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Found 11 results

  1. Nokia Nseries Could Be Resurrected, New Mid-Range Smartphone to Be Unveiled HMD might make use of the hugely popular branding We're not going to actually include the Nokia N1 tablet in the Nseries since we'll be referring to smartphones only. The last Nseries phone was the N9, which was a Meego-based device, but an N950 model was launched soon afterwards as a developer-only smartphone. However, rumors coming out of China claim HMD plans to resurrect Nokia's Nseries brand this year, and the first product might be unveiled later this year at Mobile World Congress (MWC). Obviously, these rumors must be taken with a grain of salt, especially that they're a bit confusing. Any true Nokia fan knows the Nseries is a flagship series, so it would make sense for HMD to launch a high-end Nseries device at MWC 2017. But the latest reports say the first Nseries device to be unveiled by HMD will be a mid-range smartphone powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 6xx processor. The only evidence the source of the rumor has is a picture of a promo material with the Nseries logo on it. Furthermore, it appears that the said Nokia Nseries smartphone will be the first targeted to reach 50 million units produced, which would be quite an achievement for a company like HMD that has just opened doors. We don't want to ruin it for you, but this seems a bit far fetched and impractical for HMD Global, as the company need s to make sure it can cope with the demand for its smartphones when they go on sale. However, a new Nseries smartphone is not out of the question, so we won't rule it out for the moment. One thing is certain thought, we will get all the answers in just a few weeks, as Nokia and HMD have already announced a joint event for February 26. Source
  2. Nokia and HMD Global Confirm MWC 2017 Launch Event for February 26 Hopefully, a couple of smartphones will be unveiled Despite the fact that Samsung has already confirmed it will not launch the Galaxy S8 at MWC, while Sony is rumored to show its new flagship in secret rooms only, this year's trade fair looks pretty promising when it comes to new devices. After successfully launching its first Nokia-branded smartphone in China, HMD Global will finally reveal its plans regarding the next handsets that will (hopefully) be available worldwide. Aside from the Nokia 6 that's exclusive available for purchase in China though major retailer JD.com, HMD Global plans to launch at least 5 or 6 other Android smartphones by the end of the year. Will it live up to the expectations? At least two other Nokia-branded handsets might be introduced at MWC 2017 on February 26, including the company's first flagship smartphone. Unfortunately, the expectations are very high now that new Nokia-branded phones will be once again available on the market, and we fear that HDM Global's new product might not live up to the hype. However, it's important to note that the Nokia that once was, will never be again. The Finnish giant has already decided to let another company handle the design, manufacturing and sale of Nokia-branded smartphones. Since we're less than one month away from Nokia's launch event, we won't have to wait too long to find out whether or not HMD will manage to meet Nokia fans' expectations. Naturally, it won't be able to appeal to everyone, but it would be nice to know that Nokia's spirit still lives in some (if not all) HMD Global's upcoming products. Source
  3. Nokia 6 Finally Goes on Sale Outside of China for $370 The phone is available in the Philippines in white color Well, it looks like starting tomorrow, the Nokia 6 will be available for purchase in another country, although customers will have to pay more. PinoyTechnoGuide reports major retailer Lazada will begin selling the Nokia 6 in the Philippines. As some of you probably know by now, Nokia 6 is available for purchase in China through JD.com retailer for only $245. However, customers in the Philippines will have to pay $370 for the mid-range smartphone. On the bright side (no pun intended), Nokia 6 will be available at Lazada in white color, which is rather odd considering HMD Global only released the smartphone in black version in China. It's also worth mentioning those who purchase the smartphone through Lazada will benefit from free shipping. We don't know if there's a purchase limit per customer, but it doesn't seems so. Checking out the specs listed by Lazada, it seems they're selling the same device that's been introduced in China not long ago. So, expect a mid-range smartphone running Android 7.0 Nougat operating system right out of the box, coupled with an octa-core 1.4GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 430 processor. The Nokia 6's 16-megapixel rear-facing camera has already been compared to other cameras on flagships like the OnePlus 3T and Huawei Mate 9 Pro, and it performed admirably. There's also a secondary 8-megapixel camera in the front for those who like to take selfies. It also sports a 5.5-inch full HD (1080p) display with 2.5D scratch resistant Corning Gorilla Glass 3 coating. On the inside, the Nokia 6 packs 4GB RAM and 64GB of storage (expandable up to 128GB via microSD card). Source
  4. Lineage OS Announces A Bunch Of Newly Supported Devices For Its Preview Builds Last month, Cyanogen announced that it was shutting down its offices, leaving the future of CyanogenMod in question. However, from the company's digital ashes rose a new project called Lineage OS. The developer team behind the operating system announced that it would support more than 80 devices. However, at launch, it only supported a handful of devices. Now, the company has updated its roster of supported devices, adding a number of older handsets to the list. Previously, the developer team had only included the LG Nexus 5X, Huawei Nexus 6P, Motorola Moto G4 / G4 Plus, Nextbit Robin and Xiaomi Redmi 1S. The company has now updated its list of supported devices to include: Asus Nexus 7 2013 (4G / Wi-Fi) LG Nexus 5 Huawei Honor 5X LG G4 (T-Mobile / International) LG G3 S LG G3 Beat Motorola Moto X Pure (2015) Motorola Moto E Motorola Moto G Motorola Moto G4 Play OnePlus One Oppo Find 7a Oppo Find 7s Samsung Samsung Galaxy S III (AT&T / Sprint / T-Mobile / Verizon / International) Samsung Galaxy S II (International) Sony Xperia SP Xiaomi Mi 3w and Mi 4 Xiaomi Mi 5 Xiaomi Mi Max Xiaomi Redmi 3/Prime Xiaomi Redmi Note 3 As can be seen, the list of devices has increased drastically. That said, the developer team has not announced how many installs its operating system has garnered. Previously, the company had announced that experimental builds of Lineage OS had been downloaded more than 50,000 times. This figure is bound to change with more devices being supported everyday. You can download the latest nightly and experimental builds on supported handsets by heading over to the download page here. Source
  5. Android 7.1.1 Nougat Running Surprisingly Well on a 7-Year Old Galaxy S1 Samsung released the Galaxy S in June 2010 YouTuber XTvideos posted a video showing how Android 7.1.1 Nougat performs on the 7-year old Galaxy S smartphone, announced in March 2010 and released a couple of months later in June. The video shows the first boot of Galaxy S1 i9000 running the latest version of Android. Obviously, this is an unofficial CM version of Nougat, nobody expects Samsung to release an update for devices so old. The smartphone runs a bit slow, it takes some time to load the settings menu, and the phone is running a clean OS, no apps were flashed. The user installed CyanogenMod 14.1 on the Galaxy S (GT-I9000), and since it’s an unofficial version, the phone is a bit slow in certain areas. The phone also appears to have the December security patch, which was the latest when the video was uploaded. 512MB of RAM and Hummingbird chipset inside The video shows that 7.1.1 Nougat contains most of the features that you would expect, like a revamped notification area and even quick reply. The phone can open all settings menus and it provides the user with access to developer options, without crashing, freezing or shutting down. Samsung’s Galaxy S1 (GT-I9000) had a 4-inch AMOLED display with 480 x 800 pixel resolution and Corning Gorilla Glass coating on top. It ran Android 2.1 Eclair out of the box and later received an update to 2.3 Gingerbread. These two versions haven’t been included in Android Distribution reports for quite some time now, meaning that they’re market share is well below 0.1%. Moving on the Galaxy S1 came with 512MB of RAM, 8 or 16GB of internal storage which could be expanded to 32GB with a microSD card and ran a Hummingbird chipset or Exynos 3110 with a 1.0GHz Cortex-A8 processor, coupled with PowerVR SGX540 graphics processing units. Rear camera capacity reached 5MP with autofocus, while the secondary camera was VGA. The phone drew power from a removable 1,500mAh battery. Source
  6. How to Opt Out of iOS Beta Updates and Reinstall iOS 10.2.1 on Your iPhone/iPad The tutorial also applies to iPod touch devices iOS 10.2.1 is the first point release to the iOS 10.2 series. It received a total of four Beta/Public Beta versions during its entire development cycle since mid-December last year. The last one was seeded only ten days ago. Like many of us running the iOS 10.2.1 Public Beta 4 release, it turns out you'll not receive the final version of iOS 10.2.1, which some will say it's identical with the last Beta, but what if your device is not working properly and you are still experiencing bugs. For example, we found out that, since we've installed the last Public Beta versions of iOS 10.2.1 on our iPhone 6 device, some applications were very slow to load and not so responsive like they used to be. Also, we noticed major battery drains. Removing the iOS Public Beta profile If you're experiencing the same issues on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch device, it's time to refresh it by reinstalling the operating system. First off, make sure that you have a recent iCloud backup, or at least a local backup in iTunes. It's time to remove the Public Beta profile (you can always reinstall it at a later time if you still want to use upcoming Beta versions), so open the Settings app, go to General, scroll down to the Profile section and click it. Then, remove the iOS Beta profile by pressing the red "Delete Profile" button. Restoring the device and reinstalling iOS Connect your device to your personal computer, where the latest version of iTunes needs to be installed (make sure you have the latest version installed, 12.5.5 at the moment of writing). With the device connected to your PC, enter DFU mode. Entering DFU Mode is as simple as pressing and holding both the Power and Home buttons on your device until you see the Apple logo on the screen. Release the Power button but keep holding the Home one until the "Connect to iTunes" logo appears. iTunes will soon offer you the option to "Restore and Update" the device. Click the "Restore and Update" button and the application will tell you that iOS 10.2.1 is available. Click OK and let it download the update. Once iTunes completes downloading iOS 10.2.1 from Apple's servers, it will soon begin installing it on your device. You don't have to do anything at this point, just don't touch anything and make sure your computer has enough battery or that it's plugged in. Reset and erase the device to restore it from a backup Just before iOS 10.2.1 finishes installing, iTunes will display a message saying "Congratulations, your iPhone has been unlocked. To set up and sync this iPhone, click Continue." Click the "Continue" button and iTunes will immediately detect your device. At this point, you need to set up your device by pressing the Home button. Choose your preferred language and region. On the next screen, you'll have to connect to your Wi-Fi network. Then, enable the location services, or simply don't. It doesn't matter, because we're going to reset and erase the device anyway, so there's no need to set up Touch ID now. When you reach the home screen, open the Settings app, go to the Reset section and press on "Erase All Content and Settings." Erase your device, which will bring you to the setup screen again. So, this time, make sure that you set up everything correctly, including Touch ID, location services, etc., and, after entering your Apple ID, you can finally choose to restore from a backup. Select the restore method you want (we prefer the iCloud backup) and let your device restore the backup, which can take a few good minutes. Once everything is restored, you can unlock your device and access the home screen. Most of the apps will continue to download and install in the background, so you'll have to wait a little longer for everthing to be exactly like it was before you've started all this. Congratulations, you refreshed your device and have the final iOS 10.2.1 installed, too. Source
  7. Where Can You Download LineageOS, CyanogenMod's Replacement? It's only a matter of weeks since we learned that CyanogenMod was closing down and LineageOS would replace it. At the time, little was known about the launch schedule for the open source, Android-based operating system, but that has all changed. On Friday, the LineageOS team announced that builds will "start rolling out this weekend". At time of writing the downloads have yet to make an appearance, but there is a download portal ready for you to keep an eye on. The team excitedly says that "it's nearly 'go time' for builds to start flowing", and advertised the availability of the Lineage infrastructure status page. More usefully, there is also a wiki for the OS, as well as a stats page that shows (at time of writing) that even before builds have been officially made available, there have been more than 75,000 installs. But what about the all-important download page? There is now a LineageOS Downloads portal up and running, but despite the proclamation that downloads would roll out this weekend, the page currently disappointingly reads: "Coming soon". What's clear, however, is that LineageOS is about to arrive any second, and with this in mind the development team has shared further details about what to expect: More than this, eager users are provided with more details about how the actual installation process will work: If you're missing CyanogenMod, now is the time to turn your attention to the LineageOS download page. Source Alternate Source: First Official Lineage OS Builds To Roll Out This Weekend
  8. Explained — What's Up With the WhatsApp 'Backdoor' Story? Feature or Bug! What is a backdoor? By definition: "Backdoor is a feature or defect of a computer system that allows surreptitious unauthorized access to data, " either the backdoor is in encryption algorithm, a server or in an implementation, and doesn't matter whether it has previously been used or not. Yesterday, we published a story based on findings reported by security researcher Tobias Boelter that suggests WhatsApp has a backdoor that "could allow" an attacker, and of course the company itself, to intercept your encrypted communication. The story involving the world's largest secure messaging platform that has over a billion users worldwide went viral in few hours, attracting reactions from security experts, WhatsApp team, and Open Whisper Systems, who partnered with Facebook to implement end-to-end encryption in WhatsApp. Note: I would request readers to read complete article before reaching out for a conclusion. And also, suggestions and opinions are always invited What's the Issue: The vulnerability relies on the way WhatsApp behaves when an end user's encryption key changes. WhatsApp, by default, trusts new encryption key broadcasted by a contact and uses it to re-encrypt undelivered messages and send them without informing the sender of the change. In my previous article, I have elaborated this vulnerability with an easy example, so you can head on to read that article for better understanding. Facebook itself admitted to this WhatsApp issue reported by Boelter, saying that "we were previously aware of the issue and might change it in the future, but for now it's not something we're actively working on changing." What Experts argued: According to some security experts — "It's not a backdoor, rather it’s a feature to avoid unnecessarily re-verification of encryption keys upon automatic regeneration." Open Whisper Systems says — "There is no WhatsApp backdoor," "it is how cryptography works," and the MITM attack "is endemic to public key cryptography, not just WhatsApp." A spokesperson from WhatsApp, acquired by Facebook in 2014 for $16 Billion, says — "The Guardian's story on an alleged backdoor in WhatsApp is false. WhatsApp does not give governments a backdoor into its systems. WhatsApp would fight any government request to create a backdoor." What's the fact: Notably, none of the security experts or the company has denied the fact that, if required, WhatsApp, on government request, or state-sponsored hackers can intercept your chats. What all they have to say is — WhatsApp is designed to be simple, and users should not lose access to messages sent to them when their encryption key is changed. Open Whisper Systems (OWS) criticized the Guardian reporting in a blog post saying, "Even though we are the creators of the encryption protocol supposedly "backdoored" by WhatsApp, we were not asked for comment." What? "...encryption protocol supposedly "backdoored" by WhatsApp…" NO! No one has said it's an "encryption backdoor;" instead this backdoor resides in the way how end-to-end encryption has been implemented by WhatsApp, which eventually allows interception of messages without breaking the encryption. As I mentioned in my previous story, this backdoor has nothing to do with the security of Signal encryption protocol created by Open Whisper Systems. It's one of the most secure encryption protocols if implemented correctly. Then Why Signal is more Secure than WhatsApp? You might be wondering why Signal private messenger is more secure than Whatsapp, while both use the same end-to-end encryption protocol, and even recommended by the same group of security experts who are arguing — "WhatsApp has no backdoor." It's because there is always room for improvement. The signal messaging app, by default, allows a sender to verify a new key before using it. Whereas, WhatsApp, by default, automatically trusts the new key of the recipient with no notification to the sender. And even if the sender has turned on the security notifications, the app notifies the sender of the change only after the message is delivered. So, here WhatsApp chose usability over security and privacy. It’s not about 'Do We Trust WhatsApp/Facebook?': WhatsApp says it does not give governments a "backdoor" into its systems. No doubt, the company would definitely fight the government if it receives any such court orders and currently, is doing its best to protect the privacy of its one-billion-plus users. But what about state-sponsored hackers? Because, technically, there is no such 'reserved' backdoor that only the company can access. Why 'Verifying Keys' Feature Can't Protect You? WhatsApp also offers a third security layer using which you can verify the keys of other users with whom you are communicating, either by scanning a QR code or by comparing a 60-digit number. But here’s the catch: This feature ensure that no one is intercepting your messages or calls at the time you are verifying the keys, but it does not ensure that no one, in the past had intercepted or in future will intercept your encrypted communication, and there is no way, currently, that would help you identify this. WhatsApp Prevention against such MITM Attacks are Incomplete WhatsApp is already offering a "security notifications" feature that notifies users whenever a contact's security code changes, which you need to turn on manually from app settings. But this feature is not enough to protect your communication without the use of another ultimate tool, which is — Common Sense. Have you received a notification indicating that your contact's security code has changed? Instead of offering 'Security by Design,' WhatsApp wants its users to use their common sense not to communicate with the contact whose security key has been changed recently, without verifying the key manually. The fact that WhatsApp automatically changes your security key so frequently (for some reasons) that one would start ignoring such notifications, making it practically impossible for users to actively looking each time for verifying the authenticity of session keys. What WhatsApp should do? Without panicking all one-billion-plus users, WhatsApp can, at least: Stop regenerating users' encryption keys so frequently (I clearly don't know why the company does so). Give an option in the settings for privacy-conscious people, which if turned on, would not automatically trust new encryption key and send messages until manually accepted or verified by users. ...because just like others, I also hate using two apps for communicating with my friends and work colleagues i.e. Signal for privacy and WhatsApp because everyone uses it. Source
  9. WhatsApp Security: Make This Change Right Now! Security researchers found a backdoor in the popular messaging application WhatsApp recently that could allow WhatsApp to intercept and read user messages. Facebook, the owner of WhatsApp, claims that it is impossible to intercept messages on WhatsApp thanks to the services end-to-end encryption. The company states that no one, not even itself, can read what is sent when both sender and recipient use the latest version of the application. It turns out however that there is a way for WhatsApp to read user messages, as security researcher Tobias Boelter (via The Guardian) found out. Update: In a statement sent to Ghacks, a WhatsApp spokesperson provided the following insight on the claim: WhatsApp has the power to generate new encryption keys for users who are not online. Both the sender and the recipient of messages are not made aware of that, and the sender would send any message not yet delivered again by using the new encryption key to protect the messages from third-party access. The recipient of the message is not made aware of that. The sender, only if Whatsapp is configured to display security notifications. This option is however not enabled by default. While WhatsApp users cannot block the company -- or any state actors requesting data -- from taking advantage of the loophole, they can at least activate security notifications in the application. The security researcher reported the vulnerability to Facebook in April 2016 according to The Guardian. Facebook's response was that it was "intended behavior" according to the newspaper. Activate security notifications in WhatsApp To enable security notifications in WhatsApp, do the following: Open WhatsApp on the device you are using. Tap on menu, and select Settings. Select Account on the Settings page. Select Security on the page that opens. Enable "show security notifications" on the Security page. You will receive notifications when a contact's security code has changed. While this won't prevent misuse of the backdoor, it will at least inform you about its potential use. Source Alternate Source - 1: WhatsApp Encryption Has Backdoor, Facebook Says It's "Expected Behaviour" Alternate Source - 2: WhatsApp Backdoor allows Hackers to Intercept and Read Your Encrypted Messages Alternate Source - 3: Oh, for F...acebook: Critics bash WhatsApp encryption 'backdoor' Alternate Source - 4: Your encrypted WhatsApp messages can be read by anyone Alternate Source - 5: How to protect yourself from the WhatsApp 'backdoor' Alternate Source - 6: 'Backdoor' in WhatsApp's end-to-end encryption leaves messages open to interception [Updated] Detailed Explanation of the Issue and Prevention/Alternatives:
  10. Nokia Could Launch a Foldable Smartphone of Its Own The Finnish company could join the innovation race While Samsung is expected to launch its own foldable handsets, Apple is likely to order them from those companies who own the technology required. LG on the other hand will use its foldable panel technology inside products ordered by other companies, like Apple for example. If Nokia wants to remain in tow, it needs to come up with similar devices that will compete with Samsung, Apple and LG products, as well as other companies that might introduce foldable smartphones. In this regard, it appears that the Finnish company has already filed for a patent that describes a foldable device, which could very well be a smartphone. The patent granted by the US Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) is not the first of its kind. Nokia has been filing similar patents for this type of technology since 2005, so we might not really see a Nokia-branded foldable smartphone anytime soon. The main idea behind the foldable technology is to try to provide customers with larger displays in a pocket-sized form factor. The patent reads: “In this way it is possible to provide a pocket size device with a relatively large display (for example, a 6, 7 or 8 inch display or larger)." Until the time comes for Nokia to compete other handset maker in innovation, the Finnish company is expected to have its second Android smartphone revealed next month at Mobile World Congress. A flagship smartphone, known as Nokia 8, will be introduced in late February, but it will probably not arrive on the market until March or April, just like other flagships from rival companies. Source
  11. BQ Aquaris Phones Powered by Ubuntu to Land in India in Two Weeks The OS made by Canonical will arrive in another major region The Ubuntu Touch operating system will arrive in India in a couple of week aboard the BQ Aquaris E4.5 and BQ Aquaris E5 phones. Canonical's reach is extending slowly to encompass the globe. With the help of Bq and Meizu, users can now buy Ubuntu phones in China, Europe, the United States, and now India. It might not look like much, but think about it for a second. This operating system arrived on a phone only six months ago, and it's still under heavy development. It's a stable OS, and it's reaching more and more regions. An official announcement about the impending launch in India hasn't been made just yet, but some Ubuntu insiders have revealed some information about what is happening over there. Carla Sella has been kind enough to gather all of this info on her blog and share it with everyone. Ubuntu Touch is expanding its reachIt's interesting to see that Ubuntu for phones is starting to enter markets other than the current ones. It will be a while until Ubuntu Touch becomes a global phenomenon, but it's getting there one region at a time. "BQ will be launching the same two European devices. BQ Aquaris E4.5 and BQ Aquaris E5, with a black variant in India on the Snapdeal website. 2 weeks after launch there will be an Ubuntu Store on Snapdeal where other Ubuntu products will be available. We haven't got a precise date for the launch, but it will happen probably in the next two weeks. For the Indian launch, Ubuntu Phone will not be released on devices with a specific Indian image but there will be specific apps content available from an Indian specific app store," reads the announcement on Carla Sella's blog. There won't be a dedicated release for India, so the launch shouldn't pose too many problems. Source