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Found 4 results

  1. Nokia 6 Finally Goes on Sale Outside of China for $370 The phone is available in the Philippines in white color Well, it looks like starting tomorrow, the Nokia 6 will be available for purchase in another country, although customers will have to pay more. PinoyTechnoGuide reports major retailer Lazada will begin selling the Nokia 6 in the Philippines. As some of you probably know by now, Nokia 6 is available for purchase in China through JD.com retailer for only $245. However, customers in the Philippines will have to pay $370 for the mid-range smartphone. On the bright side (no pun intended), Nokia 6 will be available at Lazada in white color, which is rather odd considering HMD Global only released the smartphone in black version in China. It's also worth mentioning those who purchase the smartphone through Lazada will benefit from free shipping. We don't know if there's a purchase limit per customer, but it doesn't seems so. Checking out the specs listed by Lazada, it seems they're selling the same device that's been introduced in China not long ago. So, expect a mid-range smartphone running Android 7.0 Nougat operating system right out of the box, coupled with an octa-core 1.4GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 430 processor. The Nokia 6's 16-megapixel rear-facing camera has already been compared to other cameras on flagships like the OnePlus 3T and Huawei Mate 9 Pro, and it performed admirably. There's also a secondary 8-megapixel camera in the front for those who like to take selfies. It also sports a 5.5-inch full HD (1080p) display with 2.5D scratch resistant Corning Gorilla Glass 3 coating. On the inside, the Nokia 6 packs 4GB RAM and 64GB of storage (expandable up to 128GB via microSD card). Source
  2. Philippine police arrested eight suspects and are hunting more in connection with an Internet extortion racket that has victimized hundreds of people in Hong Kong, Singapore and Macau, an official said Saturday. This is the second large-scale arrest of suspects allegedly for "sextortion" -- using the Internet to lure foreigners into sending them compromising material which they can use for blackmail, said Jhoanna Fabro, spokeswoman of the national police anti-cybercrime division. The eight suspects were arrested and five minors taken into custody following a raid on Thursday in towns just outside Manila, she said. But Fabro warned that an undetermined number may have escaped before the raid. "There are other targets but we weren't able to get them," she told AFP. About 400 people from Hong Kong, Singapore and Macau were targeted by the group and the arrests were made due to complaints from victims, Fabro said. The suspects operated from towns in Bulacan province, about 30 kilometres (17 miles) from Manila. They used social media websites such as Facebook to meet people overseas and then used video call services such as Skype to engage in "cybersex," the police said. "Unknown to the victim, these acts were recorded. Once the suspect captured sufficiently lewd video footages, he/she would stop the call instantly. Immediately, the victim would receive messages... from the suspect, threatening the victim that his lewd acts were video recorded with a video link to prove it," the cybercrime division said in a statement. The suspect would then demand the victim pay a huge amount or the footage would be made public on social media or even sent to the victim's friends or relatives, the division said. Each victim would usually be forced to pay about $30,000 but Fabro said she could not immediately give a figure for the total gained from the "sextortion". Initially, the group used women but later recruited five minors who were taught to lure other victims. The minors have since been turned over to social workers, said Fabro adding that the suspects would be charged with human trafficking along with extortion. Fabro also said they were still investigating whether this new group was related to a larger but similar "sextortion" operation that was broken up by police in May. In that case, dozens of people operating from industrial-sized call centers were arrested after allegedly blackmailing hundreds of people around the world, luring them on social media in order to get sexually explicit information or images. One of their victims was a 17-year-old boy in Scotland who committed suicide last year. This newest operation "is more mobile. If they have a strong enough Internet connection, they just do it from their homes," Fabro said. Interpol has warned that "sextortion" has emerged as a major concern in recent years as criminals take advantage of more people using social media and greater mobile Internet access via smartphones. Source
  3. New species of metal-eating plant discovered in the Philippines Scientists from the University of the Philippines, Los Baños have discovered a new plant species with an unusual lifestyle — it eats nickel for a living — accumulating up to 18,000 ppm of the metal in its leaves without itself being poisoned, says Professor Edwino Fernando, lead author of the report. Such an amount is a hundred to a thousand times higher than in most other plants. The study was published in the open access journal PhytoKeys. The new species is called Rinorea niccolifera, reflecting its ability to absorb nickel in very high amounts. Nickel hyperaccumulation is such a rare phenomenon with only about 0.5–1% of plant species native to nickel-rich soils having been recorded to exhibit the ability. Throughout the world, only about 450 species are known with this unusual trait, which is still a small proportion of the estimated 300,000 species of vascular plants. The new species, according to Dr Marilyn Quimado, one of the lead scientists of the research team, was discovered on the western part of Luzon Island in the Philippines, an area known for soils rich in heavy metals. "Hyperacccumulator plants have great potentials for the development of green technologies, for example, 'phytoremediation' and 'phytomining'", explains Dr Augustine Doronila of the School of Chemistry, University of Melbourne, who is also co-author of the report. Phytoremediation refers to the use of hyperacccumulator plants to remove heavy metals in contaminated soils. Phytomining, on the other hand, is the use of hyperacccumulator plants to grow and harvest in order to recover commercially valuable metals in plant shoots from metal-rich sites. Source
  4. By Manuel Mogato TACLOBAN, Philippines, Nov 10 (Reuters) - One of the most powerful storms ever recorded killed at least 10,000 people in the central Philippines, a senior police official said on Sunday, with huge waves sweeping away coastal villages and devastating one of the main cities in the region. Super typhoon Haiyan destroyed about 70 to 80 percent of structures in its path as it tore through Leyte province on Friday, said police chief superintendent Elmer Soria, before weakening and heading west for Vietnam. As rescue workers struggled to reach ravaged villages along the coast, where the death toll is as yet unknown, survivors foraged for food or searched for lost loved ones. "People are walking like zombies looking for food," said Jenny Chu, a medical student in Leyte. "It's like a movie." Most of the deaths appear to have been caused by surging sea water strewn with debris that many said resembled a tsunami, levelling houses and drowning hundreds of people in one of the worst disasters to hit the typhoon-prone Southeast Asian nation. The national government and disaster agency have not confirmed the latest estimate of deaths, a sharp increase from initial estimates on Saturday of at least 1,200 killed by a storm whose sustained winds reached 195 miles per hour (313 km per hour) with gusts of up to 235 mph (378 kph). "We had a meeting last night with the governor and the other officials. The governor said, based on their estimate, 10,000 died," Soria told Reuters. "The devastation is so big." About 300 people died in neighbouring Samar province, where Haiyan first hit land on Friday as a category 5 typhoon, with 2,000 missing, said an official of the provincial disaster agency. Nearly 480,000 people were displaced and 4.5 million "affected" by the typhoon in 36 provinces, the national disaster agency said, as relief agencies called for food, water, medicines and tarpaulins for the homeless. International aid agencies said relief efforts in the Philippines were stretched thin after a 7.2 magnitude quake in central Bohol province last month and displacement caused by a conflict with Muslim rebels in southern Zamboanga province. The U.S. embassy said it would provide $100,000 for health, water and sanitation support. Australia said it would provide an initial 15.5 million pesos ($358,900) in relief supplies. The World Food Programme said it was airlifting 40 tonnes of high-energy biscuits, enough to feed 120,000 people for a day, as well as emergency supplies and communications equipment. Witnesses and officials described chaotic scenes in Leyte's capital, Tacloban, a coastal city of 220,000 about 580 km (360 miles) southeast of Manila which bore the brunt, with hundreds of bodies piled on the sides of roads and pinned under wrecked houses. The city lies in a cove where the seawater narrows, making it susceptible to storm surges. The city and nearby villages as far as one kilometre (just over half a mile) from shore were flooded, leaving floating bodies and roads choked with debris from fallen trees, tangled power lines and flattened homes. Many Internet users urged prayers and called for aid for survivors in the largely Roman Catholic nation on social media sites such as Twitter. Source