libraries, the QML (Qt Meta Language) runtime, the Ubuntu UI (User Interface) toolkit, and their dependencies. The Oxide web engine library based on Chromium and related QML bindings is also bundled in the ubuntu-app-platform snap, so the new Snaps should now be significantly smaller. "This allows app developers to declare a dependency on this snap through the content sharing mechanism, thus reducing dramatically the size of the resulting app snaps," explains the developer. "I went through the exercise with the webbrowser-app snap. This proved surprisingly easy and the size of the snap (amd64 architecture) went down from 136MB to 22MB, a sizeable saving!" Snapcraft will soon be updated to support the new changes At the moment of writing this article, the Snapcraft Snap creator utility does not support the changes made to the ubuntu-app-platform snap, so it will still crawl for dependencies when attempting to package your apps as Snaps. An updated Snapcraft version will soon be made available for supported Ubuntu platforms. Also, if your app depends on a specific Qt module, you'll need to add it to the build. For those interested in more details, we recommend to check out actual changes made to the snapcraft.yaml file, as well as the temporary workaround that lets you use Snapcraft with the latest ubuntu-app-platform snap. All these changes lay the groundwork for next step in the massive adoption of Snaps as the universal package format for Linux-based operating systems. Source
  10. NeoFetch — See System Information from the Command Line on Linux Terminal-based system information tools are unashamedly geeky — and yet undoubtedly useful, too. With the tap of a quick command you can “fetch” all sorts of information about your system, from what kernel you’re running to what icon pack you’re currently using. While not to everyone’s tastes, such tools are often a lot quicker and surfacing what you need when you need it, rather than you having to point and click you way through apps like i-Nex or CPU-g. That garble is why I was stoked to find a link to Neofetch in my tips inbox recently (our recent call for content has done wonders). Neofetch is now my favourite CLI system information tool. Written in Bash, Neofetch displays information about your system next to an ASCII operating system logo (or any picture you configure it to display). Designed to handle show and tell, apps like neofetch are a mainstay of desktop screenshots. They can distill information about the operating system, kernel version, and desktop environment, but also what theme or icons are being used, which window manager, and even which version of Bash! Basically, its the sort of tool made for Linux nerds like us! What’s super-duper great about Neofetch is that it’s super cross-platform —uup, not just cross-platform but super cross-platform. You can run Neofetch anywhere you can run Bash. That means it runs on Linux, MacOS, iOS, BSD, Solaris, Android, and (yup) even Windows 10. One of Neaofetch’s “pluses” over similar CLI system info tools is the extent to which you can customise it. Neofetch is highly customizable through the use of command line flags or the user config file. There are over 50 config options to play around with. You can even run the app and have it take a screenshot of your entire screen! Install Neofetch in Ubuntu You can istall Neofetch Ubuntu in a number of ways, including from source. By far the easiest (and the one that ensures you get new versions as and when they’re releases) method is to make use of its official PPA. This provides the very latest release in a neatly packed, er, package for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and above (including Zesty). To add the PPA run the following commands from your Terminal app of choice: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:dawidd0811/neofetch sudo apt update && sudo apt install neofetch Alternatively, you can download an installer package directly from the PPA’s packages page: <<< Download Neofetch 1.9.1 for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS >>> As Neofetch is a command-line tool you won’t find an app icon in the Dash. Instead, to use it, simply run the following from whichever terminal emulator you prefer: neofetch from the command line. Run neofetch --help to see a full list of the various command line arguments. Feel free to share screenshots of Neofetch from your desktop in the comments below! Source
  11. Windows 10 is a really great desktop operating system, but it is not for everyone. For those that care deeply about security and privacy, an open source Linux-based operating system is a wise alternative. The problem? Learning a new user interface can be hard for some. If you have always used a Windows OS in the past, moving to a desktop environment like GNOME or Unity can be confusing and scary. Luckily, for those that have difficulty with change, there are some Linux-based operating systems that are designed for Windows-switchers. One fairly popular such offering, Zorin OS, has now reached version 12. It is designed to be familiar to former users of Microsoft's OS. While the company does charge for an "Ultimate" version, the "Core" edition of Zorin OS 12 is entirely free. "Many of the built-in system apps have seen extensive improvements both visually and under the hood. Zorin OS 12 is powered by Linux Kernel version 4.4, which now works with even more hardware and introduces performance enhancements and security improvements. As Zorin OS 12 is based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, it will be supported with security updates until April 2021. This makes Zorin OS 12 the ideal choice for large deployments in businesses, governments, schools and organisations", says The Zorin OS Team. The team further says, "with Zorin OS 12, we are introducing a new release schedule going into the future. Major releases of Zorin OS will now be made once every 2 years. In between, a number of point releases will be made that will include incremental updates to the built in apps as well as support for new hardware, security fixes and various under-the-hood improvements. This gives you the optimal balance between the robustness of tried-and-tested technology and the latest and greatest features. By focusing on one release at a time, we will be able to provide the best possible experience to everyone using Zorin OS". Zorin OS features some really great features, such as Google Drive integration with the file browser. This means Google users can easily access their cloud storage without any confusing setup. Chromium browser is installed by default, which is really the right thing to do nowadays. Look, I know some folks deeply care about Firefox -- which is available to use too -- but Chromium is just the better offering at this time. The all-new Zorin Desktop 2.0 DE can be customized to look more like GNOME or macOS too (Ultimate-version only). If you are ready to download it, you can get the operating system here. If you are new to Zorin, I suggest opting for the free "Core" edition. However, if you find that you like it and want the additional features, the €15 is a reasonably priced way to support the developer. The desktop environment even features useful gestures, 3+ finger pinch opens the Activities Overview 4 finger drag (up or down) switches workspaces 3 finger hold & tap switches between apps Which the team shares here.
  12. It's now in Ubuntu 16.10, 16.04 LTS, 14.04 LTS and 12.04 LTS Firefox 50.0 on Ubuntu Linux Three days after we reported on the official availability of the Mozilla Firefox 50.0 web browser for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems, it looks like users of the Ubuntu Linux OS can now install the application. That's right, Mozilla Firefox 50.0 is now officially available in the repositories of all supported Ubuntu OSes, including Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin), and you can use it right now if you update your system. However, you should not get all that excited because Firefox 50.0 is not a major update. The web browser ships only with native Emoji fonts support, something that most of you won't use anyway, support for cycling through tabs in the recently used order using the Ctrl+Tab keyboard shortcut, and support for searching whole words. A total of 18 security issues have been patched in Firefox 50.0 Mozilla Firefox 50.0 appears to be more of a security and bugfix release, and, according to Canonical's USN-3124-1 security advisory, a total of 18 vulnerability were addressed, as the web browser could be made to crash or run programs with the user's rights if a malicious website was accessed. Don't hesitate to check out the technical details about the security fixes patched in Mozilla Firefox 50.0 by accessing the above Ubuntu Security Notice, but, in the meantime, we recommend that you update your Ubuntu OS as soon as possible to be able to install and use Firefox 50.0. Make sure you restart the web browser. To update, simply open the Ubuntu Software application, access the Updates tab, and install all the updated packages listed there. You can also do it via the command-line by running the "sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade" command in the Terminal app. More details can be found at https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Security/Upgrades. Article source
  13. Ubuntu Budgie Is Now an Official Ubuntu Flavor The distro features the Budgie desktop environment That's right, after two successful major releases, budgie-remix has finally been accepted as an official Ubuntu flavor, earlier today during a meeting where four members of Canonical's Ubuntu Technical Board voted positive. As such, we're extremely happy to inform our readers that the new Ubuntu flavor is called Ubuntu Budgie. In April this year, when budgie-remix hit the road towards its first major release, versioned 16.04, we reported that David Mohammed was kind enough to inform Softpedia about the fact that he got in touch with Ubuntu MATE leader Martin Wimpress, who urged the developer to target Ubuntu 16.10 for an official status. budgie-remix 16.10 arrived as well this fall shortly after the release of Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), and the dream of becoming an official Ubuntu flavor is now a reality. "We now move full steam ahead and look forward to working with the Ubuntu Developer Membership Board to examine and work through the technical aspects [...] 17.04 will be our first official release under the new name," said David Mohammed in the announcement. Budgie 11 desktop environment is coming soon to Ubuntu Budgie 16.10 After this major announcement, most probably the budgie-remix developers will have a lot of work on their hands with the rebranding of the entire project from budgie-remix to Ubuntu Budgie, including the website and other components of the distribution, but we don't know yet if existing users will receive the changes. However, we know for sure that when the Solus Project releases the Budgie 11 desktop environment later this year, Ubuntu Budgie users will receive the major update as well through the official channels. In the meantime, you can start using Ubuntu Budgie right now by downloading the latest release from budgie-remix. In related news, the Ubuntu Budgie developers have recently discussed with Solus Project leader Ikey Doherty to ensure an effective and positive collaboration between the two teams, which means that any improvement made by Ubuntu Budgie devs to the Budgie desktop will also land for Solus users, or users of other distros using Budgie. "I look forward to working with you all in attaining that goal of making Budgie the number one go-to desktop, and honestly, us all enjoying it on an equal peer footing, is the most important part to me," said Ikey Doherty, who is currently working hard on re-architecting the Budgie desktop environment as detailed in our exclusive story. Source
  14. Ubuntu and Linux Mint are currently arguably 2 of the most popular Linux distros (with Debian) around. They are both quite user-friendly and for the Linux newbie, you couldn’t be wrong choosing either. For a very long time, Ubuntu was considered the distro of choice by most Linux enthusiasts, but it has currently been surpassed by Linux Mint (and Debian) as the distro with most hits. But which one is better? I believe we all have our favorite distros but having used either of these distros, I’m gonna make an argument for why I believe one is better than the other, so kindly indulge me and let’s see if you can agree with me. System Requirements Both Ubuntu and Linux Mint have quite similar requirements. For new computers, whichever way you go, you’re going to be fine. For older hardware, Ubuntu does best with Lubuntu, Xubuntu and Ubuntu MATE flavors and Mint users also have Mint MATE edition available. Installation There isn’t much difference in the installation experience of both distros. Both use the Ubiquity installer and the experience is quite similar. Ubuntu and Mint both offer support for UEFI. Interface(default) The default interface for Ubuntu is Canonical’s own built DE called Unity. With Unity, Canonical provides a global menu and notification area occupying the top panel. Some common applications live in a dock on the left. You launch software from the Dash by clicking on the Ubuntu icon. Mint ships with Cinnamon as its default DE. Applications appear in the panel on the bottom of the desktop, with a launcher menu in the bottom left and system icons on the right in a manner quite similar to MS Windows. Unity may feel more familiar to Mac OS X users, while Windows user will feel right at home on Linux Mint. Software (out of the box) Both Mint and Ubuntu use mostly free and open source software. Unlike Ubuntu, Linux Mint comes pre-installed with some proprietary software that most users tend to need, such as Flash, Java, audio and video codecs. Both distros come pre-installed with Libreoffice and Firefox browser. With Mint, you also get VLC and GIMP out of the box. Overall, Mint comes with more apps out of the box than with Ubuntu. Software Installation Both Ubuntu and Mint also have their own app stores that make it easy to find and download new software. Gnome software (previously Ubuntu's Software Center) comes with Ubuntu and Mint also offers Mint Software Manager(also responsible for updates) which is usually mistaken as a system tool instead of an app store. Both stores provide you with a ton of open source software for you to download and use. Official Spins There are ten different official flavors of Ubuntu listed on their website. Besides the Unity desktop, you have alternatives that have their default DEs to GNOME, KDE, LXDE, XFCE, MATE, and MythTV. There are also specialized distributions including Edubuntu for education community, Ubuntu Studio for multimedia production. There’s also Ubuntu Kylin for Chinese users. Linux Mint on the other hand comes in four main distros. There’s Cinnamon, MATE, KDE, and XFCE. Customization (default flavor) One great thing about Linux is the amount of customization it allows. With Ubuntu, most of this has been done away with in recent releases. You are quite limited on what you can tweak. Mint on the other hand has lots of settings that allow you to tweak everything down to the very little details of your interface. It customization is your thing, Mint does it way better. Performance (default flavor) Linux Mint most definitely has an edge when it comes to speed and performance. On a newer machine, the difference may be barely noticeable, but on older hardware, it will definitely feel faster. Ubuntu appears to run slower the older the machine gets. If you’re going to use Ubuntu on older hardware, I recommend your go in for Lubuntu or Xubuntu. Upgradeability Both Linux Mint and Ubuntu allow you to update to the new releases from the very recent version almost as soon as they are available. Software updates are also provided have easy-to-use updaters. For Ubuntu, it’s just a case of clicking on the Dash icon in the dock, and searching for the Software Updater. For Ubuntu, you use the software updater to check, download and install any updates (OS or apps), downloads them and then installs them. The process is similar in Mint using the Update Manager app to update your apps or OS.It is also worth noting that there has been some concern towards Mint’s approach to providing important updates Support While Ubuntu has software company Canonical behind it to run its development, Linux Mint relies on individual users and companies using the OS to act as sponsors, donors and partners. Both distros also have vibrant community support. In Summary Both Ubuntu and Linux Mint have a lot going for them and choosing one over the other. The main difference between the two is how they are implemented in terms of the User Interface and support. Between the default flavors, (Ubuntu Unity and Mint Cinnamon),it is not easy recommending one over the other. Ubuntu suffered a great deal of backlash due to Unity even though it is considered the more modern of the two, whilst Cinnamon is considered the more traditional but looks a bit old-fashioned. So which one is better? My Verdict... Based on the arguments I have outlined for either distros, I have provide a scorecard for them. Ubuntu has a lot going for it but in comes up on top only in 3 categories whilst Linux Mint comes top in 4 categories. Canonical has done a great job at keeping Ubuntu stable and secure. They also try well to keep their official packages as new and updated always. They lay down their own infrastructure (that Mint relies on). They provide a go-to point for transitioning OS users and companies. But Mint’s desktop and menus are easy to use whilst Ubuntu’s dash can be sort of confusing especially for new users. It's the gate that ex-Windows users walk through and as such is the most welcoming to such persons. Mint gives more in terms of the pre-installed software but finding and installing software from Ubuntu’s Software Center can be a little more easier. So I’m choosing Mint over Ubuntu, but don’t get me wrong, Ubuntu with Unity is awesome once you know what you are about. But with Canonical chasing unification of the desktop and mobile with Unity 8, I do belive Linux Mint in its current state is wee bit superior to Ubuntu. Mint is possibly "Ubuntu done better". Overall, Linux Mint with Cinnamon feels far more polished than Ubuntu with Unity. Source: http://www.linuxandubuntu.com/home/ubuntu-vs-linux-mint-which-is-better-in-2016
  15. Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) - Stable - Final - Direct Download & Alternate Downloads: Ubuntu is distributed on two types of images described below. Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Server install image The server install image allows you to install Ubuntu permanently on a computer for use as a server. It will not install a graphical user interface. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) server install image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) server install image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. A full list of available files, including BitTorrent files, can be found below. If you need help burning these images to disk, see the Create a bootable USB stick on Windows or the Image Burning Guide or the USB Image Writing Guide. Download Pen Drive Linux's USB Installer or Download the Rufus USB installer Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavours: For Ubutnu Flavours downloads, you can view below. However, Edubuntu isn't available post Trusty Tahr. Ubuntu Flavour - Lubuntu - 16.10 Lubuntu is distributed on two types of images described below. Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Lubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are three images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Mac (PowerPC) and IBM-PPC (POWER5) desktop image For Apple Macintosh G3, G4, and G5 computers, including iBooks and PowerBooks as well as older IBM OpenPower 7xx machines. Alternate install image The alternate install image allows you to perform certain specialist installations of Lubuntu. It provides for the following situations: setting up automated deployments; upgrading from older installations without network access; LVM and/or RAID partitioning; installs on systems with less than about 384MiB of RAM (although note that low-memory systems may not be able to run a full desktop environment reasonably). In the event that you encounter a bug using the alternate installer, please file a bug on the debian-installer package. There are three images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) alternate install image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) alternate install image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Mac (PowerPC) and IBM-PPC (POWER5) alternate install image For Apple Macintosh G3, G4, and G5 computers, including iBooks and PowerBooks as well as older IBM OpenPower 7xx machines. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Kubuntu - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Kubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Mythubuntu - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Mythbuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Xubuntu - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Xubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 192MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Kylin - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-Kylin without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu MATE - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-MATE without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Mac (PowerPC) and IBM-PPC (POWER5) desktop image For Apple Macintosh G3, G4, and G5 computers, including iBooks and PowerBooks as well as older IBM OpenPower 7xx machines. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu GNOME - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-GNOME without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Studio - 16.10 Ubuntu-Studio is distributed on two types of images described below. Install/live DVD The combined install/live DVD allows you either to install Ubuntu-Studio permanently on a computer, or (by entering 'live' at the boot prompt) to try Ubuntu-Studio without changing your computer at all. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) Install/live DVD Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) Install/live DVD For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg
  16. Includes Ubuntu 16.04, 14.04, and 12.04 LTS Chris Coulson from Canonical published two security advisories to inform the Ubuntu Linux community about the availability of the latest Mozilla products in all supported releases. Mozilla announced the other day that its popular Firefox web browser, which is being used in the majority of GNU/Linux distributions by default, has hit a new milestone, version 49.0, bringing various new features, such as updated Firefox Login Manager and Reader Mode or better video performance on SSSE3 systems without hardware acceleration. Mozilla Firefox 49.0 also ships with updated HTML5 video and audio technologies that let users play files at 1.25x speeds or loop them. To track font memory usage, Firefox 49.0 contains new improvements to the about:memory reports, and it looks like there's now better font shaping thanks to the re-implementation of the Graphite2 rendering engine by default. On the other hand, Mozilla Thunderbird 45.3.0 ships with several bug fixes for various issues discovered recently, such as the inability to use Disposition-Notification-To in mail.compose.other.header, corruption of the drafts summary database due to certain messages, or the composing identity problems with "edit as new message" on a received email. Ubuntu users can install Firefox 49.0 and Thunderbird 45.3 now Therefore, if you're using any of the officially supported Ubuntu releases or flavors, such as Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, or Ubuntu GNOME, you can now update your installation to get the recently released Mozilla Firefox 49.0 web browser and Mozilla Thunderbird 45.3.0 email and news client. They are available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin). To update, simply open the Ubuntu Software or Synaptic Package Manager apps, check for recent updates and install them. You can also open a terminal emulator and run the "sudo apt update && sudo apt dist-upgrade" command. Please keep in mind that you'll need to restart your Firefox and Thunderbird session after installing the new software versions. Good luck! Article source
  17. We all love Windows, right? It’s a great operating system, there’s no doubt about that. However, what if I told you that Ubuntu was better? You may laugh and think that nothing could possibly be better than your beloved Windows, but in this article we’re going to look at 6 reasons why Ubuntu is better than Windows. Some of you may think that Ubuntu is just for nerds, and that the average user wouldn’t be able to use it. So how on earth could it be better than Windows? Well the truth is that Ubuntu is not that difficult to use, in fact, it’s actually just as easy as Windows to use, if not easier in some respects. So then, let’s take a look at some of the reasons why Ubuntu is better than Windows. 1. OS and Software Updates Imagine the scenario: you sit down to do some work at your Windows PC, and just after getting stuck in to that important document you need to type up, you get a popup asking you to update Windows. Being the dutiful, security conscious user that you are, you decide to update and reboot your machine. Fast forward another 10 minutes, you’re settling in again and wouldn’t you know it, Apple now pops up and lets you know that there is an update for their software also. Annoying? Yes! You see, this is because Windows handles its operating system and application updates separately. So you will receive popups for different applications as and when they need updating. This makes the whole process very frustrating, to the point were many people just turn them off. Ubuntu is different. Everything is done via repositories and it uses a dedicated update manager to update both the operating system and all of the applications installed. So you only ever have to manage your updates from one place. This makes the process far slicker and means users tend not to turn them off — which means you are more secure. Speaking of which… 2. Computer Security Windows has a number of security features that you can use to help secure your system, but there’s no getting away from the fact that Ubuntu is more secure than Windows. User accounts within Ubuntu have far fewer permissions by default than in Windows. This means that if you want to make a change to the system — like installing an application — you need to enter your password to do it. In Windows, you don’t. This makes it much more difficult to execute malware or a virus inside Ubuntu. Ubuntu is also a lot less popular than Windows. That means that the bad guys who make all the viruses don’t really care about it, so they don’t bother writing much malware for Ubuntu: that’s great news for us users! Also, a lot of the bad guys use Linux distributions like Ubuntu themselves, so although Ubuntu isn’t impervious to virus’, it’s a lot less likely that you will get infected. It’s unlikely, but not impossible, which is why you should always use anti-virus software in Ubuntu. 3. Desktop Customization There isn’t that much you can do with Windows when it comes to customization. Windows 10 gives more customization options than previous versions, but it’s still nowhere near that of Ubuntu. You’re pretty much limited to changing your wallpaper and start menu colors in Windows, but in Ubuntu any aspect of the desktop can be easily changed. Want the window buttons on the right? No problem. Don’t like the icons? It’s easily fixed. Maybe the Ubuntu fonts don’t float your boat? Say no more! The screenshot below is my Ubuntu 16.04 desktop. The changes I have made took around 5 minutes to apply and it looks very different from a stock install. 4. System Resources Not everyone can afford an all-singing, all-dancing computer. So for some, the latest version of Windows may be out of their budget. However, the latest version of Ubuntu need not be. On a test machine, I ran stock Ubuntu and stock Windows 10, and as you can see from the results below Windows 10 used almost double the amount of RAM as Ubuntu. Now that might not seem like a big difference, as this test machine has 8 GB RAM. But if your machine has 2 GB of RAM, that would mean that you have 60% of your RAM utilized in Ubuntu, or 90% utilized in Windows 10 and that’s before you start opening applications. If your machine has even less resources than this, then there are lightweight versions of Ubuntu and Linux available that use even less system resources. This means that your computer could last years longer than you thought it would. 5. Live Environment If you haven’t used Windows before and decide you want to give it a try, you have to commit to installing it on your machine beforehand. That could lead to problems such as data loss, if you later decide you don’t like Windows. That’s not the case in Ubuntu. In Ubuntu — and many other Linux distributions — you can burn the image to a CD, or write it to a USB stick and boot it up straight from that media. This is a fully working version of the operating system, which means you can try every aspect of Ubuntu without having to commit to installing it on your hard drive. Don’t like it? No problem: just reboot your machine and you will be back on your previous operating system as if nothing had ever happened. 6. It’s Free That’s right, Ubuntu is 100% free. It won’t cost you a penny (although you can make a donation on their download page). I know what you’re going to say: “but Windows 10 is also free.” Whilst it was offered as a free upgrade until the end of July, that offer is no longer valid (although there are other ways you can still upgrade). If you want to buy Windows 10 it will cost you $119.99 for the Home edition and $199.99 for the Professional edition, that’s a lot of money. So why not save that cash and put it to better use elsewhere? You could download the latest version Ubuntu for free instead. Windows vs. Ubuntu: Which Do You Prefer? Overall, both Windows 10 and Ubuntu are fantastic operating systems, each with their own strengths and weaknesses, and it’s great that we have the choice. Article source
  18. Fix WiFi Not Connecting In Linux Mint 18 And Ubuntu 16.04 Problem description I experienced this strange issue in Ubuntu 16.04 and Linux Mint 18. When I tried to connect to wifi, I clicked on the available wireless networks, entered the correct wifi password. A few seconds later, I was still not connected to the internet. I thought it may be that I entered an incorrect password. So, I tried to connect again. This time typing the password slowly and then I double checked it to make sure that the password was correct. But no, it won’t connect to the internet. This was frustrating as my wifi password is 26 characters long. Reason I went to the network settings to find out what was wrong with it. I noticed that my wifi password was not stored which could be normal as I was not asked if I wanted to connect to the network automatically. I manually entered the wifi password and saved it in the network settings in an effort to not have to enter the long passwords again. What surprised me that it just got connected to the internet after that. I don’t know exactly what made it work but it worked. I haven’t looked to find if it is a bug in this version of the network manager or not but I experienced the same issue after installing Linux Mint 18. And using this trick again saved me. Steps to fix wifi not connecting despite correct password in Linux Mint 18 and Ubuntu 16.04 Basically, all you need to do here is: go to Network Settings choose the network you are trying to connect to under the security tab, enter the wifi password manually save it This trick has worked for me repeatedly, both in Ubuntu and Linux Mint. I hope that it works for you too. Since I am using Linux Mint 18 right now, I am going to share screenshots so that it would help beginners to fix this issue. Step 1: Go to Network Settings: Step 2: Choose the network you are trying to connect to. Note that it already provides a configuration option because I tried to connect to it earlier. Step 3: Under the security tab, enter the wifi password manually and click on apply to save it: You’ll see that your network is now connected: I hope this helps you. Note that this article deals with the problem when the wireless network is working fine in your system but it cannot connect to the access point despite correct password. I suggest this article if there is no wireless network in Ubuntu or Linux Mint. Have you already encountered the same wireless connection issue in Ubuntu 16.04 or Linux Mint 18? If yes, how did you fix it? Source
  19. How to Add Mac OS X’s ‘Quick Look’ Feature to Ubuntu Sometimes Nautilus’ icon thumbnails and metadata just aren’t good enough. Sometimes you want to take a closer look at a file, photo or folder to make sure it’s the one you want. And that’s where GNOME Sushi can help. Quick Look for Linux GNOME Sushi adds a macOS style ‘Quick Look‘ feature to GNOME’s famous file manager. Just select a file and tap the spacebar to see a larger (and sometimes interactive) preview. Instant previews of image, music and video files are possible thanks to the GStreamer framework. Sushi can also supports file previews of most plaintext documents, including scripts with syntax highlighting, PDFs and HTML files. It’s a quick and effective way to take quick peeks at PDFs, photos and other documents without having to open them fully. Sadly Sushi doesn’t update the preview if you move off and select other files (which the macOS version does do). It also lacks any additional ‘actions’. For example, it’d be great if, having Sushi’d the right selfie from the 342 I’ve taken, I could tap a button to open it in the default image viewer, or shunt it to GIMP, et al. Install GNOME Sushi on Ubuntu Although a modest feature (there are no bells or whistle) Sushi’s seamless preview prowess is such that after a few days use you’ll wonder how you managed without! GNOME Sushi is not installed by default on Ubuntu, but you can install it very quickly using the command line: sudo apt-get install gnome-sushi Alternatively, install it using Ubuntu Software: <<< Click to install GNOME Sushi >>> Source
  20. 5 Things We Secretly Miss About Ubuntu In this age of convergence Ubuntu isn’t what it used to be. Sure, it’s super stable, far more compatible, and less buggy than it was a few years back. The polish and professionalism mirrors Canonical’s own transition from scrappy startup to server-ruling stalwart. But Ubuntu is also far less …Ubuntu-y than it used to be. The open-source OS has lost a little bit of its magic, diluting its personality to placate and appease critics. So here, with my tongues firmly wedged in my cheek, are five things I think we all secretly miss about Ubuntu of old. 1. The Ubuntu Login Sound The rhythmic melody of Ubuntu’s exotic signature login sound was, at one time, a sure-fire way to wake up the dead band announce your operating system choice to your entire class. It was also a fantastic to way to learn that your computer had randomly rebooted itself. Ubuntu disabled the login sound back around the time of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS — and while I don’t miss is having to dive for the mute key at login, I am still incredibly fond of the chime. 2. The Mascot Wallpapers << Gallery of Every Ubuntu Default Wallpaper, Ever >> Mascot wallpapers shinnied in just two releases of Ubuntu — Ubuntu 8.04 and Ubuntu funny how synonymous the Ubuntu mascot wallpapers are considering they shipped for just two releases. Yes, two. The Hardy Heron wallpaper is the best loved (and most well remembered) wallpaper the distro ever shipped with, the follow up Intrepid Ibex design was also striking (and not just because it looked like a set of coffee ring stains). Few wallpapers since 8.04 LTS ever proving as popular, so maybe Ubuntu should just revert back to it. I don’t think many of us would mind! 3. The Lurid Color Scheme Ahh, Ubuntu’s old colour scheme was a thing of beauty. Seriously! More orange than a tank filled with Fanta. Ubuntu’s use of orange (and brown) lives on through the Ambiance theme, but part of me misses the luridly glossy orange excess of old. There’s something about it, and the earthy, natural browns it was used with, that felt unique. Ubuntu is far better designed today than it was back in the late 00s, but in polishing the rough edges it has, I think, lost a little touch of its scrappy malleable charm. 4. The Wi-Fi that never worked It’s easy to take for granted that Ubuntu just works these days. Back when I first started using Ubuntuthe single biggest battle (after you got Grub 1 to install correctly) was any getting your Wi-Fi drivers to work on Ubuntu. Most Wi-Fi cards of the time relied on proprietary drivers (cheers Broadcom!) with few OEMs offering open source or native Linux alternatives. The open-source community loves a challenge, and nifty tools like NDISwrapper (and its invaluable GTK front-end) popped up to let you use Windows drivers on Linux. Chuck in the advance of Linux Netbooks, improved kernel releases, and plenty of reverse-engineered after-class projects, a slate of ever-better open-source alternatives emerged. But the smug satisfaction in getting a poorly supported Wi-Fi card to work, even if it did take 5 hours, 4 forum threads, 1 random runtime, and a whole bunch of copy and pasted commands to achieve it! 5. The Bustle of the Ubuntu Forums In the late 2000s, the Ubuntu Forums was the place to be. Most of us had a link to the Ubuntu Forums pinned on our Firefox browser toolbar. The Newbies and Help sections were always overflowing with questions (and bumped threads from the impatient); while the community sections were a hive of activity, debate, banter, …and inevitable KDE vs GNOME polls. The Ubuntu Forums are still around today and still ticking over nicely, but it’s clear their heyday has passed. The forums have, to my eyes, been sidelined and marginalised in favour of shiny new avenues, like the austere Ask Ubuntu, sub-reddits, and social media. Let us know your the things you miss about Ubuntu of yore in the comments section. Source
  21. Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Contest Is Now Open For Entries Doors have opened on the Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Contest. Few desktop operating systems offer amateur and professional illustrators, photographers and graphic designers the chance to have their artwork seen by millions of people around the world. But then, Ubuntu isn’t your average operating system! The best of the community contributed submissions will ship as part of the Ubuntu 16.10 desktop which is due for release in October. It should be mentioned that none of the entries can vie for the spot of Ubuntu’s default wallpaper. The background that greets all users on a fresh installed is designed in-house by the Canonical design team (and, if tradition holds, will remain a subtle iteration on the existing design). Rules and Requirements So what do you need to know to enter? The most important rule is that all artwork should be original (i.e. your own work). You’re also limited to two entries, so be sure to only enter the best of the best! Avoid overt branding (hand drawn Yaks notwithstanding) and aim keep the Unity desktop layout in mind. You’ll also need a Yahoo! account as submissions have to be made through the Flickr photo sharing service. Basic guidelines: Keep it simple: don’t use too many colours, shapes, etc. Use a single point of focus to draw the eye in Remember to factor in Unity desktop elements, e.g., launcher, panel, etc Design at a minimum resolution of at least 2560 x 1600 Deadline for all submissions is September 29, 2016. Dig out that nifty 50, plan your weekend around the need to snap nature shots, and dust off your illustrious illustrations to enter! <<< Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Submission Pool on Flickr >>> Source
  22. Artist Sylvia Ritter Painted All 25 Ubuntu Linux Mascots and They're Astonishing - Exclusive The wallpapers are suitable for phone and tablet It's not the first time we talk here about Sylvia Ritter, as back in March 2016 we published a story with the Ubuntu Linux wallpapers she managed to paint using the powerful, open-source, and cross-platform Krita digital painting software, but now Mrs. Ritter finished this unique project and unleashed all 25 Ubuntu mascots, or animals as she likes to call them. "Hello Softpedia! I've just painted all 25 Ubuntu animals. They are also great phone and tablet wallpapers," says Sylvia Ritter in an email, exclusively for Softpedia. "All known 25 animals have just been completed, starting with the Warty Warthog (Ubuntu 4.10) and finishing with the latest release, Yakkety Yak (16.10). The series will likely continue when the Ubuntu community announces the next release name for Ubuntu 17.04." As you might know, every new Ubuntu release has a code name, and it's based on a real animal, except for Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) and Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf), which are inspired by fictional characters. Sylvia Ritter is a huge fan of the open-source Ubuntu Linux operating system and loves to paint animals of all kinds, so this was her opportunity of creating a series of astonishing wallpapers you can use on your smartphone or tablet. Here are all the Ubuntu Linux mascots painted by Sylvia Ritter Below, we've listed all the 25 wallpapers in the order of the launch of each Ubuntu OS. They are Ubuntu 4.10 (Warty Warthog), Ubuntu 5.04 (Hoary Hedgehog), Ubuntu 5.10 (Breezy Badger), Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake), Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft), Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn), Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon), Ubuntu 8.04 LTS (Hardy Heron), Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex), Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope), and Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala). The list of Ubuntu Linux release continues with Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (Lucid Lynx), Ubuntu 10.10 (Maverick Meerkat), Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal), Ubuntu 11.10 (Oneiric Ocelot), Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin), Ubuntu 12.10 (Quantal Quetzal), Ubuntu 13.04 (Raring Ringtail), Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn), Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet), Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak). More Images: You can view other 22 images here. Source
  23. InfoWorld Celebrates The 25th Birthday Of Linux -- And The New Generation Of Open Source Projects Linux Enabled I discovered Linux the way most people did, though word of mouth in the 1990s, when rumors spread of a free "hobbyist" OS designed to run on x86 PCs. For the first decade of Linux's 25 years, Linux was largely a curiosity outside of its core community. I'm proud to say InfoWorld was among the first publications to take Linux seriously, culminating in a January 2004 review entitled "Linux 2.6 scales the enterprise." In it, InfoWorld contributing editor Paul Venezia issued a fateful warning: "If commercial Unix vendors weren’t already worried about Linux, they should be now." Today Linux has expanded far beyond its conquest of the server market. If you include Android, which is built around the Linux kernel, not to mention embedded Linux devices from TVs to network switches, you're talking billions of instances. This week on InfoWorld, you'll see a string of articles celebrating Linux, including a feature article from Paul, plus his interview with Linux creator Linus Torvalds. Those two stories will run on Aug. 25 -- the same date on which Torvalds first announced Linux in 1991. Over the years, Linux has grown in another way: The sheer scale of its community development operation. Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation, recently offered me some awe-inspiring stats: That's the kernel alone. Zemlin reminds us that the versioning and repository system Git, on which GitHub is based, was created by Torvalds to help manage this massive development effort. Each rev of the kernel, offered under the GPLv2 license, flows to the multitude of Linux distributions, the providers of which are responsible for the customer experience. Given that Linux providers pay nothing for the kernel, how does Torvalds earn a living? He's an employee of the Linux Foundation, as is a coterie of core contributors and administrators, but they're far outnumbered by a much larger group of dedicated developers employed by familiar names: Intel, Red Hat, Samsung, Suse, IBM, Google, AMD, and many more. This consortium supplies both monetary support to the Foundation and millions of lines of code to the Linux project. Although Torvalds technically reports to Zemlin, the latter invokes his daughter to describe their relationship: "Like my daughter, who shares a lot in common with Linus, they’re both adorable, they both are brilliant, and neither of them listens to anything I say." As you can tell, Zemlin likes to minimize his own role, going as far as to say, "I'm just the janitor keeping the wheels turning." But it's impossible to ignore the growing importance of the Foundation itself -- and its 50 open source projects beyond the Linux kernel, a number of them vital to the future of enterprise computing. Take the Linux Foundation's Open Container Initiative (OCI). It's fair to say that no new enterprise technology over the past couple of years has had a greater impact than Docker packaging for Linux containers, and the OCI is the cauldron where those specs are being hashed out. Alongside the OCI, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation promises to harmonize container management and orchestration solutions for the next-gen enterprise cloud, with Google's red-hot Kubernetes at the core. Zemlin is particularly excited by the Foundation's new, fast-growing Hyperledger project, a blockchain-based initiative to create an open, enterprise-grade distributed ledger system for all sorts of transactions. "Blockchain has the potential to change the nature of trusted transactions on the internet," he says. "Beyond that, it’s a security modality for connected devices where you have a trusted, immutable record of cryptographically secure trust on the internet. It’s a huge project." The sheer breadth of open networking projects also demands attention. Together you can view them as circumscribing the future of networking: OpenDaylight, Open Network Operating System, Open Orchestrator Project, Open Platform for NFV, Open vSwitch, and OpenSwitch. As Linux turns 25, it's worth pondering not only the impact of the endlessly morphing, proliferating OS itself, but its role in legitimizing open source and elevating it to the point where, today, it has become ground zero for technology development. Linux has its rich ecosystem of contributors, providers, and users of all stripes. But around that, supported by the Linux and Apache Foundations and others, a vast constellation of auspicious open source projects has arisen, each with its own potential to shake up enterprise computing. Rather than wandering in the wilderness for a decade, the best of them are already being taken seriously. Source
  24. Canonical Strikes Deal To Bring Ubuntu Core to Intel Gateways Ubuntu filling in the IoT sandwich The ‘strategic partnership’ means users of Advantech’s Intel x86-based gateways will have a certified and fully supported Ubuntu image, ready for production use. The deal also nets users access to a number of services to fully manage their device’s security and software. Oft-neglected in talk of smart refrigerators and network-controlled lightbulbs, Gateways are intrinsic to the ‘Internet of Things’. They act as the “middleman” in the Internet-of-Things, ferrying data from sensors and equipment in the real world to and from that stored and analysed in the cloud. Ubuntu Core delvers a robust and secure platform through which embedded devices and the web of smart things can communicate. Jon Melamut, vice president of commercial devices operations at Canonical says:“This partnership confirms Ubuntu Core as the operating system of choice for IOT developers and systems integrators who want to deploy products to market quickly. Ubuntu Core is Ubuntu for IoT and it provides amongst others, a production ready operating system for IoT gateways.” Miller Chang, vice president of Advantech Embedded Computing Group, says: “This collaboration will enable us to satisfy even more customer requirements and deliver an integrated, pre-validated, and flexible open-computing gateway platform that allows fast solution development and deployment”. Source
  25. Canonical Show Off Converged Terminal App Design Reshaping the classic terminal app to fit multi-form factor world isn’t easy, but it’s the task that the Canonical Design team face as part of their work on Unity 8. Today, they’ve offered up a small glimpse at their design thinking in a blog post. Canonical’s Jouni Helminen explains: “On the visual side, we have brought the app in line with our Suru visual language. We have also adopted the very nice Solarized palette as the default palette.” The re-design proposes making a number of improvements to the Terminal core app currently available to install on Ubuntu phone and tablet, including the addition of features that cater to the desktop use case: Keyboard shortcuts Customisable touch/keyboard shortcuts Split screen (horizontally, vertically) option Customisable color palette Window transparency (on desktop) Unlimited history/scrollback ‘Find’ action for searching history On desktop and tablets the Terminal will sport a “visually persistent” tab bar (i.e one that’s on show all the time). On mobile, terminal tabs will be moved to the bottom edge, similar to the web-browser app. Tab behaviour aside, the proposed Terminal re-design for the Ubuntu Phone isn’t hugely dissimilar to the way the app looks now, with a different colour scheme and some new icons. Quick mobile access to shortcuts and commands Custom command shortcuts on the mobile redesign Using the Terminal app on the Ubuntu Phone is a novelty, and it’s hard to avoid the different interaction method required. One of the ways the Terminal app developers have worked around the lack of ‘full-sized keyboard’ — the on-screen keyboard lacks Ctrl, Alt, etc buttons — is through a touch-centric shortcut bar at the bottom of the screen. The shortcuts sections offers quick access to common command-line commands, including those that use Ctrl modifiers, function keys, scroll keys. A selection of common commands (e.g., top, ls, clear) is also presented. For the next iteration of the app Canonical’s designers hope to list many of these shortcuts by recency, and allow users to add their own custom key shortcuts and commands. Another interesting change mooted is using a specific auto-correct dictionary for the keyboard app when used in the Terminal. Getting it right is critical The command line is a key part of the “ubuntu” experience for many users and developers. Canonical will be keen to avoid offering a hobbled, limited or alien command prompt to users opting to try Unity 8 on the desktop. But while using the command line from a phone or tablet feels novel, and shortcomings or missing features expected, desktop users will be far more demanding. Do you like what you see so far? Share your thoughts on the converged Terminal app designs in the giant hole we’ve carved out below. Source Alternate Source - Canonical Plans on Improving the Ubuntu Linux Terminal UX on Mobile and Desktop