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Found 5 results

  1. Lifetime licence for Kryptel 8.0

    Lifetime licence for Kryptel 8.0 Kryptel is an encryption tool that provides fast, reliable, and failure-resistant protection of sensitive data using industry standard AES 256-bit encryption. Easy-to-use drag-and-drop interface combined with advanced encryption technologies makes military-strength data protection affordable for everyone. Other features of Kryptel include encrypted backups, secure file deletion (shredding), data compression, batch encryption capabilities, and integration into Windows’ right-click context menu. It even comes in a portable version you can run on any computer from a USB flash drive, without installing. Version 8.0, latest For Windows 2000, XP, Vista, 7, 8, 10 multi-computer lifetime license, for commercial or noncommercial use No free updates; if you update the giveaway, it may become unregistered You get free tech support You must redeem the code before this offer has ended Giveaway homepage: https://sharewareonsale.com/s/inv-softworks-kryptel-freebie-sale Product homepage: https://www.kryptel.com/products/kryptel.php
  2. Researchers believe a new encryption technique may be key to maintaining a balance between user privacy and government demands. For governments worldwide, encryption is a thorn in the side in the quest for surveillance, cracking suspected criminal phones, and monitoring communication. Officials are applying pressure on technology firms and app developers which provide end-to-end encryption services provide a way for police forces to break encryption. However, the moment you provide a backdoor into such services, you are creating a weak point that not only law enforcement and governments can use -- assuming that tunneling into a handset and monitoring is even within legal bounds -- but threat actors, and undermining the security of encryption as a whole. As the mass surveillance and data collection activities of the US National Security Agency hit the headlines, faith in governments and their ability to restrain such spying to genuine cases of criminality began to weaken. Now, the use of encryption and secure communication channels is ever-more popular, technology firms are resisting efforts to implant deliberate weaknesses in encryption protocols, and neither side wants to budge. What can be done? From the outset, something has got to give. However, researchers from Boston University believe they may have come up with a solution. On Monday, the team said they have developed a new encryption technique which will give authorities some access, but without providing unlimited access in practice, to communication. In other words, a middle ground -- a way to break encryption to placate law enforcement, but not to the extent that mass surveillance on the general public is possible. Mayank Varia, Research Associate Professor at Boston University and cryptography expert, has developed the new technique, known as cryptographic "crumpling." In a paper documenting the research, lead author Varia says that the new cryptography methods could be used for "exceptional access" to encrypted data for government purposes while keeping user privacy at large at a reasonable level. "Our approach places most of the responsibility for achieving exceptional access on the government, rather than on the users or developers of cryptographic tools," the paper notes. "As a result, our constructions are very simple and lightweight, and they can be easily retrofitted onto existing applications and protocols." The crumpling techniques use two approaches -- the first being a Diffie-Hellman key exchange over modular arithmetic groups which leads to an "extremely expensive" puzzle which must be solved to break the protocol, and the second a "hash-based proof of work to impose a linear cost on the adversary for each message" to recover. Crumpling requires strong, modern cryptography as a precondition as it allows per-message encryption keys and detailed management. The system requires this infrastructure so a small number of messages can be targeted without full-scale exposure. The team says that this condition will also only permit "passive" decryption attempts, rather than man-in-the-middle (MiTM) attacks. By introducing cryptographic puzzles into the generation of per-message cryptographic keys, the keys will be possible to decrypt but will require vast resources to do so. In addition, each puzzle will be chosen independently for each key, which means "the government must expend effort to solve each one." "Like a crumple zone in automotive engineering, in an emergency situation the construction should break a little bit in order to protect the integrity of the system as a whole and the safety of its human users," the paper notes. "We design a portion of our puzzles to match Bitcoin's proof of work computation so that we can predict their real-world marginal cost with reasonable confidence." To prevent unauthorized attempts to break encryption an "abrasion puzzle" serves as a gatekeeper which is more expensive to solve than individual key puzzles. While this would not necessarily deter state-sponsored threat actors, it may at least deter individual cyberattackers as the cost would not be worth the result. The new technique would allow governments to recover the plaintext for targeted messages, however, it would also be prohibitively expensive. A key length of 70 bits, for example -- with today's hardware -- would cost millions and force government agencies to choose their targets carefully and the expense would potentially prevent misuse. The research team estimates that the government could recover less than 70 keys per year with a budget of close to $70 million dollars upfront -- one million dollars per message and the full amount set out in the US' expanded federal budget to break encryption. However, there could also be additional costs of $1,000 to $1 million per message, and these kind of figures are difficult to conceal, especially as one message from a suspected criminal in a conversation without contextual data is unlikely to ever be enough to secure conviction. The research team says that crumpling can be adapted for use in common encryption services including PGP, Signal, as well as full-disk and file-based encryption. "We view this work as a catalyst that can inspire both the research community and the public at large to explore this space further," the researchers say. "Whether such a system will ever be (or should ever be) adopted depends less on technology and more on questions for society to answer collectively: whether to entrust the government with the power of targeted access and whether to accept the limitations on law enforcement possible with only targeted access." The research was funded by the National Science Foundation. Source
  3. To comply with new laws \ Last month, Apple announced that it would hand over management of its Chinese iCloud data to a local, state-owned firm in China called Cloud Big Data Industrial Development Co (GCBD) at the end of February in order to comply with new laws. Now, Reuters is reporting that Apple will also hold iCloud encryption keys for Chinese users in China itself, raising new concerns about government access. The new policy does not affect any iCloud users outside of China. As Reuters notes, that compliance means Chinese authorities will have easier access to user data that’s stored in Apple’s iCloud service, especially now that, for the first time, Apple will store the keys for Chinese iClouds within China. Apple says it alone would control the encryption keys, and Chinese authorities do not have any “backdoor” to access data. Until now, such keys were exclusively stored in the US for all users. Starting February 28th, Apple’s operation of iCloud services in the country will transfer to GCBD. Reuters spoke to human rights activists who said there was fear that those in power could use the new rules to track down dissidents. In a statement, Apple said it “had to comply with recently introduced Chinese laws that require cloud services offered to Chinese citizens be operated by Chinese companies and that the data be stored in China.” Apple noted that its values don’t change even if it is “subjected to each country’s laws.” Apple’s attempt to capitalize one of its largest growth markets has been a juggle between consumer rights and business opportunities. Last year, the company controversially removed VPN apps from its App Store in China, claiming to only be following the law in order to continue operating there. It’s also snuck in several nods to the Chinese market during its major product announcement keynotes, such as references to WeChat during its previous demonstrations of the Apple Watch. Apple chief executive Tim Cook is also due to co-chair the China Development Forum in March. We’ve reached out to Apple for further comment. Source
  4. [Poster Comment: Personally I don't understand why they would need encryption since they had no protection in the age of film, which could be and was confiscated or destroyed and could be stolen. Just because the medium has changed there doesn't need to be an expensive system put in place that would cost everyone more, not just the professional photographers. And their cards could still be stolen.] A year after photojournalists and filmmakers sent a critical letter to camera makers for failing to add a basic security feature to protect their work from searches and hacking, little progress has been made. The letter, sent in late-2016, called on camera makers to build encryption into their cameras after photojournalists said they face "a variety of threats from border security guards, local police, intelligence agents, terrorists, and criminals when attempting to safely return their footage so that it can be edited and published," according to the Freedom of the Press Foundation, which published the letter. The threat against photojournalists remains high. The foundation's US Press Freedom Tracker tallied more than 125 incidents against reporters last year, including the smashing of reporters' cameras and the "bodyslam" incident. Even when they're out in the field, collecting footage and documenting evidence, reporters have long argued that without encryption, police, the military, and border agents in countries where they work can examine and search their devices. "The consequences can be dire," the letter added. Although iPhones and Android phones, computers, and instant messengers all come with encryption, camera makers have fallen behind. Not only does encryption protect reported work from prying eyes, it also protects sources -- many of whom put their lives at risk to expose corruption or wrongdoing. The lack of encryption means high-end camera makers are forcing their customers to choose between putting their sources at risk, or relying on encrypted, but less-capable devices, like iPhones. We asked the same camera manufacturers if they plan to add encryption to their cameras -- and if not, why. The short answer: don't expect much any time soon. An Olympus spokesperson said the company will "in the next year... continue to review the request to implement encryption technology in our photographic and video products and will develop a plan for implementation where applicable in consideration to the Olympus product roadmap and the market requirements." When reached, Canon said it was "not at liberty to comment on future products and/or innovation." S ony also said it "isn't discussing product roadmaps relative to camera encryption." A Nikon spokesperson said the company is "constantly listening to the needs of an evolving market and considering photographer feedback, and we will continue to evaluate product features to best suit the needs of our users." And Fuji did not respond to several requests for comment by phone and email prior to publication. Trevor Timm, executive director of the Freedom of the Press Foundation, told ZDNet that it's "extremely disappointing the major camera manufacturers haven't even committed to investing resources into more research into this issue, let alone actually building solutions into their cameras." "Dozens of the world's best filmmakers made clear a year ago that camera companies -- in today's world -- have an obligation to build in a way for everyone to encrypt their files and footage to potentially help keep them safe," he added. "I hope the camera companies eventually listen to some of their most important and at-risk customers," he said. Article
  5. Massive data breaches are now spreading at an alarming rate. Confidential information and personal records are getting leaked, lost and stolen – from threats both virtual and physical. On top of pains from unwanted access to sensitive information, penalties have become more severe and more frequent for non-compliance with regulations on financial, medical and personal data. No information security strategy is complete unless data is properly protected at the source where it is stored. Data encryption secures the confidentiality of sensitive data to address the risks of data leaks and data theft, while also ensuring regulatory compliance. If you store sensitive data, encryption is essential. Use Cases for Data Encryption Prevent Data Breaches Unwanted access – for data stored on active computers, shared workstations or network storage vulnerable to prying eyes Physical theft – for data stored on lost or stolen computers, laptops, external drives & USB sticks Protection of Sensitive Information Against Threats Personally Identifiable Information (PII) Electronic Health Records (EHR) Credit card data Insurance & financial records Student information Client records & customer databases Proprietary information or trade secrets Emails Chat histories Compliance with Regulations Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA) UK Data Protection Act Protection of Personal Information Act (POPI) - South Africa Homepage: https://www.jetico.com/data-encryption/encrypt-files-bestcrypt-container-encryption Download: https://www.jetico.com/data-encryption/encrypt-files-bestcrypt-container-encryption SETUP + PATCH: https://www.upload.ee Share code: /files/7946916/Jetico.BestCrypt.Container.Encryption.v9.03.70-F4CG.rar.html
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