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Found 2 results

  1. Researchers believe a new encryption technique may be key to maintaining a balance between user privacy and government demands. For governments worldwide, encryption is a thorn in the side in the quest for surveillance, cracking suspected criminal phones, and monitoring communication. Officials are applying pressure on technology firms and app developers which provide end-to-end encryption services provide a way for police forces to break encryption. However, the moment you provide a backdoor into such services, you are creating a weak point that not only law enforcement and governments can use -- assuming that tunneling into a handset and monitoring is even within legal bounds -- but threat actors, and undermining the security of encryption as a whole. As the mass surveillance and data collection activities of the US National Security Agency hit the headlines, faith in governments and their ability to restrain such spying to genuine cases of criminality began to weaken. Now, the use of encryption and secure communication channels is ever-more popular, technology firms are resisting efforts to implant deliberate weaknesses in encryption protocols, and neither side wants to budge. What can be done? From the outset, something has got to give. However, researchers from Boston University believe they may have come up with a solution. On Monday, the team said they have developed a new encryption technique which will give authorities some access, but without providing unlimited access in practice, to communication. In other words, a middle ground -- a way to break encryption to placate law enforcement, but not to the extent that mass surveillance on the general public is possible. Mayank Varia, Research Associate Professor at Boston University and cryptography expert, has developed the new technique, known as cryptographic "crumpling." In a paper documenting the research, lead author Varia says that the new cryptography methods could be used for "exceptional access" to encrypted data for government purposes while keeping user privacy at large at a reasonable level. "Our approach places most of the responsibility for achieving exceptional access on the government, rather than on the users or developers of cryptographic tools," the paper notes. "As a result, our constructions are very simple and lightweight, and they can be easily retrofitted onto existing applications and protocols." The crumpling techniques use two approaches -- the first being a Diffie-Hellman key exchange over modular arithmetic groups which leads to an "extremely expensive" puzzle which must be solved to break the protocol, and the second a "hash-based proof of work to impose a linear cost on the adversary for each message" to recover. Crumpling requires strong, modern cryptography as a precondition as it allows per-message encryption keys and detailed management. The system requires this infrastructure so a small number of messages can be targeted without full-scale exposure. The team says that this condition will also only permit "passive" decryption attempts, rather than man-in-the-middle (MiTM) attacks. By introducing cryptographic puzzles into the generation of per-message cryptographic keys, the keys will be possible to decrypt but will require vast resources to do so. In addition, each puzzle will be chosen independently for each key, which means "the government must expend effort to solve each one." "Like a crumple zone in automotive engineering, in an emergency situation the construction should break a little bit in order to protect the integrity of the system as a whole and the safety of its human users," the paper notes. "We design a portion of our puzzles to match Bitcoin's proof of work computation so that we can predict their real-world marginal cost with reasonable confidence." To prevent unauthorized attempts to break encryption an "abrasion puzzle" serves as a gatekeeper which is more expensive to solve than individual key puzzles. While this would not necessarily deter state-sponsored threat actors, it may at least deter individual cyberattackers as the cost would not be worth the result. The new technique would allow governments to recover the plaintext for targeted messages, however, it would also be prohibitively expensive. A key length of 70 bits, for example -- with today's hardware -- would cost millions and force government agencies to choose their targets carefully and the expense would potentially prevent misuse. The research team estimates that the government could recover less than 70 keys per year with a budget of close to $70 million dollars upfront -- one million dollars per message and the full amount set out in the US' expanded federal budget to break encryption. However, there could also be additional costs of $1,000 to $1 million per message, and these kind of figures are difficult to conceal, especially as one message from a suspected criminal in a conversation without contextual data is unlikely to ever be enough to secure conviction. The research team says that crumpling can be adapted for use in common encryption services including PGP, Signal, as well as full-disk and file-based encryption. "We view this work as a catalyst that can inspire both the research community and the public at large to explore this space further," the researchers say. "Whether such a system will ever be (or should ever be) adopted depends less on technology and more on questions for society to answer collectively: whether to entrust the government with the power of targeted access and whether to accept the limitations on law enforcement possible with only targeted access." The research was funded by the National Science Foundation. Source
  2. part 1 (YET ANOTHER) WARNING .... Your online activities are now being tracked and recorded by various government and corporate entities around the world. This information can be used against you at any time and there is no real way to “opt out”. In the past decade, we have seen the systematic advancement of the surveillance apparatus throughout the world. The United States, United Kingdom, Australia, and Canada have all passed laws allowing, and in some cases forcing, telecom companies to bulk-collect your data: United States – In March 2017 the US Congress passed legislation that allows internet service providers to collect, store, and sell your private browsing history, app usage data, location information and more – without your consent. This essentially allows Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and other providers to monetize and sell their customers to the highest bidders (usually for targeted advertising). United Kingdom – In November 2016 the UK Parliament passed the infamous Snoopers Charter (Investigatory Powers Act) which forces internet providers and phone companies to bulk-collect customer data. This includes private browsing history, social media posts, phone calls, text messages, and more. This information is stored for 12 months in a giant database that is accessible to 48 different government agencies. The erosion of free speech is also rapidly underway as various laws allow UK authorities to lock up anyone they deem to be “offensive” (1984 is already here). Australia – In April 2017 the Australian government passed a massive data retention law that forces telecoms to collect and store text messages, phone calls, location information, and internet connection data for a full two years, with the data being accessible to authorities without a warrant. Canada, Europe, and other parts of the world have similar laws and policies already in place. What you are witnessing is the rapid expansion of the global surveillance state, whereby corporate and government entities work together to monitor and record everything you do. What the hell is going on here? Perhaps you are wondering why all this is happening. There is a simple answer to that question. Control Just like we have seen throughout history, government surveillance is simply a tool used for control. This could be for maintaining control of power, controlling a population, or controlling the flow of information in a society. You will notice that the violation of your right to privacy will always be justified by various excuses – from “terrorism” to tax evasion – but never forget, it’s really about control. Along the same lines, corporate surveillance is also about control. Collecting your data helps private entities control your buying decisions, habits, and desires. The tools for doing this are all around you: apps on your devices, social networks, tracking ads, and many free products which simply bulk-collect your data (when something is free, you are the product). This is why the biggest collectors of private data – Google and Facebook – are also the two businesses that completely dominate the online advertising industry. So to sum this up, advertising today is all about the buying and selling of individuals. But it gets even worse… Now we have the full-scale cooperation between government and corporate entities to monitor your every move. In other words, governments are now enlisting private corporations to carry out bulk data collection on entire populations. Your internet service provider is your adversary working on behalf of the surveillance state. This basic trend is happening in much of the world, but it has been well documented in the United States with the PRISM Program. So why should you care? Everything that’s being collected could be used against you today, or at any time in the future, in ways you may not be able to imagine. In many parts of the world, particularly in the UK, thought crime laws are already in place. If you do something that is deemed to be “offensive”, you could end up rotting away in a jail cell for years. Again, we have seen this tactic used throughout history for locking up dissidents – and it is alive and well in the Western world today. From a commercial standpoint, corporate surveillance is already being used to steal your data and hit you with targeted ads, thereby monetizing your private life. Reality check Many talking heads in the media will attempt to confuse you by pretending this is a problem with a certain politician or perhaps a political party. But that’s a bunch of garbage to distract you from the bigger truth. For decades, politicians from all sides (left and right) have worked hard to advance the surveillance agenda around the world. Again, it’s all about control, regardless of which puppet is in office. So contrary to what various groups are saying, you are not going to solve this problem by writing a letter to another politician or signing some online petition. Forget about it. Instead, you can take concrete steps right now to secure your data and protect your privacy. Restore Privacy is all about giving you the tools and information to do that. If you feel overwhelmed by all this, just relax. The privacy tools you need are easy to use no matter what level of experience you have. Arguably the most important privacy tool is a good VPN (virtual private network). A VPN will encrypt and anonymize your online activity by creating a secured tunnel between your computer and a VPN server. This makes your data and online activities unreadable to government surveillance, your internet provider, hackers, and other third-party snoopers. A VPN will also allow you to spoof your location, hide your real IP address, and allow you to access blocked content from anywhere in the world. Check out the best VPN guide to get started. Stay safe! SOURCE
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