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  1. protonvpn

    Proton VPN 1.0.3 Overview: ProtonVPN is designed from the ground up with a special emphasis on security and privacy, and features a number of innovations that we have made to harden VPN against compromises. ProtonVPN will eventually feature free and premium versions containing different features. For the beta period, you will be able to test the full-fledged premium version of ProtonVPN for free. Layers of Protection: Limitation / blocking access to the data / application Isolation and create a separate database / application Backup / important data Detecting and deleting viruses / malware. Proton Mail earlier announced beta VPN service for PLUS proton mail users. At this moment, Proton VPN offers 14 countries Australia Canada France Germany Hong Kong Iceland Japan Netherlands Singapore - New Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Standard Servers All of our servers are dedicated to ProtonVPN and feature high bandwidth connections Secure Core Servers Secure Core Servers add an additional layer of protection against VPN endpoint compromise. Learn More More Info: Official Product Homepage / Detailed Features: https://protonvpn.com/home Official Website: https://protonvpn.com/ Register/Signup: https://account.protonvpn.com/signup Login: https://account.protonvpn.com/login/ Pricing: https://protonvpn.com/pricing VPN Servers: https://protonvpn.com/vpn-servers Security: https://protonvpn.com/secure-vpn VPN Threat Model: https://protonvpn.com/blog/threat-model/ Transparency Report: https://protonvpn.com/blog/transparency-report/ About Us: https://protonvpn.com/about Blog: https://protonvpn.com/blog/ We are open for registration. You can follow ProtonVPN on social media to get the latest news and updates: Facebook: https://facebook.com/ProtonVPN Twitter: https://twitter.com/ProtonVPN Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/ProtonVPN/ We would love to hear your feedback on the beta and what we can do to improve ProtonVPN. In addition to the links above, you can also send your suggestions to [email protected] If you run into trouble with ProtonVPN, or have questions, you can search for answers or contact us via the ProtonVPN support site: https://protonvpn.com/support/ Screenshots: Downloads: Download: https://protonvpn.com/download/ Windows Client: https://protonvpn.com/download/ProtonVPN_win_v1.0.3.exe Clients for macOS, Linux, Android, and iOS are still under development, but it is still possible to use ProtonVPN with these operating systems using third-party OpenVPN clients. Setup guides can be found here: MacOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/mac-vpn-setup/ Linux: https://protonvpn.com/support/linux-vpn-setup/ Android: https://protonvpn.com/support/android-vpn-setup/ iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/ios-vpn-setup/ VPN Servers and Country Code for Linux, Mac, Android and iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/vpn-servers/ More Info - Articles & Reviews: Three years ago we launched ProtonMail. Today, we’re launching ProtonVPN. Encrypted email provider ProtonMail launches free VPN service to counter increasing online censorship ProtonVPN Swiss-Based VPN Launches
  2. ProtonVPN Swiss-Based VPN Launches ProtonVPN, a VPN service by the makers of the privacy focused ProtonMail email service, is out of beta testing and now available to the public. The creators of the Swiss-based VPN service promise the same level of trust, transparency, and communication that has been fundamental to the success of ProtonMail. ProtonVPN ships with four subscription plans, of which the first is entirely free. It is limited in regards to speed, devices that you may run it on simultaneously, and the number of countries you can connect to. It is not limited in terms of bandwidth however. The first paid plan, ProtonVPN Basic, is available for 4€ per month. It lets you connect to all servers, supports connections on two devices at the same time, and offers high speed. ProtonVPN has three speed tiers right now. Low for free accounts, high for basic accounts, and highest for the Plus and Visionary subscription. The two remaining plans, ProtonVPN Plus and Visionary, for €8 and €24 offer the highest speed, five or ten devices that you may connect from simultaneously, as well as extra features such as Plus servers reserved to these plans, Secure Core which adds extra protection against VPN compromise by routing through the Secure Core Network of ProtonVPN, and Tor Server support to send all traffic through Tor with a single click. The Visionary plan on top of that includes a ProtonMail email account on top of all that. Free users get an option to join a 7 day free trial of ProtonVPN Plus. Secure Core is an interesting option, as it routes traffic through multiple servers before it leaves the ProtonVPN network. This means that anyone monitoring the exit server won't be able to detect the IP address of ProtonVNP users, nor match browser activity to that IP address. Secure servers are located in Switzerland, Iceland and Sweden only. ProtonVPN encrypts all traffic with AES-256, uses 2048-bit RSA key exchange, and HMAC with SHA256 for message authentication. Other security related features that are supported include Forward Secrecy, use of OpenVPN and IKEv2 protocols only, a strict no logging policy, DNS leak prevention, and Kill switch support. ProtonVPN supports P2P traffic on top of that. ProtonVPN comes with clients for Android and iOS, Windows, Linux and Mac. Users of the service may also configure OpenVPN by downloading OpenVPN configuration files. ProtonVPN Windows client The ProtonVPN Windows client installs without issues. You need to supply your account credentials to start using it. It displays the current connection status, and the available locations you can connect to. Once you have established a connection with a click on a country, or one of the available servers, you see additional information in the interface. This includes the connected server, IP address, up and download speed, server load, a world map with information on the server location, and session information. As far as options are concerned: you can enable the VPN Kill Switch in the options, change the default protocol from UDP to TCP, and configure auto connect options. Another interesting feature of the ProtonVNP client for Windows is support for profiles. You can create profiles, and use these profiles to connect to specific servers quickly. This includes, connecting to the fastest available server of a country. Verdict ProtonVPN is one of the best, if not the best free VPN options right now, hands down. Since you are not limited in terms of bandwidth, you can use the free account all day and night long. That's good enough for all web browsing and low speed activities that you can run on your system. You should not expect to get enough bandwidth out of the free plan to stream in 4K or download very large files quickly, but that is to be expected of a free service. It remains to be seen how well the network will handle the onrush of new users who will certainly flock to the service now that it is out of beta and available to the public. ProtonVPN Plus and Visionary seem pricey, especially when compared to services that charge less for a lifetime subscription than ProtonVPN does for six months. Still, the extra privacy and security options are one of the best options that you have when it comes to maximum privacy on the Internet. Now You: Have you tried ProtonVPN? What's your take on the service? Source
  3. Three years ago we launched ProtonMail. Today, we’re launching ProtonVPN. We’re happy to announce that as of 12:00PM Geneva time today, ProtonVPN is now available to the general public. ProtonVPN is officially out of beta and we are allowing open signups for the first time. You can now directly get ProtonVPN by visiting https://protonvpn.com After more than 1 year of development, and four months of beta testing by over 10’000 members of the ProtonMail community, we’re finally making ProtonVPN available to everyone. And we really mean everyone, because consistent with our mission to make privacy and security accessible to every single person in the world, we’re also releasing ProtonVPN as a free VPN service. It has been a long and exciting journey to get here since our team first met at CERN in 2013. Back then, we had an ambitious vision to build an Internet that was free and could continue to reach its full potential as a tool for social progress. Indeed, that was the vision that inspired Tim Berners-Lee to create the World Wide Web at CERN in 1989. Since then, the Internet has met or even exceeded its promise in certain areas, but this has not come without a cost to society. While the Internet has done a great deal of good, over the course of this digital revolution, we have also lost control over our data, our most intimate secrets, and ultimately our privacy. In certain countries, the Internet has even become a tool for oppression and control, instead of the beacon of hope and freedom it once was. Back in 2013, we embarked on a journey to change this, by building the tools that could make privacy and security the default online. In 2014, on the 25th anniversary of the web, our efforts culminated with the release of ProtonMail, the world’s first end-to-end encrypted email service. Since then millions of people around the world have embraced our vision, and thanks to your support (and the numerous donations along the way), email is much safer today than it was several years ago. However, when considering the scope of all that we do online, email is just a small piece of the online world. That’s why we have decided to build ProtonVPN, to better protect the activists, journalists, and individuals who are currently using ProtonMail to secure their online lives. A VPN (Virtual Private Network) allows users to browse the web without being tracked, bypass online censorship blocks, and also increases security by passing all internet traffic through a strongly encrypted tunnel. The importance of VPNs for online security and privacy is increasing day by day. Back in April of this year, Obama-era FTC rules designed to protect the privacy of internet browsing history were rolled back. Fast forward to today, and attempts are being made to dismantle net neutrality in the US, and several European governments are now calling for increased online surveillance. Last but not least, for over 1.5 billion people around the world, the Internet does not live up to its promise of freedom of information. Instead, the Internet is a highly restricted and censored place, constantly under surveillance, where making a wrong move could lead to imprisonment or worse. We are also aware that as ProtonMail becomes a stronger force for digital freedom, the censorship of ProtonMail in certain countries is not a matter of if, but a matter of when. Earlier this year, we took the first steps to improve ProtonMail’s availability under censorship by launching an Onion site. With ProtonVPN, we can ensure the accessibility of not only ProtonMail, but all of the world’s digital knowledge and information. This is why we are committed to providing a free version of ProtonVPN. However, we have done more than make ProtonVPN free. We have also worked to make it the best VPN service ever created, by addressing many of the common pitfalls with VPNs. For example, ProtonVPN features a Secure Core architecture which routes traffic through multiple encrypted tunnels in multiple countries to better defend against network based attacks, and also features seamless integration with the Tor anonymity network. You can learn about all the steps we took to build a secure VPN here. Lastly, we’re building a VPN service that can be worthy of your trust. We understand that when it comes to VPNs, trust is paramount. Whether it is our transparent VPN threat model, our Swiss jurisdiction, our reputation, our relationship with the community, or the fact that you actually know who we are, we’re committed to building and operating ProtonVPN with the same level of transparency that has come to characterize ProtonMail. To all of you who have supported us over the years, thank you for your support. Unlike companies like Google and Facebook who abuse user privacy to sell advertisements, ProtonMail and ProtonVPN are entirely dependent on users upgrading to paid accounts to cover operating expenses. Without your support, these projects would not be able to thrive and grow. If you appreciate the security and privacy that ProtonVPN provides, and have the means to do so, please consider upgrading to a paid account. This allows us to support the millions around the world without these means. With your help, the revolution we have started with ProtonMail will continue, and we will reach the day where the Internet serves all of us equally, and reaches its full potential as a tool for freedom. Best Regards, The Proton Technologies Team You can find our launch press release here: Follow ProtonVPN on Social Media: Facebook: facebook.com/ProtonVPN Twitter: twitter.com/ProtonVPN Reddit: reddit.com/r/ProtonVPN To get a free ProtonVPN account, visit: protonvpn.com To get a free ProtonMail encrypted email account, visit: protonmail.com ProtonVPN Admin We are the scientists, engineers, and developers who build ProtonMail, the world's largest encrypted email service. We're now building ProtonVPN also to ensure that everybody can have access to free and secure internet. Source
  4. Encrypted email provider ProtonMail launches free VPN service to counter increasing online censorship World’s largest secure email service has launched ProtonVPN for free to protect consumers against mass surveillance, censorship, and other online security threats. June 20th, 2017 Geneva, Switzerland ProtonMail, the world’s largest encrypted email provider, is announcing today the immediate worldwide release of ProtonVPN, an innovative new VPN service built in response to increasing online surveillance and threats to net neutrality. This is the first new product developed by Swiss security firm Proton Technologies AG since the introduction of ProtonMail 3 years ago. Since ProtonMail was first launched in May 2014 by a group of scientists who met at CERN and MIT, the service has become the preferred email provider for millions of people around the world. Users include businesses, individuals, activists and journalists drawn to the service’s strong end-to-end encryption, ease-of-use, and open source software. The team that created ProtonMail was motivated to create ProtonVPN to combat increased threats to online freedom. In the past six months alone, these threats have included the repeal of Obama-era rules designed to protect consumer internet browsing history, calls by Prime Minister Theresa May for increased online surveillance, and the recent attempts by the US FCC to dismantle net neutrality. This is not to mention the over 1.5 billion people around the world who live with censored Internet. “In the past year, we have seen more and more challenges against Internet freedom,” says ProtonMail Co-Founder Dr. Andy Yen, “now more than ever, we need robust tools for defending privacy, security, and freedom online.” A VPN (Virtual Private Network) allows users to browse the web without being tracked, bypass online censorship blocks, and also increases security by passing all internet traffic through a strongly encrypted tunnel. In order to make this technology more accessible, the Company will also provide a free version of the service. “The best way to ensure that encryption and privacy rights are not encroached upon is to get the tools into the hands of the public as soon as possible and widely distributing them,” says Yen, “This is why, as with ProtonMail, we’re committed to making a free version of ProtonVPN available to the world.” While VPNs have existed for many years, ProtonVPN draws upon the Company’s extensive security experience and introduces several important security innovations. ProtonVPN features a Secure Core architecture which routes traffic through multiple encrypted tunnels in multiple countries to better defend against network based attacks, and also features seamless integration with the Tor anonymity network. ProtonVPN operates under Swiss jurisdiction and is protected by some of the world’s strongest privacy laws. ProtonVPN also stands out for its transparency as it is perhaps the only VPN service on the market today that is developed by a team that is publicly known, with strong security and privacy credentials. “Strong encryption and privacy are a social and economic necessity. Not only does this technology protect activists and dissidents, it is also key to securing the world’s digital infrastructure,” says Yen, “Encrypted communications is the future and with ProtonVPN, we’re committed to making online privacy a reality again for all Internet users.” About Proton Technologies AG Proton Technologies AG is a security company headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, near CERN where the founders met in 2013. We are researchers, scientists, and engineers brought together by a shared vision of protecting civil liberties, working to advance Internet security and privacy. Proton Technologies is a uniquely community-driven company. Initial funding came from an online crowdfunding campaign that raised $550,000 and set a record for a software technology project. Today, the innovative technologies that we are developing, such as ProtonMail and ProtonVPN, are used by millions of people around the world. For more information, please visit: Media Inquiries: [email protected] ProtonVPN Admin We are the scientists, engineers, and developers who build ProtonMail, the world's largest encrypted email service. We're now building ProtonVPN also to ensure that everybody can have access to free and secure internet. Source
  5. Proton VPN 1.0.1 + 1.0.2 Final Overview: ProtonVPN is designed from the ground up with a special emphasis on security and privacy, and features a number of innovations that we have made to harden VPN against compromises. ProtonVPN will eventually feature free and premium versions containing different features. For the beta period, you will be able to test the full-fledged premium version of ProtonVPN for free. Layers of Protection: Limitation / blocking access to the data / application Isolation and create a separate database / application Backup / important data Detecting and deleting viruses / malware. Proton Mail earlier announced beta VPN service for PLUS proton mail users. At this moment, Proton VPN offers 14 countries Australia Canada France Germany Hong Kong Iceland Japan Netherlands Singapore - New Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Standard Servers All of our servers are dedicated to ProtonVPN and feature high bandwidth connections Secure Core Servers Secure Core Servers add an additional layer of protection against VPN endpoint compromise. Learn More More Info: Official Product Homepage / Detailed Features: https://protonvpn.com/home Official Website: https://protonvpn.com/ Register/Signup: https://account.protonvpn.com/signup Login: https://account.protonvpn.com/login/ Pricing: https://protonvpn.com/pricing VPN Servers: https://protonvpn.com/vpn-servers Security: https://protonvpn.com/secure-vpn VPN Threat Model: https://protonvpn.com/blog/threat-model/ Transparency Report: https://protonvpn.com/blog/transparency-report/ About Us: https://protonvpn.com/about Blog: https://protonvpn.com/blog/ We are open for registration. You can follow ProtonVPN on social media to get the latest news and updates: Facebook: https://facebook.com/ProtonVPN Twitter: https://twitter.com/ProtonVPN Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/ProtonVPN/ We would love to hear your feedback on the beta and what we can do to improve ProtonVPN. In addition to the links above, you can also send your suggestions to [email protected] If you run into trouble with ProtonVPN, or have questions, you can search for answers or contact us via the ProtonVPN support site: https://protonvpn.com/support/ Screenshots: Downloads: Download: https://protonvpn.com/download/ Windows Client: https://protonvpn.com/download/ProtonVPN_win_v1.0.1.exe Windows Client: https://protonvpn.com/download/ProtonVPN_win_v1.0.2.exe Clients for macOS, Linux, Android, and iOS are still under development, but it is still possible to use ProtonVPN with these operating systems using third-party OpenVPN clients. Setup guides can be found here: MacOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/mac-vpn-setup/ Linux: https://protonvpn.com/support/linux-vpn-setup/ Android: https://protonvpn.com/support/android-vpn-setup/ iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/ios-vpn-setup/ VPN Servers and Country Code for Linux, Mac, Android and iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/vpn-servers/ More Info - Articles & Reviews: Three years ago we launched ProtonMail. Today, we’re launching ProtonVPN. Encrypted email provider ProtonMail launches free VPN service to counter increasing online censorship ProtonVPN Swiss-Based VPN Launches
  6. Proton VPN 1.0.0 Beta/RC Overview: ProtonVPN is designed from the ground up with a special emphasis on security and privacy, and features a number of innovations that we have made to harden VPN against compromises. ProtonVPN will eventually feature free and premium versions containing different features. For the beta period, you will be able to test the full-fledged premium version of ProtonVPN for free. Layers of Protection: Limitation / blocking access to the data / application Isolation and create a separate database / application Backup / important data Detecting and deleting viruses / malware. Proton Mail announced beta VPN service for PLUS proton mail users. At this moment, Proton VPN offers 13 countries with 4/IP Australia Canada France Germany Hong Kong Iceland Japan Netherlands Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States More Info: Official Product Homepage / Detailed Features: https://protonvpn.com/home Official Website: https://protonvpn.com/ Register/Signup: https://account.protonvpn.com/signup About Us: https://protonvpn.com/about Blog: https://protonvpn.com/blog/ ProtonVPN is still a work in progress, and we will be releasing more details over the next couple months about what makes ProtonVPN different. You can follow ProtonVPN on social media to get the latest news and updates: Facebook: https://facebook.com/ProtonVPN Twitter: https://twitter.com/ProtonVPN We would love to hear your feedback on the beta and what we can do to improve ProtonVPN. In addition to the links above, you can also send your suggestions to [email protected] If you run into trouble with ProtonVPN, or have questions, you can search for answers or contact us via the ProtonVPN support site: https://protonvpn.com/support/ Screenshots: Downloads: Stability Advisory: This is a "beta/RC" software release which contains known bugs. The stable release date is 20 June 2017. Download: https://protonvpn.com/download/ Windows Client: https://protonvpn.com/download/ProtonVPN_win_v1.0.0.exe Clients for macOS, Linux, Android, and iOS are still under development, but it is still possible to use ProtonVPN with these operating systems using third-party OpenVPN clients. Setup guides can be found here: MacOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/mac-vpn-setup/ Linux: https://protonvpn.com/support/linux-vpn-setup/ Android: https://protonvpn.com/support/android-vpn-setup/ iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/ios-vpn-setup/ VPN Servers and Country Code for Linux, Mac, Android and iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/vpn-servers/
  7. Windows 10 is infamous for having snooping baked in, but one government stood up for user privacy. Oh, the irony! Because Windows doesn’t make much money for Microsoft these days, the company decided, beginning in Windows 10, that snooping on users à la Google and Facebook could be profitable. But one country said enough was enough. It would stand up for its users’ “privacy.” That country? The People’s Republic of China. Cough. Didn’t see that one coming, did you? Well, I say “privacy” because China is infamous for tracking its computer users and censoring the internet with the Great Firewall of China. But just because the powers that be in Beijing want to know every move their citizens make doesn’t mean they want Microsoft joining in on the spying. So China gave Microsoft a choice: Rip out its snoopware, or forget about selling Windows 10 to government or enterprise customers. Microsoft, never known for turning down a dollar or a yuan, caved. Beginning a year ago, Microsoft started developing a Chinese government-approved version of Windows 10 in partnership with the Chinese technology and defense company China Electronics Technology Group Corp (CETC). On May 23, Windows 10 China Government Edition was released. This version complies with Chinese governmental privacy and security standards. As Orangutan Capital noted, “this version strips telemetry and data collection from Windows; thus, in a bit of irony, the Chinese Government-mandated edition is the only version of Windows since XP (or Windows 7 before updates/patches) that respects the privacy rights of its users and is not, as of today, a data-collection machine.” This is hilarious. Well, in a dark, hideously unfunny way. Microsoft has gone along with this because, while China has a huge number of Windows users, Microsoft makes barely a dime from them. Software piracy runs rampant in China. Of course, just because Microsoft isn’t snooping doesn’t mean China hasn’t had Microsoft build in the government’s own spyware. When Microsoft talks up the changes it made in the China Government Edition to satisfy Beijing, it begs the question: Why wouldn’t everyone want what China is getting? Terry Myerson, Microsoft’s executive vice president of Windows and devices, blogged, “The Windows 10 China Government Edition is based on Windows 10 Enterprise Edition, which already includes many of the security, identity, deployment, and manageability features governments and enterprises need. The China Government Edition will use these manageability features to remove features that are not needed by Chinese government employees like OneDrive, to manage all telemetry and updates, and to enable the government to use its own encryption algorithms within its computer systems.” Meanwhile, back in the United States, Microsoft has kind of, sort of kept its promise to make Windows 10 Creators Update a bit more private. Really, though, all it has done is to make its privacy settings on the PC a trifle more helpful and transparent. If you really want a private desktop operating system, Linux remains your only real choice. If you’re hoping the U.S. government might stand up for user privacy, I can only take it you haven’t seen how President Trump and his confederates are destroying net neutrality and internet privacy at the same time. These are the same people who want to let your ISPs watch your every move on the internet. Of course, you could try to get a copy of Windows 10 China Government Edition. That way you’d only need to worry about China instead of Microsoft riding with you as you do your daily work. Decisions, decisions! Article source
  8. Hi Guys I'm interested in what people consider a standard install required to protect your android devices. What Anti Virus, What Ad blocker and any other software people install when looking to secure an Android device. Having a Windows background you get told to keep your AV up-to date and apply security patches but what applies to the Android environment?
  9. Don't use VPN services. No, seriously, don't. You're probably reading this because you've asked what VPN service to use, and this is the answer. Note: The content in this post does not apply to using VPN for their intended purpose; that is, as a virtual private (internal) network. It only applies to using it as a glorified proxy, which is what every third-party "VPN provider" does. Why not? Because a VPN in this sense is just a glorified proxy. The VPN provider can see all your traffic, and do with it what they want - including logging. But my provider doesn't log! There is no way for you to verify that, and of course this is what a malicious VPN provider would claim as well. In short: the only safe assumption is that every VPN provider logs. And remember that it is in a VPN provider's best interest to log their users - it lets them deflect blame to the customer, if they ever were to get into legal trouble. The $10/month that you're paying for your VPN service doesn't even pay for the lawyer's coffee, so expect them to hand you over. But a provider would lose business if they did that! I'll believe that when HideMyAss goes out of business. They gave up their users years ago, and this was widely publicized. The reality is that most of their customers will either not care or not even be aware of it. But I pay anonymously, using Bitcoin/PaysafeCard/Cash/drugs! Doesn't matter. You're still connecting to their service from your own IP, and they can log that. But I want more security! VPNs don't provide security. They are just a glorified proxy. But I want more privacy! VPNs don't provide privacy, with a few exceptions (detailed below). They are just a proxy. If somebody wants to tap your connection, they can still do so - they just have to do so at a different point (ie. when your traffic leaves the VPN server). But I want more encryption! Use SSL/TLS and HTTPS (for centralized services), or end-to-end encryption (for social or P2P applications). VPNs can't magically encrypt your traffic - it's simply not technically possible. If the endpoint expects plaintext, there is nothing you can do about that. When using a VPN, the only encrypted part of the connection is from you to the VPN provider. From the VPN provider onwards, it is the same as it would have been without a VPN. And remember, the VPN provider can see and mess with all your traffic. But I want to confuse trackers by sharing an IP address! Your IP address is a largely irrelevant metric in modern tracking systems. Marketers have gotten wise to these kind of tactics, and combined with increased adoption of CGNAT and an ever-increasing amount of devices per household, it just isn't a reliable data point anymore. Marketers will almost always use some kind of other metric to identify and distinguish you. That can be anything from a useragent to a fingerprinting profile. A VPN cannot prevent this. So when should I use a VPN? There are roughly two usecases where you might want to use a VPN: You are on a known-hostile network (eg. a public airport WiFi access point, or an ISP that is known to use MITM), and you want to work around that. You want to hide your IP from a very specific set of non-government-sanctioned adversaries - for example, circumventing a ban in a chatroom or preventing anti-piracy scareletters. In the second case, you'd probably just want a regular proxy specifically for that traffic - sending all of your traffic over a VPN provider (like is the default with almost every VPN client) will still result in the provider being able to snoop on and mess with your traffic. However, in practice, just don't use a VPN provider at all, even for these cases. So, then... what? If you absolutely need a VPN, and you understand what its limitations are, purchase a VPS and set up your own. I will not recommend any specific providers (diversity is good!), but there are plenty of cheap ones to be found on LowEndBox. But how is that any better than a VPN service? A VPN provider specifically seeks out those who are looking for privacy, and who may thus have interesting traffic. Statistically speaking, it is more likely that a VPN provider will be malicious or a honeypot, than that an arbitrary generic VPS provider will be. So why do VPN services exist? Surely they must serve some purpose? Because it's easy money. You just set up OpenVPN on a few servers, and essentially start reselling bandwidth with a markup. You can make every promise in the world, because nobody can verify them. You don't even have to know what you're doing, because again, nobody can verify what you say. It is 100% snake-oil. So yes, VPN services do serve a purpose - it's just one that benefits the provider, not you. Article source
  10. When we talk about security and privacy, there are several common acronyms that get thrown around. You’ve likely encountered the privacy and anonymity focused browser Tor. And VPNs frequently feature in mainstream media articles. There is another option to consider, too: I2P. But what privacy acronym suits your needs? Let’s explore what I2P, Tor, and VPNs are, and which one is right for you. Tor The “Tor” name derives from the original software project name: The Onion Router. Tor software directs web traffic through a worldwide system of interconnected relay nodes. This is known as “onion routing” because your data passes through many layers. In addition to the layers, Tor encrypts all network traffic, including the next node IP address. Encrypted data passes through multiple randomly selected relays, with only a single layer containing the IP address for the following node decrypted during transit. The final relay node decrypts the entire package, sending the data to its final destination without revealing — at any point — a source IP address. How Do I Use Tor? The Tor Browser is the easiest way to use Tor software. Download and install the browser as you would any other piece of software. The setup will continue after you open Tor Browser for the first time. Then you browse as normal. It will be slightly slower than normal — sending the data through multiple relays takes time, I’m afraid. Why Should I Use Tor? The Tor Browser encrypts all data transmissions. As such, a huge range of people use it: criminals, journalists, hackers/crackers, law enforcement (to protect communications and solve crimes), government agencies, and much more. In fact, Tor started life as a U.S. Naval Research and DARPA project. We’ve even written a guide on how you can use the hidden web as a research tool. The Tor Browser is also one of the most direct routes to the dark web (not to be confused with the deep web). The dark web is the so-called “dark underbelly” of the regular (sometimes referred to as “surface”) web that we browse daily. Whenever you hear a story about an online marketplace selling illicit substances and goods, they’re talking about a site hosted on the dark net. But Tor isn’t just about crazy secret marketplaces and secret communications. You can use it for other, “normal” things. For instance, airlines use complicated algorithms to keep tabs on interest in their flights, adjusting price with demand. Keep visiting the same site, using the same IP, and the airline knows you’re interested — but the price usually increases. Check the same flights using the Tor Browser and you can find some interesting discounts. Will Tor Protect My Privacy? Yes. The Tor design protects privacy from bottom to top. If you’re just using Tor Browser to browse the internet, you’re not going to alert anyone, anywhere. However, hardcore privacy advocates consider the Tor network compromised. National Security Agency (NSA) program XKeyscore records everyone who visits the Tor webpage and downloads the Tor Browser. Furthermore, they class those that download and install it as “potential extremists.” So, yeah, sorry, you’re on a list now. (They think similarly of those who use Linux, so I wouldn’t worry too much.) Tor only encrypts data sent and received within the Tor Browser (or a different browser using Tor software). It does not encrypt network activity for your entire system. I2P The Invisible Internet Project (I2P) is a garlic routing protocol. This is a variant of the onion routing protocol used by Tor. I2P is an “anonymous overlay network.” The garlic routing protocol encrypts multiple messages together to make data traffic analysis difficult, while simultaneously increasing network traffic speed. Garlic routing takes its name from actual garlic. Each message is a “garlic clove,” with the entire encrypted bundle representing the “bulb.” Each encrypted message has its own specific delivery instruction, and each end-point works as a cryptographic identifier (read one of a pair of public keys). Each I2P client (router) builds a series of inbound and outbound connection “tunnels” — direct peer-to-peer (P2P) networking. A major difference between I2P and other P2P networks you have used is the individual selection of tunnel length. The tunnel length is a factor in anonymity, latency, and personal throughput, and forms part of the individual peer threat model. The result is that the smallest number of peers possible relay messages according to each peer’s sender and receiver threat model. How Do I Use I2P? The easiest way to use I2P is by downloading and installing the official install package. Once installed, open Start I2P (restartable). This will open a locally hosted web page in internet Explorer, the I2P default browser (you can change this later). This is the I2P Router Console, or in other words, the virtual router used to maintain your I2P connection. You’ll also notice the I2P Service command window — ignore this and leave it running in the background. The I2P service can take a few minutes to get up and running, especially during the first boot. Take the time to configure your bandwidth settings. I2P allows its users to create and host hidden websites, known as “eepsites.” If you want to access an eepsite, you’ll need to set your browser to use the specific I2P proxy. You can find the I2P proxy configuration details here. Why Should I Use I2P? I2P and Tor offer similar browsing experiences for most part. Depending on your I2P bandwidth configuration, it is probably slightly faster than Tor Browser, and runs from the comfort of your existing browser. I2P is full of hidden services, many which are faster than their Tor-based equivalents — a massive plus if you’re frustrated with the sometimes infuriating Tor network. I2P runs alongside your regular internet connection, encrypting your browser traffic. However, I2P isn’t the best tool for browsing the open web anonymously. The limited number of outproxies (where your traffic re-joins “regular” internet traffic) mean it is much less anonymous when used this way. Will I2P Protect My Privacy? In a nutshell, yes. It will protect your privacy very well, unless you’re using it for regular web browsing. And even then, it would take significant resources to isolate your web traffic. I2P uses the distributed P2P model to ensure data collection, statistic gathering, and network overviews are difficult to complete. Furthermore, the garlic routing protocol encrypts multiple messages together, making it much more difficult to perform traffic analysis. The I2P tunnels we discussed earlier are uni-directional: data only flows one way. One tunnel in, one tunnel out. This alone provides greater anonymity for all peers. I2P only encrypts data sent and received through a configured browser. It does not encrypt network activity for your entire system. VPN Finally, we have the Virtual Private Network (VPN). A VPN works differently to both Tor and I2P. Instead of focusing solely on the encryption of browser traffic, a VPN encrypts all incoming and outgoing network traffic. In that sense, it offers regular users an easy route to protecting their data, but there are some caveats that we’ll explore in a moment. How a VPN Works Normally, when you send a request (e.g. click a link in your web browser or fire up Skype for a video-call), your request pings to the server holding the specified data, and it returns to you. The data connection is usually unsecured, and anyone with enough knowledge of computers can potentially access it (especially if using standard HTTP rather than HTTPS). A VPN connects to a predefined, privately owned server (or servers), creating a direct connection called a “tunnel” (though with the rise in VPN use, this term isn’t seen as frequently). The direct connection between your system and the VPN server is encrypted, as is all your data. VPNs are accessed through a client that you’ll install on your computer. The majority of VPNs use public-key cryptography. When you open the VPN client and login in with your credentials, it exchanges a public-key, confirming the connection and protecting your network traffic. Why Should I Use a VPN? A VPN encrypts your network traffic. Everything involving an internet connection on your system is safe from prying eyes. There has been a massive surge in VPN popularity, too. They’re exceptionally useful for: Securing your data on a public Wi-Fi connection. Accessing region-restricted content. An additional layer of security when accessing sensitive information. Protecting your privacy from government or other invasive agencies. Will a VPN Protect My Privacy Yes, a VPN will protect your privacy — but here come those caveats I alluded to earlier. Like most things, you pay for what you get. There are numerous free VPN providers, but they don’t always protect you as thoroughly as you think. For instance, many free VPN providers keep a log of all users, and their internet traffic. So while encrypted data is safe coming into and out of your computer, and to and from their server, there is a still a log of what you have been doing. And while the majority of VPN providers aren’t about to turn you into the authorities, they are legally obliged to turn over what they know if presented with a subpoena. If you want a truly secure, logless connection, check out these six privacy-focused VPNs. VPNs are an excellent, easy way to take some privacy back, without having to change from your regular browser, or alter your general browsing habits and internet use. Summary of Tor vs. I2P vs. VPN If you want super-private browsing, access to the darkweb, and don’t mind a slight dip in internet speed, choose Tor. If you want super-private access to hidden services and messaging tools across a distributed network of peers, and still don’t mind a slight dip in internet speed, choose I2P. Finally, if you want to encrypt all your incoming and outgoing network traffic, and really, really don’t mind a slight dip in internet speed, choose a VPN. Some choose to use Tor Browser over a logless VPN. Others simply fire up a free VPN when they want to access their online banking in a local cafe (this is very sensible). Regardless, a VPN is now a vital piece of accessible security and privacy technology that I would advise anyone to consider. Article source
  11. Firefox: Always Open Site In Container Tab Mozilla added a much requested feature to Firefox's Container Tabs experiment recently that enables you to always open sites in a specific container. Container Tabs is an upcoming feature of the Firefox web browser that is available as a Test Pilot experiment, and in Firefox Nightly. Mozilla launched the Container Tabs experiment a couple of months ago as a Test Pilot experiment. We talked about the feature in 2016 before already when it was revealed for the first time. Called Containers back then, it allowed participants to load websites in containers. A container is a closed environment which uses custom storage for some data to separate it from the main Firefox data storage and other containers. This is useful for quite a few things, for instance to limit tracking, sign in to the same Web service at the same time in the same browser window, or to separate work from entertainment websites. Firefox: Always open site in Container Tab In the closing words under the original article here on Ghacks, I mentioned that I'd like to see Mozilla add features to Container Tabs that I think would improve the feature significantly. Among the features was a request to restrict sites to certain containers. This made sense in my opinion, as it would allow you to load bank websites in the security container, work related sites and services in the work container, and so on. Mozilla has added the functionality to the latest version of the Container Tabs experiment. Note that this feature has not landed yet in the Firefox Nightly implementation of Containers. A small informational panel is opened when you click on the Container Tabs icon in the Firefox toolbar after installation or update of the add-on in the browser. It highlights that the "always open sites in the containers you want" option is now available. To use it, you right-click inside a container tab to assign it to the loaded container. You may also right-click on the Container Tabs icon in the Firefox toolbar to check the option as well. A prompt is loaded next time you load the site in Firefox. In fact, this prompt is loaded each time you open the site, unless you check the "remember my decision for this site" option. If you check the box, the prompt is not displayed anymore. You can disable the loading of a site in a container tab by right-clicking either on the site or on the icon while the site is loaded in the active tab. Verdict Mozilla continues its work on the upcoming Container Tabs feature. While it is still possible that the feature won't land in Firefox, it seems very likely that it will land eventually. My hope is that Mozilla will address my other feature requests, especially the option to clear data only in a single container tab, as well in future updates. (via Sören Hentzschel) Now You: What is your take on the improvement and Container Tabs in general? Source
  12. Epic is a privacy-centric web browser developed by Hidden Reflex and based on Chromium source code. It is dubbed as the first web browser from India. Features & More Info: Homepage: https://www.epicbrowser.com/ Download Page: https://epicbrowser.com/thank_you.php Download: Win-EXE (1.7 MB): https://winepic-cbe.kxcdn.com/Release/58.0.3029.110/EpicSetup.exe OS X-dmg (92.2 MB): https://macepic-cbe.kxcdn.com/2462/sign/Epic.dmg OS X-dmg (103 MB): https://macepic-cbe.kxcdn.com/Epic_53.0.2785.143.dmg Win-ZIP (1.5 MB): https://winepic-cbe.kxcdn.com/Release/58.0.3029.110/EpicSetup.zip OS X-ZIP (87.5 MB): https://macepic-cbe.kxcdn.com/Epic.zip
  13. I haven't heard or read anything about this in a wile so was wondering what's happening? Is it applied on us?
  14. Chrome: Sites May Record Audio/Video Without Indication Websites may abuse WebRTC in Google Chrome to record audio or video using the technology without any indication of that to the user. A security vulnerability was reported to Google on April 10, 2017 which allows an attacker to record audio or video using Chrome without indication. Most modern web browsers support WebRTC (Web Real-Time Communications). One of the benefits of WebRTC is that it supports real-time communication without the use of plugins. This includes options to create audio and video chat services, p2p data sharing, screen sharing, and more using the technology. There is also a downside to WebRTC, as it may leak local IP addresses in browsers that support WebRTC. You can protect the IP address from being revealed in Firefox, Chrome and Vivaldi, for instance. The reported vulnerability affects Chrome but it may affect other web browsers as well. For it to work, you'd have to visit a site and allow it to use WebRTC. The site that wants to record audio or video would spawn a JavaScript window then without header, a pop under or pop up window for instance. It can then record audio or video, without giving indications in Chrome that this is happening. Chrome displays recording indicators usually in the tab that uses the functionality, but since the JavaScript window is headerless, nothing is shown to the user. A proof of concept was created which you find linked on the Chromium Bugs website. All you need to do is click on two buttons, and allow the site to use WebRTC in the web browser. The proof of concept demo records audio for 20 seconds, and gives you an option afterwards to download the recording to the local system. A Chromium team member confirmed the existence of the issue, but did not want to call it vulnerability. The explanation does not make a whole lot of sense to me. Because Android does not show an indicator in first place, and Chrome on the desktop only if enough interface space is available, it is not a security vulnerability? At the very least, it is a privacy issue and something that users need to be aware of. While users do have to trust sites enough to give them permissions to use WebRTC, it and the fact that the site needs to launch a popup window are the only things needed to exploit this. Google may improve the situation in the future, but users are on their own right now when it comes to that. The best form of protection is to disable WebRTC which can be done easily if you don't require it, the second best to allow only trusted sites to use WebRTC. If you allow a site to use WebRTC, you may want to look out for any other windows that it may spawn afterwards on top of that. Now You: Do you use services or apps that use WebRTC? Source
  15. uBlock Origin 1.12.5b3 Changes Refactoring of static filtering engine: to be more modular and hence make it easier to extent filter syntax to lessen overhead overall to address #2598 to extend filter syntax to support csp= filter option See #1930 (comment). This is an important refactoring and thus I want to make these changes available as soon as possible so that possible regression bugs can found. At first my intention was to add support for csp= filter syntax, but this required some refactoring, and while at it I decided to address a lot of other details regarding static filtering engine which I meant to address since a while, hence the extent of the changes to the code. Downloads 1.7 MB uBlock0.chromium.zip 1.59 MB uBlock0.firefox.xpi 1.71 MB uBlock0.webext.xpi Source code (zip) Source code (tar.gz) https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock/releases/tag/1.12.5b3
  16. Muhammad Rabbani, a UK citizen, and director of the CAGE human rights organization, is facing a possible three-month prison sentence for not disclosing his phone and laptop's password at Heathrow airport in London, last year. According to Rabbani's account, UK authorities have stopped him while returning from a trip abroad, where he was investigating a sensitive case of human torture. UK counter-terrorism officers invoked the "Schedule 7" section of the UK Terrorism Act, a law that allows UK authorities to detain and question any person entering or leaving the country, regardless if he's a British or foreign national. Rabbani stopped at least 20 times before Rabbani says he was stopped at least 20 other times by UK authorities under Section 7, but this time around officers wanted to check his electronic devices. Since Rabbani stores information on highly sensitive subjects, all devices were password protected. Due to the sensitive nature of this information, Rabbani politely declined to provide the password to the UK counter-terrorism officer. After three and a half hours of questioning, Rabbani was arrested for failing to cooperate with authorities. The CAGE director was later released on bail, on the same day, nine hours later. He is scheduled to appear in court this week and will find out if UK authorities plan to file charges for failure to cooperate under Section 7, which carries a sentence of up to three months in prison. Rabbani claims UK authorities are abusing the law All of this because Rabbani did not want agents to copy the content of his electronic devices after he gave them the passwords. All his devices remained in police custody after his arrest. Rabbani argues that there was no reason to stop him for questioning, as he didn't have a criminal record, wasn't arrested before, and has been questioned many times before. Furthermore, the officer questioning him said told Rabbani he was not suspected of any wrongdoing, yet he was still arrested just because he refused to give up his passwords. Rabbani and his organization are now claiming UK officials are using Section 7 outside of its scope. "Schedule 7 is an enormous blunderbuss that is over-used and the consequence of its overuse is that it is abusive," Rabbani says. "It affects almost every Muslim in ever-increasing numbers who contemplates traveling. It is not just the sheer number of Muslims stopped but that the same people are stopped repeatedly. Once on the system, you are flagged up for life." "Statistics [infographic] show that Schedule 7 stops amount to racial profiling, with 88.4% detained coming from an ethnic minority background. Only 5 people were arrested out of roughly 20,000 that were stopped last year," added Ibrahim Mohamoud, spokesperson for CAGE. "Clearly, huge numbers of innocent people are being interrogated and their data confiscated from them. Where is all this data being stored? With whom is it being shared? How does one remove themselves from these databases? These are some of the wider questions that Mr. Rabbani wishes to raise." Rabbani and CAGE have set up a campaign website to support his cause. Not the first case Last year, a Florida judge ruled that a man suspected of voyeurism must provide his iPhone password to police to verify accusations. Earlier this year, the US was debating a measure to force visa applications to reveal passwords for their social media accounts if they want to receive passage to the United States. Source
  17. uBlock Origin 1.12.5b1 Changes Refactoring of static filtering engine: to be more modular and hence make it easier to extent filter syntax to lessen overhead overall to address #2598 to extend filter syntax to support csp= filter option See #1930 (comment). This is an important refactoring and thus I want to make these changes available as soon as possible so that possible regression bugs can found. At first my intention was to add support for csp= filter syntax, but this required some refactoring, and while at it I decided to address a lot of other details regarding static filtering engine which I meant to address since a while, hence the extent of the changes to the code. I won't be pushing this revision to the dev channel channel of uBO on AMO until the changes here are committed into the master branch (they are currently committed in the csp branch) Downloads 1.68 MB uBlock0.chromium.zip 1.56 MB uBlock0.firefox.xpi 1.68 MB uBlock0.webext.xpi Source code (zip) Source code (tar.gz) https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock/releases/tag/1.12.5b1
  18. Tails 3.0 Anonymous Live OS Enters Beta, Ships with Linux 4.9 and GNOME 3.22 It will only work on 64-bit desktop and laptop computers The next version of the Tails 2.x series will be 2.11, currently scheduled for launch in early March, but it looks like the development of the Tails 3.0 major release continues in the background, and now users can get their hands on the Beta build. Tails 3.0 Beta comes two and a half months after the Alpha milestone released last year in November, when the project's developers announced that they would drop support for 32-bit systems, allowing the amnesic incognito live system to run only on 64-bit PCs. As usual, we took the Beta version of Tails 3.0 for a test drive to see what's new, and we can report that it's based on the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system and it's powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.9 kernel. GNOME 3.22 is the default desktop environment with redesigned Greeter However, probably the coolest new features of Tails 3.0 is the revamped Tails Greeter, a small dialog that will pop-up when you run the live system for the first time on your computer, helping you set up the default language, keyboard layout, formats, and other settings. Of course, Tails 3.0 will come pre-installed with all the anonymity tools that you love, including the recently introduced OnionShare utility for anonymous file sharing. The latest Tor and Tor Browser applications are also included to keep your identity safe from hackers and hide from government agencies. Numerous bugs have been squashed in this new pre-release version of Tails 3.0, but many known issues remain unresolved, and you can read all about them before jumping on the beta testing bandwagon in the official release notes. Without further ado, you can download the Tails 3.0 Beta Live ISO image right now, write it on a USB flash drive, and take it for a test drive on your modern, 64-bit computer. If you decide to stick with it, please keep in mind that it's a pre-release version, not suitable for production use, despite the fact that it will receive security updates. Source
  19. Windscribe VPN 1.70 Build 3 Stable Internet As It Should Be Windscribe is a desktop application and browser extension that work together to block ads and trackers, restore access to blocked content and help you safeguard your privacy online. Learn More. What's New: https://blog.windscribe.com/windscribe-1-7-changelog-8afa50f3b297 We’ve been working on this version for quite a while, existing installations should prompt you to update the app over the next 48 hrs. Here is what’s new. Changelog: Added city level location selection Added Automatic Connection mode Added support for 22 languages Added custom TAP adapter Added “Ignore SSL Errors” option Added notifications when firewall is ON and application not connected Added “Advanced Parameters” screen Added EULA to the installer Added IPv6 connectivity disable button, to prevent WebRTC leaks over IPv6 in some situations Added Touch support Added Beta channel Fixed auto-start bug on some systems Fixed Internet connectivity check Fixed persistent session storage Fixed API connectivity on restrictive networks Fixed unquoted service path Fixed disappearing Best Location Fixed WSD port connectivity while firewall is ON Fixed PlayStation UPNP connectivity while firewall is ON Fixed reconnection bug on computer wake up on some systems Changed the Preferences screens Changed the connecting spinner animation Downloads: Windscribe for Your Computer: Windscribe for Your Browser: Windscribe for Your Phone: Windscribe for Your Router:
  20. Dear friends, Nowadays our privacy is very important. I am interested to know which VPN service do you use and which is the best according to your opinion. Not to all vpn services are enough secure. Recently, has been discovered that HotSpot Shield in some cases could show your real ip. Have a look here : 1.Android 2. Windows Thanks for your time spent with this poll ! :)
  21. Facebook's marketing department is using algorithms to identify emotionally vulnerable and insecure youth as young as 14, The Australian reported today after reporters managed to get their hands on a 23-page report from Facebook's Australian office. The document, dated this year and flagged as "Confidential: Internal Only," presents Facebook's advertising capabilities and highlights the social network's ability to detect, determine, and categorize user moods using sophisticated algorithms. The leaked file, authored by two of Facebook Australia's top execs is a presentation that the company is willing to share with potential customers only under a "non-disclosure agreement only." Facebook using algorithms to categorize emotional states In it, Facebook reveals that by monitoring posts, photos, and interactions, they can approximate a person's emotional state into categories such as "silly," "overwhelmed," "anxious," "nervous," "defeated," "stressed," "stupid," "useless," or a "failure." Facebook claims that it can identify not only emotions and state of mind, but also how and when this changes in real-time and across periods of time. While this was to be expected from a company as advanced as Facebook, the document reveals the social network won't shy away from using its algorithms against youth as young as 14, data which it then makes available to advertisers, so they can target teens that feel insecure or are emotionally vulnerable. The social network is using these points to lure in advertisers to its network, alluding it could help in targeting users, including young teens, in their most vulnerable states when most people tend to buy products and make themselves feel better. The document specifically mentions Facebook's ability to target over 6.4 million "high schoolers," "tertiary students," and "young Australians and New Zealander [...] in the workforce." Facebook confirmed validity of leaked document Contacted by reporters, Facebook admitted the document was real, apologized, and said it would start an investigation into the practice of targeting its younger userbase. Current privacy laws allow companies to collect data on users if its anonymized and stripped of any personally-identifiable information, such as names, precise addresses, or photos. Facebook said it respects privacy laws, but reporters said Facebook is in breach of the Australian Code for Advertising & Marketing Communications to Children, an advertising guideline which states that advertisers must get permission from the child's parent or guardian before collecting any data. Facebook, who currently boasts of a total monthly active userbase of over 1.85 billion, is the second online advertisers behind Google. A recent report revealed that Google and Facebook are cannibalizing 99% of all the money in digital advertising, and have established a de-facto duopoly. In 2014, news broke out that Facebook meddled with people's news feed algorithms to test if it could influence people's moods. Source
  22. uBlock Origin 1.12.3b1 Closed as fixed: Firefox Unable to access logger/dashboard from popup upon session restore Core GUI "gear" Blocked by Temporary Elements Punycode phishing attack detection Potentially ambiguous base domain names in the popup panel will be labelled idn (as in "Internationalized Domain Name"), to inform the user that the domain name contains Cyrillic characters which could be confused with some ASCII characters. Further reading: IDN homograph attack. Tabnapping prevention More longer timeout time Better handling of timeout conditions for slow connections. Add adblock-iran filter list to regional lists Downloads 1.67 MB uBlock0.chromium.zip 1.56 MB uBlock0.firefox.xpi 1.67 MB uBlock0.webext.xpi Source code (zip) Source code (tar.gz) https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock/releases/tag/1.12.3b1
  23. Proton VPN 0.9.7 Beta Overview: ProtonVPN is designed from the ground up with a special emphasis on security and privacy, and features a number of innovations that we have made to harden VPN against compromises. ProtonVPN will eventually feature free and premium versions containing different features. For the beta period, you will be able to test the full-fledged premium version of ProtonVPN for free. Layers of Protection: Limitation / blocking access to the data / application Isolation and create a separate database / application Backup / important data Detecting and deleting viruses / malware. Proton Mail announced beta VPN service for PLUS proton mail users. At this moment, Proton VPN offers 13 countries with 4/IP Australia Canada France Germany Hong Kong Iceland Japan Netherlands Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States More Info: Official Product Homepage / Detailed Features: https://protonvpn.com/home Official Website: https://protonvpn.com/ About Us: https://protonvpn.com/about Blog: https://protonvpn.com/blog/ ProtonVPN is still a work in progress, and we will be releasing more details over the next couple months about what makes ProtonVPN different. You can follow ProtonVPN on social media to get the latest news and updates: Facebook: https://facebook.com/ProtonVPN Twitter: https://twitter.com/ProtonVPN We would love to hear your feedback on the beta and what we can do to improve ProtonVPN. In addition to the links above, you can also send your suggestions to [email protected] If you run into trouble with ProtonVPN, or have questions, you can search for answers or contact us via the ProtonVPN support site: https://protonvpn.com/support/ Screenshots: Downloads: Stability Advisory: This is a "beta" software release which contains known bugs. Download: https://protonvpn.com/download/ Windows Client: https://protonvpn.com/download/ProtonVPN_win_v0.9.7.exe Clients for macOS, Linux, Android, and iOS are still under development, but it is still possible to use ProtonVPN with these operating systems using third-party OpenVPN clients. Setup guides can be found here: MacOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/mac-vpn-setup/ Linux: https://protonvpn.com/support/linux-vpn-setup/ Android: https://protonvpn.com/support/android-vpn-setup/ iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/ios-vpn-setup/ VPN Servers and Country Code for Linux, Mac, Android and iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/vpn-servers/
  24. Proton VPN 0.9.6 Beta Overview: ProtonVPN is designed from the ground up with a special emphasis on security and privacy, and features a number of innovations that we have made to harden VPN against compromises. ProtonVPN will eventually feature free and premium versions containing different features. For the beta period, you will be able to test the full-fledged premium version of ProtonVPN for free. Layers of Protection: Limitation / blocking access to the data / application Isolation and create a separate database / application Backup / important data Detecting and deleting viruses / malware. Proton Mail announced beta VPN service for PLUS proton mail users. At this moment, Proton VPN offers 13 countries with 4/IP Australia Canada France Germany Hong Kong Iceland Japan Netherlands Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States More Info: Official Product Homepage / Detailed Features: https://protonvpn.com/home Official Website: https://protonvpn.com/ About Us: https://protonvpn.com/about Blog: https://protonvpn.com/blog/ ProtonVPN is still a work in progress, and we will be releasing more details over the next couple months about what makes ProtonVPN different. You can follow ProtonVPN on social media to get the latest news and updates: Facebook: https://facebook.com/ProtonVPN Twitter: https://twitter.com/ProtonVPN We would love to hear your feedback on the beta and what we can do to improve ProtonVPN. In addition to the links above, you can also send your suggestions to [email protected] If you run into trouble with ProtonVPN, or have questions, you can search for answers or contact us via the ProtonVPN support site: https://protonvpn.com/support/ Screenshots: Downloads: Stability Advisory: This is a "beta" software release which contains known bugs. Download: https://protonvpn.com/download/ Windows Client: https://protonvpn.com/download/ProtonVPN_win_v0.9.6.exe Clients for macOS, Linux, Android, and iOS are still under development, but it is still possible to use ProtonVPN with these operating systems using third-party OpenVPN clients. Setup guides can be found here: MacOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/mac-vpn-setup/ Linux: https://protonvpn.com/support/linux-vpn-setup/ Android: https://protonvpn.com/support/android-vpn-setup/ iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/ios-vpn-setup/ VPN Servers and Country Code for Linux, Mac, Android and iOS: https://protonvpn.com/support/vpn-servers/
  25. uBlock Origin 1.12.3b0 Closed as fixed: Punycode phishing attack detection Potentially ambiguous base domain names in the popup panel will be labelled idn (as in "Internationalized Domain Name"), to inform the user that the domain name contains Cyrillic characters which could be confused with some ASCII characters. Further reading: IDN homograph attack. More longer timeout time Better handling of timeout conditions for slow connections. Downloads 1.67 MB uBlock0.chromium.zip 1.56 MB uBlock0.firefox.xpi 1.68 MB uBlock0.webext.xpi Source code (zip) Source code (tar.gz) https://github.com/gorhill/uBlock/releases/tag/1.12.3b0