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  1. KNOW  YOUR  MEME

    KNOW YOUR MEME About Memes are broadly defined as culturally transmitted information, or ideas and beliefs that can be spread from one organism, or group of organisms, to another.[2] A key component to the meme concept is that the information is able to self-replicate, and in turn undergoes a type of natural selection, much like biological genes and viruses. Origin The word was coined by evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins in his 1976 book The Selfish Gene (shown below). The book focused on the importance of self-replication in evolution, and pointed to the gene as the unit of biological information that is subject to selection pressures.[1]He postulated that perhaps not only biological information undergoes natural selection, and that anything that is capable of replicating itself would also be susceptible to selection pressures, like ideas and beliefs. The word “meme” was used to label this type of self-replicating cultural information, and it was derived from the Greek word mimema, which translates to “something imitated”. Spread With the commercialization of the internet in 1995,[6] modern memes gradually became more strongly associated with internet memes. Internet memes are associated with media, catchphrases, and more general trends that spread throughout various outlets on the World Wide Web like chat clients, blogs, social networking sites, email, forums and image boards. They’re often used to point out how trends online evolve and change over time, creating various new derivatives.[5] Russian Anti-Meme Law The Russian Anti-Meme Law refers to the Russian government’s ban on impersonating or sharing doctored image macros of public figures that are deemed out-of-context in relation to their personality or reputation in real life. The policy was introduced in early April 2015 as a direct result of a court decision in Moscow which ruled the unauthorized use of Russian singer Valeri Syutkin’s images as an internet meme to be an infringement of his privacy. However in other areas of the world, the ban showed a Streisand Effect as satire and memeification towards Russia’s President Vladimir Putin showed an increase. #MemeGate #MemeGate refers to an online feud between YouTubers LeafyIsHere and Ethan Klein of h3h3productions starting in late March 2016. The primary causes of the disagreement centered on accusations that LeafyIsHere cyberbullyied young and disabled vloggers and that Klein was hypocritical and preached sanctimonious views. Various Examples Related Sites KnowYourMeme Know Your Meme is a database style website run by the Cheezburger Network. Although the site has a small support team, the site is largely dependent on crowdsourcing for the documentation of memes as they develop and for the submission of viral media as it spreads. Encyclopedia Dramatica Encyclopedia Dramatica (or ED) is a satirical internet-culture based wiki created in late 2004 dedicated to documenting and categorizing internet memes and other cultural phenomenon. It is famous for having NSFW content that is largely uncensored. Originally hosted at encyclopediadramatica.com, it was turned into the “safe for work” Semantic Mediawiki OhInternet. Most of the articles were salvaged from the website and are available for download, and a new wiki EncyclopediaDramatica.se (previously EncyclopediaDramatica.es, .se, and .ch) has been set up containing most of the old articles, and is constantly being updated with new articles. TV Tropes TV Tropes is a wiki devoted to the documentation of “tropes”, which are tools of the trade for storytelling in movies, television shows, literature, memes, and other forms of media. These conventions and devices are used in all forms of fiction, and should not be confused with clichés. Related Subcultures The Internet The Internet is a system of interconnected computer networks linking billions of machines worldwide using the TCP/IP Internet protocol suite. Use of the Internet in the West expanded rapidly throughout the 1990s, growing over 100x within two decades. The Internet is the source of internet memes and is naturally the subject of numerous memes. Fandoms A fandom is a social group based around a particular interest and comprised of individuals who share that interest. On the internet, the term is typically used to refer to the fans of media franchises. It is often associated with fanfiction, as well as fan-made art and music. Fandoms are known for spawning large varieties of memes and in-jokes. Meme Elitism Meme Elitisim is an online ideology rooted in the opposition to the popularization of memes among non-underground communities and the mainstream media. While elitism has been a staple element of online communities since the days of Usenet newsgroups, such disdain for the promulgation of meme culture can be seen as a countermovement to the growing influence of social media in the Internet culture which began in the late 2000s. Those who pertain to this belief tend to have ties with online communities that thrived before the arrival of Web 2.0 and view themselves as arbitrators of what a meme can be and cannot be. Ironic Memes Ironics Memes is a subculture surrounding memes that are used satirically, usually by being deliberately humorless, crude, or overused, as a way to both criticize meme or meme elitism cultures, which has been considered by some to have become overused and unfunny with time, usually due to The Family Guy Effect, as well as to catch those with less Internet experience off guard. The use of ironic memes often includes intentional overuse of older Internet phenomena, such as 1337 speak or rage comics, as well as the use of the word “meme” as a replacement for some parts of speech, usually nouns or verbs. Related Memes Various meta memes exist that make use of the word meme or memes within their own memes. Meme Lord / Meme Master Meme Lord is an internet slang term used to refer to someone who shows a strong passion for memes.[9] The alternate term Meme Master is often used as a synonym.[10] Meme Master was first used on March 2nd, 2006, by user Duffergeek on his blog.[11] In his post titled C’est la même meme he posts various facts about himself and near the end says “1. Leslie – Go Go Meme Master!” Memeing Memeing is an internet slang verb that means to create or spread a meme. In 2013, the verb evolved to also mean communicating through memes.[7] On May 3rd, 1996, Matthew Aaron Taylor first used the term memeing in the title Fiction, AL, and the Memeing of Life for an online article about memes on the site Telepolis.[8] Meme Overload Meme Overload is internet slang which indicates that multiple internet meme references have been made. It often refers to images and videos, but can also be seen as a subgenre of online remix culture largely driven by the hyperinflation of online media and in-jokes in general. Meme Magic Meme Magic is a slang term used to describe the hypothetical power of sorcery and voodoo supposedly derived from certain internet memes that can transcend the realm of cyberspace and result in real life consequences. Since its coinage on the imageboard 8chan, the fictitious concept has gained popularity on 4chan’s /pol/ (politically incorrect) board and been heavily associated with several in-jokes and shitposting fads on the site, including Ebola-chan, Baneposting, and Donald Trump. Dank Memes Dank Memes is an ironic expression used to mock online viral media and in-jokes that have exhausted their comedic value to the point of being trite or cliché. In this context, the word “dank,” originally coined as a term for high quality marijuana, is satirically used as a synonym for “cool.” External References [1] Wikipedia – Richard Dawkins; Fathering the meme [2] Dictionary – Meme [3] KnowYourMeme – Internet Meme Database [4] Encyclopedia Dramatica – Main Page [5] Wikipedia – Internet meme [6] FAQs – Internet – The 1970s, The 1980s, Birth of the Internet [7] Urban Dictionary – Memeing [8] Telepolis – Fiction, AL, and the Memeing of Life [9] Urban Dictionary – memelord [10] Urban Dictionary – meme master [11] Duffergeek – Duffergeek March 2006 SOURCE and much more on the subject Special thanks goes to @SnakeMasteR who posted somewhere else the link to the site Hey @fl0ppyd1scours3, you might be interested, as you are the starter of nsane general meme thread.
  2. Hi I have a broadband connection and a 4G mobile data service as internet service to my laptop (Windows). The broadband data speed is high but the internet service goes off often and resumes. To manage that I got a 4G mobile data service - internet connection which has lower data speed while is having a daily limit. I always connect both my broadband and 4G mobile data service with my laptop. When both services are up, how to know which internet service (broadband or 4G mobile) is being utilized by system (alternatively, how to assign broadband as preferred internet connection for the system?) Looking for a (internet service / connection fail-over mechanism) software or any internet network configuration such that the internet for laptop works mainly on broadband and should switch AUTOMATICALLY to mobile data service, in case of broadband service failure and switch BACK automatically to broadband, once the broadband service resumes Thank you
  3. Firefox Portable Latest Build Online Installer by demon.devin (Softables.tk/) Built using the latest version of my PortableApps Compiler; Installer code included as well. Thanks to @Geez for pointing me in the right direction for adding the version selection custom install page. I had to heavily rewrite and debug anyway but I got it and it looks sweet.. To upgrade Firefox Portable, simply rerun the installer and enter your desired version of Firefox that you would like to download and install. New In Rev. 2: When installing this PAF, there's a page where it asks you to enter the version you want to install. To install the latest, stable build enter: latest To install the latest, Beta build enter: beta To install the latest, DevEdition build enter: devedition To install the latest, ESR build enter: esr To install any other version, enter the version number of that build and install as normal. HASHES: CRC32: 3288851D MD5: B5148B93B1ADAA4719B747B12EE1559C DOWNLOADS: Mirrors: http://softables.tk/depository/internet/firefox Site: https://www.upload.ee Sharecode[?]: /files/7601871/FirefoxPortable_x86_x64_Latest_Builds_Rev._2_online.paf.exe.html
  4. North Korea has opened a new internet connection with the outside world, this time via Russia, a move which cybersecurity experts say would strengthen the country’s internet and its ability to conduct cyberattacks. North Korea has been blamed for several major cyberattacks in recent years, including against banks and Sony Pictures, as well as the WannaCry ransomware attack. Pyongyang has routinely denied any involvement. Dyn Research, a company which monitors internet connectivity, said it had seen Russian telecommunications company TransTeleCom routing North Korean traffic since about 0900 GMT on Sunday. Previous traffic was handled via China Unicom. TransTeleCom could not be immediately reached to comment on the report. North Korea’s internet is limited to a few hundred connections. But these connections are vital for coordinating the country’s cyber attacks, said Bryce Boland, FireEye’s chief technology office for the Asia-Pacific region. Boland also confirmed the new connection, which was first reported by 38 North, a project of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). Boland said the Russian connection would enhance North Korea’s ability to command future cyberattacks. Many of the cyber attacks conducted on behalf of Pyongyang came from outside North Korea, using hijacked computers, he said, while those ordering and controlling the attacks remained inside, communicating to hackers and hijacked computers from computers within North Korea. “This will improve the resiliency of their network and increase their ability to conduct command and control over those activities,” Boland said. The Washington Post reported earlier that the U.S. Cyber Command has been carrying out denial of service attacks against hackers from North Korea. The operation was due to end at the weekend.(wapo.st/2yRbg8w) < Here >
  5. Last Friday, someone in Google fat-thumbed a border gateway protocol (BGP) advertisement and sent Japanese Internet traffic into a black hole. The trouble began when The Chocolate Factory “leaked” a big route table to Verizon, the result of which was traffic from Japanese giants like NTT and KDDI was sent to Google on the expectation it would be treated as transit. Since Google doesn't provide transit services, as BGP Mon explains, that traffic either filled a link beyond its capacity, or hit an access control list, and disappeared. The outage in Japan only lasted a couple of hours, but was so severe that Japan Times reports the country's Internal Affairs and Communications ministries want carriers to report on what went wrong. BGP Mon dissects what went wrong here, reporting that more than 135,000 prefixes on the Google-Verizon path were announced when they shouldn't have been. Since it leaked what the monitors call “a full table” to Verizon, the fat-thumb error also provided a “peek into what Google's peering relationships look like and how their peers traffic engineer towards Google”. For example, BGP Mon explains how the mistake hit ISP Jastel (Jasmine Telecom) in Thailand: “If we take a closer look at the AS paths involved starting at the right side, we see the prefix was announced by 45629 (Jastel) as expected. Since Jastel peers with Google (15169) that’s the next AS we see. The next AS in the path is 701 (Verizon) and this is where it is getting interesting as Verizon has now started to provide transit for Jastel via Google. “Verizon (701) then announced that to several of it’s customers, some of them very large such as KPN (286) and Orange (5511). So by just looking at four example paths we can see it hit large networks in Europe, Latin America, the US, and India (9498 Airtel).” BGP is the Internet's protocol for distributing routing information between networks. A BGP advertisement shouts out to the rest of the internet to announce things like “if you give me traffic for Verizon, it will reach its destination”. Designed for a more trusting (and much smaller) Internet, BGP's most serious shortcoming is that it's up to network admins to check and filter information in route advertisements. As BGP Mon notes, BGP leaks are “a great risk to the Internet's stability”, and both sides of an advertisement should be filtering them before accepting them. Previous BGP incidents have sent YouTube traffic to Pakistan, blackholed Chinese traffic, made Belarus the default route for more traffic than it could handle, and redirected Level 3's traffic to Malaysia. There are various proposals to tweak BGP to stop this sort of thing happening, but as is so often the case, implementation is lagging far behind requirement. Article BGPMON - explanation of cause of outages in Japan and beyond
  6. All modern web browsers leak extension information to sites if the sites run scripts to pull the information. We talked about the findings of a research term that published its findings recently in a paper. Unless scripts are blocked, sites may run scripts that check the response time of the browser as it is different when checks are made for fake extensions and fake resources, and existing extensions and fake resources. Firefox's situation is special, as it supports the legacy add-on system and the new WebExtensions system. The researcher tested the browser's legacy add-on system only, but suggested that Firefox's new system would also be vulnerable. An anonymous reader pointed out that Firefox's WebExtensions system uses random IDs, and that this meant that the method to enumerate extensions would not work in that case (unlike in Chrome and other Chromium based browsers). While that is correct, Mozilla's implementation introduces a new issue that allows sites to identify users if WebExtensions expose content to sites as the random IDs are permanent. "... in particular, they [Mozilla] changed the initial scheme (moz-extension://[extID]/[path]) to moz-extension://[random-UUID]/[path]. Unfortunately, while this change makes indeed more difficult to enumerate user extensions, it introduces a far more dangerous problem. In fact, the random-UUID token can now be used to precisely fingerprint users if it is leaked by an extensions. A website can retrieve this UUID and use it to uniquely identify the user, as once it is generated the random ID never changes. We reported this design-related bug to Firefox developers as well." If a site manages to get hold of the ID, it may track the Firefox installation as that ID never changes. This is not just theoretical either; Earthling, one of the maintainers of the Ghacks Firefox user.js file, has created a proof of concept that highlights a leak in Firefox's native Screenshot tool. While this particular example requires that users click on the screenshot button in the Firefox interface to make the unique ID available to the site, other extensions may expose content without user interaction. Apple's Safari uses a random UUID system as well, and the researchers discovered that they could enumerate about 40% of all extensions as its implementation is flawed. If the WebExtension exposes content to sites because they have implementation flaws, sites may fingerprint users based on the unique ID that gets exposed in the process. Closing Words Mozilla needs to rework the implementation to protect users of the browser from this. Even if you don't use WebExtensions at all, you may be vulnerable to this as Firefox ships with several system add-ons that may expose the ID to sites. (Thanks Pants and Earthling) Article source
  7. How fast is your internet speed?

    I wonder what is the plan on other country dsl they have... i got upgraded to 8mb
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