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Found 121 results

  1. Hi All, Just wondering if Nokia with Canonical makes Ubuntu Touch Devices, does people love it and buy to help support Ubuntu Touch development? My wish is that Nokia should join hands with Canonical to make Ubuntu Devices. If that happens, all lazy s/w app giants will create apps supporting Ubuntu Touch platform. I'm calling s/w app giants as lazy bcoz if they would've supported Ubuntu Touch earlier, the OS could've been overtaking Android & Windows Phones(or Windows 10 Mobile) by now. All Nokia & Ubuntu/Linux fans(incl. myself) or devs out there, please suggest Nokia to create Ubuntu Devices in future ASAP. Please vote and provide feedback in comments(if any). Members please note that I'm referring to the future and not now. I'm not a fool to ask for/suggest a change in the first year of re-emerged Nokia. @steven36 & @teodz1984: Please read the desc carefully before providing comments.
  2. Canonical to Remove Old Unity 7 Scopes from Ubuntu Because They're Not Secure These won't be supported by Unity 8 anyway April will see the release of Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, but it also marks the fifth year of Unity user interface's implementation, which was first introduced as part of the Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) release. While Canonical's engineers are concentrating all of their efforts on bringing us the next-generation Unity 8 user interface, current Ubuntu Linux releases are still successfully using Unity 7, and so will Ubuntu 17.04. Old, unmaintained Unity 7 Scopes are still out there However, it would appear that the Ubuntu repositories still include some old, unmaintained Scopes that have security issues open, posing a threat to the entire system if installed and used. Most of these are related to some popular music playback apps and include unity-scope-audacious, unity-scope-clementine, unity-scope-gmusicbrowser, unity-scope-guayadeque, unity-scope-musique, and unity-scope-gourmet. Because of that, Canonical is planning on removing these and many other unmaintained Unity 7 Scopes from the official repositories, if their maintainers don't step up to patch any of the existing security issues, and also because Unity 8 won't support them. "Couple this with the decision to turn off online searches by default and I think it's time to consider dropping these Scopes from the archive. Plus of course, the fact that they won't work in Unity 8 in the future anyway," said Will Cooke, Ubuntu Desktop Manager at Canonical. If you submitted a Unity 7 Scope in the past, and no longer offer security fixes for it, please do everyone a favor and remove it from the repositories as soon as possible. Unity 7 will be supported for a few more years, but it doesn't have to be insecure. Source
  3. Canonical: 2017 Will See a Mir 1.0 Release, Plans to Implement Vulkan Support 2016 was a good year for Mir, says the company behind Ubuntu As most of you are aware, Canonical develops its own display server for Ubuntu, called Mir, which, in some ways, is similar to the X.Org Server and Wayland technologies. While Ubuntu on the desktop still uses X.Org Server's components, Mir is currently heavily tested for the Unity 8 user interface that Canonical plans on implementing by default for future releases of Ubuntu Linux, for desktops. However, until now, Mir has only been successfully deployed on mobile devices, powering the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system used in various official and unofficial Ubuntu Phone and Tablets. According to Alan Griffiths, Software Engineer at Canonical, 2016 was a great year for Mir, and in 2017 the company plans on releasing the 1.0 milestone of the display server, which should implement the long-anticipated Vulkan support. "2017 will see a cleanup of our "toolkit" API and better support for "platform" plugin modules," said Griffiths. "We will then be working on upstreaming our Mesa patch. That will allow us to release our (currently experimental) Vulkan support." Canonical is working on reducing latency for Mir Canonical worked very hard in 2016 to improve its Mir display server by enabling a client-side toolkit, application, or library to work on Mir, as well as to upstream Mir support into GTK+ 3, Qt, SDL2, and Kodi. They also managed to create Mir Abstraction Layer and released MirAL 1.0, but for 2017 the company plans on enabling Mir on new platforms, upstream their Mesa patch, and enable Mir on a new graphics API, such as Vulkan. Canonical is now working on reducing latency for Mir, and hops that 2017 will be the year when Mir becomes mature enough to be used on desktops, powering the next-generation Unity 8 display server. At the moment, the company did not reveal the exact date when Mir 1.0 will see the light of day, so we can only guess that it could launch sometime around the release of Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus), in mid-April, when they'll prepare for Ubuntu 17.10. Source
  4. Meet The GPD Pocket, A 7-inch Ubuntu Laptop The GPD Pocket Do you have small hands? Are you a Borrower? Do you consider 10-inch netbooks to be monstrous? If so, the GPD Pocket may be right up your (very miniature) street. GPD Pocket, 7″ Laptop The GPD Pocket is a 7-inch laptop that’s small enough to slip in to a pocket — and it will apparently be available in two versions: with Windows 10, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. As reported on Liliputing, GPD (the company who makes the device) is currently only showing the device off a few fancy renders and photos with a prototype unit. But GPD has form for releasing other (similar) devices, like the GPD Win, and Android gaming portables, so although a novelty this latest device is unlikely to be outright vapourware. The GPD Pocket touts some impressive specifications for the size, including a quad-core Intel Atom x7-Z8700 processor (the same one used in the Microsoft Surface 3), 4GB RAM and a high-res IPS touch display: 7-inch IPS touch display Intel Atom x7-Z8700 (quad-core @ 1.6GHz) 4GB of RAM 128GB of storage 1x USB Type-C 1x USB 3.0 Mini HDMI Out MicroSD Card slot Courage jack (“headphone port”) 7000 mAh battery The overall dimensions of the device mean you won’t be able to hammer away on a full-sized keyboard, but the chiclet style QWERTY one included (plus a ThinkPad-like mouse nub as there’s no room for a touchpad) looks perfectly serviceable for tweets, forum posts and some basic web browsing. Since I doubt anyone would be using this device as their primary device issues to do with the keyboard size, or lack of palm rest, etc, are unlikely to be primary considerations. No, the GPD Pocket is, as the name suggests, intended as the sort of device you literally slide into your pocket as you head out the door. The “bad” news is that, like everything these days, GPD plan to crowdfund the GPD Pocket over on Indiegogo sometime in February. Currently there’s no indication of pricing or release date, but providing it’s not too weighted at the high-end it could make a nice midrange alternative to Linux hobbyists. Source
  5. uNav 0.64 Turn-by-Turn GPS Navigation App Now Available for Ubuntu Phones Map viewer and GPS navigator for car, bike and walking uNav 0.64 comes four months after version 0.63, which was a minor update improving the simulator, adding support for skipping confirmation of routes, rounding off the distance to the nearest turn in guidance mode, fixing the '¿¿¿' string in POI names, adding CartoDB layers, as well as a bash script to generate translations. Not that uNav 0.64 is a major release, but it looks like it adds some improvements than the previous version. Among these, we can mention centering on POI (Point of Interest) in search instead of in an area, correct roundabout of arrow directions for some countries, and Breton voice support. Available now for all Ubuntu Phone users uNav 0.64 also attempts to improve the out-of-the-box experience for newcomers by fixing the main window, which appeared to be unnecessarily large, spicing up the "empty state" of the application, remove "hairdresser" from the POI list, as well as to rename various translation files. If you're the proud owner of an Ubuntu Phone and you're running the latest version of the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system (OTA-14), you should find the new uNav 0.64 release on the Ubuntu Store. Existing users can update the application right now through the usual channels. For those unfamiliar with uNav, it's an online and offline map viewer and GPS navigator powered by OpenStreetMap and Mapzen. It features convergence support, which means that you can use it on a desktop too if you're Ubuntu Phone can be converged. The app offers turn-by-turn navigation for bikes, cars, and walking. Source
  6. Watch This Terrifying 13ft Robot Walk, Thanks To Ubuntu The world’s first manned robot took its first formative (and no doubt very loud) steps in South Korea last week — but you may be surprised to hear that Ubuntu was there to assist it. Standing an impressive 13 feet high, the bipedal Method-2 robot is referred to “robot-powered suit” that responds and mimics the actions of the person sat inside the cockpit, Ripley Power Loader style! The machine, which is able to walk like a human, has to haul a huge 130kg arms in each lunge forward, and weighs 1.5 ton in total. From a short video posted by Ruptly TV, Ubuntu is involved in helping engineers monitor, debug, and process the robot as it stomps forward. While there’s no suggestion that the robot itself runs on Ubuntu or Linux (something that is not improbable) it’s nonetheless great to see open-source software (especially of the flavor we write about) being used in advancements in robotics and engineering. Around 30 engineers are said to have on the mechanical marvel, the design of which is, in part, inspired by films like Terminator says its (famous) designer Vitaly Bulgarov. R&D spending on the creation has thus far hit $200 million, and news reports say the Method-2 could go on sale by the end of 2017 — with an equally giant price tag of $8.3 million! For more details on the robot, including a glimpse at some truly epic sci-fi-esque photos of the machine in action, see this blog post over on Design Boom. And if you’re lucky enough to get to try one, please don’t run sudo snap install skynet on it! Source
  7. Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 Officially Released with Revamped Unity 8 Interface, Fixes Available now for all supported Ubuntu Phone/Table devices Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 has been in development for the past two and a half months, but it focuses on fixing bugs than adding new features. Probably the most exciting thing implemented in the OTA-14 update is a revamped Unity 8 design that sports a brand-new task manager with support for fuzzy backgrounds and app icons. "This time not so many changes released in overall but with the goal of introducing less regressions. Also, the commit log for this release isn't too verbose due to multiple different cherry-picking we had todo during the release. Possibly the best way to know what changed is looking at the Launchpad milestone," said Lukasz Zemczak. Oxide 1.17 and Opus audio codec support have landed Also new in the Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 update is version 1.17 of the Chromium-based Oxide web engine library, as well as Opus audio codec support, which was implemented in the qt-multimedia package. Among the improvements, we can mention that SMS notifications should now be displayed when the device is locked. Other than that, the device should no longer appear off during an image update, some alarm issues have been fixed, and it looks like vibrations will work again when other vibrations are enabled. There are various other small fixes, and for more details we recommend studying the full changelog on the Launchpad page of the OTA-14 milestone. Meanwhile, you can check your Ubuntu Phone or Tablet device to see if the Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 is available, as it has been released as a phased update, which means that it might take up to 24 hours to land in all regions. If you do not see the update, check again in a few hours, but by tomorrow, December 8, everyone should have it. Ubuntu Touch OTA-14 is currently supported on BQ Aquaris E4.5, BQ Aquaris E5, BQ Aquaris M10, BQ Aquaris M10 HD, Meizu MX4, Meizu PRO 5, Nexus 4, and Nexus 7 devices. Please note that the x86 emulator images don't work on Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) hosts. Check out the release notes for more details! Source
  8. Ubuntu Budgie Minimal Edition Coming Soon for Those Who Love Customizing the OS The ISO image is now in testing and uses 220MB of RAM However, we're aware of the fact that the Ubuntu Budgie team have a lot of work on their hands re-branding the entire project from the old name (budgie-remix) to the new one, and we can all agree it's a huge effort. Also, they're preparing for the distribution's first release as an official Ubuntu flavor, as part of Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus). The first development snapshot of Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 might land later this month, on December 29, when some of the opt-in flavors will participate in the Alpha 1 release. Until then, it looks like the team is working on an ultra minimal version of Ubuntu Budgie, for those who love customizing their installations. Ubuntu Budgie Minimal ISO will use 220MB of RAM or less The good news is that the Ubuntu Budgie Minimal ISO image will use no less than 220MB of RAM, which means that it's perfect for deployments of the Ubuntu-based operating system on computers from 10 years ago, especially considering the fact that the Budgie desktop environment is also very low on resources. However, it is mainly designed for those who want a barebone version of the OS, which they can shape into anything they want from Ubuntu Budgie by adding only the packages they see fit for their needs. More details about Ubuntu Budgie Minimal Edition will be unveiled shortly. A download link for the Ubuntu Budgie Ultra Minimal Edition is coming soon and will be available on the distro's website if you plan on taking it for a test drive. As usual, we'll keep you guys informed with the development cycle of Ubuntu Budgie, as well as the rest of the Ubuntu flavors, for the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) release, so stay tuned. Ultra minimal version of #ubuntubudgie now in testing - 220MB or less of RAM - for all of you who love customising their distro! pic.twitter.com/RyuFD8rhjG — Ubuntu Budgie (@UbuntuBudgie) December 10, 2016 Source
  9. Mesa 12.0.4 Promises 15% Performance Boost for Radeon Users on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS It's also coming soon to Ubuntu 16.10 users The Mesa 3D Graphics Library is a unique open-source implementation of the OpenGL graphics API for Linux-based operating systems, and it includes drivers for Intel, Radeon, and Nvidia graphics cards. But it looks like Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) was shipping with a pretty old version of Mesa. "[Ubuntu] 16.04 shipped with 11.2.0 so it’s a slightly bigger update there, while yakkety is already on 12.0.3 but the new version should give radeon users a 15% performance boost in certain games with complex shaders," explained Timo Aaltonen, Hardware Enablement, Field Expert Squad Team Lead at Canonical Ltd. Mesa 12.0.4 is coming soon to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 16.10 Therefore, the good news we'd like to share with you today is that Mesa 12.0.4 3D Graphics Library, which is currently the most advanced release of the Mesa 12.0 series, is coming soon to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 16.10, promising a 15% performance boost for AMD Radeon graphics cards. But before it lands in the stable repos of the latest Ubuntu releases, it needs to be thoroughly tested. Therefore, users are invited by Timo Aaltonen to give Mesa 12.0.4 a spin by adding his PPA (Personal Package Archive) using the commands listed below in the Terminal app and report if it works or not with their GPU. Intel Skylake seems to work well with Mesa 12.0.4, according to the developer. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:tjaalton/test sudo apt-get update Source
  10. You Can Now Package Your Apps as Snaps without Bundling Their Dependencies Resulting Snaps should be significantly smaller This is possible now because the latest ubuntu-app-platform snap build incorporates the standard Qt 5 libraries, the QML (Qt Meta Language) runtime, the Ubuntu UI (User Interface) toolkit, and their dependencies. The Oxide web engine library based on Chromium and related QML bindings is also bundled in the ubuntu-app-platform snap, so the new Snaps should now be significantly smaller. "This allows app developers to declare a dependency on this snap through the content sharing mechanism, thus reducing dramatically the size of the resulting app snaps," explains the developer. "I went through the exercise with the webbrowser-app snap. This proved surprisingly easy and the size of the snap (amd64 architecture) went down from 136MB to 22MB, a sizeable saving!" Snapcraft will soon be updated to support the new changes At the moment of writing this article, the Snapcraft Snap creator utility does not support the changes made to the ubuntu-app-platform snap, so it will still crawl for dependencies when attempting to package your apps as Snaps. An updated Snapcraft version will soon be made available for supported Ubuntu platforms. Also, if your app depends on a specific Qt module, you'll need to add it to the build. For those interested in more details, we recommend to check out actual changes made to the snapcraft.yaml file, as well as the temporary workaround that lets you use Snapcraft with the latest ubuntu-app-platform snap. All these changes lay the groundwork for next step in the massive adoption of Snaps as the universal package format for Linux-based operating systems. Source
  11. Ubuntu Budgie Is Now an Official Ubuntu Flavor The distro features the Budgie desktop environment That's right, after two successful major releases, budgie-remix has finally been accepted as an official Ubuntu flavor, earlier today during a meeting where four members of Canonical's Ubuntu Technical Board voted positive. As such, we're extremely happy to inform our readers that the new Ubuntu flavor is called Ubuntu Budgie. In April this year, when budgie-remix hit the road towards its first major release, versioned 16.04, we reported that David Mohammed was kind enough to inform Softpedia about the fact that he got in touch with Ubuntu MATE leader Martin Wimpress, who urged the developer to target Ubuntu 16.10 for an official status. budgie-remix 16.10 arrived as well this fall shortly after the release of Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), and the dream of becoming an official Ubuntu flavor is now a reality. "We now move full steam ahead and look forward to working with the Ubuntu Developer Membership Board to examine and work through the technical aspects [...] 17.04 will be our first official release under the new name," said David Mohammed in the announcement. Budgie 11 desktop environment is coming soon to Ubuntu Budgie 16.10 After this major announcement, most probably the budgie-remix developers will have a lot of work on their hands with the rebranding of the entire project from budgie-remix to Ubuntu Budgie, including the website and other components of the distribution, but we don't know yet if existing users will receive the changes. However, we know for sure that when the Solus Project releases the Budgie 11 desktop environment later this year, Ubuntu Budgie users will receive the major update as well through the official channels. In the meantime, you can start using Ubuntu Budgie right now by downloading the latest release from budgie-remix. In related news, the Ubuntu Budgie developers have recently discussed with Solus Project leader Ikey Doherty to ensure an effective and positive collaboration between the two teams, which means that any improvement made by Ubuntu Budgie devs to the Budgie desktop will also land for Solus users, or users of other distros using Budgie. "I look forward to working with you all in attaining that goal of making Budgie the number one go-to desktop, and honestly, us all enjoying it on an equal peer footing, is the most important part to me," said Ikey Doherty, who is currently working hard on re-architecting the Budgie desktop environment as detailed in our exclusive story. Source
  12. Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) - Stable - Final - Direct Download & Alternate Downloads: Ubuntu is distributed on two types of images described below. Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Server install image The server install image allows you to install Ubuntu permanently on a computer for use as a server. It will not install a graphical user interface. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) server install image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) server install image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. A full list of available files, including BitTorrent files, can be found below. If you need help burning these images to disk, see the Create a bootable USB stick on Windows or the Image Burning Guide or the USB Image Writing Guide. Download Pen Drive Linux's USB Installer or Download the Rufus USB installer Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavours: For Ubutnu Flavours downloads, you can view below. However, Edubuntu isn't available post Trusty Tahr. Ubuntu Flavour - Lubuntu - 16.10 Lubuntu is distributed on two types of images described below. Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Lubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are three images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Mac (PowerPC) and IBM-PPC (POWER5) desktop image For Apple Macintosh G3, G4, and G5 computers, including iBooks and PowerBooks as well as older IBM OpenPower 7xx machines. Alternate install image The alternate install image allows you to perform certain specialist installations of Lubuntu. It provides for the following situations: setting up automated deployments; upgrading from older installations without network access; LVM and/or RAID partitioning; installs on systems with less than about 384MiB of RAM (although note that low-memory systems may not be able to run a full desktop environment reasonably). In the event that you encounter a bug using the alternate installer, please file a bug on the debian-installer package. There are three images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) alternate install image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) alternate install image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Mac (PowerPC) and IBM-PPC (POWER5) alternate install image For Apple Macintosh G3, G4, and G5 computers, including iBooks and PowerBooks as well as older IBM OpenPower 7xx machines. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Kubuntu - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Kubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Mythubuntu - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Mythbuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Xubuntu - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Xubuntu without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 192MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Kylin - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-Kylin without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu MATE - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-MATE without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Mac (PowerPC) and IBM-PPC (POWER5) desktop image For Apple Macintosh G3, G4, and G5 computers, including iBooks and PowerBooks as well as older IBM OpenPower 7xx machines. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu GNOME - 16.10 Desktop image The desktop image allows you to try Ubuntu-GNOME without changing your computer at all, and at your option to install it permanently later. This type of image is what most people will want to use. You will need at least 384MiB of RAM to install from this image. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) desktop image Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. 32-bit PC (i386) desktop image For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Choose this if you are at all unsure. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg Ubuntu Flavour - Ubuntu Studio - 16.10 Ubuntu-Studio is distributed on two types of images described below. Install/live DVD The combined install/live DVD allows you either to install Ubuntu-Studio permanently on a computer, or (by entering 'live' at the boot prompt) to try Ubuntu-Studio without changing your computer at all. There are two images available, each for a different type of computer: 64-bit PC (AMD64) Install/live DVD Choose this to take full advantage of computers based on the AMD64 or EM64T architecture (e.g., Athlon64, Opteron, EM64T Xeon, Core 2). If you have a non-64-bit processor made by AMD, or if you need full support for 32-bit code, use the i386 images instead. Choose this if you are at all unsure. 32-bit PC (i386) Install/live DVD For almost all PCs. This includes most machines with Intel/AMD/etc type processors and almost all computers that run Microsoft Windows, as well as newer Apple Macintosh systems based on Intel processors. Signing Certificates For Verification: MD5SUMS MD5SUMS-metalink MD5SUMS-metalink.gpg MD5SUMS.gpg SHA1SUMS SHA1SUMS.gpg SHA256SUMS SHA256SUMS.gpg
  13. Fix WiFi Not Connecting In Linux Mint 18 And Ubuntu 16.04 Problem description I experienced this strange issue in Ubuntu 16.04 and Linux Mint 18. When I tried to connect to wifi, I clicked on the available wireless networks, entered the correct wifi password. A few seconds later, I was still not connected to the internet. I thought it may be that I entered an incorrect password. So, I tried to connect again. This time typing the password slowly and then I double checked it to make sure that the password was correct. But no, it won’t connect to the internet. This was frustrating as my wifi password is 26 characters long. Reason I went to the network settings to find out what was wrong with it. I noticed that my wifi password was not stored which could be normal as I was not asked if I wanted to connect to the network automatically. I manually entered the wifi password and saved it in the network settings in an effort to not have to enter the long passwords again. What surprised me that it just got connected to the internet after that. I don’t know exactly what made it work but it worked. I haven’t looked to find if it is a bug in this version of the network manager or not but I experienced the same issue after installing Linux Mint 18. And using this trick again saved me. Steps to fix wifi not connecting despite correct password in Linux Mint 18 and Ubuntu 16.04 Basically, all you need to do here is: go to Network Settings choose the network you are trying to connect to under the security tab, enter the wifi password manually save it This trick has worked for me repeatedly, both in Ubuntu and Linux Mint. I hope that it works for you too. Since I am using Linux Mint 18 right now, I am going to share screenshots so that it would help beginners to fix this issue. Step 1: Go to Network Settings: Step 2: Choose the network you are trying to connect to. Note that it already provides a configuration option because I tried to connect to it earlier. Step 3: Under the security tab, enter the wifi password manually and click on apply to save it: You’ll see that your network is now connected: I hope this helps you. Note that this article deals with the problem when the wireless network is working fine in your system but it cannot connect to the access point despite correct password. I suggest this article if there is no wireless network in Ubuntu or Linux Mint. Have you already encountered the same wireless connection issue in Ubuntu 16.04 or Linux Mint 18? If yes, how did you fix it? Source
  14. How to Add Mac OS X’s ‘Quick Look’ Feature to Ubuntu Sometimes Nautilus’ icon thumbnails and metadata just aren’t good enough. Sometimes you want to take a closer look at a file, photo or folder to make sure it’s the one you want. And that’s where GNOME Sushi can help. Quick Look for Linux GNOME Sushi adds a macOS style ‘Quick Look‘ feature to GNOME’s famous file manager. Just select a file and tap the spacebar to see a larger (and sometimes interactive) preview. Instant previews of image, music and video files are possible thanks to the GStreamer framework. Sushi can also supports file previews of most plaintext documents, including scripts with syntax highlighting, PDFs and HTML files. It’s a quick and effective way to take quick peeks at PDFs, photos and other documents without having to open them fully. Sadly Sushi doesn’t update the preview if you move off and select other files (which the macOS version does do). It also lacks any additional ‘actions’. For example, it’d be great if, having Sushi’d the right selfie from the 342 I’ve taken, I could tap a button to open it in the default image viewer, or shunt it to GIMP, et al. Install GNOME Sushi on Ubuntu Although a modest feature (there are no bells or whistle) Sushi’s seamless preview prowess is such that after a few days use you’ll wonder how you managed without! GNOME Sushi is not installed by default on Ubuntu, but you can install it very quickly using the command line: sudo apt-get install gnome-sushi Alternatively, install it using Ubuntu Software: <<< Click to install GNOME Sushi >>> Source
  15. 5 Things We Secretly Miss About Ubuntu In this age of convergence Ubuntu isn’t what it used to be. Sure, it’s super stable, far more compatible, and less buggy than it was a few years back. The polish and professionalism mirrors Canonical’s own transition from scrappy startup to server-ruling stalwart. But Ubuntu is also far less …Ubuntu-y than it used to be. The open-source OS has lost a little bit of its magic, diluting its personality to placate and appease critics. So here, with my tongues firmly wedged in my cheek, are five things I think we all secretly miss about Ubuntu of old. 1. The Ubuntu Login Sound The rhythmic melody of Ubuntu’s exotic signature login sound was, at one time, a sure-fire way to wake up the dead band announce your operating system choice to your entire class. It was also a fantastic to way to learn that your computer had randomly rebooted itself. Ubuntu disabled the login sound back around the time of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS — and while I don’t miss is having to dive for the mute key at login, I am still incredibly fond of the chime. 2. The Mascot Wallpapers << Gallery of Every Ubuntu Default Wallpaper, Ever >> Mascot wallpapers shinnied in just two releases of Ubuntu — Ubuntu 8.04 and Ubuntu funny how synonymous the Ubuntu mascot wallpapers are considering they shipped for just two releases. Yes, two. The Hardy Heron wallpaper is the best loved (and most well remembered) wallpaper the distro ever shipped with, the follow up Intrepid Ibex design was also striking (and not just because it looked like a set of coffee ring stains). Few wallpapers since 8.04 LTS ever proving as popular, so maybe Ubuntu should just revert back to it. I don’t think many of us would mind! 3. The Lurid Color Scheme Ahh, Ubuntu’s old colour scheme was a thing of beauty. Seriously! More orange than a tank filled with Fanta. Ubuntu’s use of orange (and brown) lives on through the Ambiance theme, but part of me misses the luridly glossy orange excess of old. There’s something about it, and the earthy, natural browns it was used with, that felt unique. Ubuntu is far better designed today than it was back in the late 00s, but in polishing the rough edges it has, I think, lost a little touch of its scrappy malleable charm. 4. The Wi-Fi that never worked It’s easy to take for granted that Ubuntu just works these days. Back when I first started using Ubuntuthe single biggest battle (after you got Grub 1 to install correctly) was any getting your Wi-Fi drivers to work on Ubuntu. Most Wi-Fi cards of the time relied on proprietary drivers (cheers Broadcom!) with few OEMs offering open source or native Linux alternatives. The open-source community loves a challenge, and nifty tools like NDISwrapper (and its invaluable GTK front-end) popped up to let you use Windows drivers on Linux. Chuck in the advance of Linux Netbooks, improved kernel releases, and plenty of reverse-engineered after-class projects, a slate of ever-better open-source alternatives emerged. But the smug satisfaction in getting a poorly supported Wi-Fi card to work, even if it did take 5 hours, 4 forum threads, 1 random runtime, and a whole bunch of copy and pasted commands to achieve it! 5. The Bustle of the Ubuntu Forums In the late 2000s, the Ubuntu Forums was the place to be. Most of us had a link to the Ubuntu Forums pinned on our Firefox browser toolbar. The Newbies and Help sections were always overflowing with questions (and bumped threads from the impatient); while the community sections were a hive of activity, debate, banter, …and inevitable KDE vs GNOME polls. The Ubuntu Forums are still around today and still ticking over nicely, but it’s clear their heyday has passed. The forums have, to my eyes, been sidelined and marginalised in favour of shiny new avenues, like the austere Ask Ubuntu, sub-reddits, and social media. Let us know your the things you miss about Ubuntu of yore in the comments section. Source
  16. Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Contest Is Now Open For Entries Doors have opened on the Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Contest. Few desktop operating systems offer amateur and professional illustrators, photographers and graphic designers the chance to have their artwork seen by millions of people around the world. But then, Ubuntu isn’t your average operating system! The best of the community contributed submissions will ship as part of the Ubuntu 16.10 desktop which is due for release in October. It should be mentioned that none of the entries can vie for the spot of Ubuntu’s default wallpaper. The background that greets all users on a fresh installed is designed in-house by the Canonical design team (and, if tradition holds, will remain a subtle iteration on the existing design). Rules and Requirements So what do you need to know to enter? The most important rule is that all artwork should be original (i.e. your own work). You’re also limited to two entries, so be sure to only enter the best of the best! Avoid overt branding (hand drawn Yaks notwithstanding) and aim keep the Unity desktop layout in mind. You’ll also need a Yahoo! account as submissions have to be made through the Flickr photo sharing service. Basic guidelines: Keep it simple: don’t use too many colours, shapes, etc. Use a single point of focus to draw the eye in Remember to factor in Unity desktop elements, e.g., launcher, panel, etc Design at a minimum resolution of at least 2560 x 1600 Deadline for all submissions is September 29, 2016. Dig out that nifty 50, plan your weekend around the need to snap nature shots, and dust off your illustrious illustrations to enter! <<< Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Submission Pool on Flickr >>> Source
  17. Artist Sylvia Ritter Painted All 25 Ubuntu Linux Mascots and They're Astonishing - Exclusive The wallpapers are suitable for phone and tablet It's not the first time we talk here about Sylvia Ritter, as back in March 2016 we published a story with the Ubuntu Linux wallpapers she managed to paint using the powerful, open-source, and cross-platform Krita digital painting software, but now Mrs. Ritter finished this unique project and unleashed all 25 Ubuntu mascots, or animals as she likes to call them. "Hello Softpedia! I've just painted all 25 Ubuntu animals. They are also great phone and tablet wallpapers," says Sylvia Ritter in an email, exclusively for Softpedia. "All known 25 animals have just been completed, starting with the Warty Warthog (Ubuntu 4.10) and finishing with the latest release, Yakkety Yak (16.10). The series will likely continue when the Ubuntu community announces the next release name for Ubuntu 17.04." As you might know, every new Ubuntu release has a code name, and it's based on a real animal, except for Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) and Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf), which are inspired by fictional characters. Sylvia Ritter is a huge fan of the open-source Ubuntu Linux operating system and loves to paint animals of all kinds, so this was her opportunity of creating a series of astonishing wallpapers you can use on your smartphone or tablet. Here are all the Ubuntu Linux mascots painted by Sylvia Ritter Below, we've listed all the 25 wallpapers in the order of the launch of each Ubuntu OS. They are Ubuntu 4.10 (Warty Warthog), Ubuntu 5.04 (Hoary Hedgehog), Ubuntu 5.10 (Breezy Badger), Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake), Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft), Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn), Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon), Ubuntu 8.04 LTS (Hardy Heron), Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex), Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope), and Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala). The list of Ubuntu Linux release continues with Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (Lucid Lynx), Ubuntu 10.10 (Maverick Meerkat), Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal), Ubuntu 11.10 (Oneiric Ocelot), Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin), Ubuntu 12.10 (Quantal Quetzal), Ubuntu 13.04 (Raring Ringtail), Ubuntu 13.10 (Saucy Salamander), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn), Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet), Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak). More Images: You can view other 22 images here. Source
  18. Canonical Strikes Deal To Bring Ubuntu Core to Intel Gateways Ubuntu filling in the IoT sandwich The ‘strategic partnership’ means users of Advantech’s Intel x86-based gateways will have a certified and fully supported Ubuntu image, ready for production use. The deal also nets users access to a number of services to fully manage their device’s security and software. Oft-neglected in talk of smart refrigerators and network-controlled lightbulbs, Gateways are intrinsic to the ‘Internet of Things’. They act as the “middleman” in the Internet-of-Things, ferrying data from sensors and equipment in the real world to and from that stored and analysed in the cloud. Ubuntu Core delvers a robust and secure platform through which embedded devices and the web of smart things can communicate. Jon Melamut, vice president of commercial devices operations at Canonical says:“This partnership confirms Ubuntu Core as the operating system of choice for IOT developers and systems integrators who want to deploy products to market quickly. Ubuntu Core is Ubuntu for IoT and it provides amongst others, a production ready operating system for IoT gateways.” Miller Chang, vice president of Advantech Embedded Computing Group, says: “This collaboration will enable us to satisfy even more customer requirements and deliver an integrated, pre-validated, and flexible open-computing gateway platform that allows fast solution development and deployment”. Source
  19. Canonical Show Off Converged Terminal App Design Reshaping the classic terminal app to fit multi-form factor world isn’t easy, but it’s the task that the Canonical Design team face as part of their work on Unity 8. Today, they’ve offered up a small glimpse at their design thinking in a blog post. Canonical’s Jouni Helminen explains: “On the visual side, we have brought the app in line with our Suru visual language. We have also adopted the very nice Solarized palette as the default palette.” The re-design proposes making a number of improvements to the Terminal core app currently available to install on Ubuntu phone and tablet, including the addition of features that cater to the desktop use case: Keyboard shortcuts Customisable touch/keyboard shortcuts Split screen (horizontally, vertically) option Customisable color palette Window transparency (on desktop) Unlimited history/scrollback ‘Find’ action for searching history On desktop and tablets the Terminal will sport a “visually persistent” tab bar (i.e one that’s on show all the time). On mobile, terminal tabs will be moved to the bottom edge, similar to the web-browser app. Tab behaviour aside, the proposed Terminal re-design for the Ubuntu Phone isn’t hugely dissimilar to the way the app looks now, with a different colour scheme and some new icons. Quick mobile access to shortcuts and commands Custom command shortcuts on the mobile redesign Using the Terminal app on the Ubuntu Phone is a novelty, and it’s hard to avoid the different interaction method required. One of the ways the Terminal app developers have worked around the lack of ‘full-sized keyboard’ — the on-screen keyboard lacks Ctrl, Alt, etc buttons — is through a touch-centric shortcut bar at the bottom of the screen. The shortcuts sections offers quick access to common command-line commands, including those that use Ctrl modifiers, function keys, scroll keys. A selection of common commands (e.g., top, ls, clear) is also presented. For the next iteration of the app Canonical’s designers hope to list many of these shortcuts by recency, and allow users to add their own custom key shortcuts and commands. Another interesting change mooted is using a specific auto-correct dictionary for the keyboard app when used in the Terminal. Getting it right is critical The command line is a key part of the “ubuntu” experience for many users and developers. Canonical will be keen to avoid offering a hobbled, limited or alien command prompt to users opting to try Unity 8 on the desktop. But while using the command line from a phone or tablet feels novel, and shortcomings or missing features expected, desktop users will be far more demanding. Do you like what you see so far? Share your thoughts on the converged Terminal app designs in the giant hole we’ve carved out below. Source Alternate Source - Canonical Plans on Improving the Ubuntu Linux Terminal UX on Mobile and Desktop
  20. Lithuanian police switched to LibreOffice Now piloting use of Ubuntu Linux The savings were the main motive for the switch to LibreOffice, the police confirms in an email to the European Commission’s Open Source Observatory (OSOR). The switch saves the police EUR 1 million. The completion of the transition was announced on June 30. Management support Key to the success of the switch is support by the top management, the police confirms by email: “Deputy Police Commissioner General D. Malaškevičius personally took care of the project, in direct contact with the IT department.” “Changing to a slightly different desktop is very complicated”, the police writes in its announcement. “Once staff members realised the huge amounts of money we saved, they became open to change, and quickly adapted to using the LibreOffice word processor, spreadsheet, presentation application, its mathematics tool and database solution”, the statement quotes General Malaškevičius as saying. “We did not have any specific change management plans, the police writes to OSOR. “The dates were set by the order of the Police Commissioner General.” Next steps LibreOffice is one of several open source solutions in use at the Lithuanian police. “About 30% of the software is open source”, the police writes. It uses this type of software for email, for project management and online file sharing. The police is now testing the use of Ubuntu Linux. One unit, totalling nearly 50 workstations, have switched to Ubuntu, and will continue to use it until the end of this year. The police in Lithuania did not contact their colleagues in France and Italy. In France, the Gendarmerie has 65,000 PC workstations running Ubuntu Linux and LibreOffice. In Italy, the Ministry of Defence expects to save EUR 26-29 million over the coming years by using LibreOffice on about 100,000 desktop workstations. More information: Police force announcement (in Lithuanian) LibreOffice Denmark blog post (in Danish) Radio France Internationale news item (in French) 15Min news item (in Lithuanian) Blog post in Spanish Source
  21. Canonical Makes Its Ubuntu Linux Professional Support More Accessible to Anyone The company launches the Ubuntu Advanage store Through its Ubuntu Advantage program, Canonical has provided professional support to small and medium-sized business, as well as to anyone else who needed help to configure and use the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system on the various desktop, severs, or cloud scenarios. Today, Canonical is proud to announce the launch of their new Ubuntu Advantage store via the buy.ubuntu.com domain, allowing any Ubuntu user out there to purchase or renew their UA subscription more easily. However, the service is mostly designed to help different organizations manage their Ubuntu deployments. "Ubuntu Advantage gives the world’s largest enterprises the assurance they need for their cloud infrastructure," says Ellen Arnold, Partner Marketing Manager at Canonical. "These include private and public cloud users, as well as those running on bare metal. In the cloud, Ubuntu Advantage is available to customers running Ubuntu in a private cloud, or in an Ubuntu Certified Public Cloud such as AWS, Azure, Google Cloud Platform, Rackspace, or Softlayer." Here's what you will get by buying an Ubuntu Advantage subscription If you decide to purchase an Ubuntu Advantage subscription, we would like to inform you that its benefits are up to 24x7 phone and online chat support for main Ubuntu packages and certain backport ones, access to the Landscape management and monitoring service (SaaS Edition), IP indemnification, hardening guides, knowledge base access, as well as the ability for a Canonical support engineer to be available on your premises. Among the most famous Ubuntu Advantage customers, we can mention eBay, Bloomberg, Walmart, Best Buy, Deutsche Telecom, AT&T, NTT, and Cisco. Canonical also provides customer with a complete list of Ubuntu Certified Public Cloud partners, which might come in handy to those interested to purchase its professional support service. For more details, please visit the official Ubuntu Advantage store. Source
  22. Canonical Makes It Easy to Port Native iOS and Android Apps to Ubuntu Mobile OS They are introducing the React Native framework It appears that Canonical love web developers, and they always keep them in the loop with all the tools needed for the perfect job. After introducing support for the Cordova framework, which is very well supported on Ubuntu Linux and has received a lot of attention from web developers, today Canonical promise to offer full support for another great framework, namely React Native. "Application development for mobile and desktop using web technologies is becoming increasingly popular. If you are one of these developers then Ubuntu has a great choice of frameworks you can use to create new apps," says Richard Collins, Ubuntu Mobile Product Manager at Canonical. "The Webapps team at Canonical is always focused on ensuring the right frameworks are available to developers." The best web development framework for Ubuntu convergence For those not in the known, React Native is a web development framework that can be used for building native mobile apps using JavaScript and React. It's based on ReactJS, a web-friendly declarative programming model, and has been designed from the ground up to offer an extra layer of system performance by using native UI (User Interface) components and system APIs for delivering a deeply integrated UX. However, Canonical's main reason for the introduction of the React Native framework in Ubuntu Linux is to continue its convergence vision and to allow mobile application developers to be able to port existing iOS and Android applications written with React Native to the Ubuntu mobile OS. Of course, developers can also build Ubuntu native versions of any existing ReactJS webapp. The React Native Ubuntu source code is available for download today. Support for packaging apps as Snaps and publish them on the Snappy Store is also available. Source
  23. GNOME Improves Handling of Unknown Audio Devices (Thanks to Unity) Is it a mic? Is it a speaker? No, it’s a … well, actually GNOME doesn’t know either — but the popular open-source desktop is getting smarter at finding out. As previewed in mockups earlier this year, GNOME 3.20 is to present users with a dialog window when an audio device that it can’t identify is connected to the headphone/microphone input jack. The user assistive feature has been able to go from mock-up to implementation thanks, in part, to Unity developer David Henningsson, Henningsson’s original code (and knowledge) has helped GNOME integrate the functionality into their desktop shell in a way that ‘…should be easily implementable in other desktop environments that use libgnome-volume-control to interact with PulseAudio.’ In a blog post GNOME developer Bastien Nocera explains how it works in a little more depth: Nifty! If you connect a lot of different audio peripherals to your Linux device keep a beady eye out for the feature in GNOME 3.20, which ships later this year. Source
  24. Ubuntu 14.04.5 Released, This Is What’s New The 5th and final point release of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is now available to download. Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS delivers a new hardware enablement stack comprised of the Ubuntu Linux Kernel 4.4 and X graphics stack derived from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Users running an older point release with an older hardware enablement stack are encouraged to update to the 16.04 hardware enablement stack, or make the transition to the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS release. Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS also rolls together all of the app updates, bug fixes and security patches released to Trusty Tahr since Ubuntu 14.04.4 which was released earlier this year. The new disc image reduces the number of post-installation updates that users need to download after install. The Point of Point Releases in 3 Bullet Points: Improve support for selected (and newer) hardware Roll in stable updates to reduce download requirements on fresh install Maintain stability Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is supported until mid-2019 on desktop, server and core. See our Ubuntu 14.04 LTS review for more details on the core features of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. New Hardware Enablement Stack Ubuntu 14.04.5 features an updated hardware enablement stack (HWE). This HWE comprises of the Linux Kernel 4.4 and an updated X11 pulled from Ubuntu 16.04 ‘Xenial Xerus’. Those who installed Trusty using the original 14.04 disc image or the 14.04.1 disc image will need to manually opt-in to receive the new hardware enablement stack. This wiki post has full details on how to opt-in. An exhaustive list of the changes, fixes and improvements rolled in can be found in the official release notes for this release. Download Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS Links to the latest disc images can be found below. Download Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS If you already run Ubuntu 14.04 you do not need to ‘do‘ anything to get 14.04.5. It you’ve been installing all available app and security updates you’re already running it! Source
  25. This is Why The ‘Snap Find’ Command No Longer Works on Ubuntu You’re reading this post because you’re confused. Confused as to why running this command: sudo snap find now returns this error: error : cannot list snaps: empty query instead of a showing you a sprawling list of super new Snap packages available to install. This Error Is Not a Bug, It’s Intentional Well, first things first: you’re not crazy. This isn’t a bug, and nothing is wrong with your snapd install. This is intentional. Canonical don’t want users to discover snaps this way — or rather they say users don’t want to discover Snaps in this way. That is according to Canonical’s John Lenton, who explains: A frustrating, if understandable, position. Even though the ‘snap find’ command only shows 100 (random) Snaps (and there are now more than 100 snaps available) the fact you could get a list of them right there in the terminal where you interact with Snapd was — I’m lazy, I know — super convenient. I enjoyed being able to take a peeksie at what Snaps were available in one straight-forward command. It suddenly changing, or rather working in a different way, is confusing. Lenton continues with the rationale, explaining why ‘snap find’ is not an analog to the familiar ‘apt find’ command as many of us had, until now, treated it as: So ‘snap find’ is gone — but not entirely. Before you reach for one of these ‘snap specific endpoints’, like the Ubuntu Store (the same Ubuntu Store which is woeful for discovering and delineating Snaps) try this: sudo snap find . Et voila: Hurrah! Panic over. Yes, you now simple need to pass an argument to the snap find command. E.g., snap find telegram Alternatively, the wonderful uappexplorer website now has a CLI available as a snap. This makes it super-duper easy to see a list of available Snap packages for the desktop, sort them by name, update, creation date, and so on. Source