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Found 9 results

  1. ShieldApps’ Ransomware Defender deals with known ransomware in a way no other solution can. Specially designed for detecting and blocking ransomware prior to any damage, Ransomware Defender blacklists and stops both common and unique ransomware. Once installed, Ransomware Defender stands guard 24/7 utilizing active protection algorithms enhanced with user-friendly alerts and notifications system. Ransomware Defender is fully automated, taking care of all threats via an advanced Scan > Detect > Lock Down mechanism that proactively stands guard to detected threats, and works alongside all main antiviruses and anti-malware products! Ransomware Defender also features a scheduled automatic scan, secured file eraser, lifetime updates and support! More Screehshots: Homepage: https://shieldapps.com/products/ransomware-defender/ or https://www.shieldapps.online/collections/ransomware-defender Download: https://s3.amazonaws.com/shield-products/RansomwareDefender/ShieldApps/RansomwareDefenderSetup.exe or https://s3.amazonaws.com/shield-products/RansomwareDefender/Reseller/RansomwareDefenderSetup.exe Manual/Guide: https://s3.amazonaws.com/partnertemporary/resellerresources/Ransomware+Defender+Operation+Manual.pdf 3.5.8 - 3.x Patch from URET TEAM - igorca: Site: https://yadi.sk Sharecode[?]: /d/CPeTqzwJ3HqiyP
  2. Trend Micro Ransom Buster v12.0.2.1125 File size: 123 MB Reinforce your protection against ransomware. Ransom Buster offers protection from all forms of ransomware and provides an additional layer of security for your computer to protect important files and precious memories. It does not matter whether you have already installed security software. Easy handling After you have selected a protected folder Ransom Buster automatically prevents unknown programs from accessing your protected files. Intelligent Common applications such as Microsoft Office, can automatically access your protected folders, whereby the occurrence of false alarms is minimized. Flexible Access to protected files can be granted easily trusted applications. Compatible Ransom Buster complements your current security software with an additional layer of security. Compact your PC will not slow down and does not require virus pattern updates. automatic updates Do not be more concerned about new threats. Ransom Buster is updated automatically, so your files stay safe - no matter what they are facing. System requirements: Ransom Buster supports Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 10 and newer versions. Ransom Buster is already included in Trend Micro Security products (Antivirus+/Internet Security/Maximum Security) Release Notes Changes in v12.0.2.1125: some minor improvements. Get Ransom Buster for free for a limited time only. Homepage: https://www.ransombuster.trendmicro.com/ Videos: https://www.ransombuster.trendmicro.com/#video Download: https://ti-res.trendmicro.com/ti-res/FST/1202/1124/RansomBuster.exe
  3. After a year of headline-grabbing ransomware campaigns, it looks like hackers are launching the attacks less frequently. Ransomware is malicious software that can lock up your files until you send hackers a ransom payment. It featured in the WannaCry attacks in May and the NotPetya attacks in June, both of which swept through hospitals, banks and governments in several countries. But after July, the rates of ransomware infections dropped sharply, according to a report from Malwarebytes. If the trend continues, it would mean a reprieve from an attack that targeted institutions where time is money, like banks, or where lives could hang in the balance, like hospitals. So why would hackers ditch one of their favorite attacks? It turns out that computer users have a really valuable tool against ransomware: backing up their files. That's according to Chris Boyd, a malware analyst at Malwarebytes, who told ZDNet that publicity around the major ransomware attacks probably helped educate people about how to avoid needing to pay by uploading files to the cloud or a backup device. "This alone, even without additional security precautions, effectively deadens the otherwise considerable sting of the threat," Boyd told ZDNet, a CNET sister site. The company sells a product that detects and blocks malicious software for businesses and regular computer users. That's not to say hackers aren't hacking. They've simply turned to other kinds of attacks to steal money, such as banking trojans and adware, both of which are old-school hacking tricks. Hackers are also still innovating. Adam Kujawa, director of malware intelligence at Malwarebytes, said the biggest trend he observed in December was the rise of "crypto-jacking." That's when websites you visit secretly use your computer's processing power to run a program that creates bitcoins. That lets hackers make money off your computer. And, Kujawa said, "it wears down resources really fast," slowing down your computer's performance. But hey, at least you can still access your files. Source: https://www.cnet.com/news/wannacry-notpetya-ransomware-hackers-2017-less-popular-malwarebytes/
  4. Talos has been working in conjunction with Cisco IR Services on what we believe to be a new variant of the SamSam ransomware. This ransomware has been observed across multiple industries including Government, Healthcare and ICS. These attacks do not appear to be highly targeted, and appear to be more opportunistic in nature. Given SamSam's victimology, its impacts are not just felt within the business world, they are also impacting people, especially if we consider the Healthcare sector. Non-urgent surgeries can always be rescheduled but if we take as an example patients where the medical history and former medical treatment are crucial the impact may be more severe. Furthermore, many critical life savings medical devices are now highly computerized. Ransomware can impact the operation of these devices making it very difficult for medical personnel to diagnose and treat patients leading to potentially life threatening situations. Equipment that might be needed in time-sensitive operations may be made unavailable due to the computer used to operate the equipment being unavailable. The initial infection vector for these ongoing attacks is currently unknown and Talos is investigating this in order to identify it. The history of SamSam indicates that attackers may follow their previous modus operandi of exploiting a host and then laterally moving within their target environment to plant and later run the SamSam ransomware. Previously, we observed the adversaries attacking vulnerable JBoss hosts during a previous wave of SamSam attacks in 2016. Although the infection vector for the new variant is not yet confirmed, there is a possibility that compromised RDP/VNC servers have played a part in allowing the attackers to obtain an initial foothold. There are no differences between the encryption mechanism used by this current SamSam variant compared to older versions. However, this time the adversaries have added some string obfuscation and improved the anti-analysis techniques used to make detection and analysis marginally more difficult. This new variant is deployed using a loader which decrypts and executes an encrypted ransomware payload, this loader/payload model represents an improvement in the anti-forensic methods used by the malware. Samples containing this loader mechanism have been found as far back as October 2017. The wallet used by SamSam for this wave is shared by multiple infected victims as observed by monitoring the wallet at 1MddNhqRCJe825ywjdbjbAQpstWBpKHmFR. We are also able to confirm the first payment into this wallet was received on 25th December 2017 - a nice holiday gift for this adversary. This can be confirmed by observing the first wallet transaction found on the Bitcoin blockchain here. There is a possibility that other Bitcoin wallets are also used but currently Talos is currently unaware of any others. Similar to the previous variants, we believe the deployment of this SamSam variant to be highly manual, meaning an adversary must take manual action in order to execute the malware. The symmetric encryption keys are randomly generated for each file. The Tor onion service and the Bitcoin wallet address are hardcoded into the payload whilst the public key is stored in an external file with the extension .keyxml. Additionally, code analysis didn't find any kind of automated mechanism for contacting the Tor Service address which means that the victim identification with the associated RSA private key must be done either manually or by another adversary tool. Ransom note displayed by SamSam new variant In most ransomware the attackers try to convince affected users that they have the ability to decrypt the data after the payment is made. SamSam is no different here and even displays a disclaimer as seen in the above screenshot, stating 'we don't want to damage our reliability' and 'we are honest'. To this end SamSam adversaries offer free decryption of two files and an additional free key to decrypt one server. Once again SamSam actors show their ability to monitor and laterally move through the network by pointing out they will only provide a key if they believe the server is not an important piece of infrastructure. As with previous versions of SamSam they are advising that messaging the attackers can be performed via their site. The "Runner" The adversary has changed their deployment methodology and now they use a loader mechanism called "runner" to execute the payload. Upon execution, the loader will search for files with the extension .stubbin in its execution directory, this file contains the SamSam encrypted .NET Assembly payload. Upon reading the file, the loader decrypts the payload with the password supplied as the first argument and executes it, passing the remaining arguments. The loader is a very simple .NET assembly with no obfuscation. Comparing both the Initialization Vector (IV) and the code structure it seems like it may have been derived from an example posted on the Codeproject.com website. As you can seen in the images below, the IV used for the Rijndael encryption is the same in both implementations (posted code in hexadecimal, reversed code in decimal due to decompiler implementation). Posted code Reversed code At the code level looking specifically at the function 'Decrypt', it is obvious that the code structure in the Codeproject source and the latest SamSam runner sample is the same (comments from the posted code were removed). Encryption routine source code comparison The Payload Previous versions of SamSam put some effort into the obfuscation of the malware code by encrypting strings with AES. The new version also obfuscates functions, class names and strings, including the list of targeted file extensions, the help file contents and environment variables, this time using DES encryption with a fixed hard-coded key and the IV. Once again, the adversary has put more effort into preventing the forensic recovery of the malware sample itself rather than only relying on the obfuscation the running malware code, which allowed us to reverse engineer this sample. As mentioned before, the password to decrypt the payload is passed as a parameter to the loader, which reduces the chances of obtaining the payload for analysis. Previous versions of SamSam had an equivalent method for making payload access difficult by launching a thread that would wait 1 second before deleting itself from the hard disk. The comparison of the main encryption routines between the old and the new samples indicates that this version of SamSam is similar enough to have high confidence that it belongs to the same malware family. Encryption Routine Comparison While previous SamSam versions used the API call DriveInfo.GetDrives() to obtain the list of available drives, this new version has the drive letters hardcoded. After checking that a drive is ready it starts a search for targeted files on the non-blacklisted folder paths. The new variant keeps the same list of targeted file extensions as some of the previous ones. It adds a few new entries to the list of paths not to encrypt, which includes user profiles "All Users", "default" and the boot directory. This is in tune with most ransomware which attempt to preserve the operability of the victim's machine. If the machine operation is so damaged that the system cannot be booted then the victim will be unable to pay, whereas if they keep the machine able to function, with limited access to files/folders, then they have a greater chance of a victim paying for recovering their important files and documents. Just like previous versions of SamSam the new version is especially careful to make sure that there is enough space on the current drive to create the encrypted document, thus avoiding any corruption that would lead to irrecoverable encryption. Unlike most ransomware, SamSam does not delete Volume Shadow Copies and creates an encrypted version of the original file which is then deleted using the regular Windows API. Although unlikely, due to block overwriting, recovery of the original files from the versions of affected folders saved by the operating system may be possible. Profitability In identifying the scope of this SamSam campaign, Talos analyzed the Bitcoin wallet addresses used by the attackers in each of these attacks. As of the time of this writing, the attackers have received approximately 30.4 BTC which equals $325,217.07. As previously mentioned, it is possible that the attackers are leveraging multiple bitcoin wallets, however Talos has not observed any other than the one listed here being used in these attacks. Recommendations As the specific initial threat vector is not known at this time, best practices should be implemented to minimize risk to organizations. Talos has outlined several best practices that should be considered in a previous blog related to defending against ransomware related threats. In accordance with best practices protocols like SMB or RDP should never be internet facing. Article
  5. A new form of ransomware attempts to trick victims into installing it with the lure of quickly profiting from cryptocurrency -- before encrypting their files and demanding Monero for the decryption key. 'SpriteCoin' is advertised on forums as a new cryptocurrency which is "sure to be profitable" for users -- when it is anything but. Those who fall for the scam -- which is likely to have been designed to take advantage of the publicity around bitcoin and the blockchain -- will find their Windows system infected with ransomware. To add insult to injury, if the user infected user pays the 0.3 Monero (around $100 at the time of writing) ransom, they're delivered additional malware with capabilities that certificate harvesting, image parsing, and the ability to activate the victim's webcam. Uncovered by researchers at Fortinet, SpriteCoin is advertised on forums and requires a degree of social engineering in order to successfully compromise targets. While many forms of ransomware are delivered through phishing emails, this form is delivered as a cryptocurrency wallet which the user is told contains SpriteCoin. It's one of the oldest cybercriminal tricks in the book: luring victims in with the prospect of a get quick rich scheme. Once the user runs the .exe file, they're asked to enter a wallet password, before being told that the file is downloading the blockchain. In reality, this isn't happening at all: the ransomware is running the encryption routine, adding a '.encrypted' suffix to any affected files. The user's Chrome and Firefox credential stores are raided during this process and sent to a remote website, likely putting passwords in the hands of the attackers. Once the process is complete, the victim is presented with a ransom note, demanding a 0.3 Monero payment in order to retrieve their files. The note contains links to information about what Monero is, how to purchase it, and how to pay, as well as a warning that if the program is deleted the files will remain decrypted forever. The ransom figure is low compared to many forms of ransomware, which now often demand payments of hundreds or thousands of dollars. It could be that the attackers ask for a relatively low ransom demand because SpriteCoin is a test for new ransomware delivery mechanisms. "In this instance, it seems like the intent was not just about money. What we infer is that the intent is not about the amount of money, but possibly about proof of concept or testing new delivery mechanisms, and to see how many people would fall for it," Tony Giandomenico, senior security researcher at Fortinet FortiGuard Labs, told ZDNet. "This is very similar to when attackers would test to see how effective or fast a worm would spread before really launching it. This could be the same concept." Those behind the SpriteCoin ransomware attempt to offer the victim assurance that payment will result in the return of their files because "if we didn't, you could tell others not to pay", adding: "so trust us, will return your files". However, it seems unlikely that victims will actually get their documents back. If they do decide to pay up for the decryption key, what they actually receive is additional malware with the ability to activate webcams and parse certificates. "The note is really encouraging the victim to 'initiate payment of the ransom' in order to get the secondary malicious payload dropped," said Giandomenico. While researchers haven't been able to fully analyse this malware, it's unlikely that suffering from additional compromises can be anything but bad for the victim. SpriteCoin isn't the first form of ransomware to ask for payment in Monero. The popularity of bitcoin -- and the associated increase in transaction fees and delays receiving payments -- is causing problems for cybercriminals who use it to collect ransom demands. As a result, some ransomware distributors are shifting their business model away from bitcoin and to other cryptocurrencies like Monero. source
  6. Hancock Health fell victim to a cyber attack Thursday, with a hacker demanding Bitcoin to relinquish control of part of the hospital’s computer system. Employees knew something was wrong Thursday night, when the network began running more slowly than normal, senior vice president/chief strategy and innovation officer Rob Matt said. A short time later, a message flashed on a hospital computer screen, stating parts of the system would be held hostage until a ransom is paid. The hacker asked for Bitcoin — a virtual currency used to make anonymous transactions that is nearly impossible to trace. The hospital’s IT team opted to immediately shut down the network to isolate the problem. The attack affected Hancock Health’s entire health network, including its physician offices and wellness centers. Friday afternoon, Hancock Health CEO Steve Long confirmed the network was targeted by a ransomware attack from an unnamed hacker who “attempted to shut down (Hancock Health’s) operations.” Hospital leaders don’t believe any personal medical information has been compromised, Long said. Long declined to disclose details of the attack, including how much ransom has been requested. The attack amounts to a “digital padlock,” restricting personnel access to parts of the health network’s computer systems, he said. The attack was not the result of an employee opening a malware-infected email, a common tactic used to hack computer systems, he said. The attack was sophisticated, he said, adding FBI officials are familiar with this method of security breach. “This was not a 15-year-old kid sitting in his mother’s basement,” Long said. Protecting patients Notices posted Friday at entrances to Hancock Regional Hospital alerted visitors to a “system-wide outage” and asked any hospital employee or office using a HRH network to ensure all computers were turned off. Doctors and nurses have reverted to using pen and paper for now to keep patients’ medical charts updated. Long said he wasn’t aware of any appointments or procedures that were canceled directly related to the incident, adding Friday’s snowy weather contributed to many cancellations. Most patients likely didn’t notice there was a problem, nor did the attack significantly impact patient care, Long said. Hospital staff members worked with the FBI and a national IT security company overnight and throughout the day Friday to resolve the issue. Long said law enforcement has been acting in an “advisory capacity,” and declined to release details about the plan going forward, including whether the hospital is considering paying the ransom. Long commended his staff, especially IT workers, who quickly identified the problem Thursday evening. “If I was going through this with anybody, this is the team I would want to go through this with because I know what the outcome is going to be,” he said. Leaders updated hospital employees, totaling about 1,200 people, throughout the day Friday and took steps to be accommodate both patients and staff, including offering free food in the hospital cafeteria all day, Long said. Long said if there is any suggestion private patient information has been compromised, hospital officials will reach out to those affected, though he doesn’t expect that to become an issue. “We anticipate questions,” he said. “This is not a small deal.” A growing problem Ransomware attacks like the one at Hancock Health are growing more common, according to experts in the field of information technology and cybersecurity. Some 4,000 ransomware attacks have occurred everyday since 2016, according to a report by the federal Department of Justice — a 300 percent increase from the roughly 1,000 attacks per day in 2015. Hackers often use phishing techniques — posing as a legitimate company or source the user recognizes — to break into a person’s or company’s computer and take it over, said Von Welch, the director of Indiana University’s Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research in Bloomington. Rather than stealing private information stored on the computer and using or selling it, hackers who engage in ransomware turn the tables on their victims and refuse to give back control of the device unless someone pays up, Welch said. It’s “particularly nasty” when hospitals fall victim to a ransomware attack because it can completely cripple the medical facility’s ability to help people, Welch said. Depending on what’s been compromised, hospitals can’t check patients in or gain access to certain essential equipment, he said. Long said the hospital’s equipment continued to function normally Friday, though he’s troubled someone would target people in need of medical care, when many are at their most vulnerable. “That somebody would do this to a hospital really boggles the mind,” Long said. Hacker attacks in Indiana and elsewhere At least one other Indiana hospital and government unit have fallen victim to similar attacks in recent years. In November 2016, hackers in Anderson executed a similar cyber-attack on Madison County government servers. Criminals uploaded a computer virus to county officials’ network that restricted officials’ access to confidential files. The hackers then withheld the encryption code – which would allow county officials to retrieve the locked data – for a $200,000 ransom. Madison County’s insurance carrier recommended officials pay the demands, which they did, regaining access to their system. Six months earlier, hackers targeted a healthcare facility in Auburn, Indiana, where Dekalb Health’s administrative servers were infected with ransomware. The threat caused only a minor disruption; the ransom was never paid, and most servers were brought back online shortly after the malware attack, hospital officials said in a news release issued at the time. Hancock Health had policies in place for such an attack, knowing digital thieves are always on the lookout for a target, Long said. “Unfortunately,” he said, “we were probably next on the list.” Article
  7. Bitdefender 2018 Build 22.0.12.161 Overview: The Bitdefender proprietary technologies, based on innovative ideas and leading trends in the information security industry, continue to be internationally recognized as the best Internet security software. The independent organizations which reward BitDefender outstanding results through numerous prizes and certifications are: Av-Test.org, Virus Bulletin, ICSA Lab, Checkmark, PC World Top 100, just to name but a few. Homepage: https://www.bitdefender.com/ Changelog: https://forum.bitdefender.com/index.php?/topic/77459-latest-changelog/ A new Bitdefender Classic Line product update has been released with the following details: Affected software: Bitdefender Total Security 2018 Bitdefender Internet Security 2018 Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2018 Platform: x86, x64 Version: 22.0.12.161 This version fixes the following issues: Fixed an issue with Active Threat Defense not activating Fixed an issue where the product would show "Last Update Never" Fixed an issue where the offline weekly updates would not detect Bitdefender 2018 Fixed an issue where Google would report SafePay is an outdated browser Fixed an issue where Custom Scans would not be saved after switching to Aggressive Fixed an issue where SafePay couldn't save bank statements(PDF) on hsbc.co.uk The following improvements were included: Wallet's compatibility with several websites Several Improvements to the in-product Support Tool Several interface improvements Various Install Engine optimizations Various SafePay optimizations and security improvements Several Firewall improvements Several Advanced Threat Defense improvements Improved compatibility with upcoming Windows release Several OneClick Optimizer improvements KB is unavailable at this time. Downloads: Online Installers: Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2018 22.0.12.161 Online: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/bitdefender_antivirus.exe XP | Vista: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/xp-vista/bitdefender_antivirus.exe Bitdefender Internet Security 2018 22.0.12.161 Online: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/bitdefender_isecurity.exe XP | Vista: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/xp-vista/bitdefender_isecurity.exe Bitdefender Total Security 2018 22.0.12.161 Online: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/bitdefender_tsecurity.exe XP | Vista: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/xp-vista/bitdefender_tsecurity.exe Offline Installers and Install Guide: Bitdefender 2018 Offline Installation Guide: Bitdefender 2018 AV Plus / Internet Security / Total Security - Standalone Installers [Windows]: 32bit [x86]: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/desktop/connect/cl/2018/all/bitdefender_ts_22_32b.exe 64bit [x64]: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/desktop/connect/cl/2018/all/bitdefender_ts_22_64b.exe Bitdefender Agent - 2018 - Universal [Same Agent for AV Plus / IS / TS]: Note: Bitdefender Agent installer supports both x86 & x64 architecture. Note: Bitdefender Agent installer is the same for Antivirus Plus / Internet Security / Total Security. Direct Download: https://flow.bitdefender.net/connect/2018/en_us/bitdefender_windows.exe Install Notes: Precaution Note: If you've already installed older version of Bitdefender[incl. 2017/2016 version], we are sure that you'll lose your settings. Please take note of configuration, settings. whitelisted files and links Download and Install Bitdefender Agent. When it starts downloading the install files, Stop/Close it immediately. Note: Check whether there the Agent is installed only once in "Add/Remove Programs" or "Programs & Features". Note: Check in "Program Files" for folder named "Bitdefender Agent". Now, start installing offline installer and proceed with installation. Note: Please choose respective download link based on architecture x86/x64 for smooth installation. Note: Don't worry about AV Plus/IS/TS. The installer automatically modifies the installation depending on the license you entered. Once installation is done, configure accordingly for best protection and to avoid files from getting deleted. Configure Whitelist files and links if you have any. It is better to keep note of the configured settings for future use. User Guide: Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2018: https://download.bitdefender.com/resources/media/materials/2018/userguides/en_EN/bitdefender_av_2018_userguide_en.pdf Bitdefender Internet Security 2018: https://download.bitdefender.com/resources/media/materials/2018/userguides/en_EN/bitdefender_is_2018_userguide_en.pdf Bitdefender Total Security 2018: https://download.bitdefender.com/resources/media/materials/2018/userguides/en_EN/bitdefender_ts_2018_userguide_en.pdf Uninstall Tool: Uninstall Tool For Bitdefender 2018 Products: https://www.bitdefender.com/files/KnowledgeBase/file/Bitdefender_2018_UninstallTool.exe NOTE: Bitdefender 2018 Uninstall Tool require KB2999226. If you didn't install, you'll get error "api-ms-win-crt-runtime-l1-1-0.dll" missing. You can download it here - KB2999226 Uninstall Tool For Bitdefender 2017 Products: https://www.bitdefender.com/files/KnowledgeBase/file/Bitdefender_2017_UninstallTool.exe NOTE: Bitdefender 2017 Uninstall Tool require KB2999226. If you didn't install, you'll get error "api-ms-win-crt-runtime-l1-1-0.dll" missing. You can download it here - KB2999226 Uninstall Tool For Bitdefender 2016 Products: http://www.bitdefender.com/files/KnowledgeBase/file/Bitdefender_2016_UninstallTool.exe Uninstall Tool For Bitdefender 2015 / 2014 / 2013 Products: http://www.bitdefender.com/files/KnowledgeBase/file/The_New_Bitdefender_UninstallTool.exe Uninstall Tool For Bitdefender 2012 Products and Earlier: http://www.bitdefender.com/files/KnowledgeBase/file/BitDefender_Uninstall_Tool.exe
  8. Bitdefender 2018 Build 22.0.13.169 Overview: The Bitdefender proprietary technologies, based on innovative ideas and leading trends in the information security industry, continue to be internationally recognized as the best Internet security software. The independent organizations which reward BitDefender outstanding results through numerous prizes and certifications are: Av-Test.org, Virus Bulletin, ICSA Lab, Checkmark, PC World Top 100, just to name but a few. Homepage: https://www.bitdefender.com/ Changelog: N/A Update info shared by @boulawan A new Bitdefender Classic Line product update has been released with the following details: Affected software: Bitdefender Total Security 2018 Bitdefender Internet Security 2018 Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2018 Platform: x86, x64 Version: 22.0.13.169 KB is unavailable at this time. Downloads: Online Installers: Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2018 22.0.13.169 Online: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/bitdefender_antivirus.exe XP | Vista: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/xp-vista/bitdefender_antivirus.exe Bitdefender Internet Security 2018 22.0.13.169 Online: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/bitdefender_isecurity.exe XP | Vista: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/xp-vista/bitdefender_isecurity.exe Bitdefender Total Security 2018 22.0.13.169 Online: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/bitdefender_tsecurity.exe XP | Vista: https://download.bitdefender.com/windows/installer/en-us/xp-vista/bitdefender_tsecurity.exe Offline Installers and Install Guide: Bitdefender 2018 Offline Installation Guide:
  9. ShieldApps’ Ransomware Defender deals with known ransomware in a way no other solution can. Specially designed for detecting and blocking ransomware prior to any damage, Ransomware Defender blacklists and stops both common and unique ransomware. Once installed, Ransomware Defender stands guard 24/7 utilizing active protection algorithms enhanced with user-friendly alerts and notifications system. Ransomware Defender is fully automated, taking care of all threats via an advanced Scan > Detect > Lock Down mechanism that proactively stands guard to detected threats, and works alongside all main antiviruses and anti-malware products! Ransomware Defender also features a scheduled automatic scan, secured file eraser, lifetime updates and support! More Screehshots: Homepage: https://shieldapps.com/products/ransomware-defender/ Download: https://s3.amazonaws.com/shield-products/RansomwareDefender/ShieldApps/RansomwareDefenderSetup.exe 3.5.8 - 3.x Patch from URET TEAM - igorca: Site: https://yadi.sk Sharecode[?]: /d/CPeTqzwJ3HqiyP Installer + Patch: Site: https://www.multiup.eu/en Sharecode[?]: /download/3929b572efc906983914a46208db9223/Ransomware.Defender.3.6.6.zip
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