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  1. 10 Easy Ways To Prevent Malware Infection We told you how to tell if you’re infected with malware. We told you how to clean up the infection if you get it. How about how to stop the infection from happening in the first place? Yes, it’s possible to clean up an infected computer and fully remove malware from your system. But the damage from some forms of malware, like ransomware, cannot be undone. If they’ve encrypted your files and you haven’t backed them up, the jig is up. So your best defense is to beat the bad guys at their own game. While no single method is ever 100 percent fool-proof, there are some tried and true cybersecurity techniques for keeping malware infections at bay that, if put into practice, will shield you from most of the garbage of the Internet. Without further ado: Protect vulnerabilities One of the top delivery methods for malware today is by exploit kit. Exploit kits are sneaky little suckers that rummage around in your computer and look for weaknesses in the system, whether that’s an unprotected operating system, a software program that hasn’t been updated in months, or a browser whose security protocols aren’t up to snuff (we’re looking at you, Internet Explorer). Here are some ways you can protect against exploits and shield your vulnerabilities: 1. Update your operating system, browsers, and plugins. If there’s an update to your computer waiting in queue, don’t let it linger. Updates to operating systems, browsers, and plugins are often released to patch any security vulnerabilities discovered. So while you leave those programs alone, cybercriminals can find their way in through the vulnerabilities. Bonus mobile phone tip: To protect against security flaws in mobile phones, be sure your mobile phone software is updated regularly. Don’t ignore those “New software update” pop-ups, even if your storage is full or your battery is low. 2. Enable click-to-play plugins. One of the more devious ways that exploit kits (EKs) are delivered to your computer is through malvertising, or malicious ads. You needn’t even click on the ad to become infected, and these malicious ads can live on prestigious, well-known sites. Besides keeping your software patched so that exploit kits can’t do their dirty work, you can help to block the exploit from ever being delivered by enabling click-to-play plugins. Click-to-play plugins keep Flash or Java from running unless you specifically tell them to (by clicking on the ad). The bulk of malvertising relies on exploiting these plugins, so enabling this feature in your browser settings will help keep the EKs at bay. 3. Remove software you don’t use (especially legacy programs). So, you’re still running Windows XP? Microsoft discontinued releasing software patches for this program in 2015. That means you’re wide open to exploit attack. Take a look at other legacy apps on your computer, such as Adobe Reader or older versions of media players. If you’re not using them, best to remove. Watch out for social engineering Another top method for infection is to scam users through social engineering. Whether that’s an email that looks like it’s coming from your bank, a tech support scam, or a fishy social media campaign, cybercriminals have gotten rather deft at tricking even tech-savvy surfers. By being aware of the following top tactics, you can fend off uninvited malware guests: 4. Read emails with an eagle eye. Check the sender’s address. Is it from the actual company he or she claims? Hover over links provided in the body of the email. Is the URL legit? Read the language of the email carefully. Are there weird line breaks? Awkwardly constructed sentences that sound foreign? And finally, know the typical methods of communication for important organizations. For example, the IRS will never contact you via email. When in doubt, call your healthcare, bank, or other potentially-spoofed organization directly. Bonus mobile phone tip: Cybercriminals love spoofing banks via SMS/text message or fake bank apps. Do not confirm personal data via text, especially social security numbers. Again, when in doubt, contact your bank directly. 5. Do not call fake tech support numbers. Ahhh, tech support scams. The bane of our existence. These often involve pop-ups from fake companies offering to help you with a malware infection. How do you know if they’re fake? A real security company would never market to you via pop-up saying they believe your computer is infected. They would especially not serve up a (bogus) 1-800 number and charge money to fix it. If you have security software that detects malware, it will show such a detection in your scan, and it will not encourage you to call and shell out money to remove the infection. That’s a scam trying to infect you. Don’t take the bait. 6. Do not believe the cold callers. On the flip side, there are those who may pick up the phone and try to bamboozle you the good old-fashioned way. Tech support scammers love to call up and pretend to be from Microsoft. They’ve detected an infection, they say. Don’t believe it. Others may claim to have found credit card fraud or a loan overdue. Ask questions if something feels sketchy. Does the person have info on you that seems outdated, such as old addresses or maiden names? Don’t confirm or update the info provided by these callers. Ask about where that person is calling from, if you can call back, and then hang up and check in with credit agencies, loan companies, and banks directly to be sure there isn’t a problem. Practice safe browsing There’s such a thing as good Internet hygiene. These are the things you should be doing to protect against external and internal threats, whether that’s losing your device, walking away from your computer, using public wifi, or shopping online. “While many of the threats you hear about on the news make it seem like there is no way to protect yourself online these days, the reality is that by following some basic tips and maintaining good habits while online, you will evade infection from over 95 percent of the attacks targeting you,” says Adam Kujawa, Head of Intelligence for Malwarebytes. “For that last 5 percent, read articles, keep up with what the actual security people are saying, and follow their advice to protect yourself.” So here are some of the basics to follow: 7. Use strong passwords and/or password managers. A strong password is long, is not written down anywhere, is changed often, and isn’t tied to easily found personal information, like a birthday. It’s also not repeated for different logins. Admittedly, that’s a tough cookie to swallow. If you don’t want to worry about remembering 5,462 different rotating passwords, you may want to look into a password manager, which collects, remembers, and encrypts passwords for your computer. 8. Make sure you’re on a secure connection. Look for the padlock icon to the left of the URL. If it’s there, then that means the information passed between a website’s server and your browser remains private. In addition, the URL should read “https” and not just “http.” 9. Log out of websites after you’re done. Did you log into your healthcare provider’s site using your super-strong password? You could still be leaving yourself vulnerable if you don’t log out, especially if you’re using a public computer. It’s not enough to just close the browser tab or window. A person with enough technical prowess could access login information from session cookies and sign into a site as you. Layer your security Sometimes all the safe browsing and careful vigilance in the world can’t protect you from all threats. Sometimes you need a professional to catch all the poo that cybermonkeys are flinging. So to keep your machine clean, invest in security software and layer it up with the following: 10. Use firewall, antivirus, anti-malware, and anti-exploit technology. Your firewall and antivirus programs will detect and block the known bad guys. Meanwhile, your anti-malware and anti-exploit software can fend off sophisticated attacks from unknown agents, stopping malware infection in real time and shielding vulnerable programs from exploit attack. Security professionals agree a multi-layer approach—using not only multiple layers of security technology but also user awareness—helps keep you protected from the bad guys and your own mistakes. Now go forth and fight malware! Source
  2. NOD32 Antivirus & ESET Smart Security v8.0.319.0 English Silent Note: Credits to Cerberus (Scripting Help) ESET NOD32 Antivirus: 32Bit (Size: 70.6 MB) Site: http://www.mirrorcreator.com Sharecode[?]: /files/1RCBMOLD/ESET_NOD32_Antivirus_v8.0.319.0_32Bit.zip_links 64Bit (Size: 79.9 MB) Site: http://www.mirrorcreator.com Sharecode[?]: /files/07MFNOKR/ESET_NOD32_Antivirus_v8.0.319.0_64Bit.zip_links ESET Smart Security 32Bit (Size: 77.7 MB) Site: http://www.mirrorcreator.com Sharecode[?]: /files/OLZAEFQI/ESET_Smart_Security_v8.0.319.0_32Bit.zip_links 64Bit (Size: 88 MB) Site: http://www.mirrorcreator.com Sharecode[?]: /files/17IRIU9W/ESET_Smart_Security_v8.0.319.0_64Bit.zip_links ESET NOD32 Antivirus & ESET Internet Security & ESET Smart Security v10.1.210.0 English Repack Note: A Video To See How Repack Work Credit to @alfreire inno setup help ESET NOD32 Antivirus: 32Bit (Size: 96.2 MB) Site: http://www.mirrorcreator.com Sharecode[?]: /files/1RIKZKFB/ESET_NOD32_Antivirus_v10.1.210.0_32Bit_Repack.zip_links 64Bit (Size: 99.2 MB) Site: http://www.mirrorcreator.com Sharecode[?]: /files/PCNKM6RX/ESET_NOD32_Antivirus_v10.1.210.0_64Bit_Repack.zip_links ESET Internet Security 32Bit (Size: 103 MB) Site: http://www.mirrorcreator.com Sharecode[?]: /files/WMQQXZO7/ESET_Internet_Security_v10.1.210.0_32Bit_Repack.zip_links 64Bit (Size: 107 MB) Site: http://www.mirrorcreator.com Sharecode[?]: /files/0YHTQABB/ESET_Internet_Security_v10.1.210.0_64Bit_Repack.zip_links ESET Smart Security 32Bit (Size: 104 MB) Site: http://www.mirrorcreator.com Sharecode[?]: /files/0XJALO6E/ESET_Smart_Security_v10.1.210.0_32Bit_Repack.zip_links 64Bit (Size: 108 MB) Site: http://www.mirrorcreator.com Sharecode[?]: /files/0HSYKKCH/ESET_Smart_Security_v10.1.210.0_64Bit_Repack.zip_links Additional info for v10:
  3. Target settles with 47 states Target has reached a settlement with the Attorneys General of 47 states regarding the data breach it suffered in 2013, agreeing to pay a mere $18.5 million. The Attorneys General who led the investigation - for Illinois and Connecticut - will determine how much each state will receive. The money will be used for various purposes, like covering attorney fees and investigation costs. The settlement also states that Target will implement an information security program, as the company has promised to take both administrative and technical measures to properly secure its systems and customer data. More security The company will also have to make sure it separates card data from the rest of the network, so it is kept safe in case of another data breach. It also has to implement two-factor authentication, run proper encryption policies and so on. Furthermore, the company has to hire a third-party to conduct a cyber security assessment. The company also has to make sure it properly vets the vendors to make sure they comply with its information security program, especially since the 2013 data breach happened after cybercriminals gained access to its systems via an HVAC contractor. Back in 2013, Target was the victim of a data breach where about 70 million payment cards were compromised, alongside the personal data of about 110 million customers. Target has estimated that the breach cost it $290 million thus far, including payments made to Visa card issuers, banks and credit unions, MasterCard card issuers and affected consumers. With this most recent settlement, it seems that Target is closer to finally finish dealing with the aftermath of this security breach. Over the years, there have been numerous security breaches and all companies have had to pay quite a lot of money to compensate for the lack of security. Perhaps seeing how much Target has paid will push other companies to better secure their networks so they don't have to face the same scenario. Source
  4. DISCLAIMER: This post is for hypothetical discussion only. With police and border control having increasingly broad powers to search people's electronic devices, how long before we see malware developed as a security service? Given that it is already possible to create infected usb drives that execute code as soon as they are plugged in to a PC, how difficult would it be to design something that infects any device trying to read a phone or tablet?
  5. I think everyobdy knows now that what's going on in the world by the name of wanacry. My friends have been the victims of this too. So just wondering if there're more here? And also if some can can help prevent it? Tips?
  6. Mine is extremely light, but undoubtedly powerful. Here is my setup: Defensewall ShadowDefender Keyscrambler Sandboxie (custom rules) (A2, SAS, MBAM used rarely, on demand)
  7. VMware fixed two bugs in its VMware Workstation late Thursday night, including an insecure library loading vulnerability and a NULL pointer dereference vulnerability. The virtualization software company warned of the issues Thursday night in a security advisory VMSA-2017-0009. Jann Horn, a security researcher for Google Project Zero who’s previously uncovered bugs in Xen’s hypervisor and the Linux kernel, found the library loading vulnerability in VMware’s Workstation Pro/Player product. The vulnerability (CVE-2017-4915) is tied to the loading of Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) files. ALSA, a software framework and part of the Linux kernel, facilitates APIs for sound card driver files. If an attacker exploited the issue successfully they could be able to escalate their privileges to root in a Linux host machine, the advisory warns. The update also fixes a NULL pointer dereference vulnerability (CVE-2017-4916) in a virtual storage volume driver, vstor2. If exploited the bug, discovered by Borja Merino, a security researcher based in Spain, could allow host users with normal user privileges to trigger a denial of service in a Windows host machine. VMware is urging customers to update to the most recent version, 12.5.6, to mitigate both issues. It’s the ninth security advisory VMware has issued this year. Last month the company fixed a remote code execution vulnerability in its vCenter Server platform that could have been exploited via BlazeDS. It also fixed several critical vulnerabilities in its Unified Access Gateway, Horizon View and Workstation products. Most of those vulnerabilities stemmed from issues in Cortado ThinPrint, a protocol that compresses print data and exists in VMware’s Workstation and Horizon Client platforms. Attackers could have exploited the bugs via integer overflow and out of bounds read/write vulnerabilities in JPEG2000 and TrueType fonts. Article source
  8. When, in January 2017, Mozilla and Google made Firefox and Chrome flag HTTP login pages as insecure, the intent was to make phishing pages easier to recognize, as well as push more website owners towards deploying HTTPS. But while the latter aim was achieved, and the number of phishing sites making use of HTTPS has increased noticeably, the move also had one unintended consequence: the number of phishing sites with HTTPS has increased, too. “While the majority of today’s phishing sites still use the unencrypted HTTP protocol, a threefold increase in HTTPS phishing sites over just a few months is quite significant,” noted Netcraft’s Paul Mutton. One explanation may be that fraudsters have begun setting up more phishing sites that use secure HTTPS connections. Another may be that they have simply continued compromising websites to set up the phishing pages, but as more legitimate sites began using HTTPS, more phishing pages ended up having HTTPS. Finally, it’s possible that fraudsters are intentionally compromising HTTPS sites so that their phishing login pages look more credible. Whatever the reason – and it might simply be a combination of them all – the change made some phishing attempts even more effective. And so the battle between attackers and defenders continues. Article source
  9. uBlock Origin 1.12.5b3 Changes Refactoring of static filtering engine: to be more modular and hence make it easier to extent filter syntax to lessen overhead overall to address #2598 to extend filter syntax to support csp= filter option See #1930 (comment). This is an important refactoring and thus I want to make these changes available as soon as possible so that possible regression bugs can found. At first my intention was to add support for csp= filter syntax, but this required some refactoring, and while at it I decided to address a lot of other details regarding static filtering engine which I meant to address since a while, hence the extent of the changes to the code. Downloads 1.7 MB uBlock0.chromium.zip 1.59 MB uBlock0.firefox.xpi 1.71 MB uBlock0.webext.xpi Source code (zip) Source code (tar.gz) https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock/releases/tag/1.12.5b3
  10. Intel’s CPUs have another Intel inside. Since 2008, most of Intel’s chipsets have contained a tiny homunculus computer called the “Management Engine” (ME). The ME is a largely undocumented master controller for your CPU: it works with system firmware during boot and has direct access to system memory, the screen, keyboard, and network. All of the code inside the ME is secret, signed, and tightly controlled by Intel. Last week, vulnerabilities in the Active Management (AMT) module in some Management Engines have caused lots of machines with Intel CPUs to be disastrously vulnerable to remote and local attackers. While AMT can be disabled, there is presently no way to disable or limit the Management Engine in general. Intel urgently needs to provide one. This post will describe the nature of the vulnerabilities (thanks to Matthew Garrett for documenting them well), and the potential for similar bugs in the future. EFF believes that Intel needs to provide a minimum level of transparency and user control of the Management Engines inside our computers, in order to prevent this cybersecurity disaster from recurring. Unless that happens, we are concerned that it may not be appropriate to use Intel CPUs in many kinds of critical infrastructure systems. What is AMT? How is it vulnerable? On many Intel chips, the Management Engine is shipped with the AMT module installed. It is intended to allow system administrators to remotely control the machines used by an organization and its employees. A vulnerability announced on May 1 allows an attacker to bypass password authentication for this remote management module, meaning that in many situations remote attackers can acquire the same capabilities as an organization’s IT team, if active management was enabled and provisioned.1 Once they have AMT access, attackers can interact with the screen or console as if the user were doing so themselves. Attackers can also boot arbitrary OSes, install a new OS, and (with some work) steal disk encryption passwords.2 Not every machine is susceptible to the attack. For it to work, AMT has to have been both enabled and provisioned (commonly AMT is enabled but not provisioned by default). Once provisioned, AMT has a password set, and is listening for network packets and will control the system in response to those.3 It can be provisioned by default if vendors used a feature called “Remote Configuration” with OEM Setup, by a user with administrative access, interactively or with a USB stick during system boot, or (via the LMS vulnerability) by unprivileged users on Windows systems with LMS. Macs have MEs, but don’t ship with AMT at all. The password protection is crucial for machines with AMT provisioned, but this week’s vulnerability allowed it to be bypassed. How can users protect themselves? Many organizations will need to take steps to protect themselves by ensuring that AMT is disabled in their BIOS and LMS is not installed, or by updating Intel firmware. Unfortunately, even if AMT is currently disabled, that doesn’t mean an attack was never possible—an attacker might have disabled AMT after concluding the attack, to close the door on their way out. But troublingly, AMT is only one of many services/modules that come preinstalled on Management Engines. The best recommendation we can make for addressing this vulnerability today is to disable that specific AMT module, because Intel doesn’t provide any way to generally limit the power of the ME. But vulnerabilities in any of the other modules could be as bad, if not worse, for security. Some of the other modules include hardware-based authentication code and a system for location tracking and remote wiping of laptops for anti-theft purposes. While these may be useful to some people, it should be up to hardware owners to decide if this code will be installed in their computers or not. Perhaps most alarmingly, there is also reportedly a DRM module that is actively working against the user’s interests, and should never be installed in an ME by default. For expert users on machines without Verified Boot, a Github project called ME cleaner exists and can be used to disable a Management Engine. But be warned: using this tool has the potential to brick hardware, and interested parties should exercise caution before attempting to protect their systems. A real solution is going to require assistance from Intel. What Intel needs to do fix this mess Users need the freedom to choose what they want running on their system, and the ability to remove code that might contain vulnerabilities. Because the Management Engine only runs code modules signed by Intel, this means having a way to disable the ME or reflash it with minimal, auditable firmware. While Intel may put a lot of effort into hunting for security bugs, vulnerabilities will inevitably exist, and having them lurking in a highly privileged, low level component with no OS visibility or reliable logging is a nightmare for defensive cybersecurity. The design choice of putting a secretive, unmodifiable management chip in every computer was terrible, and leaving their customers exposed to these risks without an opt-out is an act of extreme irresponsibility. What would be best for users and for the public’s ability to control machines that they have purchased would be for Intel to provide official support for reducing the attack surface to limit the potential harm of the ME. So we call upon Intel to: Provide clear documentation for the software modules that are preinstalled on various Management Engines. What HECI commands provide a full list of the installed modules/services? What are the interfaces to those services? Provide a way for their customers to audit ME code for vulnerabilities. That is presently impossible because the code is kept secret. Offer a supported way to disable the ME. If that’s literally impossible, users should be able to flash an absolutely minimal, community-auditable ME firmware image. On systems where the ME is an essential requirement for other security features that are important to some users (like Boot Guard), offer an additional option of a near-minimal, community-auditable ME firmware image that performs these security functions, and nothing else. Or alternatively, a supported way to build and flash firmware images where the user can inspect and control which services/modules are present, in order to manage security risks from those modules. Until Intel takes these steps, we have reason to fear that the undocumented master controller inside our Intel chips could continue to be a source of serious vulnerabilities in personal computers, servers, and critical cybersecurity and physical infrastructure. Intel needs to act quickly to provide the community with an auditable solution to these threats. Correction 2017-05-12: Intel has contacted us with two corrections to the details of this post. (1) Management Engines are not physically located on the CPU die itself, but in other parts of Intel's chipsets; (2) the LMS-based local privilege escalation was a second consequence of the first code vulnerability, rather than a second vulnerability or bug of its own. We have accordingly edited the language of this post in a couple of places, but do not believe these updates affect its conclusions. Article source
  11. uBlock Origin 1.12.5b1 Changes Refactoring of static filtering engine: to be more modular and hence make it easier to extent filter syntax to lessen overhead overall to address #2598 to extend filter syntax to support csp= filter option See #1930 (comment). This is an important refactoring and thus I want to make these changes available as soon as possible so that possible regression bugs can found. At first my intention was to add support for csp= filter syntax, but this required some refactoring, and while at it I decided to address a lot of other details regarding static filtering engine which I meant to address since a while, hence the extent of the changes to the code. I won't be pushing this revision to the dev channel channel of uBO on AMO until the changes here are committed into the master branch (they are currently committed in the csp branch) Downloads 1.68 MB uBlock0.chromium.zip 1.56 MB uBlock0.firefox.xpi 1.68 MB uBlock0.webext.xpi Source code (zip) Source code (tar.gz) https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock/releases/tag/1.12.5b1
  12. A new strain of ransomware has recently been discovered, which employs old tactics by cybercriminals, but still takes advantage of the rapid rise of the value of Bitcoin. Dubbed "Jaff", the malware was detected by MalwareHunterTeam. It was found to be distributed via the Necurs botnet, which is an infamous distributor of malware like Locky, which it closely resembles. Like many ransomware, it employs the classic technique of sending spam emails that are designed to look important to the receiver. Macro used as decoy by cybercriminals | via Malwarebytes Labs A PDF file will be downloaded, which will subsequently open a .docm Word file. At this point, the document will ask the receiver to click "Enable Content" to reveal the message. However, doing so will start the file's dirty work. According to BleepingComputer, it will begin to gather information about the user, and then execute a number of files. Moreover, once the Jaff installer is executed, this will start the encryption process, which will lock a large number of files, appending ".jaff" to all of them, preventing proper access. Once this process is done, a lock screen will be displayed, asking victims to go to a Tor website to find out how they can decrypt their files. The ransomware is demanding for 2 bitcoins, which is currently equal to roughly $3,600. Unfortunately, in an analysis conducted by Fabian Wosar of Emsisoft, there is no known way of decrypting infected files without paying a ransom. Many ransomware variants are known to exploit Word/Excel macros, as cybercriminals can easily make receivers believe that a sensitive document has been sent to them, making it easy to enable the content and launch the doom within. Despite this, this ransomware is a good reminder to be careful of our activities on the internet, as cybercriminals are now getting more creative to trap victims, aiming to drain them of their hard-earned money. Source
  13. WIKILEAKS founder Julian Assange has condemned the CIA as “one of the most useless organisations in the world”. By SIMON OSBORNE 17:04, Tue, May 9, 2017 | UPDATED: 18:54, Tue, May 9, 2017 http://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/1/590x/Julian-Assange-802360.jpg Mr Assange, declared by the Donald Trump administration as US public enemy number one, was speaking ahead of a live Spanish television interview. He told current affairs show When It’s Gone: “The CIA is basically useless. They are extremely incompetent as an organisation. good read continued: http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/802360/Wikileaks-founder-Julian-Assange-slams-US-intelligence-chiefs-CIA
  14. Though Encryption is not a new topic, you might have heard it online, while doing purchases, etc. Whats App messages are protected with end-to-end encryption. Your credit card details, id& password, payment information are transferred over an encrypted network. You might have already read these things on various sites and services. So, every time you read about or heard of encryption, what was the first thing that came to your mind? Most of the people would think that encryption is complex, has something to do with security and only computer programmers or geeks can understand it. But it is not that complicated you might be thinking right now. I mean the encryption techniques you may find hard to understand but the basic essence of encryption and decryption is very simple. So, What is Encryption? In simple words, Encryption is the process of encoding a data in such a way that only intended or authorized recipient can decode it. Encryption does not secure the data but it makes your data un-readable to other parties. Which means, even if an unauthorized person or hacker is able to read the network he/she won’t be able to make any sense out of it without the correct decryption key. The science of encryption and decryption is called cryptography. Why is Encryption important? In today’s scenario, we perform a lot of data exchange online. When much of your personal information and financial transactions are processed via the Internet, no business or individual can afford to get their data stolen. Not only the financial data or business files, even the messages we exchanged with our friends, the photos/files shared with family or emails sent to our clients, we need encryption for all of these data. Cybercrime is already at its peak. Nothing is really safe. We witness cases of identity theft on daily basis. Keeping your personal data secure while using the system or at your end can be done. But when the same information is sent over the Internet, you want that information to be only viewed by the particular person and no one else. The data is first sent to the local network and then travels to Internet Service Provider. Finally, a person for whom the information was meant for, finally receives it. Meanwhile, there are numerous of people who can access your information that you are sending. That is the reason why encryption is important. Individuals use it to protect personal information, businesses use it to protect corporate secrets and government uses it to secure classified information. Basic Encryption Techniques For Network Security You Should Know About The strength of encryption is measured by its key size. No matter how strong encryption algorithm is being used, the encrypted data can be subjected to brute force attacks. There are some basic encryption techniques that are used by online services and websites that you should know about. 1. AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) Advanced Encryption Standard is a symmetric encryption technique. Symmetric encryption means it involves secret key that could be a number, word or a string of random letters which is known to both sender and receiver. This secret key is applied to messages in a particular way after which the data becomes encrypted. As long as the sender and recipient know the secret key, encryption and decryption can be performed. AES is extremely efficient in 128-bit form and it uses 192 and 256 bits for encryption purposes. In present day cryptography, AES is widely supported in hardware and software with a built-in flexibility of key length. The security with AES is assured if and only if it is implemented correctly with the employment of good key management. AES-256 bit is a very heavy and strong encryption. Most of the governments use it. 2. Blowfish Encryption Blowfish is symmetric cipher technique ideal for domestic and exportable purpose as this symmetric cipher splits messages into blocks of 64 bit each and then encrypts them individually. Blowfish encryption technique can be used as a drop-in replacement for DES. The technique takes variable length key varying from 32 bits to 448 bits. Blowfish is found in software categories ranging from e-commerce platform from security passwords to various password management tools. It is one the most flexible encryption methods available. 3. RSA Encryption The Rivest Shamir Adleman (RSA) encryption technique is one of the most popular and secure public key encryption methods. This public key encryption technique is also known as asymmetric cryptography that uses two keys, one public and one private. In RSA encryption technique, both public and private key can be used to encrypt the message. But for the decryption of the message, the opposite key that has been used for encryption will be used. Most of the times, the data is encrypted with public key and decrypte using the private key. RSA encryption method assures the confidentiality, authenticity, integrity and non-reputability of electronic communication and data storage. 4. Triple DES Encryption Triple DES encryption method is a more secure procedure of encryption as the encryption is done three times. Triple DES encryption technique takes three keys each of 64bit, so overall key length is 192bis. The data is encrypted with the first key, decrypted with the second key and then again encrypted with the third key. The procedure of decryption is somewhat same as the procedure included in encryption expect that it is executed in reverse. 5. Twofish Encryption Twofish is a symmetric block cipher method, in which single key is used for encryption and decryption. Twofish could be the best choice when among AES techniques as this encryption technique is unique in terms of speed, flexibility, and conservative design. Twofish is new encryption technique which is highly secure and flexible. This encryption technique works extremely well with large microprocessors, dedicated hardware, and 8-bit or 32-bit card processors. Also, twofish encryption technique can be used in network applications where keys tend to change frequently and in various applications with little or no ROM or RAM available. 6. DES Encryption Data Encryption Standard (DES) is symmetric block cipher which uses 56-bit key to encrypt and decrypt 64-bit block of data. The Same key is used to encrypt and decrypt the message, so both the sender and the receiver should know how to use the same private key. DES has been suspended by more secure and advanced AES encryption technique and triple DES encryption techniques. 7. IDEA Encryption International Data Encryption Algorithm (IDEA) is another block cipher encryption technique that uses 52 sub keys, each 16-bit long. This technique was used in pretty good privacy version 2. Conclusion Encryption is a standard method for making a communication private. The sender encrypts the message before sending it to another user. Only the intended recipient knows how to decrypt the message. Even if someone was eavesdropping over the communication would only know about the encrypted messages, but not how to decrypt the message successfully. Thus in order to ensure the privacy in electronic communication, various encryption techniques and methods are used. As with the growth of electronic commerce and Internet, the issue of privacy has forefront in electronic communication. In this era of internet, where every kind of data is transferred in digital format, it is important that we know how our data is transferred, saved and used. Everyone must know about these basic encryption techniques. You can share this information with your friends and family to make them aware of encryption techniques. Article source
  15. Tails 3.0 Anonymous Live OS Enters Beta, Ships with Linux 4.9 and GNOME 3.22 It will only work on 64-bit desktop and laptop computers The next version of the Tails 2.x series will be 2.11, currently scheduled for launch in early March, but it looks like the development of the Tails 3.0 major release continues in the background, and now users can get their hands on the Beta build. Tails 3.0 Beta comes two and a half months after the Alpha milestone released last year in November, when the project's developers announced that they would drop support for 32-bit systems, allowing the amnesic incognito live system to run only on 64-bit PCs. As usual, we took the Beta version of Tails 3.0 for a test drive to see what's new, and we can report that it's based on the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system and it's powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.9 kernel. GNOME 3.22 is the default desktop environment with redesigned Greeter However, probably the coolest new features of Tails 3.0 is the revamped Tails Greeter, a small dialog that will pop-up when you run the live system for the first time on your computer, helping you set up the default language, keyboard layout, formats, and other settings. Of course, Tails 3.0 will come pre-installed with all the anonymity tools that you love, including the recently introduced OnionShare utility for anonymous file sharing. The latest Tor and Tor Browser applications are also included to keep your identity safe from hackers and hide from government agencies. Numerous bugs have been squashed in this new pre-release version of Tails 3.0, but many known issues remain unresolved, and you can read all about them before jumping on the beta testing bandwagon in the official release notes. Without further ado, you can download the Tails 3.0 Beta Live ISO image right now, write it on a USB flash drive, and take it for a test drive on your modern, 64-bit computer. If you decide to stick with it, please keep in mind that it's a pre-release version, not suitable for production use, despite the fact that it will receive security updates. Source
  16. Windscribe VPN 1.70 Build 3 Stable Internet As It Should Be Windscribe is a desktop application and browser extension that work together to block ads and trackers, restore access to blocked content and help you safeguard your privacy online. Learn More. What's New: https://blog.windscribe.com/windscribe-1-7-changelog-8afa50f3b297 We’ve been working on this version for quite a while, existing installations should prompt you to update the app over the next 48 hrs. Here is what’s new. Changelog: Added city level location selection Added Automatic Connection mode Added support for 22 languages Added custom TAP adapter Added “Ignore SSL Errors” option Added notifications when firewall is ON and application not connected Added “Advanced Parameters” screen Added EULA to the installer Added IPv6 connectivity disable button, to prevent WebRTC leaks over IPv6 in some situations Added Touch support Added Beta channel Fixed auto-start bug on some systems Fixed Internet connectivity check Fixed persistent session storage Fixed API connectivity on restrictive networks Fixed unquoted service path Fixed disappearing Best Location Fixed WSD port connectivity while firewall is ON Fixed PlayStation UPNP connectivity while firewall is ON Fixed reconnection bug on computer wake up on some systems Changed the Preferences screens Changed the connecting spinner animation Downloads: Windscribe for Your Computer: Windscribe for Your Browser: Windscribe for Your Phone: Windscribe for Your Router:
  17. Bitdefender 2017 Build 21.0.25.84 Overview: The Bitdefender proprietary technologies, based on innovative ideas and leading trends in the information security industry, continue to be internationally recognized as the best Internet security software. The independent organizations which reward BitDefender outstanding results through numerous prizes and certifications are: Av-Test.org, Virus Bulletin, ICSA Lab, Checkmark, PC World Top 100, just to name but a few. Homepage: https://www.bitdefender.com/ Changelog: https://forum.bitdefender.com/index.php?/topic/75881-latest-changelog/ A new Bitdefender Classic Line product update has been released with the following details: Affected software: Bitdefender Total Security 2017 Bitdefender Internet Security 2017 Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2017 Platform: x86, x64 Version: 21.0.25.84 This version fixes the following issues: • Rare issue where the Virus Shield would report a invalid current state 0 • Rare issue where the interface would go transparent while connected via RDP • Firewall crash caused by late BFE startup • Widget not saving its position after reboot The following improvements were included: • Added support for Korean and Vietnamese • Product interface fixes and improvements • Interface functionality • Rescue mode changed to Rescue Environment under Windows 10 • SafePay's ability to handle foreign languages • FileShreder engine functionality • Event engine functionality • Update engine functionality • Agent's functionality • Wallet's compatibility with several websites • Wallet's ability to handle browser extensions • Product stability KB is unavailable at this time. Downloads: Online Installers: Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2017 21.0.25.84 Online: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/bitdefender_antivirus.exe XP | Vista: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/xp-vista/bitdefender_antivirus.exe Bitdefender Internet Security 2017 21.0.25.84 Online: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/bitdefender_isecurity.exe XP | Vista: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/xp-vista/bitdefender_isecurity.exe Bitdefender Total Security 2017 21.0.25.84 Online: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/bitdefender_tsecurity.exe XP | Vista: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/xp-vista/bitdefender_tsecurity.exe Offline Installers and Install Guide: Bitdefender 2017 Offline Installation Guide:
  18. IObit AMC Security Pro(Clean & Boost) for Android - 6 Months[180 Days] Promo by SharewareOnSale Links: Offer: https://apkpure.com/topic/giveaway-amc-security-pro Shared Key: Note: Limited Period Offer. Expires by 10:00 (Moscow time) May 4, 2017. Current Status: Open. Terms - SharewareOnSale: This is a 1-user multi-device 6-month license, for non-commercial use. You get free upgrades for six months. You get free tech support for six months. You must activate the license key before this offer ends. May not be resold. Overview: Product Homepage Downloads: https://apkpure.com/amc-security-clean-boost/com.iobit.mobilecare/ (or) https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.iobit.mobilecare&hl=en
  19. Bitdefender 2017 Build 21.0.25.80 Overview: The Bitdefender proprietary technologies, based on innovative ideas and leading trends in the information security industry, continue to be internationally recognized as the best Internet security software. The independent organizations which reward BitDefender outstanding results through numerous prizes and certifications are: Av-Test.org, Virus Bulletin, ICSA Lab, Checkmark, PC World Top 100, just to name but a few. Homepage: https://www.bitdefender.com/ Changelog: https://forum.bitdefender.com/index.php?/topic/75881-latest-changelog/ A new Bitdefender Classic Line product update has been released with the following details: Affected software: Bitdefender Total Security 2017 Bitdefender Internet Security 2017 Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2017 Platform: x86, x64 Version: 21.0.25.80 This version fixes the following issues: • Rare issue where the Virus Shield would report a invalid current state 0 • Rare issue where the interface would go transparent while connected via RDP • Firewall crash caused by late BFE startup • Widget not saving its position after reboot The following improvements were included: • Added support for Korean and Vietnamese • Product interface fixes and improvements • Interface functionality • Rescue mode changed to Rescue Environment under Windows 10 • SafePay's ability to handle foreign languages • FileShreder engine functionality • Event engine functionality • Update engine functionality • Agent's functionality • Wallet's compatibility with several websites • Wallet's ability to handle browser extensions KB is unavailable at this time. Downloads: Online Installers: Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2017 21.0.25.80 Online: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/bitdefender_antivirus.exe XP | Vista: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/xp-vista/bitdefender_antivirus.exe Bitdefender Internet Security 2017 21.0.25.80 Online: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/bitdefender_isecurity.exe XP | Vista: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/xp-vista/bitdefender_isecurity.exe Bitdefender Total Security 2017 21.0.25.80 Online: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/bitdefender_tsecurity.exe XP | Vista: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/xp-vista/bitdefender_tsecurity.exe Offline Installers and Install Guide: Bitdefender 2017 Offline Installation Guide:
  20. uBlock Origin 1.12.3b1 Closed as fixed: Firefox Unable to access logger/dashboard from popup upon session restore Core GUI "gear" Blocked by Temporary Elements Punycode phishing attack detection Potentially ambiguous base domain names in the popup panel will be labelled idn (as in "Internationalized Domain Name"), to inform the user that the domain name contains Cyrillic characters which could be confused with some ASCII characters. Further reading: IDN homograph attack. Tabnapping prevention More longer timeout time Better handling of timeout conditions for slow connections. Add adblock-iran filter list to regional lists Downloads 1.67 MB uBlock0.chromium.zip 1.56 MB uBlock0.firefox.xpi 1.67 MB uBlock0.webext.xpi Source code (zip) Source code (tar.gz) https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock/releases/tag/1.12.3b1
  21. Proton VPN 0.9.7 Beta Overview: ProtonVPN is designed from the ground up with a special emphasis on security and privacy, and features a number of innovations that we have made to harden VPN against compromises. ProtonVPN will eventually feature free and premium versions containing different features. For the beta period, you will be able to test the full-fledged premium version of ProtonVPN for free. Layers of Protection: Limitation / blocking access to the data / application Isolation and create a separate database / application Backup / important data Detecting and deleting viruses / malware. Proton Mail announced beta VPN service for PLUS proton mail users. At this moment, Proton VPN offers 13 countries with 4/IP Australia Canada France Germany Hong Kong Iceland Japan Netherlands Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States More Info: Official Product Homepage / Detailed Features: https://protonvpn.com/home Official Website: https://protonvpn.com/ About Us: https://protonvpn.com/about Blog: https://protonvpn.com/blog/ ProtonVPN is still a work in progress, and we will be releasing more details over the next couple months about what makes ProtonVPN different. You can follow ProtonVPN on social media to get the latest news and updates: Facebook: https://facebook.com/ProtonVPN Twitter: https://twitter.com/ProtonVPN We would love to hear your feedback on the beta and what we can do to improve ProtonVPN. In addition to the links above, you can also send your suggestions to [email protected] If you run into trouble with ProtonVPN, or have questions, you can search for answers or contact us via the ProtonVPN support site: https://protonvpn.com/support/ Screenshots: Downloads: Stability Advisory: This is a "beta" software release which contains known bugs. Download: https://protonvpn.com/download/ Windows Client: https://protonvpn.com/download/ProtonVPN_win_v0.9.7.exe Clients for macOS, Linux, Android, and iOS are still under development, but it is still possible to use ProtonVPN with these operating systems using third-party OpenVPN clients. Setup guides can be found here: MacOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/mac-vpn-setup/ Linux: https://protonvpn.com/support/linux-vpn-setup/ Android: https://protonvpn.com/support/android-vpn-setup/ iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/ios-vpn-setup/ VPN Servers and Country Code for Linux, Mac, Android and iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/vpn-servers/
  22. Proton VPN 0.9.6 Beta Overview: ProtonVPN is designed from the ground up with a special emphasis on security and privacy, and features a number of innovations that we have made to harden VPN against compromises. ProtonVPN will eventually feature free and premium versions containing different features. For the beta period, you will be able to test the full-fledged premium version of ProtonVPN for free. Layers of Protection: Limitation / blocking access to the data / application Isolation and create a separate database / application Backup / important data Detecting and deleting viruses / malware. Proton Mail announced beta VPN service for PLUS proton mail users. At this moment, Proton VPN offers 13 countries with 4/IP Australia Canada France Germany Hong Kong Iceland Japan Netherlands Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States More Info: Official Product Homepage / Detailed Features: https://protonvpn.com/home Official Website: https://protonvpn.com/ About Us: https://protonvpn.com/about Blog: https://protonvpn.com/blog/ ProtonVPN is still a work in progress, and we will be releasing more details over the next couple months about what makes ProtonVPN different. You can follow ProtonVPN on social media to get the latest news and updates: Facebook: https://facebook.com/ProtonVPN Twitter: https://twitter.com/ProtonVPN We would love to hear your feedback on the beta and what we can do to improve ProtonVPN. In addition to the links above, you can also send your suggestions to [email protected] If you run into trouble with ProtonVPN, or have questions, you can search for answers or contact us via the ProtonVPN support site: https://protonvpn.com/support/ Screenshots: Downloads: Stability Advisory: This is a "beta" software release which contains known bugs. Download: https://protonvpn.com/download/ Windows Client: https://protonvpn.com/download/ProtonVPN_win_v0.9.6.exe Clients for macOS, Linux, Android, and iOS are still under development, but it is still possible to use ProtonVPN with these operating systems using third-party OpenVPN clients. Setup guides can be found here: MacOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/mac-vpn-setup/ Linux: https://protonvpn.com/support/linux-vpn-setup/ Android: https://protonvpn.com/support/android-vpn-setup/ iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/ios-vpn-setup/ VPN Servers and Country Code for Linux, Mac, Android and iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/vpn-servers/
  23. Until everybody and their dog eventually replaces passwords, the long-running log-in security feature is here to stay. That said, there are ways in which you can decrease the likelihood of your account being compromised by an attacker. One way is two-factor authentication, which sends a code to a different device, a code which you need to input along with your password to log into the account. A bug related to this security feature was just revealed to have been fixed by password management service provider, LastPass. Back in February, a security researcher at Salesforce, Martin Vigo, privately disclosed a bug to LastPass, via the company's bug bounty problem. The issue itself has to do with people using Google Authenticator as an extra security measure on their LastPass vaults. The server-side bug meant that if the user was logged into LastPass and was then lured to a "nefarious website", Google Authenticator could be bypassed entirely. Vigo recently detailed the process on his blog. Of course, LastPass continues to recommend users stay vigilant at all times and outlines a few safe practices: Beware of phishing attacks. Do not click on links from people you don’t know, or that seem out of character from your trusted contacts and companies. Never reuse your LastPass master password and never disclose it to anyone, including us. Use different, unique passwords for every online account. Two-factor authentication remains the most effective way to protect your account. Always enable 2FA for LastPass and other services like your bank, email, Twitter, Facebook, etc. Keep a clean machine by running antivirus and keeping your software up-to-date. If you find any issues, LastPass encourages you to contact them using their bug bounty program. Article source
  24. Nvidia GeForce Experience Node.js security vulnerability Sec Consult security researchers discovered a vulnerability in Nvidia's GeForce Experience software that allows attackers to bypass Windows application whitelisting. Nvidia's GeForce Experience is a program that Nvidia installs by default in its driver packages. The program, initially designed to provide users with good configurations for computer games so that they run better on user systems, has been blown up since then by Nvidia. The software checks for driver updates now, and may install those, and it enforces registration before its other functionality becomes available. What's interesting about it is that it is not needed for making use of the graphics card, and that the video card works equally fine without it. Nvidia GeForce Experience installs a node.js server on the system when it is installed. The file is not called node.js, but NVIDIA Web Helper.exe, and it is located under %ProgramFiles(x86)%\NVIDIA Corporation\NvNode\ by default. Nvidia renamed Node.js to NVIDIA Web Helper.exe and signed it. What this means is that Node.js is installed on the majority of systems with Nvidia graphics cards, considering that drivers are installed automatically and not using the custom install option. Tip: Only install the Nvidia driver components that you need, and disable Nvidia Streamer Services and other Nvidia processes, Whitelisting allows administrators to define programs and processes that may run on an operating system. Microsoft AppLocker is a popular whitelisting solution to improve security on Windows PCs. Administrators may improve security further by using signatures to enforce code and script integrity. The latter is supported by Windows 10 and windows Server 2016 with Microsoft Device Guard for instance. The security researchers found two possibilities to exploit Nvidia's NVIDIA Web Helper.exe application: Use Node.js directly to interact with Windows APIs. Load executable code "into the node.js process" to run malicious code. Since the process is signed, it will bypass any reputation-based checks by default. From attacker perspective, this opens two possibilities. Either use node.js to directly interact with the Windows API (e.g. to disable application whitelisting or reflectively load an executable into the node.js process to run the malicious binary on behalf of the signed process) or to write the complete malware with node.js. Both options have the advantage, that the running process is signed and therefore bypasses anti-virus systems (reputation-based algorithms) per default. How to resolve the issue Probably the best option right now is to uninstall the Nvidia GeForce Experience client from the operating system. First thing you may want to do is make sure that a system is vulnerable. Open the folder %ProgramFiles(x86)%\NVIDIA Corporation\ on the Windows PC and check if the directory NvNode exists. If it does, open the directory. Find the file Nvidia Web Helper.exe in the directory. Right-click on the file afterwards, and select properties. When the properties window opens, switch to details. There you should see the original file name and product name. Once you have established that a Node.js server is indeed on the machine, it is time to remove it provided that Nvidia GeForce Experience is not required. You may use the Control Panel > Uninstall a Program applet for that, or if you use Windows 10 Settings > Apps > Apps & features. Either way, Nvidia GeForce Experience is listed as a separate program installed on the system. Uninstall the Nvidia GeForce Experience program from your system. If you check the program folder afterwards again, you will notice that the entire NvNode folder is no longer on the system. Source
  25. uBlock Origin 1.12.3b0 Closed as fixed: Punycode phishing attack detection Potentially ambiguous base domain names in the popup panel will be labelled idn (as in "Internationalized Domain Name"), to inform the user that the domain name contains Cyrillic characters which could be confused with some ASCII characters. Further reading: IDN homograph attack. More longer timeout time Better handling of timeout conditions for slow connections. Downloads 1.67 MB uBlock0.chromium.zip 1.56 MB uBlock0.firefox.xpi 1.68 MB uBlock0.webext.xpi Source code (zip) Source code (tar.gz) https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock/releases/tag/1.12.3b0